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View Full Version : What would YOU do (interesting racial study)


Boobs McGee
03-23-2011, 03:36 PM
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My dumb ass would probably stop and ask if they need help first without realizing what they were up to haha. BUT, in all reality I'd like to think I'd stop ANY race from stealing if I saw that **** happening. I'm not an old person, don't have kids, and feel tough enough to hold my own in a fight...so for me it would be a lot less frightening.

I don't honestly know though, because I haven't been in that particular situation.

I find this video fascinating though, and it's saddening to think this crap is ingrained in our minds. I'd like to know where the fundamental thoughts come from? My parents have always taught me equality, and to treat all others with respect. I can't ever recall them in a situation similar to this, or having anything to do with a racially charged crime.

I CAN tell you, at earlier points in my life (when I was living in predominantly white communities), if I saw a kid dressed like that in a store I would naturally think to myself "wonder if he's stealing something". Whereas with a white person at that time in life, I wouldn't have thought twice about it.

NOW, after being through quite a ****storm of change (lived in the ghetto, been through the drugs/thief/f*ck my life up stages/religion stages), I don't have those same feelings. I live and interact with many different races at all times of the day, without any change in my own demeanor. People are just people. I question sketchy looking people's motives equally, regardless of color.

I think part of the reason for this change, is my lost naivety. Having been through/with a wide array of experiences, it's given me a much better grasp on the fact that ANYONE is capable of making stupid decisions (and obviously, on the flip side, wonderful decisions). We're all just people on a rock clanking around into each other. Will that opinion of mine change if I ever become isolated into a white dominated community again? Without that wonderfully diverse interaction I have now? I don't know. I would obviously hope not. Do I still have racially charged thoughts pop into my head in certain situations? Unfortunately, yes. BUT, now, instead of feeling like a piece of ****, I can question myself and the origins of those thoughts, and continually try to eradicate them.

I guess, my point is, I wonder at what point in our lives do some of these racial stereotypes start popping into our heads?

discuss

Fusionfrontman
03-23-2011, 03:46 PM
Wow. Interesting. Not suprising, unfortunately though. Although, I do like how the white male at the end, LEADS the into the question (making an assumption of his own ) about losing his key.

Mogulseeker
03-23-2011, 03:52 PM
This is great... watch the one with the pretty girl afterward, too.

jhns
03-23-2011, 04:26 PM
That is an interesting video and, sadly, it would have been easy to guess the results before watching it. Notice the age and race of those standing up to the black kid. Older white guys. Go figure.

schaaf
03-23-2011, 04:42 PM
hahaha this is true...

I'm sure that kid also enjoys watermelon, fried chicken, and purple drank

ColoradoDarin
03-23-2011, 05:37 PM
This is great... watch the one with the pretty girl afterward, too.

Seriously, watch the pretty white girl one (I caught the whole episode a couple of months ago) and how many people *help* the girl. Even when she blatantly admits she's stealing the bike.

Mogulseeker
03-23-2011, 05:47 PM
This is indicative of society as a whole. But quite honestly statistical data backs up peoples opinions - African-Americans are more prone to crime than whites, and men are more prone to crime than women.

Notice how even the black women said she would have responded differently had to pulpit been black because she though the white guy was a park worker.

You know what I would do? I would probably pass by and do nothing each time... unless I thought I had a chance at taking the girl home, in which I'd probably somehow avoid the whole situation in general - but I would likely ignore her too.

enjolras
03-23-2011, 05:50 PM
Doesn't age matter a lot here? A teenage white kid is going to have a stronger reaction I'd think.

After all, it's about hierarchy isn't it? The fact that he's a kid automatically puts those old men in an authority position. The white guy appears to be in mid-20's, which is a very different position in the hierarchy.

I call shenanigans.

oubronco
03-23-2011, 06:07 PM
hahaha this is true...

I'm sure that kid also enjoys watermelon, fried chicken, and purple drank

Dude LOL

That One Guy
03-23-2011, 06:09 PM
Doesn't age matter a lot here? A teenage white kid is going to have a stronger reaction I'd think.

After all, it's about hierarchy isn't it? The fact that he's a kid automatically puts those old men in an authority position. The white guy appears to be in mid-20's, which is a very different position in the hierarchy.

I call shenanigans.

Agreed there. They tried to make it similar but the white guy definitely did look older. You put a 13 year old kid out there doing it and people react differently, I'd bet.

Beyond that, it's sad to say... but as long as some populations embrace the thug mentality, people will perceive them as thugs. Be it someone white or black, if you look like someone that just came out of the ghetto... I'm skeptical. Probably more skeptical of the black than the white, not purposely, but I wouldn't be surprised if I were.

Just a week or so ago I got turned the wrong way in West Palm Beach, Florida. I ended up in a black neighborhood (it wasn't a boarded up windows neighborhood but everyone I saw was black) and stopped at a stop sign when a black guy walked behind the car and started toward me making a gesture with his hand. Not sure what it was but I wasn't staying around to find out. He didn't necessarily look threatening and I wasn't entirely scared but I played the better safe than sorry role and pulled off. Now, had that been a white guy in the sagging baggy jeans or something inherently "thuggish", I think I would've responded the same way. Had it been a guy in cowboy boots and a cowboy hat... I probably would've stopped to ask if he needed anything. I actually felt bad as I drove away because I thought I saw the guy gesture as I pushed the gas with kind of a roll of the eyes type look... it made me think maybe he needed something, needed help or a ride. I just wasn't comfortable with the situation.

Mogulseeker
03-23-2011, 06:15 PM
Also, I'd like to point out that the tshirt the white dude was wearing was maybe one size too large, wheras the tshirt the black dude was wearing was about 3 sizes too large.

s0phr0syne
03-23-2011, 06:27 PM
Also, I'd like to point out that the tshirt the white dude was wearing was maybe one size too large, wheras the tshirt the black dude was wearing was about 3 sizes too large.


Really salient point.

listopencil
03-23-2011, 08:29 PM
The last time I caught someone committing a crime it was cute young white girl. I called the cops on my cordless phone and laughed at her when she begged me not to. It was kind of funny to me that she was begging me not to call the cops as I was on the phone with them. It was a motor vehicle theft.

Conklin
03-23-2011, 08:55 PM
NOT A SNITCH

That One Guy
03-23-2011, 08:58 PM
NOT A SNITCH

That's one of the most frustrating things I've ever heard. That whole movement is disappointing like no other.

You're saying you're more indebted to the criminals of society than to the good citizens they're ripping off. I can understand if it were a victimless crime like doing 10 over on the speedway but theft? That's ignorance. The way the "Don't be a snitch" campaign caught on just showed what some parts of society really want to contribute to the greater whole.

Bronco Boy
03-23-2011, 08:59 PM
I would rail that chick. That's what I would do.

strafen
03-23-2011, 09:03 PM
That was very interesting to watch. wow!

epicSocialism4tw
03-23-2011, 09:31 PM
Doesn't age matter a lot here? A teenage white kid is going to have a stronger reaction I'd think.

After all, it's about hierarchy isn't it? The fact that he's a kid automatically puts those old men in an authority position. The white guy appears to be in mid-20's, which is a very different position in the hierarchy.

I call shenanigans.

That and the park looks like a typical upper middle class white kind of place where there really arent many black kids to begin with. So seeing one who isnt familiar at a park breaking a bike chain would be an easy alarm-ringer.

Seeing a twenty-something white guy would be a more difficult proposition.

Its a simplistic set up that got the exact response that they wanted.

gyldenlove
03-23-2011, 09:33 PM
People who steal bicycles are antisocial and should be punished with a shift blow to the head followed by a good old fashioned curb stomping, or if there are witnesses around, repeated knees to the groin.

epicSocialism4tw
03-23-2011, 09:38 PM
People who steal bicycles are antisocial and should be punished with a shift blow to the head followed by a good old fashioned curb stomping, or if there are witnesses around, repeated knees to the groin.

I see nice bikes tied to racks all the time that are missing wheels and seats. People learn the hard way every day.

enjolras
03-23-2011, 10:06 PM
That's one of the most frustrating things I've ever heard. That whole movement is disappointing like no other.

You're saying you're more indebted to the criminals of society than to the good citizens they're ripping off. I can understand if it were a victimless crime like doing 10 over on the speedway but theft? That's ignorance. The way the "Don't be a snitch" campaign caught on just showed what some parts of society really want to contribute to the greater whole.

Totally agree.. I for one am most definitely a snitch (at least for the big things):)

Mogulseeker
03-23-2011, 10:08 PM
I would rail that chick. That's what I would do.

Basically, I was saying that I would rail that chick as well, while avoinding the situation entirely.

iforgotmypassword
03-23-2011, 10:59 PM
Some of it truely is statistics... I mean I'd LOVE to say that I would react the same from race to race, but I doubt it. But if I saw that same white kid dressed like a gangsta wanksta, or goth, or anything "hoodlum" stereotype, I would make assumptions based on that also. I'm not sure it's so much racism racing through us, as much as it is being somewhat imformed of the statistics...

The real question is, does racism create the statistics? too much studying to do tonight to ponder that right now. I guess the simple answer would be socioeconimic standards probably create the statistics.