PDA

View Full Version : OT IQ Testing for kids


TheReverend
02-03-2011, 06:06 AM
So my seven year old was selected from her first grade class to undergo gifted testing with the school psychologist.

Today we met with the school psychologist, her teacher and the gifted program teacher to talk about the results. She scored a 136 and easily surpassed the intelligence and behavioral requirements.

Blah, blah, I know "no one cares". Just very proud, at the moment.

Dedhed
02-03-2011, 06:15 AM
Congrats, but be careful with that crap.

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 06:25 AM
Congrats, but be careful with that crap.

???

jhns
02-03-2011, 06:39 AM
So the kid takes after her mother? Congrats!

vancejohnson82
02-03-2011, 06:48 AM
So my seven year old was selected from her first grade class to undergo gifted testing with the school psychologist.

Today we met with the school psychologist, her teacher and the gifted program teacher to talk about the results. She scored a 136 and easily surpassed the intelligence and behavioral requirements.

Blah, blah, I know "no one cares". Just very proud, at the moment.

God, I have no class...

Instead of saying 'congrats" or something of that nature my first thought was, "That's great. I love having intellectual conversations with strippers."

Congrats tho

Dedhed
02-03-2011, 06:52 AM
???
I'm not disparaging you or your child at all. I'm just saying that labeling kids in any manner can be a slippery slope. Even if it's something positive like this.

I have a friend who teaches "gifted" kids at a charter school here in Boston, and he says that his kids are often stress cases at 12 years old because of the expectations heaped on them by their parents.

It's great that your daughter has brains, but just be careful about making her live up to a label. That's all I was saying. My friend says that parents hear "gifted" and they lose all perspective.

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 06:58 AM
So the kid takes after her mother? Congrats!

Something like that. Side story: During the meeting her mom said, "She gets it from her dad. I'm just cute." Which was kinda funny.

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 07:01 AM
I'm not disparaging you or your child at all. I'm just saying that labeling kids in any manner can be a slippery slope. Even if it's something positive like this.

I have a friend who teaches "gifted" kids at a charter school here in Boston, and he says that his kids are often stress cases at 12 years old because of the expectations heaped on them by their parents.

It's great that your daughter has brains, but just be careful about making her live up to a label. That's all I was saying. My friend says that parents hear "gifted" and they lose all perspective.

Ohhhhhhhhhhh gotcha. I completely agree.

I went through a similar thing when I was a kid in NY, and the expectations of having to exceed the work of every one else grew extremely frustrating to the point of flat out rebellion by 8th/9th grade.

Repeating the same mistakes with her was absolutely my primary concern. However, in this situation, she spends a day a week outside of her class working on advanced material in a very individualized setting.

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 07:01 AM
God, I have no class...

Instead of saying 'congrats" or something of that nature my first thought was, "That's great. I love having intellectual conversations with strippers."

Congrats tho

Bold is extremely true.

vancejohnson82
02-03-2011, 07:04 AM
Bold is extremely true.

the first step to rehabilitation is admitting you have a problem


true story: i was labeled as "gifted" in elementary school and actually skipped a great. But I didnt stop ****ting my pants until I was twelve

worm
02-03-2011, 07:17 AM
Just be proud your kid isn't on ritalin. A much bigger accomplishment these days.

bronco militia
02-03-2011, 07:34 AM
Something like that. Side story: During the meeting her mom said, "She gets it from her dad. I'm just cute." Which was kinda funny.

ha ha...smart people are ugly ;D


anyway, congrats on the news

Chris
02-03-2011, 07:35 AM
Congrats. Do not turn into tiger parents. That's all I'll say. Socialisation is the key to real (non-academic) success as an adult.

Just some friendly advice!

illbroncsfn
02-03-2011, 07:45 AM
Rev-

It seems as if you have a good handle on your daughter's situation. Best two points IMHO are listed below- one is by you. Good luck and most importantly give your daughter opportunities to be a well balanced adult....

Socialisation is the key to real (non-academic) success as an adult.

the expectations of having to exceed the work of every one else grew extremely frustrating to the point of flat out rebellion by 8th/9th grade.

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 07:54 AM
Rev-

It seems as if you have a good handle on your daughter's situation. Best two points IMHO are listed below- one is by you. Good luck and most importantly give your daughter opportunities to be a well balanced adult....

Socialisation is the key to real (non-academic) success as an adult.

the expectations of having to exceed the work of every one else grew extremely frustrating to the point of flat out rebellion by 8th/9th grade.

I'm not extremely concerned with "success as an adult". Not nearly as concerned as I am just with general happiness. She'll be a trust fund kid, so conventional interpretations of "success" are pretty much a foregone conclusion.

Now naturally, I want her to be a productive member of society in spite of this, but I think it provides an unique opportunity to actually do what she wants to do and not by a monetary reward.

Super cute kiddo too, here's us at my best friends wedding this past summer:

http://sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/hs1376.snc4/164800_478591108154_515728154_5916515_1272183_n.jp g

Binkythefrog
02-03-2011, 08:35 AM
Congrats. Do not turn into tiger parents. That's all I'll say. Socialisation is the key to real (non-academic) success as an adult.

Just some friendly advice!

I grew up with "tiger parents" and I feel like I'm doing fine. Amy Chua's article in the WSJ matches my upbringing. The disparaging comments, the unrelenting discipline, the extreme push for good grades.

Tiger parenting is not a bad style of parenting. I was pushed to practice the piano for 3 hours a day through elementary school almost through high school which led to daily fights. My parents constantly berated me for being "fat" even though I was maybe 5 pounds overweight. I socialized very little until I got to college, and although there were some growing pains, I managed to trick my wife into marrying me and managed to bribe some other people into becoming good friends. I am incredibly loyal to my parents and think the world of them regardless of our fierce battles.

I'm very driven and disciplined, and I attribute that to my piano practicing and my parents constantly bothering me on my homework, giving me extra homework etc. I believe that high expectations are important. While I'm not a superstar by anymeans, I'm self sufficient and have a career path. Without my parents pushing me, I don't think I would of had that, given my propensity for laziness without a routine or structure.

Now, other styles of parenting I'm sure could result in a similar story, many of my more successful friends grew up that way. On the flip side, my sister is a different story. She has been unemployed for 24 months and has a much more murky future.

To summarize, tiger parenting and setting very high expectations is a feasible option and worked well for me, I wouldn't trade it for anything else.

BTW, you should be proud of your kid! She sounds super smart and is adorable.

Kaylore
02-03-2011, 08:36 AM
That's cute and good for her. That's a great opportunity and she will be better for it.

I think the "careful" comments come from going overkill. There is some danger in being ostracized and away from your friends. I was in a few gifted programs throughout school and did a lot of extracurricular activities like Odyssey of the mind and some special science classes. I endured a bit of scorn for being a nerd and missed not hanging with my friends as much. Looking back I would say I would have liked to have 30% of that time back doing more normal stuff. Just my thoughts.

vancejohnson82
02-03-2011, 08:39 AM
Now, other styles of parenting I'm sure could result in a similar story, many of my more successful friends grew up that way. On the flip side, my sister is a different story. She has been unemployed for 24 months and has a much more murky future.

To summarize, tiger parenting and setting very high expectations is a feasible option and worked well for me, I wouldn't trade it for anything else.

BTW, you should be proud of your kid! She sounds super smart and is adorable.

Being unemployed these days isn't anything to be frowned upon....job market sucks and you really need to fall into something at the right time

Binkythefrog
02-03-2011, 08:46 AM
Being unemployed these days isn't anything to be frowned upon....job market sucks and you really need to fall into something at the right time

I definitely agree, it is really difficult for everyone. The issue is that she really isn't trying to find a job, she's not motivated and is just living off the parents, that is all. My parents don't know what to do. Cut her off completely? That could end up badly. Keep supporting her? Then maybe she'll become dependent and never find a job.

Mediator12
02-03-2011, 08:47 AM
Congrats Rev. She has a great gift, just make sure it is a gift and not a curse!

Pm Me and we will talk.

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 08:49 AM
Congrats Rev. She has a great gift, just make sure it is a gift and not a curse!

Pm Me and we will talk.

Will do soon. We have lots of catching up to do anyways.

Mediator12
02-03-2011, 08:50 AM
I definitely agree, it is really difficult for everyone. The issue is that she really isn't trying to find a job, she's not motivated and is just living off the parents, that is all. My parents don't know what to do. Cut her off completely? That could end up badly. Keep supporting her? Then maybe she'll become dependent and never find a job.

Her parents need to set boundaries and make her make real world choices is the ONLY thing that will get her moving. Right now, she is simply returning the favor to her parents of her childhood. What works for one child, rarely works for the other despite the similar environment.

vancejohnson82
02-03-2011, 08:53 AM
I definitely agree, it is really difficult for everyone. The issue is that she really isn't trying to find a job, she's not motivated and is just living off the parents, that is all. My parents don't know what to do. Cut her off completely? That could end up badly. Keep supporting her? Then maybe she'll become dependent and never find a job.

Yea, thats a tricky situation. I was let go from a really good job two months after a promotion into another department (I think they moved my salary for company reasons). I was unemployed for 9 months but my parents didnt let me move home, so I lived in a crap apartment and couldnt do **** for fun. THAT was motivation.

Ended up with a job paying the same that actually had better benefits, etc...

It took me 9 months of really searching hard and it felt like a job. I couldnt believe that with a good number of years of experience and an MBA that I was at one point applying at Foot Locker and whatnot (not that there is anything wrong with those jobs)....and they wouldnt hire

you're right though, there needs to be motivation there

sorry to get this off topic

Requiem
02-03-2011, 10:13 AM
Congratulations. I was gifted too. Durrr. :D

mkporter
02-03-2011, 11:02 AM
That's cute and good for her. That's a great opportunity and she will be better for it.

I think the "careful" comments come from going overkill. There is some danger in being ostracized and away from your friends. I was in a few gifted programs throughout school and did a lot of extracurricular activities like Odyssey of the mind and some special science classes. I endured a bit of scorn for being a nerd and missed not hanging with my friends as much. Looking back I would say I would have liked to have 30% of that time back doing more normal stuff. Just my thoughts.

Nerd!



Sorry, I'm trying to be a reformed Odyssey/Computer Club/Math Competition kid myself. Most of my friends were also nerds also, so that was okay. Going to a college with students with much lower social skills then my own did wonders for me, though. All the sudden I was a popular kid. I can almost pass for normal, now.

mkporter
02-03-2011, 11:03 AM
So my seven year old was selected from her first grade class to undergo gifted testing with the school psychologist.

Today we met with the school psychologist, her teacher and the gifted program teacher to talk about the results. She scored a 136 and easily surpassed the intelligence and behavioral requirements.

Blah, blah, I know "no one cares". Just very proud, at the moment.

Nothing wrong with being proud of your kid. Sounds like you got a smart one on your hands. Keep your guard up.

OCBronco
02-03-2011, 11:18 AM
Congrats. I echo what some others have said re: making sure her emotional needs are met.

I'll also add this: check to see what kind of curriculum they will have her on. I was in two different programs when I was a kid. One was great, they had us working on logic puzzles and other things that enhanced our education. The other program was a joke. Also, keep an eye on her to make sure that she's getting the support from her teachers when she needs it. Sometimes, teachers have a way of assuming that the smart kids will figure it out for themselves, or that they can just teach the material to themselves, and that they don't need any help with their lessons.

TonyR
02-03-2011, 11:29 AM
On the flip side, my sister is a different story...

Out of curiousity, was she parented in the same style/manner you were?

broncocalijohn
02-03-2011, 11:38 AM
My son seems to be in the same situation but they will be testing him (and other kids) for Gate Program. He has known his timetables since 1st grade and is bored with 2nd grade math and they have never suggested to put him up a grade (or two) just for math. We have never been approached for IQ test but at 5 (he is now 8) he could figure out how much money he was going to get for turning in his aluminum cans. See if you can do this in your head and if so, can you do it in 15 seconds or less? You have 767 cans and get $.05 a can, how much money do you get? See if you can get it as he does in about 15 seconds. ........(answer below)..........







$38.35 (i did it in 5 to 6 seconds)

Beantown Bronco
02-03-2011, 11:49 AM
This is starting to remind me of one of my favorite movies of all time.

<object style="height: 390px; width: 640px"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/wNFMPhKIZXg?version=3"><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"><param name="allowScriptAccess" value="always"><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/wNFMPhKIZXg?version=3" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowScriptAccess="always" width="640" height="390"></object>

OABB
02-03-2011, 11:58 AM
my IQ is 131. And I'm a barely functional retard most of the time. No offense, but I think IQ doesn't mean much.

bronco militia
02-03-2011, 12:06 PM
http://www.dlisted.com/files/openpostgenius.jpg

Irish Stout
02-03-2011, 12:06 PM
my IQ is 131. And I'm a barely functional retard most of the time. No offense, but I think IQ doesn't mean much.

Yeah this! Mine is 132 (take that orangeandblue) and I'll eat anything covered in cheese sauce. Anything. Cheese sauce..... :homer:

Dukes
02-03-2011, 12:12 PM
Congrats Rev

DomCasual
02-03-2011, 12:12 PM
http://www.dlisted.com/files/openpostgenius.jpg

At least he didn't spell it genious.

cutthemdown
02-03-2011, 12:18 PM
I grew up with "tiger parents" and I feel like I'm doing fine. Amy Chua's article in the WSJ matches my upbringing. The disparaging comments, the unrelenting discipline, the extreme push for good grades.

Tiger parenting is not a bad style of parenting. I was pushed to practice the piano for 3 hours a day through elementary school almost through high school which led to daily fights. My parents constantly berated me for being "fat" even though I was maybe 5 pounds overweight. I socialized very little until I got to college, and although there were some growing pains, I managed to trick my wife into marrying me and managed to bribe some other people into becoming good friends. I am incredibly loyal to my parents and think the world of them regardless of our fierce battles.

I'm very driven and disciplined, and I attribute that to my piano practicing and my parents constantly bothering me on my homework, giving me extra homework etc. I believe that high expectations are important. While I'm not a superstar by anymeans, I'm self sufficient and have a career path. Without my parents pushing me, I don't think I would of had that, given my propensity for laziness without a routine or structure.

Now, other styles of parenting I'm sure could result in a similar story, many of my more successful friends grew up that way. On the flip side, my sister is a different story. She has been unemployed for 24 months and has a much more murky future.

To summarize, tiger parenting and setting very high expectations is a feasible option and worked well for me, I wouldn't trade it for anything else.

BTW, you should be proud of your kid! She sounds super smart and is adorable.

Funny because my parents had to stop me from practicing music. I think you can do it either way and have good kids. Be a demanding taskmaster, or more laid back and put enjoying your childhood as a priority. IMO if you can have a kid who gets to be a kid, who still ends up reaching goals as an adult, wouldn't that be best case?

cutthemdown
02-03-2011, 12:19 PM
Yeah great looking dad and daughter combo Reverend.

Binkythefrog
02-03-2011, 12:25 PM
Out of curiousity, was she parented in the same style/manner you were?

Similar, except in one way.

I have Chinese parents, and in China, often the first born son (that is what I am) received preferential treatment (before the whole one child thing). My mom grew up in that environment and saw her brothers get all kinds of privileges she never got.

My mom wanted to ensure that didn't happen with my sister, so she "over-compensated (her words)" and spoiled her. She also rarely ever had to do chores (I did pretty much all of them). Otherwise, everything was the same.

rugbythug
02-03-2011, 12:32 PM
I've noticed net ia s scores are inflated vs the norm. You have got to be smart to log in here!!

On a seperate note I am blowing my kids trust fund!! They can earn it like I did. I hope my parents get to spending.

TonyR
02-03-2011, 01:08 PM
She'll be a trust fund kid...

Absolutely none of my business but, while we're sharing, does this mean you're a trust fund kid? Or is this by way of the ex-inlaws?

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 01:42 PM
Absolutely none of my business but, while we're sharing, does this mean you're a trust fund kid? Or is this by way of the ex-inlaws?

Neither.

In the spirit of sharing more personal information than I'm comfortable with that I personally started in this thread, I'll explain.

I do come from a pretty wealthy family, but one that put an emphasis on building character, which is pretty much code for neglect, but whatever, beside the point. Anyways, my dad passed away while I was in bootcamp for the Marines, and my mother hit a reallllllly dark place and, the perfect timing that it was, also started getting audited by the IRS, and they'd just built an amazing house in Scottsdale, AZ. Anyways, to help out, I gave my inheritance to her. Several years later, she'd bounced back on her feet, and started seeing a guy that runs a very large company. A couple more years later and they got married, roughly around the time my daughter was born. She spends several weeks a year out there with them and he's like a grandfather to her (though I very, very much tell her about her actual grandfather and what a great man he was, etc), and as a couple they're wealthy, and my mother has had discussions with me when she started the trusts for the grand kids.

I'm not trying to claim that I myself am poverty stricken. I've built up a very respectable amount of capital for someone my age, but sadly, it's all mine. At this point, I'd love to get handed some money.

Chris
02-03-2011, 01:53 PM
I grew up with "tiger parents" and I feel like I'm doing fine. Amy Chua's article in the WSJ matches my upbringing. The disparaging comments, the unrelenting discipline, the extreme push for good grades.

Tiger parenting is not a bad style of parenting. I was pushed to practice the piano for 3 hours a day through elementary school almost through high school which led to daily fights. My parents constantly berated me for being "fat" even though I was maybe 5 pounds overweight. I socialized very little until I got to college, and although there were some growing pains, I managed to trick my wife into marrying me and managed to bribe some other people into becoming good friends. I am incredibly loyal to my parents and think the world of them regardless of our fierce battles.

I'm very driven and disciplined, and I attribute that to my piano practicing and my parents constantly bothering me on my homework, giving me extra homework etc. I believe that high expectations are important. While I'm not a superstar by anymeans, I'm self sufficient and have a career path. Without my parents pushing me, I don't think I would of had that, given my propensity for laziness without a routine or structure.

Now, other styles of parenting I'm sure could result in a similar story, many of my more successful friends grew up that way. On the flip side, my sister is a different story. She has been unemployed for 24 months and has a much more murky future.

To summarize, tiger parenting and setting very high expectations is a feasible option and worked well for me, I wouldn't trade it for anything else.

BTW, you should be proud of your kid! She sounds super smart and is adorable.

Some interesting parallels here. I'm not a trust fund kid but I've definitely benefited from having parents that were reasonably well off (not rich, not even close) both in terms of exposure and education in the conventional sense.

I grew up in Hong Kong so EVERYONE around me grew up in Tiger households. For some, like my best friend, it worked out and he got into good schools and ended up with a well paying corporate job. That's not him though. He's a creative guy and feels like a square peg in a round hole. He's currently reevaluating his life path. For another friend, the best student of the bunch, he is significantly behind in his social development and he has some deep seeded issues to work through. Again he's in a high paying job, though not necessarily one he feels fulfilled by.

That said, I'm not seeing any entrepreneurs out of that group. Just a lot of kids who were well positioned to get through the Oxbridge / IV league schools and on to the golden treadmill that is the finance industry (specifically Goldman Sachs if we're talking about the Chinese ideal).

My story is as yet "unwritten". I didn't even go to undergrad yet I have excelled working at a top flight company in my industry. There are a lot of reasons for that, one being that I am extremely self-motivated and two that I historically resented the rigid structure of formal education.

I don't know where I'm going with this. I think there is value to every approach though I knew some complete shut-ins growing up that I believe the result of overbearing tiger parents... kids that excelled academically but didn't seem to have an ounce of intellectual autonomy. I for one will say that I managed to love my childhood and develop specific passions through personal exploration (for example, my parents were very encouraging of my acting in amateur theatre... I since haven't become an actor but it's made me very comfortable with people and a great public speaker). I've been driven by dreams, not report cards.

To me entrepreneurship is driven by dreams. The more entrepreneurs and leaders we have , the better off society is. That is the purpose of a top flight education.

/rant off

HAT
02-03-2011, 02:16 PM
You have 767 cans and get $.05 a can, how much money do you get? See if you can get it as he does in about 15 seconds. ........(answer below)..........







$38.35 (i did it in 5 to 6 seconds)

It took you 5 seconds to move a decimal point and divide by 2? Were you hungover? :wiggle:

My .02 on the topic.....

I got moved up to 1st after a few weeks of K. Didn't really affect anything b/c I was barely socialized into the elementary school environment. I'd be leery about moving up my kid in 2nd grade or beyond. Could be pretty traumatic to change classmates that he's come up with.

And like Rev, I rebelled big time but it was way before 8th grade. I got moved to GATE in 4th grade and pretty much became a world class smart ass. I already had the 'poindexter' label from skipping Kindergarten and wasn't about to to be made fun of more for GATE. Pretty much turned into an underachieving class clown to compensate. Ironic, eh? Smart enough to qualify for all of that stuff but not smart enough to see it as a good thing.

I've got a 7 y.o. 1st grader too and she also will never really have to worry about money (ex's parents). When they start testing & pushing GATE, I'll be all for it but will be damn certain that SHE wants to.

Like others have said....Looks like you've got a good handle on the situation Rev.

cutthemdown
02-03-2011, 04:27 PM
I dont think kids need to really hit the books until HS. Just my opinion but I don't have any. Not like people get jobs because they had better grade school classes or grades. Let kids be kids then when they hit the teen yrs you start giving them more and more to do. My G/F works at a posh private school, man those kids are like 7 yrs old doing tons and tons of homework already. Its crazy.

Requiem
02-03-2011, 05:05 PM
Kids need to start hitting the books a lot sooner, being prepared at home well before they even get into organized school. They also should be learning another language in elementary school.

vancejohnson82
02-03-2011, 05:17 PM
my kid lives in a Samsung 60" television box behind my house...he's pretty smart and has learned to slide out of the chains I have on him. He's not very good at art, as he has eaten all of the coloring books I've put out. He excels at physical education and can catch almost 3 rabbits in less than 8 minutes....

I'm thinking of having him skip the garage phase of his childhood and having him come straight to the attic...

Chris
02-03-2011, 06:06 PM
my kid lives in a Samsung 60" television box behind my house...he's pretty smart and has learned to slide out of the chains I have on him. He's not very good at art, as he has eaten all of the coloring books I've put out. He excels at physical education and can catch almost 3 rabbits in less than 8 minutes....

I'm thinking of having him skip the garage phase of his childhood and having him come straight to the attic...

dada?

bowtown
02-03-2011, 06:19 PM
So my seven year old was selected from her first grade class to undergo gifted testing with the school psychologist.

Today we met with the school psychologist, her teacher and the gifted program teacher to talk about the results. She scored a 136 and easily surpassed the intelligence and behavioral requirements.

Blah, blah, I know "no one cares". Just very proud, at the moment.

Sounds like a huge nerd to me. ;)

oubronco
02-03-2011, 06:31 PM
Congrats rev that is so awesome

Swedish Extrovert
02-03-2011, 06:38 PM
I'm not disparaging you or your child at all. I'm just saying that labeling kids in any manner can be a slippery slope. Even if it's something positive like this.

I have a friend who teaches "gifted" kids at a charter school here in Boston, and he says that his kids are often stress cases at 12 years old because of the expectations heaped on them by their parents.

It's great that your daughter has brains, but just be careful about making her live up to a label. That's all I was saying. My friend says that parents hear "gifted" and they lose all perspective.

This. I was apparently a 150... completeley alienated me from soceity. Took the military to find out that I wasn't actually hot ****.

gunns
02-03-2011, 07:28 PM
Ohhhhhhhhhhh gotcha. I completely agree.

I went through a similar thing when I was a kid in NY, and the expectations of having to exceed the work of every one else grew extremely frustrating to the point of flat out rebellion by 8th/9th grade.

Repeating the same mistakes with her was absolutely my primary concern. However, in this situation, she spends a day a week outside of her class working on advanced material in a very individualized setting.

That's what happened after testing with me and they wanted to start me in college courses...in 6th grade. It was great at first but my mother just kept expecting more and more till a full blown rebellion by me in 9th grade. I just wanted to be one of the other kids and have some fun. I don't believe my mom and my relationship was ever the same.

vancejohnson82
02-03-2011, 07:51 PM
wow....this board is full of really smart people

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 08:02 PM
wow....this board is full of really smart people

Frankly I'm stunned that every poster seems to be in the 99th percentile.

What a coincidence!

mkporter
02-03-2011, 08:05 PM
Frankly I'm stunned that every poster seems to be in the 99th percentile.

What a coincidence!

We're all better than average drivers, too. :yep:

TheReverend
02-03-2011, 08:08 PM
We're all better than average drivers, too. :yep:

With 11 inch penises.

Or is it peni?

Miss I.
02-03-2011, 10:22 PM
Rev,
Congrats on the smart and lovely young lady. I imagine when she hits her teen years you are going to be in a bit of trouble. Being pretty and smart is a dangerous thing for a daughter to be for the dad, because she's pretty enough to attract lots of stupid boys and smart enough to play em off dad if she is inclined to rebellion like you indicated you were. However, the good news is eventually they grow out of that and both my sister and I have really good relationship with dad now. Frankly, my dad is the only guy I know who gives me faith their might not be a total ass out there for me, though I suspect my guy is stuck under a rock somewhere, so he's obviously not a smart guy (either that or he's Wiley Coyote). ;D anyway, congrats.

Kaylore
02-04-2011, 05:30 AM
With 11 inch penises.

Or is it peni?

It should be peni but it isn't. That's always annoyed me.

Ray Finkle
02-04-2011, 06:17 AM
Congrats Rev,
As long as she is grounded you should be fine. You're pretty stable (save for the lobster loving) and have a level head. I have seen parents go over board on this and inflate the child's ego at an early age and it leads to issues later on.

worm
02-04-2011, 06:44 AM
No wonder the Mane can speak with such authority on every subject on Earth. We's really smart!

mkporter
02-04-2011, 06:55 AM
With 11 inch penises.

Or is it peni?

Easy does it man, there are ladies posting in this thread...



Their peni are probably only 8 inches or so.

Swedish Extrovert
02-04-2011, 04:44 PM
Frankly I'm stunned that every poster seems to be in the 99th percentile.

What a coincidence!

It's because smart people gravitate away from social life and into message forums.

Plus every kid is told they're smart.

ICON
02-04-2011, 08:08 PM
Congrats Rev.

I know how you feel Rev my kid was just tested by Gifted and Talented Education or GATE program.She took an IQ test with G.A.T.E she got great results, lets just say she is Above average intelligence.