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✡✡ JOSHUA ✡✡
01-28-2011, 11:19 AM
I was in my second grade class in El Paso, Texas and our teacher informed us the Challenger had exploded and its pieces fell into the Atlantic Ocean. She was very distraught and close to tears.

theAPAOps5
01-28-2011, 11:26 AM
I was in first grade in a private Christian school. We were saying a prayer for their safety as they took off and then it exploded. One of my earliest and most vivid memories from school.

SonOfLe-loLang
01-28-2011, 11:27 AM
Watching it in the cafeteria in elem school

bronco militia
01-28-2011, 11:31 AM
8th grade, English class.

the following year they changed the school name to Challenger Middle School

Peoples Champ
01-28-2011, 11:34 AM
I was in first grade in a private Christian school. We were saying a prayer for their safety as they took off and then it exploded. One of my earliest and most vivid memories from school.


I am a little younger, buy my most viid memory was the tragic columbine incedent. Worst time I can remember.

theAPAOps5
01-28-2011, 11:42 AM
I am a little younger, buy my most viid memory was the tragic columbine incedent. Worst time I can remember.

Yes that was another very bad time. I was a sophomore in College for that one up at CU. I was working the info booth in front of Folsom Field and it came on the radio.

I was friends with several kids who went to Columbine and knew some of the victims.

2KBack
01-28-2011, 11:47 AM
Sitting in class in Elementary school in Colorado Springs. It was either Pioneer Elementary or Explorer (thinking explorer) that actually built an entire memorial to the Challenger and Crew in the School.

Kaylore
01-28-2011, 11:47 AM
Kindergarten class, Mrs. Britt's class, Acres Green Elementary. She sat everyone down and told us what happened. She was a hot blond lady married to a football player but I can't remember who or for what team (not Broncos).

footstepsfrom#27
01-28-2011, 11:49 AM
I was waiting in the car for my wife to get off work and reading a computer magazine when it came over the car radio.

Popps
01-28-2011, 11:49 AM
I was in my second grade class in El Paso, Texas and our teacher informed us the Challenger had exploded and its pieces fell into the Atlantic Ocean. She was very distraught and close to tears.

Same for me. My science teacher was a wreck. Sad day.

Dedhed
01-28-2011, 11:49 AM
Watching live from my 3rd grade classroom.

PRBronco
01-28-2011, 11:54 AM
I was waiting in the car for my wife to get off work and reading a computer magazine when it came over the car radio.

<-- Interested that there were computer magazines in 1986.

Interesting topic, I'm gonna have to ask my Mom though, I would have been almost 3.

Baba Booey
01-28-2011, 11:57 AM
Not born yet - but my mom, a teacher, entered the contest to go on the Challenger.

BroncoFiend
01-28-2011, 11:57 AM
I was in my 4th grade class. Every one of the 4th grade teachers had entered to be the teacher who would be taken. Much of the theme that year centered around our teacher's wanting to go and the excitement of the event.

I remember so well, sitting in class being excited to hear about the launch, when another teacher, Mr. Kelly came in to tell us the news. He was a big scary teacher and the kids were all afraid of him. I remember thinking that anyone could cry if he could.

FantomForce
01-28-2011, 12:03 PM
I was in 3rd grade, and along with all of the other elementary kids sitting in the library watching the Challenger take off. Sudden gasps and an akward silence filled the room, never forget it

BleedingOrange
01-28-2011, 12:05 PM
I was in my chemistry class as a Junior. We were watching the launch because of McAuliffe being on the shuttle. Our teacher was so excited about it. A very sad day.

loborugger
01-28-2011, 12:07 PM
At High School, walking between classes when a friend came up and told me.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-28-2011, 12:11 PM
Third grade watching it live with my class. That was seriously f--ked up.

jhns
01-28-2011, 12:12 PM
I don't know. My best guess is either sleeping, pooping, or sucking on my moms boob.

bronco militia
01-28-2011, 12:22 PM
<-- Interested that there were computer magazines in 1986.

Interesting topic, I'm gonna have to ask my Mom though, I would have been almost 3.

I had a Commodore 64 ;D

Dedhed
01-28-2011, 12:24 PM
I don't know. My best guess is either sleeping, pooping, or sucking on my moms boob.

So not much has changed for you since then?

Dedhed
01-28-2011, 12:26 PM
I was in 3rd grade, and along with all of the other elementary kids sitting in the library watching the Challenger take off. Sudden gasps and an akward silence filled the room, never forget it

Exactly the same for me, but we were just watching with my class. I'll never forget my teaching just repeating "Oh my god, oh my god!"

Gort
01-28-2011, 12:27 PM
i was asleep. i had just worked the 3AM-6AM slot on my college's radio station and getting caught up on some z's. after i awoke, a friend of mine stopped by that afternoon and starting talking about it as if i must have already known about it. i didn't. he had to tell me. one of the astronauts was an alum from that school too, so it was a big deal there.

Pick Six
01-28-2011, 12:29 PM
I was a high school sophomore, and I was in the school library. They brought in a TV to watch the coverage. Those images will stay with me, forever. I had the same feeling during the Challenger disaster that I had for 9/11...:'(

Durango
01-28-2011, 12:35 PM
Sitting in a forestry class at CSU. A large class with stadium seating. A girl in front of me started crying and pretty soon the buzz in the room nearly drowned out the lecturer. Finally, a student just stood up and said the space shuttle had exploded after launch and all the crew had apparently been killed.

The professor became angry at the interruption, but he couldn't stop people from talking, so he cancelled class and stomped away from his lecture podium.

The next day, he sarcastically asked if everyone had worked through their emotions. Quite a few people became very angry at that and about half the students dropped the class, leaving about 30 people in a room that seated well over a hundred to finish the semester.

Pick Six
01-28-2011, 12:39 PM
Sitting in a forestry class at CSU. A large class with stadium seating. A girl in front of me started crying and pretty soon the buzz in the room nearly drowned out the lecturer. Finally, a student just stood up and said the space shuttle had exploded after launch and all the crew had apparently been killed.

The professor became angry at the interruption, but he couldn't stop people from talking, so he cancelled class and stomped away from his lecture podium.

The next day, he sarcastically asked if everyone had worked through their emotions. Quite a few people became very angry at that and about half the students dropped the class, leaving about 30 people in a room that seated well over a hundred to finish the semester.

Good grief. That's the definition of an elite snob who's stuck on himself. I don't blame students at all for dropping the class. I would've filed a complaint against the guy, for not recognizing a disaster that affected all of us...:thumbsdow

footstepsfrom#27
01-28-2011, 12:40 PM
<-- Interested that there were computer magazines in 1986.

Interesting topic, I'm gonna have to ask my Mom though, I would have been almost 3.
Well actually we just got fire and the wheel in '83 so yes I see how that would interest you...young feller. ;D :rofl: Remember the Mac hit the market in '85 or so. I remember Internet magazines on the shelves in '93 before a lot of people had even heard of the internet yet.

Gcver2ver3
01-28-2011, 12:48 PM
like many on here, we saw it live in my 5th grade class...

Town n Country elementry, teacher Ms Fruit...

it was a surreal moment...sad sad day...

Mile High Shack
01-28-2011, 12:49 PM
man I'm old

was in my 7th grade science class watching it

Quoydogs
01-28-2011, 12:50 PM
This one makes me feel bad. I was in the forth grade, I had walking Pneumonia at the time and was at home in bed. I remember my mom telling me before she left that they were launching the Space shuttle today and that would be something fun to watch while I was stuck in bed.

When it exploded I remembered I cheered and clapped my hands, I though that it was just the boosters coming off. I had no idea what had happened at the time.

Even though I understand I had no idea to what had happened I still feel horrible to the fact that I celebrated it.

broncosteven
01-28-2011, 12:51 PM
I was in the library at a small private Music college in downtown Chicago. The librarian was also the AV guy and he was a crazy jewish guy (I figured Joshua would appreciate that detail) who was always nervous and hyper about the TV and VCR being used.

I remember him rushing in this small library and not being able to setup the TV and then yelling at another freshman for touching his radio, then abandoing the TV, turning the radio on and listening to it on WBBM. It took him a while but he got the TV working.

They didn't cancel classes but a lot of people just left.

It was the saddest day that affected the most people I can remember in my life. I am sure Kennedy was a bigger national tradgey but that was before my time. I had to edit in that 9/11 was probablly worse. At the time, being the 1st major shocking event Challenger was my 1st experience with national tragedy.

TerrElway
01-28-2011, 12:51 PM
Ninth grade English class. They told us and all the guys were like "cool!" Then we saw it and it kind of sunk in that it wasn't really cool. It was sad.

broncosteven
01-28-2011, 12:57 PM
This one makes me feel bad. I was in the forth grade, I had walking Pneumonia at the time and was at home in bed. I remember my mom telling me before she left that they were launching the Space shuttle today and that would be something fun to watch while I was stuck in bed.

When it exploded I remembered I cheered and clapped my hands, I though that it was just the boosters coming off. I had no idea what had happened at the time.

Even though I understand I had no idea to what had happened I still feel horrible to the fact that I celebrated it.

If you watch the footage of the people in the bleachers I think someone asks "was that supposed to happen?" in the background. Very sad to watch a loved one die like that.

gunns
01-28-2011, 01:03 PM
I was 8 days away from delivering my youngest child. Two days before had watched the Chicago Bears demolish the Pats. Very interested in this one as it had the school teacher on it. Just felt so sorry for the families.

Miss I.
01-28-2011, 01:19 PM
Breaks my heart even now. I was sitting in my 7th grade Catholic school class in LA, when the principal came on the PA system and said this: "I have terrible news. The Space Shuttle Challenger just blew up." Then we were all walked out into the quad and watched the news showing it over and over and over again on TV. They left the tv on all day out there so people could see the news. There was a lot of crying, I remember a lot of crying and hugging. It was a sad day. When the Columbia exploded more recently, it made me go numb in the same way and just shut off a little. It makes me sad and remember that the people who go up into space are very brave, it is a great risk they take. I went to Kennedy Space Center 2 years ago to watch a Delta rocket launch, which was pretty cool but during the tour we got to see the Shuttle up close, walk underneath one being prepared for a lauch. It was just surreal to be near it, to be close enough to touch (obviously not doing so). Then we went over to a launch pad that had a memorial for other astronauts lost in the Apollo 1 launch in 1967 and it triggered my memories of the Challenger. That really has stayed with me.

broncosteven
01-28-2011, 01:27 PM
Breaks my heart even now. I was sitting in my 7th grade Catholic school class in LA, when the principal came on the PA system and said this: "I have terrible news. The Space Shuttle Challenger just blew up." Then we were all walked out into the quad and watched the news showing it over and over and over again on TV. They left the tv on all day out there so people could see the news. There was a lot of crying, I remember a lot of crying and hugging. It was a sad day. When the Columbia exploded more recently, it made me go numb in the same way and just shut off a little. It makes me sad and remember that the people who go up into space are very brave, it is a great risk they take. I went to Kennedy Space Center 2 years ago to watch a Delta rocket launch, which was pretty cool but during the tour we got to see the Shuttle up close, walk underneath one being prepared for a lauch. It was just surreal to be near it, to be close enough to touch (obviously not doing so). Then we went over to a launch pad that had a memorial for other astronauts lost in the Apollo 1 launch in 1967 and it triggered my memories of the Challenger. That really has stayed with me.

This is one of the reason's I am such a NASA geek. The project management of designing things that are that big and go that fast and the danger involved is just amazing to me.

broncocalijohn
01-28-2011, 01:29 PM
It was sophmore year and I believe I was watching it at home. I can only imagine all the little kids that watched it from school and had a horrible vision as a youngin. Sadly, Challenger jokes came in a few days later.

Goobzilla
01-28-2011, 01:34 PM
Home sick from school, junior year at Ranum. Sooooo many replays in the days and weeks following the event. Some of those Challenger jokes were pretty bad.

ghwk
01-28-2011, 01:42 PM
Grad school at CSU working on my Masters in Exercise Science. I watched it in my living room then went to school and told some of my profs. For the next few hours the campus got very quiet and somber.

The only other day where the "environment changed" and struck me like that was 911. Everyone was huddled around TV's at work trying to grasp the magnitude. Not seeing or hearing any planes in the sky for the next few days. I will always remember that.

loborugger
01-28-2011, 02:02 PM
Kinda changing the subject a bit - how many "where were you when X happened" events have their been in our lifetime? I am too young for Kennedy, but I understand from thats a big one. There was the Challenger... there was OJ... and 9/11.

Los Broncos
01-28-2011, 02:03 PM
I remember being in class not sure what grade I was in.

I was in total shock couldn't believe what I was seeing.

Gort
01-28-2011, 02:11 PM
Well actually we just got fire and the wheel in '83 so yes I see how that would interest you...young feller. ;D :rofl: Remember the Mac hit the market in '85 or so. I remember Internet magazines on the shelves in '93 before a lot of people had even heard of the internet yet.

everybody knows the Mac was introduced in 1984. everybody. the fact that you think it was 1985 means you should go hit yourself repeatedly in the head while standing in the corner muttering the name of Steve Jobs over and over and over again...

1984. the first Mac commercial ran during the superbowl. it was an ad inspired by George Orwell's 1984. the tagline was something like "1984 won't be like 1984". is any of this ringing any bells? it's probably the single most famous superbowl commercial ever.

Taco John
01-28-2011, 02:19 PM
I was in 5th grade and part of the Young Astronauts club at school, and we got a chance to watch the challenger lift off in the library with a little party. It was a, uh, blast...

Taco John
01-28-2011, 02:20 PM
Kinda changing the subject a bit - how many "where were you when X happened" events have their been in our lifetime? I am too young for Kennedy, but I understand from thats a big one. There was the Challenger... there was OJ... and 9/11.

Where were you when you found out Brittney Spears and Justin Timberlake broke up?

Kaylore
01-28-2011, 02:24 PM
Kinda changing the subject a bit - how many "where were you when X happened" events have their been in our lifetime? I am too young for Kennedy, but I understand from thats a big one. There was the Challenger... there was OJ... and 9/11.

Columbine, 9/11, Challenger, Dessert Storm, Afghanistan, SB XXXII, XXXIII

not so much on OJ.

BigPlayShay
01-28-2011, 02:24 PM
I remember watching it in school, but the more vivid memory was the school wide moment of silence we had on the blacktop. That was when I learned about the flag at half-mast.

bronco militia
01-28-2011, 02:26 PM
Where were you when you found out Brittney Spears and Justin Timberlake broke up?

at the Mane bitching about Brian Griese :thanku:

loborugger
01-28-2011, 02:49 PM
Columbine, 9/11, Challenger, Dessert Storm, Afghanistan, SB XXXII, XXXIII

not so much on OJ.

Columbine is bigger for you cuz you live in CO. I have no recollection of the event other than it happened. I was on active duty and away from TVs for Desert Storm. And the SBs are ez - parked in front of a TV in the living room.

Pick Six
01-28-2011, 03:22 PM
Columbine, 9/11, Challenger, Dessert Storm, Afghanistan, SB XXXII, XXXIII

not so much on OJ.

I absolutely remember where I was when the police chase happened, because it was just so bizarre. I was working at a truck weigh station, so I had a lot of time to listen to the radio (no TV, there)...

SouthStndJunkie
01-28-2011, 03:34 PM
I absolutely remember where I was when the police chase happened, because it was just so bizarre. I was working at a truck weigh station, so I had a lot of time to listen to the radio (no TV, there)...

I was at Dominic's Italian Restaurant feeding Long Island Ice Teas one after another to a married lady whose husband was away and remember watching the chase while getting smashed with her.

I went back to her apartment and parked my white bronco in her 3 door garage.

Lucky I didn't get OJ'ed myself leaving her place.

I wish I was 22 again....

Hogan11
01-28-2011, 03:35 PM
I was in 5th grade and part of the Young Astronauts club at school, and we got a chance to watch the challenger lift off in the library with a little party. It was a, uh, blast...

Man....that's just so wrong ;D

Bronco Yoda
01-28-2011, 03:48 PM
Man, I don't remember anything from High School dayze....It was all a haze.

Now the O.J. thing. I had a tv in my office in Irvine and rushed up to the roof just in time to look down and watch the whole thing (the slow white Bronco chase down 5) live go right by me. That was surreal.

elsid13
01-28-2011, 04:01 PM
Overseas in Germany, whole family was there watching the event because a teacher at our school was one of the finally groups of teachers that made the cut.

Archer81
01-28-2011, 04:40 PM
I was in 1st grade. They showed it on TV before lunch. We were living in Virginia then.


:Broncos:

srphoenix
01-28-2011, 04:48 PM
I dont think I was even alive for Challenger, there is an elementary school here in town that my wife went to thats named after the McAulife lady. Columbine wasn't even reported on at the schools in Wisconsin until after kids were all sent home for the day, probably to keep all us youngsters from freaking out. 9/11 is the only one I can vividly remember, was in health class freshman year of high school, the whole school shut down for the day and all we did was watch cnn. I knew global politics had changed after that and the middle east was going to take center stage for good.

gunns
01-28-2011, 04:53 PM
Columbine, 9/11, Challenger, Dessert Storm, Afghanistan, SB XXXII, XXXIII

not so much on OJ.

All of these had an effect on me and I remember where I was when they happened including OJ. 9/11 I stood with my mouth open and of course it had a lasting affect. The other was the assassinations of MLK and RFK.

But the 1st and in different ways most overwhelming for me was the assassination of JFK. I was in 4th grade and for an entire weekend I was an observer to the whole nation and my little world changing in ways I could often not comprehend. I saw my parents, grandparents, my teacher and other adults just devastated and by the end of the weekend I comprehended the importance of this man and that Caroline and John had lost their father and cried when John made his little salute.

Denver Crush
01-28-2011, 04:55 PM
Watching live in my 5th grade class @ Bradley Elementary in Denver.

Archer81
01-28-2011, 05:00 PM
Lets see...

Iran-Contra, Challenger explosion, Fall of the Berlin Wall, Collapse of the USSR, Gulf War, Monicagate, Us Spyplane crash in china, Colombine, 9/11, Afghanistan, Iraq...

World going crazy.

:Broncos:

broncolife
01-28-2011, 05:01 PM
I remember it being in Elementary and the teacher wheeling in the tv so we could watch it live.

FISH
01-28-2011, 05:02 PM
7th grade math class (1st period) Hyde Park Jr High Las Vegas, NV

chadta
01-28-2011, 05:16 PM
Columbine, 9/11, Challenger, Dessert Storm, Afghanistan, SB XXXII, XXXIII

not so much on OJ.

touch em all joe carter, (blue jays world series victory) and princess diana crash, i actually remember that one cuz i was out wiht a bunch of friends for somebody's birthday and cuz it was spaghetti wrestling night at the local strip joint

Tombstone RJ
01-28-2011, 05:30 PM
Kinda changing the subject a bit - how many "where were you when X happened" events have their been in our lifetime? I am too young for Kennedy, but I understand from thats a big one. There was the Challenger... there was OJ... and 9/11.

Three big events that all are kinda the same in magnitude for me are the Challenger Shuttle disaster, the Columbine High School tragedy and 911. I was in Colorado for all three events and they all felt similar in their effects on the general public. Columbine of course hit a little closer to home and the chaos that ensued was tangible. I can't believe it was 1986 when Challenger exploded, seems like yesterday in many ways... I was a freshman in HS and I just remember walking outside and looking up into the sky, it was a fantastic sunny Colorado day and I remember thinking "how can this happen on such a beautiful day?"

I went into the library which overlooked the front lawn of the school, others were gathering in the library foyer and we tried to get more news on the situation. The library felt amazing peaceful and the light shown in through the upper windows, we watched in silence as a senior captain of the football team walked out to the middle of the grass where the flag was flying and he looked up, then grabbed the rope and lowered the Stars and Stipes to half mast... other people were walking outside and everyone was just kinda numb, trying to absorb what had just happened....

Kid A
01-28-2011, 05:41 PM
Columbine, 9/11, Challenger, Dessert Storm, Afghanistan, SB XXXII, XXXIII

not so much on OJ.

I was pretty young, but I remember the OJ trial as this constant background buzz for weeks, everyone talking about it, every TV station in every restaurant following it. When the verdict was delivered the whole school watched it on TVs in the library. Followed by all the kids chanting "Guilty! Guilty!" through lunch and recess. Very surreal.

Didn't learn about Columbine until the day after, but that dominated school assemblies and conversations for weeks. OKC, Lewinsky scandal, 2000 Election (easy to forget just how bat**** crazy that month long ordeal was) also come to mind.

Archer81
01-28-2011, 05:45 PM
I was pretty young, but I remember the OJ trial as this constant background buzz for weeks, everyone talking about it, every TV station in every restaurant following it. When the verdict was delivered the whole school watched it on TVs in the library. Followed by all the kids chanting "Guilty! Guilty!" through lunch and recess. Very surreal.

Didn't learn about Columbine until the day after, but that dominated school assemblies and conversations for weeks. OKC, Lewinsky scandal, 2000 Election (easy to forget just how bat**** crazy that month long ordeal was) also come to mind.


I was in the 8th grade during the OJ trial and we were in NC off base. They read the verdict. Half of the class went nuts cheering because OJ was found not guilty. The other half just groaned in annoyance. Hunters Creek Middle School...what a hole.

:Broncos:

TDmvp
01-28-2011, 07:09 PM
3rd grade , our whole school was watching live and I actually raised my hand and asked if there was a way to get out if something went wrong like a ejector seats. (my dad owns planes and it made me wonder then if the shuttle was like a plane with ejectors)

The teacher sorta chuckled at my question and said no and the rest of the class kinda teased me for being the one who always had to ask something.

And then it happened as we all watched live , my whole school. One of those moment you realize as a child how quick life can change and be stolen away...

The whole school wrote a paragraph or a "story" thanking them and their families for their sacrifice and that we would never forget them and the best was send away to some sorta memorial and mine was chosen to be on a wall at a event the families attended.


I've always felt like that day was a moment that really changed / pushed me to grow up faster then some. As a child I always wondered if I didn't ask that question if it would have still happened , I knew it would have , but always wished different.

g00fyfoot
01-28-2011, 07:09 PM
Jr. High shop class. I was probably making a clock in the shape of a deer head or something. I was oblivious to the fact that the shuttle was going up that day until another shop teacher came into our class and announced it. I don't remember much of anything else. I think we watched the news in class for a while. I have some fascination about it, but never an emotional reaction, not even then.

footstepsfrom#27
01-28-2011, 07:41 PM
Top dozen most memorable events for me--

1) JFK- very very vaguely, only a dim memory of people crying, flags, etc
2) MLK- I was 9
3) Moon walk
4) Nixon resigns
5) Marine barracks bomed in Beruit
6) Reagan assasination attempt- I was in college
7) Challenger
8) Gulf war announcement, "Tonight, we are at war."...chilling
9) OJ
10) Alfred Murray Federal Building bombed in OKC
11) Columbine
12) 911

BleedingOrange
01-28-2011, 07:54 PM
I wonder why the Columbia disaster doesn't seem to be on anybody's list of where were you.

footstepsfrom#27
01-28-2011, 07:57 PM
I wonder why the Columbia disaster doesn't seem to be on anybody's list of where were you.
Hey right...I was at McDonalds, my wife called to tell me

How about John Lennon getting gunned down?

BleedingOrange
01-28-2011, 08:04 PM
I was in Utah watching tv when the news broke for Columbia. In Germany when Lennon was killed so I didn't hear about it until the next day after school.

broncosteven
01-28-2011, 08:09 PM
Top dozen most memorable events for me--

1) JFK- very very vaguely, only a dim memory of people crying, flags, etc
2) MLK- I was 9
3) Moon walk
4) Nixon resigns
5) Marine barracks bomed in Beruit
6) Reagan assasination attempt- I was in college
7) Challenger
8) Gulf war announcement, "Tonight, we are at war."...chilling
9) OJ
10) Alfred Murray Federal Building bombed in OKC
11) Columbine
12) 911

You forgot Apollo 13 (and 1 for that matter)

Kid A
01-28-2011, 08:11 PM
I wonder why the Columbia disaster doesn't seem to be on anybody's list of where were you.

Columbia was definitely a major news event and I won't soon forget seeing those initial images of debris falling through the atmosphere. But I think there are a lot of reasons it didn't strike the same chord as Challenger.

Primarily, NASA activity is not as big a cultural event as it used to be. Some of the novelty was still there with Challenger, whereas by 2003 we had become very accustomed to the idea. Add in that it was a Saturday morning, there was no special news story in addition to the flight (i.e. a civilian teach on board), and it was the re-entry (not the more covered and iconic launch), and you have a disaster that most weren't paying attention to until it happened. Whereas with Challenger everyone was following it in the weeks leading up to the tragedy. That played a big part in why it left such a powerful mark on people emotionally.

Another important thing, I think, is the images we remember. I wasn't around for Challenger, but the images of the explosion are striking and (I'm assuming) especially traumatic if you saw them live. Kind of like how I think what made 9/11 such a disturbing event for the entire nation was not just what it represented or the number of dead, but the horrifying images we saw all day on TV that were unlike anything anyone had ever seen. Images that made everyone say "holy ****" the second they saw them. Columbia had nothing like that. Just streaks of burning refuse slowly coming down. Haunting, but not nearly as visceral.

mkporter
01-28-2011, 08:14 PM
We watched it live on TV in my fourth grade class. My best friend and our 4th grade teacher won a contest to go see the launch live. He still gets interviewed by the local news every five years. I still remember the confusion over what had happened.

Mr Chatterboodamn
01-28-2011, 08:15 PM
i watched it blow up on punky brewster

broncosteven
01-28-2011, 08:36 PM
Columbia was definitely a major news event and I won't soon forget seeing those initial images of debris falling through the atmosphere. But I think there are a lot of reasons it didn't strike the same chord as Challenger.

Primarily, NASA activity is not as big a cultural event as it used to be. Some of the novelty was still there with Challenger, whereas by 2003 we had become very accustomed to the idea. Add in that it was a Saturday morning, there was no special news story in addition to the flight (i.e. a civilian teach on board), and it was the re-entry (not the more covered and iconic launch), and you have a disaster that most weren't paying attention to until it happened. Whereas with Challenger everyone was following it in the weeks leading up to the tragedy. That played a big part in why it left such a powerful mark on people emotionally.

Another important thing, I think, is the images we remember. I wasn't around for Challenger, but the images of the explosion are striking and (I'm assuming) especially traumatic if you saw them live. Kind of like how I think what made 9/11 such a disturbing event for the entire nation was not just what it represented or the number of dead, but the horrifying images we saw all day on TV that were unlike anything anyone had ever seen. Images that made everyone say "holy ****" the second they saw them. Columbia had nothing like that. Just streaks of burning refuse slowly coming down. Haunting, but not nearly as visceral.

The big reason Challenger was such a big shock was the hype about NASA flying the 1st Civilian and a teacher no less who was going to do some teaching from orbit.

Your right the launch was televised, the reentry wasn't but most reentry's aren't, the only one I remember seeing was when Crippen nailed the landing on Columbia's maiden voyage.

The sad thing about both disasters was there were people who couldn't get management to listen to their facts about the O-ring's being vunerable to freezing temps and the foam that was shed from the LOX tank on Columbia.

Garcia Bronco
01-28-2011, 08:43 PM
at home sick and I was in the 5th grade.

BleedingOrange
01-28-2011, 08:43 PM
That's a better answer then I expected Kid A. It's still major for me and more vivid then OJ, Desert Storm (I found out about being at war when trying to sign in at my next duty station in England), or the OKC bombing.

MABroncoFan
01-28-2011, 08:50 PM
Kindergarten class, Mrs. Britt's class, Acres Green Elementary. She sat everyone down and told us what happened. She was a hot blond lady married to a football player but I can't remember who or for what team (not Broncos).

James Britt of the Falcons?

BlueCrusher
01-28-2011, 10:18 PM
I don't know. My best guess is either sleeping, pooping, or sucking on my moms boob.

Can't multitask?

BroncosMT
01-28-2011, 10:47 PM
I was in my 6th Grade English Class watching it live....horrible...will never forget

footstepsfrom#27
01-28-2011, 11:23 PM
You forgot Apollo 13 (and 1 for that matter)
Yep...I don't remember hearing about those for some reason though. I forgot Jonestown too, which I vividly remember. I also don't remember hearing about the Manson killings but the Zodiac killer in the late '60's was driven home big time because I lived in the Bay Area and all us kids had to be in before dark with that going on. The Iranian hostage thing was another bad one, the rescue effort that failed.

gunns
01-29-2011, 06:46 AM
Yep...I don't remember hearing about those for some reason though. I forgot Jonestown too, which I vividly remember. I also don't remember hearing about the Manson killings but the Zodiac killer in the late '60's was driven home big time because I lived in the Bay Area and all us kids had to be in before dark with that going on. The Iranian hostage thing was another bad one, the rescue effort that failed.

Wow, forgot about the Manson killings. That was huge news because murders like that just didn't happen that much. It scared the hell out of me. But the one that put me in a funk for week from fright was the Texas Tower sniper in Austin. I was young and it scared the hell out of me that you could be walking down the street and be shot. I can't imagine what kids go through today with all the crap that happens. I think we've become numb.

Pony Boy
01-29-2011, 08:47 AM
I remember it well, I was just a pup working with Motorola Communications on an out of state project in New Orleans, you couldn't turn on a TV that week without seeing it.

Old Dude
01-29-2011, 09:04 AM
man I'm old

was in my 7th grade science class watching it

I was in the 7th grade when Chaffee, White & Grissom died in the Apollo 1 fire. Just heard about it. We had no TVs in the school. I guess I got used to the idea that being an astronaut was an extremely dangerous job and that deadly accidents happen.

So, to me, Challenger was a tragedy, but it wasn't really that shocking or unexpected and I honestly don't recall where I was or what I was doing when I heard about it.