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View Full Version : OT: Tip "To Go" Orders or No?


TheReverend
01-23-2011, 09:35 AM
So, this always confuses me. In a sense, it's practically like drive through, but in another, it's not really very different from sitting down and eating. And every time my card receipt comes up with the tip line, I feel obligated to leave something.

So... what's the proper etiquette, tip to go orders or no?

Dedhed
01-23-2011, 09:37 AM
5%

gyldenlove
01-23-2011, 09:39 AM
So, this always confuses me. In a sense, it's practically like drive through, but in another, it's not really very different from sitting down and eating. And every time my card receipt comes up with the tip line, I feel obligated to leave something.

So... what's the proper etiquette, tip to go orders or no?

I don't tip to go orders, you went and picked it up yourself and nobody had to serve you or laugh at your jokes even they are not funny.

RhymesayersDU
01-23-2011, 09:39 AM
As somebody who worked to-go orders once upon a time, I never expected a tip. I even had people ask "am I supposed to tip" and I'd usually respond "I wouldn't" to that question.

I never expected a tip, and I don't now when I get to-go orders.

DennisSmithHOF
01-23-2011, 09:41 AM
Heck to the no. I feel like I did all of the tip-worthy portion of the sale myself.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-23-2011, 09:44 AM
I'll tip these guys a buck in this setting. I don't know what the proper etiquette is in this scenario either. My feeling is that a tip is for people that provide service. I'm usually a 15-20% tipper here for good service when dining in. I quit eating fast food a couple of years ago, and Sonic was my favorite. There is no implicit tip there, but they always seemed pretty happy with a buck and the loose change. The to go orders have less service requirement than a car hop.

Crushaholic
01-23-2011, 09:47 AM
A lot of times, that's WHY I choose to order "to go". I don't feel the obligation to tip, in that case...

Goobzilla
01-23-2011, 09:50 AM
Proper, who knows? I don't tip on takeout but that's me. Too many friggin' tip jars in the world these days, it's ridiculous.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:51 AM
My favorite are the tip lines on places like Arby's. I make a good point to draw a nice fat line across there - maybe 2.

I don't tip much for buffets, I don't tip at sonic, and I don't do to go very often but I don't recall tipping there either.

I know I'm a prick though so I wouldn't base anything off my vote.

Gort
01-23-2011, 09:51 AM
I'll tip these guys a buck in this setting. I don't know what the proper etiquette is in this scenario either. My feeling is that a tip is for people that provide service. I'm usually a 15-20% tipper here for good service when dining in. I quit eating fast food a couple of years ago, and Sonic was my favorite. There is no implicit tip there, but they always seemed pretty happy with a buck and the loose change. The to go orders have less service requirement than a car hop.

here's my "rule"... workers who receive a reduced minimum wage because it's expected that they receive income from tips should be tipped. those who don't, shouldn't be tipped, unless they go above and beyond to provide some service to the customer, not part of their normal job description.

http://www.dol.gov/elaws/faq/esa/flsa/002.htm

my default tip is 20% and goes up or down depending on how well they provide their service. when you realize alot of waiters are treated as slave labor by restaurant owners to setup and breakdown a restaurant before and after service for $2.13 an hour, and then they have to tip out to the busboys and bartenders, one would have to be a cheap bastard not to default to 20% on the tip.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:57 AM
here's my "rule"... workers who receive a reduced minimum wage because it's expected that they receive income from tips should be tipped. those who don't, shouldn't be tipped, unless they go above and beyond to provide some service to the customer, not part of their normal job description.

http://www.dol.gov/elaws/faq/esa/flsa/002.htm

my default tip is 20% and goes up or down depending on how well they provide their service. when you realize alot of waiters are treated as slave labor by restaurant owners to setup and breakdown a restaurant before and after service for $2.13 an hour, and then they have to tip out to the busboys and bartenders, one would have to be a cheap bastard not to default to 20% on the tip.

A - I feel no pity for their situation. If they sold themselves into that slave labor, let them enjoy it. Unlike slave labor, though, they can go get a normal cubicle 9-5 like everyone else can if they choose.

B - There's a lot more opportunity for a waitress to F up than to go above and beyond. Too slow with the meal? F up. Bring my appetizer and immediately bring my meal? F up. Don't bring me a drink? F up. Bring me drinks every 5 mins? F up.

In all honesty, I tip extra if my kid makes a mess or if the waitress is particularly friendly. I'd say 25% is about my max though. The kid thing being the most important as I feel terrible when he does. Usually my tip is just 10-20% depending on what makes it a round number. If my bill is $51.64 or $53.99... I'm either going up to $60 or maybe $65 if I'm feeling generous.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:58 AM
Also, because we had a thread about this a few years ago and noone ever mentions it, I also try to keep in mind those states where the waitress gets paid full wages plus tips... I feel even less obligation there.

RhymesayersDU
01-23-2011, 09:59 AM
Obligatory "Reservoir Dogs" reference here:

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Z-qV9wVGb38" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:02 AM
Obligatory "Reservoir Dogs" reference here:

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="480" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/Z-qV9wVGb38" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

Wow... he sounds like such a prick when he says it but I totally agree.

I'll have to look this movie up. See what it's about.

Gort
01-23-2011, 10:03 AM
A - I feel no pity for their situation. If they sold themselves into that slave labor, let them enjoy it. Unlike slave labor, though, they can go get a normal cubicle 9-5 like everyone else can if they choose.

B - There's a lot more opportunity for a waitress to F up than to go above and beyond. Too slow with the meal? F up. Bring my appetizer and immediately bring my meal? F up. Don't bring me a drink? F up. Bring me drinks every 5 mins? F up.

In all honesty, I tip extra if my kid makes a mess or if the waitress is particularly friendly. I'd say 25% is about my max though. The kid thing being the most important as I feel terrible when he does. Usually my tip is just 10-20% depending on what makes it a round number. If my bill is $51.64 or $53.99... I'm either going up to $60 or maybe $65 if I'm feeling generous.

alot of waiters and waitresses are in college. some are single moms who can't get other jobs. unless you're talking about proper fine dining restaurants, most restaurants rely on the abundance of college-aged kids to keep their labor costs down. not many college kids can hold down a 9-5 job while going to school.

HAT
01-23-2011, 10:09 AM
I don't do tip jars or sign the tip line at places where you order from a counter.

But if you are calling in a take out order at an actual sit down restaurant then yes, you should tip 10% or so. A server or hostess still had to write the order, bag it all up with napkins & condiments, etc.

I get take-out alot from Island's where they even have "curbside to go" and you don't even have to get out of the car. They have a designated parking spot with a camera on it that they monitor from the bar. You just pull up and they bring your order out to you.

IMO:
Sit down 20%
Curbside take out 15%
Walk in take out 10%

tsiguy96
01-23-2011, 10:12 AM
i dont, i think its crazy that customers are relied upon to directly pay their employees wages.

gunns
01-23-2011, 10:12 AM
A - I feel no pity for their situation. If they sold themselves into that slave labor, let them enjoy it. Unlike slave labor, though, they can go get a normal cubicle 9-5 like everyone else can if they choose.

B - There's a lot more opportunity for a waitress to F up than to go above and beyond. Too slow with the meal? F up. Bring my appetizer and immediately bring my meal? F up. Don't bring me a drink? F up. Bring me drinks every 5 mins? F up.

In all honesty, I tip extra if my kid makes a mess or if the waitress is particularly friendly. I'd say 25% is about my max though. The kid thing being the most important as I feel terrible when he does. Usually my tip is just 10-20% depending on what makes it a round number. If my bill is $51.64 or $53.99... I'm either going up to $60 or maybe $65 if I'm feeling generous.

Agreed and might I add I do not want to wait for the check after I'm finished. The longer I wait the lower the tip goes. But I am a very generous tipper when I get good service.

As far as to go order, no I do not tip. I'm using my gas to go there and I'm supporting their business. The only people that have done any work there is the cook and the cashier and they generally are not paid minimum wage.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:13 AM
I don't do tip jars or sign the tip line at places where you order from a counter.

But if you are calling in a take out order at an actual sit down restaurant then yes, you should tip 10% or so. A server or hostess still had to write the order, bag it all up with napkins & condiments, etc.

I get take-out alot from Island's where they even have "curbside to go" and you don't even have to get out of the car. They have a designated parking spot with a camera on it that they monitor from the bar. You just pull up and they bring your order out to you.

IMO:
Sit down 20%
Curbside take out 15%
Walk in take out 10%

Walk in take out 10%? Curbside take out 15%? What makes that different from the drive through or going in at Burger King?

_Oro_
01-23-2011, 10:15 AM
Wow... he sounds like such a prick when he says it but I totally agree.

I'll have to look this movie up. See what it's about.

:notworthy

rbackfactory80
01-23-2011, 10:28 AM
Yes you always tip.

HAT
01-23-2011, 10:30 AM
Walk in take out 10%? Curbside take out 15%? What makes that different from the drive through or going in at Burger King?

Like I said...I'm not talking about so called 'fast casual' chains like Chipotle, Rubios or anywhere where you would normally be ordering from a counter. But for places like Chili's or Olive Garden, where full table service is the only other option, sure. Somebody is still doing the work and if it's a server than you are taking time away from their normal tables.

Dedhed
01-23-2011, 10:31 AM
i dont, i think its crazy that customers are relied upon to directly pay their employees wages.

You realize that every industry in the world relies on customers to pay the employees wages, right?

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:37 AM
Like I said...I'm not talking about so called 'fast casual' chains like Chipotle, Rubios or anywhere where you would normally be ordering from a counter. But for places like Chili's or Olive Garden, where full table service is the only other option, sure. Somebody is still doing the work and if it's a server than you are taking time away from their normal tables.

Ahh... I guess I always envisioned stuff like that was someone's job in particular. I don't know exactly how that works.

As a side note, do you guys tip more at places like Hooters or at a bar if the girl has her boobs on display? If I'm tipping for incentive, I feel the obligation to reward display as well. Thoughts?

peacepipe
01-23-2011, 10:37 AM
if I go to a restaurant then I'll leave a tip. if its a pizza parlor or burger joint then no. At a restaurant the bartender or waitress has to pay the busboy or barback based on what they sell,not what they are tipped. If they only get to go orders that don't tip they still have to pay those employees.

bombay
01-23-2011, 10:38 AM
I'll tip these guys a buck in this setting. I don't know what the proper etiquette is in this scenario either. My feeling is that a tip is for people that provide service. I'm usually a 15-20% tipper here for good service when dining in. I quit eating fast food a couple of years ago, and Sonic was my favorite. There is no implicit tip there, but they always seemed pretty happy with a buck and the loose change. The to go orders have less service requirement than a car hop.

Sonic pays their car servers, or carhops.. whatever.. as if they are tipped employees. Few customers realize that, so Sonic gets away with paying them $2 dollars and change per hour and they don't make much in tips.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:38 AM
You realize that every industry in the world relies on customers to pay the employees wages, right?

Anyone who tries to make this argument for the food industry makes me roll my eyes. I guarrantee you that the restaurant owners and waitresses would be the big losers if tipping were done away with and wages just rolled up into the bill. It'd be cheaper for the paying consumer.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:40 AM
Sonic pays their car servers, or carhops.. whatever.. as if they are tipped employees. Few customers realize that, so Sonic gets away with paying them $2 dollars and change per hour and they don't make much in tips.

And these people don't realize working at Sonic isn't worth their time?

People need to have standards in their life too. Not just leave the consumer with a sob story and an obligation. I refuse to tip Sonic because the only difference between there and McDonalds is a 15 foot walk.

tsiguy96
01-23-2011, 10:41 AM
You realize that every industry in the world relies on customers to pay the employees wages, right?

yes, thats why i said "directly" pay employees. you think the restaurants are lowering their prices because they got rid of an expense, or is it just an additional form of profit at the expense of the consumer?

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:43 AM
yes, thats why i said "directly" pay employees. you think the restaurants are lowering their prices because they got rid of an expense, or is it just an additional form of profit at the expense of the consumer?

Seven states pay their servers minimum wage. I've eaten in some of those states and never noticed a price difference. Owners are just taking advantage of making someone else cover their tab for work.

Cito Pelon
01-23-2011, 10:45 AM
I don't tip to go orders, you went and picked it up yourself and nobody had to serve you or laugh at your jokes even they are not funny.

They'll probably put a booger in your food next time. You better watch them like a hawk.

RhymesayersDU
01-23-2011, 10:46 AM
Sonic pays their car servers, or carhops.. whatever.. as if they are tipped employees. Few customers realize that, so Sonic gets away with paying them $2 dollars and change per hour and they don't make much in tips.

Yes and no... I don't know every state's law, but in New Mexico if an employee doesn't make enough in tips over a pay period, the employer is obligated to pay them enough to get them to minimum wage.

I'm not saying that it means people should tip less, but in situations like this, the servers are still getting minimum wage.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:47 AM
Yes and no... I don't know every state's law, but in New Mexico if an employee doesn't make enough in tips over a pay period, the employer is obligated to pay them enough to get them to minimum wage.

I'm not saying that it means people should tip less, but in situations like this, the servers are still getting minimum wage.

That's part of the federal law that allows them to pay tipped pay. Any time they don't get minimum wage, the employer has to make up the difference.

It all comes down to responsibility though. Rather than force the issue and make a stand, I'd say many probably don't take advantage of that scenario and just cry into their pillow about it.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:49 AM
They'll probably put a booger in your food next time. You better watch them like a hawk.

If you're going to a restaurant so often that they remember you (and you don't live in a small town where you know whether this is happening anyways), you need to learn to cook at home. I don't really have that worry. I just make sure they don't see what kind of tip they're getting until I'm headed out the door.

tsiguy96
01-23-2011, 10:49 AM
Seven states pay their servers minimum wage. I've eaten in some of those states and never noticed a price difference. Owners are just taking advantage of making someone else cover their tab for work.

exactly, especially in chain restaurants. but its one of those things that will never change.

peacepipe
01-23-2011, 10:49 AM
Yes and no... I don't know every state's law, but in New Mexico if an employee doesn't make enough in tips over a pay period, the employer is obligated to pay them enough to get them to minimum wage.

I'm not saying that it means people should tip less, but in situations like this, the servers are still getting minimum wage.

Waiters for the most part don't force that issue due to not wanting to lose there jobs or finding themselves in a situation where they're being forced to quit.

RhymesayersDU
01-23-2011, 10:52 AM
Waiters for the most part don't force that issue due to not wanting to lose there jobs or finding themselves in a situation where they're being forced to quit.

Then they're stupid... I mean, I understand losing your job is hard, but there is so much turnover in the restaurant business that you can easily find another job the next day.

And the thing is this; if you're not getting good tips at this place, why would you even want to stay?

peacepipe
01-23-2011, 10:54 AM
I waited tbls for almost 10 yrs,I learned early on to grab payment prior to a customer leaving.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:56 AM
Then they're stupid... I mean, I understand losing your job is hard, but there is so much turnover in the restaurant business that you can easily find another job the next day.

And the thing is this; if you're not getting good tips at this place, why would you even want to stay?

Exactly. It seems like the entire service industry is about pity and these people buy into their "poor poor me" scenario so much that they sacrifice their dignity for the tears. I wanted to confirm (so I didn't get an a-hole playing gotcha with me) and saw this as one of the first comment in an article:


Posted by: tabatha
I got one for you, what about when you work your butt off for $2.13 an hour and your check is only $50.00 a week if you worked 40 hours and you cant even cash it, not at the bank its from, or any check cashing in your town. Or what if the restaurant you work at is one of the biggest franchises internationally and you live off your tips. But this restaurant never has everything on the menu, and especially runs out of the basics everyday, so why then is it fair to get minimum wage when that in effect is what you will make as soon as you tell a customer Iím sorry we donít have that, and this happens everyday


Who the F would continue to work under those circumstances? Have some dignity and find another job. At very least, better yourself and know that you have to suck up the conditions just long enough to make it somewhere else. It seems serving is the endstate for too many.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-23-2011, 10:57 AM
Sonic pays their car servers, or carhops.. whatever.. as if they are tipped employees. Few customers realize that, so Sonic gets away with paying them $2 dollars and change per hour and they don't make much in tips.

They don't put a tip line on credit card slips. At least, they didn't when I used to eat there.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:57 AM
I waited tbls for almost 10 yrs,I learned early on to grab payment prior to a customer leaving.

And that's why I usually fill it out as I'm getting up from the table. Save the boogers for the guy who doesn't protect himself.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:58 AM
They don't put a tip line on credit card slips. At least, they didn't when I used to eat there.

They still don't. That's another reason it's awkward there when I used to go with a buddy that insisted on tipping them.

HAT
01-23-2011, 10:59 AM
Ahh... I guess I always envisioned stuff like that was someone's job in particular. I don't know exactly how that works.

As a side note, do you guys tip more at places like Hooters or at a bar if the girl has her boobs on display? If I'm tipping for incentive, I feel the obligation to reward display as well. Thoughts?

Hot chicks always get a few % more. :thumbsup:

Another thing to consider....Some full service restaurant servers tip out support staff. Granted there's no bartender or bus boy involved in a take out order but at some places, even line cooks & dishwashers get a small piece.

If I get a 14.50$ meal from say, Olive Garden, rounding up to 16$ is far from unreasonable for someone to take my phone order, deliver it to the kitchen or punch it in to the terminal, box my lasagna, salad & breadsticks separately, fill 3 small solo cups with dressing, fetch packets of parmesan & peppers, napkins, plastic ware, bag it and walk it up to the hostess counter.

Really, the only thing you are 'saving' them by getting take out vs. table service is a couple of drink refills.

Gort
01-23-2011, 10:59 AM
If you're going to a restaurant so often that they remember you (and you don't live in a small town where you know whether this is happening anyways), you need to learn to cook at home. I don't really have that worry. I just make sure they don't see what kind of tip they're getting until I'm headed out the door.

are you Scrooge? or maybe Louie De Palma?

Dr. Broncenstein
01-23-2011, 10:59 AM
They still don't. That's another reason it's awkward there when I used to go with a buddy that insisted on tipping them.

How is that awkward for you?

atomicbloke
01-23-2011, 11:01 AM
I tip 20% for to go orders from a proper restaurant, 25% for dine in, 15% for fast food drive through, and $3 + 20% for pizza delivery.

I like to tip generously because a few extra bucks won't really break the bank for me, but it makes a difference to the people receiving the tip.

And besides folks of my race are stereotyped to be terrible tippers, so I try to do my bit to break the stereotype.

Popps
01-23-2011, 11:02 AM
What kind of restaurant?

If you're talking a place you would normally go and sit down... then yes, a small tip is appropriate. (10% or less is fine.) Just because the item is picked up doesn't mean someone didn't have to take the order.... see it through, bag it, deal with payment, check for accuracy, etc.

Since employees in dine-in restaurants work mostly on tips, it's a decent thing to do.

Now, if you're in a coffee shop and someone has a tip jar on the counter, that's totally up to you. Even the kids at Robek's have a tip jar up front now. I'll pitch a buck in there now and again. Yes, they make an hourly... but I also remember being their age and working for THAT kind of hourly. A few extra bucks to split up at the end of the night can make a kid's night.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 11:03 AM
are you Scrooge? or maybe Louie De Palma?

It actually started because I noticed once you pay, you better get your own drink if you want another. I took my family out to dinner for my mom's birthday and in a backwoods Missouri joint, gave like a 35% tip on a $100+ meal (which is huge for me) and I did it the same way. It's not just so I can stiff them though that does come in handy.

It worked out great that night too because after I gave the biggest tip I ever have, I walked out and left my credit card. The waitress came running after my car as I started to pull away. She was awesome though so she deserved it.

Gort
01-23-2011, 11:03 AM
How is that awkward for you?

i think he means it's awkward because he's a cheap bastard who really just wants to grab the buck out of his buddy's hand and put it in his own pocket... i bet he makes his buddy pay him gas money too.

:thanku:

Gort
01-23-2011, 11:04 AM
I tip 20% for to go orders from a proper restaurant, 25% for dine in, 15% for fast food drive through, and $3 + 20% for pizza delivery.

I like to tip generously because a few extra bucks won't really break the bank for me, but it makes a difference to the people receiving the tip.

And besides folks of my race are stereotyped to be terrible tippers, so I try to do my bit to break the stereotype.

that's a good attitude to have.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 11:04 AM
How is that awkward for you?

It was just awkward trying to scrounge up something for a tip because I don't often have small bills on me. She wasn't even getting a 5 for a $6 sonic meal so while he insisted on tipping, the option for me was usually either pay with cash (which I only keep for rare occasions) or dig for change in my console. A couple ones vs 8 quarters are two different things.

COBronc78
01-23-2011, 11:04 AM
I work as a bartender/take out at a restaurant. I don't really expect tips on take-out orders, but I do appreciate them. When you're working a bar shift and taking care of people eating at the bar, constantly making drinks for the servers AND taking care of take-out orders at the same time it can be a lot of time and effort. I'm sure a lot of people don't realize that handling to-go orders and especially large catering orders can be a hard task. If I have someone order over $250 dollars worth of catering from me, I expect some sort of tip. I'm not asking for 20% but I expect atleast a couple of bucks for an order that large. Now if it's only a $25-$30 order then no, I don't expect a tip.

Something over $100 should have a tip included. Not the same as a sit-down tip, but still something. All these arguments that the "customer did all the work" isn't exactly true. Yes, you're not actually sitting down and getting all the service that comes with it but take-outs still take a good amount of work to get everything for the order.

It also matters what kind of restaurant you go to. Fast food? Hell no. If it's a normal "proper" establishment than yes you should tip something. Take-out orders can actually be harder for someone to put together than serving someone at a table. Just something I've noticed from my experiences in the industry.

RhymesayersDU
01-23-2011, 11:05 AM
As a side note, do you guys tip more at places like Hooters or at a bar if the girl has her boobs on display? If I'm tipping for incentive, I feel the obligation to reward display as well. Thoughts?

Well what's interesting about this question is what kind of service do you receive?

I ask because there's this bar/restaurant in Albuquerque that I've frequented in the past, has decent enough food and has like 50 or so beers on tap. On top of that, on weekend nights, they employ a stable of hot women wearing not much clothing. All good looking girls, big boobs short skirts etc.

Here's the problem: most of them are freaking airheads. The bar hires hot women, not good waitresses. The service at this place is so bad I barely go anymore. It's pretty routine to have very slow service whether they're busy or not. The waitresses for the most part are just really bad. The only reason I'll go now is just because of all the good stuff they have on tap.

So I guess to answer your question, no I don't really tip on appearance, at least not at this place because the service is usually terrible.

peacepipe
01-23-2011, 11:06 AM
I'd never work an olive garden or chilis. I worked high end restaurants where the avg person was in the $50+ per head range.

Dedhed
01-23-2011, 11:06 AM
Anyone who tries to make this argument for the food industry makes me roll my eyes. I guarrantee you that the restaurant owners and waitresses would be the big losers if tipping were done away with and wages just rolled up into the bill. It'd be cheaper for the paying consumer.

You clearly have no experience in the restaurant industry.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 11:07 AM
i think he means it's awkward because he's a cheap bastard who really just wants to grab the buck out of his buddy's hand and put it in his own pocket... i bet he makes his buddy pay him gas money too.

:thanku:

Oooh... I get it. I worded that poorly. We paid for our own meals and he always insisted I tip as well. Not caring to make a scene over a couple bucks I'd do it rather than argue the philosophy of tipping.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 11:09 AM
You clearly have no experience in the restaurant industry.

Again, I've lived in those states where workers got minimum wage + tips and I've lived in those states where it was $2~ + tips. Chain restaurants have almost no difference. How can some make it work but some can't?

Those who say the prices would go up substantially are undermined by the fact that it's already happening and doesn't.

Archer81
01-23-2011, 11:11 AM
I normally tip when I order food. Considering I live in a small town, the people you order from generally remember you and remember you tip and you tend to get extras because of it.

:Broncos:

gyldenlove
01-23-2011, 11:12 AM
It really depends on the place, usually when I order to go I do it online, so the order comes up already printed and they just have to put the food in boxes and and the boxes in a bag so I can get it when I get there, in that case I don't tip.

If it is a place I have to call in and especially if I order something special or customize my order, I tip because someone had to work for it.

Gort
01-23-2011, 11:13 AM
Oooh... I get it. I worded that poorly. We paid for our own meals and he always insisted I tip as well. Not caring to make a scene over a couple bucks I'd do it rather than argue the philosophy of tipping.

i am just kidding with you... but you seem dead set against tipping anyone anything.

here's the thing though. put yourself in that college kid's shoes. you go to a chain restaurant and run up a $50 or $60 bill. you were there for maybe an hour and a half or 2 hours. at the end of the night, if you leave $5 it's not going to put the college kid in the poor house. it's not a good tip, but it's something. however, if you leave him/her $15 then they'll remember you and it'll put a smile on their face. they'll probably even tell the other waiters to remember you because you left a good tip. so that extra $10 bought a) a smile for your waiter, and b) good will for you if they recognize you your next time. it's not that they expect that you'll always tip 30%, but that you did once let's them know you're not an a-hole, so if they see you again, they'll say "hi" even if somebody else is waiting on you that night.

COBronc78
01-23-2011, 11:15 AM
It really depends on the place, usually when I order to go I do it online, so the order comes up already printed and they just have to put the food in boxes and and the boxes in a bag so I can get it when I get there, in that case I don't tip.

If it is a place I have to call in and especially if I order something special or customize my order, I tip because someone had to work for it.

You realize it's more than that, right? Lot more work than just "putting the food in the bag". But I understand that this is most of peoples thinking, and thus I don't receive many tips on small orders. But if you order multiple items, especially if you modify the actual item and your order exceeds $100 you should atleast tip a few bucks.

HAT
01-23-2011, 11:15 AM
I'd never work an olive garden or chilis. I worked high end restaurants where the avg person was in the $50+ per head range.

Who the hell is getting take out from Ruth Chris or Morton's ???

Gort
01-23-2011, 11:15 AM
Again, I've lived in those states where workers got minimum wage + tips and I've lived in those states where it was $2~ + tips. Chain restaurants have almost no difference. How can some make it work but some can't?

Those who say the prices would go up substantially are undermined by the fact that it's already happening and doesn't.

it works because not everyone takes that attitude. in essence, they can tolerate a certain percentage of customers who don't tip so long as those who do, tip enough to make up for it. when that stops, then prices will go up.

basically, the rest of us are subsidizing your meal with our tips. :P

peacepipe
01-23-2011, 11:18 AM
Who the hell is getting take out from Ruth Chris or Morton's ???

you'd be surprised. doesn't happen much but it does happen. nobody get steak to go but some apps.,entree salads or pasta dishes.

tsiguy96
01-23-2011, 11:21 AM
one thing ive always found funny is tipping on % of bill. a ****ty little diner and a 30 dollar a plate restaurant have one major difference in terms of service to you: how much your meal costs. your server is working the same or harder at the small restaurant, but makes a total fraction of what the big one makes. sorta keeps money going at the top but keeps the people at teh bottom from getting a real income.

Dedhed
01-23-2011, 11:22 AM
Again, I've lived in those states where workers got minimum wage + tips and I've lived in those states where it was $2~ + tips. Chain restaurants have almost no difference. How can some make it work but some can't?

Those who say the prices would go up substantially are undermined by the fact that it's already happening and doesn't.
It's a very simple equation. Either the cost of food/goods goes up, or the quality of the product goes down. There are no two ways about it.

If a restaurant owner has to pay wait staff minimum wage, I guarantee you he'll have fewer wait staff on payroll. They might get away with it because they have good servers, but eventually they'll be understaffed on a night, and your experience will suffer because of it.

I guarantee you that owner will be paying less money to managers, chefs, etc. I guarantee you he'll be buying lower quality food if he keeps the prices the same. I guarantee you he'll push the boundaries on food that probably should be thrown out. If prices don't go up, the quality of the product will absolutely go down.

If a restaurant has 10 waiters who work 35 hours/week, you're talking about a $91,000 difference in a year. A restaurant with only has 10 waiters probably doesn't clear much more than that paying waiters $2.25/hour.

atomicbloke
01-23-2011, 11:29 AM
In countries like Finland, Sweden, Norway, tipping is strictly prohibited. That's because the waiters are paid a very decent salary in those countries.

Of course, as a customer, you have to pay through the nose for dining out in those countries, because restaurant dining is freaking expensive there.

Cito Pelon
01-23-2011, 11:32 AM
i think he means it's awkward because he's a cheap bastard who really just wants to grab the buck out of his buddy's hand and put it in his own pocket... i bet he makes his buddy pay him gas money too.

:thanku:

Sure seems that is the case . . .

I don't see a problem with rounding up into the tip jar if there is one. Throw a dollar bill in if rounding up is only like 12 cents. It's commonly known as having class.

HAT
01-23-2011, 11:43 AM
one thing ive always found funny is tipping on % of bill. a ****ty little diner and a 30 dollar a plate restaurant have one major difference in terms of service to you: how much your meal costs. your server is working the same or harder at the small restaurant, but makes a total fraction of what the big one makes. sorta keeps money going at the top but keeps the people at teh bottom from getting a real income.

And the mail room staffer works the same or harder than the marketing VP.

As with any industry, people need to work their way to the top. They are not being given a $100 tip on a $500 check for that nights service per se. They are being rewarded for probably a decade plus in the industry and the drive and impeccable service it took to get there. Those are career type servers and absolutely deserve more than some kid working his way through college while slinging burgers at Applebee's.

Cito Pelon
01-23-2011, 11:47 AM
In countries like Finland, Sweden, Norway, tipping is strictly prohibited. That's because the waiters are paid a very decent salary in those countries.

Of course, as a customer, you have to pay through the nose for dining out in those countries, because restaurant dining is freaking expensive there.

http://www.ccrainternational.com/tools/TippingGuidelines.htm

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 12:19 PM
i am just kidding with you... but you seem dead set against tipping anyone anything.

here's the thing though. put yourself in that college kid's shoes. you go to a chain restaurant and run up a $50 or $60 bill. you were there for maybe an hour and a half or 2 hours. at the end of the night, if you leave $5 it's not going to put the college kid in the poor house. it's not a good tip, but it's something. however, if you leave him/her $15 then they'll remember you and it'll put a smile on their face. they'll probably even tell the other waiters to remember you because you left a good tip. so that extra $10 bought a) a smile for your waiter, and b) good will for you if they recognize you your next time. it's not that they expect that you'll always tip 30%, but that you did once let's them know you're not an a-hole, so if they see you again, they'll say "hi" even if somebody else is waiting on you that night.

I agree I'm generally a prick. For that reason, I save everyone the hassle and try not to eat out too often. When I do eat out, I usually give in to societal pressures and tip halfway decently. I try to avoid ever getting under 10% unless it was really rough. Part of that is probably why I hate the concept so much.

There's so many tip jars and hands out these days (particularly if you ever get toward a vacation spot, holy crap!) that I find myself opting not to tip and then trying to justify why I MUST tip them rather than expecting to tip unless I have a good reason not to. We are what we are, I guess.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 12:23 PM
It's a very simple equation. Either the cost of food/goods goes up, or the quality of the product goes down. There are no two ways about it.

If a restaurant owner has to pay wait staff minimum wage, I guarantee you he'll have fewer wait staff on payroll. They might get away with it because they have good servers, but eventually they'll be understaffed on a night, and your experience will suffer because of it.

I guarantee you that owner will be paying less money to managers, chefs, etc. I guarantee you he'll be buying lower quality food if he keeps the prices the same. I guarantee you he'll push the boundaries on food that probably should be thrown out. If prices don't go up, the quality of the product will absolutely go down.

If a restaurant has 10 waiters who work 35 hours/week, you're talking about a $91,000 difference in a year. A restaurant with only has 10 waiters probably doesn't clear much more than that paying waiters $2.25/hour.

Well I can't really say any specifics, I don't know much about the industry and exactly how it works but I will say I'd would VERY MUCH rather they just incorporate the prices into the food and we roll on. Then we'd know what's expected right from the start. Unfortunately, everytime you suggest this concept (especially to anyone in the industry), they're always quick to throw out how they wouldn't have any incentive to try hard and quality of service would go down. I think that's indicative of the types that wind up in the service industry and just irritates the piss out of me. It seems service industry and politicians are the only jobs out there that you have to dangle money in their faces to get anything done.

maven
01-23-2011, 12:26 PM
I did all the work. Why would I tip? It's no different than ordering at Taco Bell.

tsiguy96
01-23-2011, 12:31 PM
And the mail room staffer works the same or harder than the marketing VP.

As with any industry, people need to work their way to the top. They are not being given a $100 tip on a $500 check for that nights service per se. They are being rewarded for probably a decade plus in the industry and the drive and impeccable service it took to get there. Those are career type servers and absolutely deserve more than some kid working his way through college while slinging burgers at Applebee's.

hey i agree, just saying, its not always black and white in that you work your way to the top. the top restaurants dont hire without experience, but its almost luck of the draw.

i live in south florida now, and i teach and make GA money, but **** if i can find a job doing pretty much ANYTHING. experience >>>>>>>> education down here. a degree doesnt matter, 10 years experience in a field does. makes it tough to get into a market like security at a bar, given my weekday schedule is almost tied up it limits the types of jobs i can get to night ones, and i cant get a job doing them.

COBronc78
01-23-2011, 12:31 PM
I did all the work. Why would I tip? It's no different than ordering at Taco Bell.

Hahahha, funniest thing I've read. You did not do all the work, the take out person did a lot more than you

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 12:33 PM
Oh, and another point I often make when having this discussion with people:

Which would provide you better service? The current standard or having your standard teenager in a seat next to your table waiting on only you. Or have a button on the table so he can hang out in the back and the instant you push it, he walks up? You could theoretically hire THAT person for minimum wage or $7-$8 per hour. If you're in and out in an hour (just about any chain joint, really), that's the equivalent of a tip on a $40 meal. Why are you then expected to tip even more when you get an occasional visit from someone doing 16 other things?

And for someone saying the job is more than that... I've been to, I believe, one restaurant where I had to have a meal explained to me and that was some super duper nice joint in the Disney place. They had placenta listed in a meal and I thought that sounded like the things that comes out of chicks when babies are born so I had that meal explained to me. Otherwise, my usual dining experience is order off the menu, they write it down, take it to the back, and bring me the food when it is done with a couple drink refills. How does that justify beyond minimum wage? Why is the service industry immune from the forces of labor?

maven
01-23-2011, 12:33 PM
Hahahha, funniest thing I've read. You did not do all the work, the take out person did a lot more than you

I did all the work. I went and picked up a to-go order. This is no different than ordering at a fast food joint. Therefor, no tip.

COBronc78
01-23-2011, 12:36 PM
I did all the work. I went and picked up a to-go order. This is no different than ordering at a fast food joint. Therefor, no tip.

You did not do all the work. Have you ever worked in the industry? All you did was walk in and pick it up. Take-out at a normal restaurant is more than just going to the expo line and grabbing your food to put in a bag. A lot more, especially when you juggle that duty with your other duties (bartending, serving other tables, helping guests). Not even close to a normal fast food joint.


I'm not saying anyone is required to tip, but it's laughable when people like you say you did all the work. Not even close.

Dedhed
01-23-2011, 12:37 PM
Well I can't really say any specifics, I don't know much about the industry and exactly how it works but I will say I'd would VERY MUCH rather they just incorporate the prices into the food and we roll on.You would rather that only because of your admitted ignorance.

Then we'd know what's expected right from the start. Unfortunately, everytime you suggest this concept (especially to anyone in the industry), they're always quick to throw out how they wouldn't have any incentive to try hard and quality of service would go down. I think that's indicative of the types that wind up in the service industry and just irritates the piss out of me.It has nothing to do with incentive, and everything to do with common business sense. It's not a difficult concept to understand. If you CHOOSE to go out to eat, you're paying for 3 things: 1-the food 2-Someone to cook it 3-Someone to serve it to you. If you don't know that from the start, and are blindsided by any of that, you need to get a clue. If you don't want to pay for that, stay home, cook your own food.

It seems service industry and politicians are the only jobs out there that you have to dangle money in their faces to get anything done.Are you serious with this? What are these industries where people want to work without the incentive of money, because I would love to employ free labor.

It's called capitalism, and without it, you're not in a country I want to live in.

You get what you pay for.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 12:38 PM
You did not do all the work. Have you ever worked in the industry? All you did was walk in and pick it up. Take-out at a normal restaurant is more than just going to the expo line and grabbing your food to put in a bag. A lot more, especially when you juggle that duty with your other duties (bartending, serving other tables, helping guests). Not even close to a normal fast food joint.


I'm not saying anyone is required to tip, but it's laughable when people like you say you did all the work. Not even close.

While I understand the point everyone is making, it sounds as if everyone is acting like fast food just gets pumped out of a machine as a taco/burger/etc and it gets bagged up and that's it. Food prep occurs in fast food as well. Neither are instantly magical exercises.

maven
01-23-2011, 12:39 PM
You did not do all the work. Have you ever worked in the industry? All you did was walk in and pick it up. Take-out at a normal restaurant is more than just going to the expo line and grabbing your food to put in a bag. A lot more, especially when you juggle that duty with your other duties (bartending, serving other tables, helping guests). Not even close to a normal fast food joint.


I'm not saying anyone is required to tip, but it's laughable when people like you say you did all the work. Not even close.

Yep, bussed and wait tables.

My point, in regarding a tip for a pickup order, is I think that's absurd and I do not tip.

Jay3
01-23-2011, 12:39 PM
No, I don't tip to go orders.

yerner
01-23-2011, 12:39 PM
Yes. Tip everyone if you can.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 12:40 PM
You would rather that only because of your admitted ignorance.

It has nothing to do with incentive, and everything to do with common business sense. It's not a difficult concept to understand. If you CHOOSE to go out to eat, you're paying for 3 things: 1-the food 2-Someone to cook it 3-Someone to serve it to you. If you don't know that from the start, and are blindsided by any of that, you need to get a clue. If you don't want to pay for that, stay home, cook your own food.

Are you serious with this? What are these industries where people want to work without the incentive of money, because I would love to employ free labor.

It's called capitalism, and without it, you're not in a country I want to live in.

You get what you pay for.

Everyone gets paid. The service industry are the only ones that will admit that if they didn't have to directly work for your individual tip, they wouldn't try as hard as they do. I've known more than one person to make such a claim.

COBronc78
01-23-2011, 12:41 PM
Yep, bussed and wait tables.

My point, in regarding a tip for a pickup order, is I think that's absurd and I do not tip.

So you're saying if you ordered a catering order from a restaurant that comes out to over $350 dollars (like I had yesterday), you won't tip the person who set up and accurately organized your entire order? The person who made sure your order was made on-time and made correctly with whatever modifications you make to the item? That is a lot more work than the average dine-in table.

Jay3
01-23-2011, 12:43 PM
When I tip, I'm tipping for table service, which typically includes:

1. I get to sit down right away.
2. Someone takes my order.
3. Someone brings me a drink while the food is coming.
4. Someone brings refills.
5. Someone brings the food.
6. Someone brings more stuff if I need it.
7. Someone clears the table.
8. (Ideallly) someone takes my money at the table and brings me change.

In other words, all the things that free me up to have social occasion with my guests and no hassle, never a need to slip up and wait in a line.

On a to go order, none of these things happen. In fact, I don't even occupy a table, allowing the wait-staff to maintain 100% tip occupancy at all of their tables.

No tip is the way to go.

Jay3
01-23-2011, 12:43 PM
Yes. Tip everyone if you can.

I'll take one, if you're giving them out willy-nilly.

Jay3
01-23-2011, 12:45 PM
So you're saying if you ordered a catering order from a restaurant that comes out to over $350 dollars (like I had yesterday), you won't tip the person who set up and accurately organized your entire order? The person who made sure your order was made on-time and made correctly with whatever modifications you make to the item? That is a lot more work than the average dine-in table.

That seems kind of like an extreme case. I might tip, but I wouldn't tip 15 to 20% like I would if a waiter had to deal with a huge group to run up that bill.

COBronc78
01-23-2011, 12:48 PM
That seems kind of like an extreme case. I might tip, but I wouldn't tip 15 to 20% like I would if a waiter had to deal with a huge group to run up that bill.

Yeah, 15-20% isn't expected. Like I said in an earlier post, I don't expect tips on a small order ($0-$60). But when it exceeds $100, a couple of bucks shouldn't be a big deal. You should never really tip 15-20% on takeout, I understand that. Really depends on your order and how much the bill is. Mostly because a larger order requires more time and work to get it setup when you also have other tables or guests to attend to at the same time. A small order shouldn't take too much time away from your other guests.

zdoor
01-23-2011, 12:49 PM
So, this always confuses me. In a sense, it's practically like drive through, but in another, it's not really very different from sitting down and eating. And every time my card receipt comes up with the tip line, I feel obligated to leave something.

So... what's the proper etiquette, tip to go orders or no?

I usually leave $5.00 for to go orders and 20% when eating out at a decent place.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 12:52 PM
So you're saying if you ordered a catering order from a restaurant that comes out to over $350 dollars (like I had yesterday), you won't tip the person who set up and accurately organized your entire order? The person who made sure your order was made on-time and made correctly with whatever modifications you make to the item? That is a lot more work than the average dine-in table.

There a tip is justified but just the same as a wedding planner or something else. It's not related to the food but the accuracy of planning and things that aren't incorporated with standard food service.

Los Broncos
01-23-2011, 03:00 PM
Eh, I tip a couple of bucks, cant hurt.

Ratboy
01-23-2011, 03:01 PM
I never tip on to go orders.

Jay3
01-23-2011, 03:07 PM
I've never appeared as the actor in a sentence that was about dealing with catered food.

brandishes man card

bombay
01-23-2011, 03:09 PM
And these people don't realize working at Sonic isn't worth their time?

People need to have standards in their life too. Not just leave the consumer with a sob story and an obligation. I refuse to tip Sonic because the only difference between there and McDonalds is a 15 foot walk.


I don't give a ****. Just pointing out what Sonic does.

Kaylore
01-23-2011, 04:51 PM
Tips or for the waiter's service. No waiter on to go order = no tip. The cook staff won't see a share anyway. I never tip for to go orders. Ever.

broncosteven
01-23-2011, 06:17 PM
I don't tip for to go orders where I come in and pick up my order. I will tip a couple dollars for curbside takeaway especially in the winter.

I have never been to sonic so I am not sure what the deal is there but if I had people bringing my food and taking it way and I never left the car I would tip something.

HAT
01-23-2011, 06:39 PM
When I tip, I'm tipping for table service, which typically includes:

1. I get to sit down right away.
2. Someone takes my order.
3. Someone brings me a drink while the food is coming.
4. Someone brings refills.
5. Someone brings the food.
6. Someone brings more stuff if I need it.
7. Someone clears the table.
8. (Ideallly) someone takes my money at the table and brings me change.

In other words, all the things that free me up to have social occasion with my guests and no hassle, never a need to slip up and wait in a line.

On a to go order, none of these things happen. In fact, I don't even occupy a table, allowing the wait-staff to maintain 100% tip occupancy at all of their tables.

No tip is the way to go.

1. I get to sit down right away. (Technically, you are 'served' faster with take out)

2. Someone takes my order. (Happens with take out)
3. Someone brings me a drink while the food is coming.
4. Someone brings refills.
5. Someone brings the food. (Happens with take out)
6. Someone brings more stuff if I need it. (A good take out order should include everything you need from the get go)
7. Someone clears the table. (Most people don't tip thinking any gets to the busboy)
8. (Ideallly) someone takes my money at the table and brings me change. (Happens with take out...Except for the table part, obviously)


As I stated earlier....**** places where you'd normally order from a counter anyway but with 'sit down' restaurants, the only thing you miss out on with take out as opposed to table service is drink refills.

Cheap bastards.

Jay3
01-23-2011, 06:50 PM
1. I get to sit down right away. (Technically, you are 'served' faster with take out)

2. Someone takes my order. (Happens with take out)
Someone walks over -- I don't have to wait in a line, I can sit down with my friends.
3. Someone brings me a drink while the food is coming.
4. Someone brings refills.
5. Someone brings the food. (Happens with take out)
Brings it over to my table where I'm sitting with my friends, not "brings from one place to another behind the counter.
6. Someone brings more stuff if I need it. (A good take out order should include everything you need from the get go)
That's the difference -- eating there and I need attendance and service. It's worth more.
7. Someone clears the table. (Most people don't tip thinking any gets to the busboy)
It's not always a separate busboy, and either way service was needed to get the table ready from one customer to the next -- I used up a table.
8. (Ideallly) someone takes my money at the table and brings me change. (Happens with take out...Except for the table part, obviously)
The table part was the key part -- you do the concept of walking, right? With table service, the waiter hoofs for all those things so I can sit and talk and drink.


As I stated earlier....**** places where you'd normally order from a counter anyway but with 'sit down' restaurants, the only thing you miss out on with take out as opposed to table service is drink refills.

Cheap bastards.

See answers in red -- you're being myopic. There's a reason they have to hire a bunch of wait-staff at a place with table service. All that hustling around.

kappys
01-23-2011, 06:50 PM
one thing ive always found funny is tipping on % of bill. a ****ty little diner and a 30 dollar a plate restaurant have one major difference in terms of service to you: how much your meal costs. your server is working the same or harder at the small restaurant, but makes a total fraction of what the big one makes. sorta keeps money going at the top but keeps the people at teh bottom from getting a real income.

The server is working harder but on multiple tables - hence multiple tips. At a nice restaurant I expect a very attentive servers with a reasonable number of tables - which is why the meals and tips cost more. If I don't get good service at a nice restaurant the waiter won't be seeing a decent tip. I tend to be much more forgiving at cheap places.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 07:41 PM
I went to an Ihop at about 10 AM on the 27th of December in St Louis and despite the well-known fact that everyone would be out of school and the place would be busy, there was almost an hour wait while half the tables were empty. They only had 3 or 4 waitresses and rather than have everyone getting angry at their server, they just made everyone wait and ran the place at half capacity. Again, that just tells me the mindset of those running the industry. They would've had the opportunity to reeeeeeaaalllllly bust their ass and clean up in tips but instead they wanted a few people at a moderate pace. Everytime we saw a waitress talking to someone or counting money or whatever the case may be, everyone that was waiting got a little more pissed.

In the end though, I couldn't find the right way to tell the place to F off and my waitress was nice enough so she got a decent tip despite having spent probably longer waiting than I did sitting. I sometimes think I should take to going on whitepages or whatever and leaving bad reviews for the entire restuarant rather than stiffing the waitress for a tip.

COBronc78
01-23-2011, 07:45 PM
I went to an Ihop at about 10 AM on the 27th of December in St Louis and despite the well-known fact that everyone would be out of school and the place would be busy, there was almost an hour wait while half the tables were empty. They only had 3 or 4 waitresses and rather than have everyone getting angry at their server, they just made everyone wait and ran the place at half capacity. Again, that just tells me the mindset of those running the industry. They would've had the opportunity to reeeeeeaaalllllly bust their ass and clean up in tips but instead they wanted a few people at a moderate pace. Everytime we saw a waitress talking to someone or counting money or whatever the case may be, everyone that was waiting got a little more pissed.

In the end though, I couldn't find the right way to tell the place to F off and my waitress was nice enough so she got a decent tip despite having spent probably longer waiting than I did sitting. I sometimes think I should take to going on whitepages or whatever and leaving bad reviews for the entire restuarant rather than stiffing the waitress for a tip.

That's one of the things I hate about many managers at restaurants. Our restaurant has gotten so concerned with the cost of labor the past few months they have been cutting hours like crazy. Therefore, on some nights we won't have enough servers and end up getting slammed by the dinner rush. I can handle 8-10 tables at once, but many servers can't so they'll tell the host to go on a "false wait" even though it's clear we have open tables. Annoys the hell out of me, and sadly pissed off customers will take it out on the servers (leaving crappy tips).

Just the life of a server. Most of the time, if something is wrong with the food or wait times the server will be punished in the form of tips. The kitchen will be slammed and food will take longer than usual to get to the table or a customer is forced to wait longer than expected to get a table and sadly customers will tip less because of that. Sucks, but it's reality.

HAT
01-23-2011, 07:49 PM
See answers in red -- you're being myopic. There's a reason they have to hire a bunch of wait-staff at a place with table service. All that hustling around.

Congrats bro....You've put together such a well thought out response that I've changed my mind on the subject completely.

The next time I get a $10 take out order at Chili's I'm totally gonna stiff whoever brings it to me at the door out of a dollar. I can't believe it never dawned on me before that I only need to do this 10 times (approximately 1 year) and I'll have enough to get a 'free' meal. Awesome.

HAT
01-23-2011, 08:04 PM
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Dedhed
01-23-2011, 08:14 PM
I went to an Ihop at about 10 AM on the 27th of December in St Louis and despite the well-known fact that everyone would be out of school and the place would be busy, there was almost an hour wait while half the tables were empty. They only had 3 or 4 waitresses and rather than have everyone getting angry at their server, they just made everyone wait and ran the place at half capacity. Again, that just tells me the mindset of those running the industry. They would've had the opportunity to reeeeeeaaalllllly bust their ass and clean up in tips but instead they wanted a few people at a moderate pace. Everytime we saw a waitress talking to someone or counting money or whatever the case may be, everyone that was waiting got a little more pissed.

In the end though, I couldn't find the right way to tell the place to F off and my waitress was nice enough so she got a decent tip despite having spent probably longer waiting than I did sitting. I sometimes think I should take to going on whitepages or whatever and leaving bad reviews for the entire restuarant rather than stiffing the waitress for a tip.
You're truly clueless.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 08:16 PM
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I actually know someone that happened to. Said they only had like 3 bucks left after a $50 meal and the guy chased them into the parking lot to give em the money back. They bought drinks with it and headed down the road.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 08:17 PM
You're truly clueless.

You aren't the first to tell me that. You're joining a big ol' club as just the newest member. Be nice, maybe they'll give you a free t-shirt.

bombay
01-23-2011, 08:21 PM
I actually know someone that happened to. Said they only had like 3 bucks left after a $50 meal and the guy chased them into the parking lot to give em the money back. They bought drinks with it and headed down the road.

Someone bought 'drinks' - that sounds multiple - with $3?

What country were they in?

broncocalijohn
01-23-2011, 08:22 PM
A lot of times, that's WHY I choose to order "to go". I don't feel the obligation to tip, in that case...

Exactly! I save money and I eat at my office or home with my tv. I never tip to go.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 08:23 PM
Someone bought 'drinks' - that sounds multiple - with $3?

What country were they in?

A couple sodas at a gas station....?

That really wasn't the point of the story...

bombay
01-23-2011, 08:24 PM
Hard to tell.

ColoradoDarin
01-28-2011, 01:28 PM
Rediclues to see a tip line on a credit card receipt today at the mall food court....

The gyro was good though.