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Rohirrim
03-21-2011, 02:43 PM
Pretty cool technology. It would be very nice if they could implement this and lower user costs. I'm paying for five damn cell phones. :gripe:
http://money.cnn.com/2011/03/21/technology/light_radio/index.htm?hpt=T2

Chris
03-21-2011, 02:46 PM
Nice. Tangent but I have a friend that worked in 3d printing... as this stage they can actual print a working cell phone.

OBF1
03-21-2011, 02:49 PM
you are paying for 5 cell phone.... blame only yourself, no one is that damn important.

Rohirrim
03-21-2011, 02:52 PM
you are paying for 5 cell phone.... blame only yourself, no one is that damn important.

My kids are.

bendog
03-21-2011, 02:58 PM
tHIS thing will probably cause cancer too. (-:

Chris
03-21-2011, 03:44 PM
tHIS thing will probably cause cancer too. (-:

boo cynicism.

HILife
03-21-2011, 03:57 PM
tHIS thing will probably cause cancer too. (-:

I was thinking the same thing.

broncosteven
03-21-2011, 07:36 PM
Pretty cool technology. It would be very nice if they could implement this and lower user costs. I'm paying for five damn cell phones. :gripe:
http://money.cnn.com/2011/03/21/technology/light_radio/index.htm?hpt=T2

But if you open the cube doesn't someone you don't know get killed but you get one Million dollars?

DarkHorse30
03-21-2011, 08:29 PM
My kids are.

Bingo. Handy little locaters those cell phones are. BTW, I'll see your 5 and raise you 1.....

alkemical
03-21-2011, 08:45 PM
Nice. Tangent but I have a friend that worked in 3d printing... as this stage they can actual print a working cell phone.

this is a field i'm highly interested in. Is there anyway or anyone I can talk to about this? I'm very excited about it.

alkemical
03-21-2011, 08:46 PM
Pretty cool technology. It would be very nice if they could implement this and lower user costs. I'm paying for five damn cell phones. :gripe:
http://money.cnn.com/2011/03/21/technology/light_radio/index.htm?hpt=T2

I saw this during th AM but didn't spend much time on it. How does this differ vs the microcells att/vz offer?

mwill07
03-22-2011, 09:46 AM
Nice. Tangent but I have a friend that worked in 3d printing... as this stage they can actual print a working cell phone.

Maybe they can print housings (with not very good material properties), and I guess technically PCB's could be considered printed, but no way can they print batteries, displays, or microchips.

alkemical
03-22-2011, 10:05 AM
Maybe they can print housings (with not very good material properties), and I guess technically PCB's could be considered printed, but no way can they print batteries, displays, or microchips.

They can print batteries, they just don't have the charge level. I've read about "paper" processors - and well this:

In a recent TED Talk, surgeon Anthony Atala printed a prototype human kidney, using living cells and an 3D inkjet printer, onstage. When this happened, TED attendees took note. John Hodgman wrote: “A doctor just literally printed out a human kidney. I hope we are all going to get one in our gift bag.”

From the talk’s description:

Using similar technology, Dr. Atala’s young patient Luke Massella received an engineered bladder 10 years ago; we meet him onstage.

Atala’s talk is a good basic overview of recent work in regenerative medicine. It’s important to note that this work is experimental — this doesn’t mean we’ve got free kidneys for everybody ready today — but it’s an exciting first step (and indeed, the video has a huge text watermark over it at the moment you see the kidney explaining how it’s not ready for primetime). Anyway, Atala starts talking about the kidney starting around the 9:30 mark in the video, and you see it around the 11:00 mark. Note: there’s a high-resolution MP4 version here if you don’t like the tiny video below.

Rohirrim
03-22-2011, 10:20 AM
Here are nine jobs that will probably be done by robots in the future. Sportswriter is one of them. Ha! It will be so cool when nobody has to work. We can just starve the excess population. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42183592/ns/business-careers/

So what is the goal here? To end up with people just standing around watching the machines do the work?

I once bought one of my sons an expensive robot that he really, really wanted for Christmas. He played with it for one day and then got bored and never played with it again. Nobody likes to just sit and watch things.

alkemical
03-22-2011, 10:21 AM
Here are nine jobs that will probably be done by robots in the future. Sportswriter is one of them. Ha! It will be so cool when nobody has to work. We can just starve the excess population. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42183592/ns/business-careers/

So what is the goal here? To end up with people just standing around watching the machines do the work?

I once bought one of my sons an expensive robot that he really, really wanted for Christmas. He played with it for one day and then got bored and never played with it again. Nobody likes to just sit and watch things.

TV?

footstepsfrom#27
03-22-2011, 10:32 AM
What about initial applications? I like the idea of using the social enterprise business space to field test tech, in this case maybe something like this:

<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/20122497?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0"></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/20122497">A New Chapter: Early Warning Radio Network</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/invisible">INVISIBLE CHILDREN</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

Using solar powered radios in the bush makes sense, unless it's raining I guess, but it's still a step forward. Getting mobile communications into remote areas would be easier if functional models of cell phones could be stamped out like ATM cards with embedded communications technology as well as credit/debit banking functions built in. No reason people in the bush can't bank at Chase or citibank.

alkemical
03-22-2011, 10:38 AM
What about initial applications? I like the idea of using the social enterprise business space to field test tech, in this case maybe something like this:

<iframe src="http://player.vimeo.com/video/20122497?title=0&amp;byline=0&amp;portrait=0" width="400" height="225" frameborder="0"></iframe><p><a href="http://vimeo.com/20122497">A New Chapter: Early Warning Radio Network</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/invisible">INVISIBLE CHILDREN</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com">Vimeo</a>.</p>

Using solar powered radios in the bush makes sense, unless it's raining I guess, but it's still a step forward. Getting mobile communications into remote areas would be easier if functional models of cell phones could be stamped out like ATM cards with embedded communications technology as well as credit/debit banking functions built in. No reason people in the bush can't bank at Chase or citibank.



http://www.brainsturbator.com/articles/saving_the_world_starts_in_africa/


In Africa, they already use cellphones for a ton of solutions: banking via SMS, etc.

Arkie
03-22-2011, 10:42 AM
Here are nine jobs that will probably be done by robots in the future. Sportswriter is one of them. Ha! It will be so cool when nobody has to work. We can just starve the excess population. http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/42183592/ns/business-careers/

So what is the goal here? To end up with people just standing around watching the machines do the work?

I once bought one of my sons an expensive robot that he really, really wanted for Christmas. He played with it for one day and then got bored and never played with it again. Nobody likes to just sit and watch things.

You will get $40 trillion just by reading this essay and understanding what it says.

An analysis of the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense “intuitive linear” view. So we won’t experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century — it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today’s rate). The “returns,” such as chip speed and cost-effectiveness, also increase exponentially. There’s even exponential growth in the rate of exponential growth. Within a few decades, machine intelligence will surpass human intelligence, leading to The Singularity — technological change so rapid and profound it represents a rupture in the fabric of human history. The implications include the merger of biological and nonbiological intelligence, immortal software-based humans, and ultra-high levels of intelligence that expand outward in the universe at the speed of light. http://www.kurzweilai.net/the-law-of-accelerating-returns

broncosteven
03-22-2011, 11:33 AM
You will get $40 trillion just by reading this essay and understanding what it says.

An analysis of the history of technology shows that technological change is exponential, contrary to the common-sense “intuitive linear” view. So we won’t experience 100 years of progress in the 21st century — it will be more like 20,000 years of progress (at today’s rate). The “returns,” such as chip speed and cost-effectiveness, also increase exponentially. There’s even exponential growth in the rate of exponential growth. Within a few decades, machine intelligence will surpass human intelligence, leading to The Singularity — technological change so rapid and profound it represents a rupture in the fabric of human history. The implications include the merger of biological and nonbiological intelligence, immortal software-based humans, and ultra-high levels of intelligence that expand outward in the universe at the speed of light. http://www.kurzweilai.net/the-law-of-accelerating-returns

Ray Kurzweil is very interesting.

footstepsfrom#27
03-22-2011, 11:33 AM
http://www.brainsturbator.com/articles/saving_the_world_starts_in_africa/


In Africa, they already use cellphones for a ton of solutions: banking via SMS, etc.
It's the fastest growing cell phone market in the world, which is why something like you saw in that video makes so little sense.

alkemical
03-22-2011, 12:08 PM
It's the fastest growing cell phone market in the world, which is why something like you saw in that video makes so little sense.

I didn't see the video yet, but I have been following the "solutions" market in Africa. trying to take what I see working there (obviously not in person...yet) and trying to find ways to take our tech savvy and creativity and solve our problems.