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View Full Version : Any coffee bean freaks in here?


footstepsfrom#27
03-16-2011, 11:55 AM
Let's talk coffee...truly the most effective barometer of cultural decline in our nation that I'm aware of. I mean, come on...coffee used to be a man's drink, now it's a measure of chic-ness. Can you imagine John Wayne or Lee Marvin camping out on the prarie, scannning for Apaches in the darkness with their coffee pot on the open fire, and one's sipping a cup of Vanilla Latte with cinnamon and the other a nice Cholate Trouffle Expresso? HELL NO! The Duke brewed his up in a dirty sock and drank it down when it got to the thickness of pancake syrup. Real men don't drink cappuccinos.

OK now that aside, are there any joe freaks in here? I don't like much store-bought coffee unless I can grind the beans, and it's partly about the smell of fresh ground coffee in the morning as well as the taste. So I was looking at the different grocery chain whole bean brands...I dabble around with different brands, whatever is on the shelf at Tom Thumb or Krogers usually..and wondering what the best stuff is. I'll also buy fair trade coffees even at a higher price if they're good.

So I figured I'd ask in here to find out two things,

1) what grocery store brand coffee bean do you like best,
2) what about the specialty coffee boutiqe brands?

Is anyone heavily into coffee beans you can't get at the local grocery? Around here I've been noticing more than a few specialty shops carrying Brazilian and other Latin American coffees, those I'm aware of, but now also alot of fair trade stuff coming out of Kenya or other African countries...plus European stuff too. Predictably higher in cost...so what's worth the extra $$ in these types (country or region of origin) as well as brand?

_Oro_
03-16-2011, 12:07 PM
It's foremost about freshness. Your best bet is to get a nice organic bean and roast it at home just the way you like it. If you don't want to roast at home then you need to find where's the closest coffee roastery to your house and order from them.

Raw beans stay fresh for a long time but as soon as they are roasted they are at their peak.. Well maybe you have to wait a few days for the chemicals to react but it's all downhill from there. So again your best bet is simply to try and find freshly roasted beans.

As for the beans in the grocery store I would say most of those are far too old to be really really good.

Quoydogs
03-16-2011, 12:12 PM
We have a guy here in Portland that roasts it fresh. Gets his beans from Guatemala and I tell it is some damn good stuff. We also bought some of the blue mountain from Jamaica when we were there and that stuff is hard to beat.

footstepsfrom#27
03-16-2011, 12:33 PM
Whole Foods over here has some organics selling around $18 a pound but they're always higher. So far the stuff I've been most impressed with is this Brazilian bean that has zero aftertaste and it's very smooth. It doesn't leave you with a nasty case of heartburn either.

Rulon Velvet Jones
03-16-2011, 02:14 PM
I like cappuccinos, though.

DivineLegion
03-16-2011, 02:37 PM
Before I got into the Medical laboratory business I worked in coffee for about 4 years. The best coffee is indeed fresh coffee, and the best way to keep it fresh is to store it in your freezer. In a blind study where "coffee experts" tried 20 of the top national brands to determine which was the best I believe 8 o'clock coffee came out on top. You can get 8 o'clock coffee at any grocery store, and its cheap. Personally if you want some really good coffee (I mean change your perspective on $hit) check this out http://counterculturecoffee.com/. I did my barista training at their facility, and let me tell you these people are freaking amazing. One of their instructors has placed second in the national barista competition for something like the last 2-3 years. The owner has a caffeine molecule tattooed on his arm, and the head roaster has a branch with coffee beans. These people literally live their lives for coffee, and how its supposed to be done. This is a place where cream and sugar in your coffee is consider the 8th deadly sin.

Mogulseeker
03-16-2011, 03:02 PM
I do enjoy a good latte occasionally, and I disagree with the basis of this argument. Go anywhere in Europe, and you'll find the chic element of coffee at any cafe. The euros drink 4 times the coffee Americans do.

I do agree, however, that coffee is a mans drink and for the most part I like my stuff dark and black. Cream and sugar is for girls.

Broncojef
03-16-2011, 03:39 PM
I'm looking into buying coffee/macadamia nut farm in Kona this weekend...if I get it I'll send you some kona coffee to try. It's the best.

Durango
03-16-2011, 03:45 PM
I drink gallons of the stuff, but very, very rarely get the exotic latte bs. I say rarely because I had a free coupon once for a free latte-caramel something or another at Starbucks and it was like gulping down liquid sugar.

Far and away, the best coffee I've ever tasted from the specialty shops are the Caribou Coffees, particularly the Mahogany and, during the holiday seasons only, the Reindeer blend.

Off the grocery shelves, the Kirkland Supremo Blend sold at Costco of all places is outstanding and approaches the taste of the coffee shop, or specialty blends. It really is a fantastic coffee AND you get 3 pounds of the stuff per can.

I avoid the most popular retail coffees because they're inconsistent, bland and even bitter for the most part, but if I have to buy one, I guess the Maxwell House will do. Folgers is god awful, and almost the price of the coffee shop blends these days, or so it seems.

Mogulseeker
03-16-2011, 03:56 PM
Haha Caribou Coffee... a "specialty shop"

Mogulseeker
03-16-2011, 03:57 PM
If you want good coffee in Denver, go to Kaladi...

There are some roasters in Maine called "Wicked Joe" and they're amazing.

schaaf
03-16-2011, 04:22 PM
I drink my coffee black, and as dark roast as possible.

Play2win
03-16-2011, 04:32 PM
Americanos All the way!

Best coffee I have ever had was Vivace's in Seattle. Wonderful stuff!

Ray Finkle
03-16-2011, 04:32 PM
I'm a fan of Dunkin Donuts....I buy the bags of coffee from their store since it's better than the crap in the grocery store/costco. I also like Caribou.....

Mogulseeker
03-16-2011, 04:58 PM
Douwe Egberts

broncogary
03-16-2011, 05:00 PM
Douwe Egberts

Yep, ordered some over the internet. Pretty expensive, though.

Quoydogs
03-16-2011, 05:00 PM
I am 100 percent sure there is no American coffee that will Compare to blue mountain Jamaican coffee. I believe it is known to be the best in the world. I brought back 2 pounds and I have to admit they are right. ( By the way blue mountain that Costco gets is NOT the same stuff. )

I think the Guatemalan will give it a run for the money though. Kona is OK but anything related to starbucks is pure crap.

Just my 2 cents.


I'm waiting for someone on here that has tried the cat sh@t coffee.

rugbythug
03-16-2011, 05:26 PM
I like my coffee black like my men.

El Minion
03-16-2011, 05:52 PM
<iframe title="YouTube video player" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cEVTQHiAQRA" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

El Minion
03-16-2011, 05:55 PM
Go to Santa Maria's (http://www.sweetmarias.com/):

<center> http://www.sweetmarias.com/roastingcoffee.parisstr.pre.jpg
The Home Roasting Tradition

</center> Once Upon a Time: Roasting coffee in the kitchen was a part of the daily life of many people through the 1930s. Europeans who could not afford to buy their coffee pre-roasted, and Amercian rural folks who cherished the taste of coffee, roasted out on their porches, over their fireplaces, or atop their cast iron stoves. A neighborhood coffee roasting shop was an urban luxury. Settlers appreciated the fact that coffee in the form of raw green beans could be stored indefinitely, or at least until their next trip to the general store. The Sears Roebuck catalog circa 1900 actually sold two kinds of green coffee, one a Guatemala Antigua!
The beans weren't the best, the grind was terrible, and their brewing methods resulted in a cup of swill. But I am sure that the smell of warm, fresh-roasted beans in an old hand-cranked grinder made up for some of that.
What happened to those clever roasting devices that were fired up twice a week and happily puffed out pleasant roasting smoke? And what happened to the thousands of neighborhood roasting shops that supplied the community with fresh whole bean coffee?
http://www.sweetmarias.com/roaster_images/roaster.panroast.solo.sml.jpghttp://www.sweetmarias.com/copperroaster.JPGhttp://www.sweetmarias.com/roaster_images/roaster.gashomeroaster.gifhttp://www.sweetmarias.com/roaster_images/roaster.charcoal.roaster1.gif
for more images (http://www.sweetmarias.com/Roasters-SweetMarias.php)of Tom's antique (and not so antique) roaster collection
Canned Obsolecense
As interstate commerce grew and the mass packaging of goods became possible, some roasting companies grew to mammoth proportions. Fewer and fewer raw materials entered American homes, as the focus turned to time and labor-saving packaged goods. Civilized people ate food from cans. A poll of your neighbors in the early 1960's might show that coffee was a brown powder, not a bean.
The reappearance of the neighborhood shop roaster in the late 60s and 70s was a part of the "back to basics" movement. I worked for a man who started roasting in the 1960s, after finding an old coffee roaster-turned-peanut-roaster down in Mexico. The pioneers of today's specialty coffee industry resuscitated a profession that had been dead for 50 years.
Now the proliferation of coffeehouses has reached such extremes that there are neighborhoods that have imposed a 2 year ban: No New Cafes! And not all of the 1980s "gourmet" coffee craze helped to improve the brown drink we hold so dear.
http://www.sweetmarias.com/sweetmarias.kohlersarabica.gifFreshness: Everyone in the specialty coffee industry knows that freshness counts. Everyone knows that only your neighborhood coffee roaster, who sells a limited variety of beans roasted in small batches daily, can truly claim to offer fresh coffee. All that whole bean, vacuum-packed stuff at the supermarket is the result of large centralized roasting companies attempting to cut into the sales of the neighborhood roaster. On the whole, coffee is better roasted and better packaged due to their efforts. But it is not fresh.
Coffee is best 4 to 24 hours after roasting. During this time, coffee emits enough C02 to keep the oxygen (that will eventually make it stale) at bay. The essential flavor oils are delicate, and fade or become tainted quickly despite all our interventions. Stored as whole beans in an airtight glass jar in a dark place, coffee can stay "fresh" for roughly 5 days. For those without a good neighborhood roaster, we invite you to discover the simple pleasure of roasting your own coffee.
Cost: Coffee is the second most traded commodity on the world market after crude oil. With 7 billion dollars exchanged in coffee every year, some people will say and do anything to promote their product. The issue isn't only a narcissistic concern for the quality of our morning coffee, it is the way this hot commodity undermines sound ecological practice worldwide. The demand for lower quality coffees has resulted in massive coffee agribusiness, clearing huge parcels of biodiverse forest to plant coffee. The small fincas, co-ops, estates and traditional "shade-grown" coffees that we sell must compete against the ultra-productive coffee farms and their machine-picked, disease-resistant hybrid coffee products.
And as far as your pocketbook goes, why buy 2+ week-old coffee for $10/pound when you can roast your own for much less? It's as easy as making popcorn, and the green coffee from Sweet Maria's costs half the price of roasted beans. If you use the air popcorn popper method, you can usually find the appropriate type in thrift stores for $2. That's all you need to start roasting coffee at home!

http://www.sweetmarias.com/homemade-homeroasters/boutellFRFrontsml.jpghttp://www.sweetmarias.com/homemade-homeroasters/uglyroast.jpghttp://www.sweetmarias.com/homemade-homeroasters/heatgundogbowl.JPG http://www.sweetmarias.com/homemade-homeroasters/dial-pumper.jpg
For more on getting started and for help on choosing a home roaster, you may want to go to this page. (http://www.sweetmarias.com/prod.roasters.php)

Archer81
03-16-2011, 06:06 PM
My former boss moved to Hawaii and grows his own coffee for sale. Its pretty good and very strong. They also have a place here in town that gets "free trade beans" and sells them. Excellent coffee.

And if the duke had a choice he would have gone with the Caramel Macciato. Its delicious.

:Broncos:

cutthemdown
03-16-2011, 06:12 PM
Usually Hawaiian coffee isn't that strong i thought?. Arabica beans I heard are strongest. But my Kona blend from Hawaii seems pretty strong. But I don't really know coffee so I am only guessing.

Archer81
03-16-2011, 06:13 PM
Usually Hawaiian coffee isn't that strong i thought?. Arabica beans I heard are strongest. But my Kona blend from Hawaii seems pretty strong. But I don't really know coffee so I am only guessing.


He grows kona. Its pretty damn good.


:Broncos:

Al Wilson 4 Mayor
03-16-2011, 06:51 PM
Before I got into the Medical laboratory business I worked in coffee for about 4 years. The best coffee is indeed fresh coffee, and the best way to keep it fresh is to store it in your freezer. In a blind study where "coffee experts" tried 20 of the top national brands to determine which was the best I believe 8 o'clock coffee came out on top. You can get 8 o'clock coffee at any grocery store, and its cheap. Personally if you want some really good coffee (I mean change your perspective on $hit) check this out http://counterculturecoffee.com/. I did my barista training at their facility, and let me tell you these people are freaking amazing. One of their instructors has placed second in the national barista competition for something like the last 2-3 years. The owner has a caffeine molecule tattooed on his arm, and the head roaster has a branch with coffee beans. These people literally live their lives for coffee, and how its supposed to be done. This is a place where cream and sugar in your coffee is consider the 8th deadly sin.

I love coffee! I wouldn't say I'm a coffee snob, but I'm close. :approve:

The two best beans I've ever had were from a Colombian company, and I don't think you can get it in the US. It was called OMA. I brought a few bags back with which disappeared rather quickly.

The other bean I've tried that was absolutely delicious was a type of Kona bean called "peabody". They are the elite of the Kona beans. They are a little smaller than a typical bean, but man, it is tasty and smooth, much like the OMA. A 1 pound bag of Kona Peabody will cost you about $20. My wife and I brought a small bag back from Hawaii about 7 years ago. I believe the lava rock releases a lot of carbon and minerals into the soil that makes the soil very rich for growing coffee.

Someone else mentioned 8 O'clock coffee, and it is a very good bean, and inexpensive as well. I believe it's a company from New Jersey. I'm not sure where they got there beans from, but I use to get them from Walmart for $3 or $4 for a 12 oz bag.

Another inexpensive coffee with good flavor is the San Francisco Bay brand at Cosco called Organic Rainforest blend. It's the best buy for me because of the amount of coffee I go through. You can get a 3 pound bag for under $15. It will last me close to 2 months.

Goobzilla
03-16-2011, 06:52 PM
I only use that cat poop coffee:wiggle:

HILife
03-16-2011, 07:03 PM
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AZorange1
03-16-2011, 07:19 PM
OK children, sit down and be quiet. Here goes--A long, long time ago in a far-a-way land called Denver (Cherry Creek to be specific), a man went to meet his construction friend in a place called "Starbucks". This man was a contstruction worker to the bone, drywall, framing, tile, all of it. When he got there he noticed a smell that was just awful. Yes, awful. Smelled just like the coffee pot mom used to leave on the burner till the coffee was all gone. He asked the 16 year-old for a cup of coffee and was asked what kind? "Just regular coffee" the construction worker said. While he waited for his "reg coffee" he looked around and noticed that all the people in there were "light of touch". (thin, anemic looking, pale, and biceps like pencils) Well, he got his "reg coffee" and took a sip. UGHHHHH!! This isn't regular coffee! The 16-year old said to the construction worker, "uh, you can go across the street to the 7-11 and get some there" The construction worker left and thanked the 16 year-old for saving him $4 for a cup of mom's old coffee and got a good cup of coffee for 79cents. He promised to NEVER EVER go back to that funky place again. And he never has. Suffice to say that when the news broke this week that Starbucks is in financial trouble, I shed no tears. (except for the 16 year old that is probably a manager now and has 4 kids to support)

Requiem
03-16-2011, 07:34 PM
I'm not sure what I've been drinking at work around the office, but I know one of my co-workers (heck, all the ladies) are ga-ga about these organic beans that you can only get at a certain market in town. It's pretty good stuff, IMHO -- but I don't know much about coffee.

I have to admit, I haven't been much of a coffee drinker in my life. I always tried to sneak a sip from my grandparents cups as a kid, but they said it was for adults so I never got into it. Now, they routinely buy my younger cousins (females) whatever expensive latte/moo-latte whatever crap when they so please. I think it's wrong 13-15 year old kids are hooked on the stuff, just like pop.

I usually drink my coffee black with no creamer, but creamer can give it a little ooh yah.

orange skier
03-17-2011, 04:52 AM
I don't consider myself a coffee snob.....I'll drink anything, and I consider coffee one of life's necessities. Dunkin Donuts is just fine, and so is 7-11...that being said, life is too short to not really treat yourself well in the coffee department. If you read the above messages, you can see a trend developing around the Kona coffees........my favorite is naturally ridiculously expensive......I have it sent from the Holualoa Kona Coffee Company in Kona...I get the dark roast....... www.konalea.com (http://www.konalea.com) It is absolutely a reason to get up in the morning. I keep it in the freezer, and only share it with my good friends. It works out to be cheaper than Starbucks, or a trip to one of the coffee places.......and it is very, very good coffee.

baja
03-17-2011, 09:45 AM
opi luwak (Malay pronunciation: [ˈkopi ˈlu.aʔ]), or civet coffee, is one of the world's most expensive and low-production coffee. It is made from the beans of coffee berries which have been eaten by the Asian Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) and other related civets, then passed through its digestive tract.[1] A civet eats the berries for their fleshy pulp. In its stomach, proteolytic enzymes seep into the beans, making shorter peptides and more free amino acids. Passing through a civet's intestines the beans are then defecated, keeping their shape. After gathering, thorough washing, sun drying, light roasting and brewing, these beans yield an aromatic coffee with much less bitterness, widely noted as the most expensive coffee in the world.

Pony Boy
03-17-2011, 10:03 AM
Be a man.......Campfire coffee........nothing better than this.

Put 6 tablespoons of coarsely ground coffee in the pot and pour the water on top of them. Put the pot on the fire and bring it to a boil. (You can also put the pot on hot coals or a hot grill and boil slowly for a smoother flavor.) Remove from the heat and allow to steep three minutes. Add two tablespoons of cool water to help settle the ground, then serve. YIELD: 3 large mugs

orange skier
03-17-2011, 07:32 PM
opi luwak (Malay pronunciation: [ˈkopi ˈlu.aʔ]), or civet coffee, is one of the world's most expensive and low-production coffee. It is made from the beans of coffee berries which have been eaten by the Asian Palm Civet (Paradoxurus hermaphroditus) and other related civets, then passed through its digestive tract.[1] A civet eats the berries for their fleshy pulp. In its stomach, proteolytic enzymes seep into the beans, making shorter peptides and more free amino acids. Passing through a civet's intestines the beans are then defecated, keeping their shape. After gathering, thorough washing, sun drying, light roasting and brewing, these beans yield an aromatic coffee with much less bitterness, widely noted as the most expensive coffee in the world.



wow Baja...you're not kidding.....that stuff is over $300 a pound.........think Bowlen serves it in his restaurants...............

AZorange1
03-17-2011, 08:26 PM
wow Baja...you're not kidding.....that stuff is over $300 a pound.........think Bowlen serves it in his restaurants...............

OK Alex, I'll take "Movie Trivia" for $500. Whats Jacks coffee in the "Bucket List". (just trying to get to that "magical" 100 posts so I can feel like I finally graduated from------------well, something)