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Doggcow
01-23-2011, 04:01 AM
I don't know tons about setting up a system, so I was hoping to pick someones brain that is more techy than I.

I will be gaming on my new rig. Probably gonna play SC2, D3 and probably some other RPGs like Dragon Age 2 or something.

I am on a buget, hoping to stay under about $700, but with potential to upgrade later if need be. I also like to go higher end, so I'm more satisfied with my investments.

This is what I was thinking of going with this from Newegg, is it all compatable, quality, and with my vid card choices?

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.569868

and then video card I was debating between these two.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161315
(very affordable, great reviews, cheap, I can Crossfire it later if I need more power, and it doesn't cost a lot)

or

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127512
(Bumps me a little over my buget... but the obviously far superior card)

Doggcow
01-23-2011, 04:03 AM
I also plan on hooking this computer up to my 50" G25, so I'm not going to get a monitor at this juncture.

And in the same vein, anyone recommend any specific wireless keyboards/mice?

extralife
01-23-2011, 04:37 AM
oh hey I accidentally closed the tab while responding!

long story short:

you have a problem with your priorities of processor vs. video card. if you want a gaming machine, the video card is far more important. you do not need or even want that six core processor. for one thing, if you want to spend $200 on a processor, an Intel Sandy Bridge model will straight murder that 6-core in any game (or anything else, really) you could care to name. You can get a cheaper processor from Intel or AMD that will outperform that one in games.

The first video card you linked will not be sufficient. If you are using a 50 inch monitor, you are going to be running games at a resolution of at leas 1900x1080. At those resolutions, even the second card, with it's limited 768mb of video RAM, is going to be problematic. You're going to need to spend more on the video card regardless of whether or not you go cheaper on the processor (and, again, you should pick a different processor whether you go cheaper or not).

That case is a luxury you cannot afford at that budget (particularly given the demands of your monitor). There's nothing wrong with something like <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042&cm_re=antec_300-_-11-129-042-_-Product">this</a>, for instance (though you may want to get additional/better fans).

extralife
01-23-2011, 04:41 AM
I would look to budget in <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125348&cm_re=radeon_6850-_-14-125-348-_-Product">this</a> particular video card at minimum and go from there. At $20 more than the 768MB 460, it will handily outperform it in any game, and it'll do it with slightly less power usage and slightly lower temperatures. With lots of overclocking headroom.

Ratboy
01-23-2011, 04:50 AM
Just head over to maximumpc.com.

They usually have a budget list. Just need to search for it.

Doggcow
01-23-2011, 04:52 AM
oh hey I accidentally closed the tab while responding!

long story short:

you have a problem with your priorities of processor vs. video card. if you want a gaming machine, the video card is far more important. you do not need or even want that six core processor. for one thing, if you want to spend $200 on a processor, an Intel Sandy Bridge model will straight murder that 6-core in any game (or anything else, really) you could care to name. You can get a cheaper processor from Intel or AMD that will outperform that one in games.

The first video card you linked will not be sufficient. If you are using a 50 inch monitor, you are going to be running games at a resolution of at leas 1900x1080. At those resolutions, even the second card, with it's limited 768mb of video RAM, is going to be problematic. You're going to need to spend more on the video card regardless of whether or not you go cheaper on the processor (and, again, you should pick a different processor whether you go cheaper or not).

That case is a luxury you cannot afford at that budget (particularly given the demands of your monitor). There's nothing wrong with something like <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042&cm_re=antec_300-_-11-129-042-_-Product">this</a>, for instance (though you may want to get additional/better fans).

The overclocking benchmarks for the 1075t were dominant from all the reviews I have read so far... this for instance http://www.overclockers.com/amd-phenom-ii-x6-1075t-review/

Ratboy
01-23-2011, 04:53 AM
If you want a budget pc, yet the capability to upgrade later. I'd spend a bit on a nicer motherboard. You can easily skimp out on a graphics card and get the lower end CPU for now.

I still have my 8800 gts in my i7 machine and run World of Warcraft on the highest settings (I guess not too hard).

Doggcow
01-23-2011, 04:56 AM
I would look to budget in <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125348&cm_re=radeon_6850-_-14-125-348-_-Product">this</a> particular video card at minimum and go from there. At $20 more than the 768MB 460, it will handily outperform it in any game, and it'll do it with slightly less power usage and slightly lower temperatures. With lots of overclocking headroom.

I was thinking I could double up my gpu's if I needed to. Why wouldn't that be an issue?

Hotwheelz
01-23-2011, 04:58 AM
DENVER FANS ARE IDIOTS! NO COACH WANTS US!

/Playad

Drek
01-23-2011, 06:43 AM
1. Hold off a little while if you can and wait for Nvidia's Geforce GTX 560's to drop. Could happen as soon as the end of the month. Supposed to be ~15-20% better than the 460 and enter the market at the same price point.

2. I completely agree with extralife's comments on the case and the CPU. AMDs are ok but Intel has been beasting on them for the better part of this decade and that doesn't look to stop any time soon. You're tying yourself to an AMD mobo because you've read that one chip OC's well. No matter how well it OC's its not going to hold up to you buying a newer model intel mobo and being able to upgrade through the years with a series of rock solid, top of the line chips. Also, a $120 case has no business in a "budget" CPU build.

Do you need a DVD/BRD drive in this? You haven't mentioned one. Are you going to cannibalize one from another system or buy one on the cheap, because if its the later a few extra dollars in that to bump DVD to BRD is a worthwhile investment for what will be a HTPC.

A few things I'd recommend to start with.

Case:
$45 Thermaltake black ATX case (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811133094)

PSU:
$80 700W PSU with additional 15% off coupon (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817553002)

CPU:
$195 i5 Sandy Bridge, lowest cost entry into the LGA 1555 socket line (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115074)

Mobo + RAM:
$270 for a quality MSI LGA 1555 mobo and 8GB of DDR3 1866 Corsair mem (2x4GB, so ready for more) (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.576629)

HDD:
$65 (after promo code) WD 1TB 6.0 GB/s HDD (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16822136767)

Disc Drive:
$50 LiteOn BD-Rom, only reads (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106325)

or

$110 LiteOn BD-R/BD-RE w/lightscribe, reads and writes CD, DVD, BDR (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16827106348)

I know that this runs ~$700 before a graphics card (only $650 if you pass on the disc drive) but its a FAR superior kit with MUCH greater future expansion possible and it focuses your money where it should be (the mobo, mem, etc., not the case).

Not to mention that having 8GB of 1866 mem instead of 4GB of 1600 and using a 6 GB/s HDD instead of a 3 GB/s would make a HUGE impact from day one. That is even before you'd turbo boost the i5 to 3.1 Ghz or OC the mem to 2133.

I would also personally grab two of the 1 TB HDDs and run them as a RAID stripe 0 pair. That would really fly. But then I'd also personally throw an 80-120 GB SSD in there for my Windows partition and I offload all media to my home network so the 2 TB RAID 0 setup would be focused almost exclusively on crushing Steam.

Killericon
01-23-2011, 10:42 AM
If you want a budget pc, yet the capability to upgrade later. I'd spend a bit on a nicer motherboard. You can easily skimp out on a graphics card and get the lower end CPU for now.

I still have my 8800 gts in my i7 machine and run World of Warcraft on the highest settings (I guess not too hard).

Yeah, you can run WoW on a netbook(and a goddamned PSP (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OikanSeKsg0)).

You say 'upgrade'....What do you have right now? No need to get a new case or PSU if you have a decent one already.

As far as general upgrades go, the best piece of hardware in my rig(Which I love dearly) in terms of the performance boost it's responsible for is my SSD. It's outstanding.

Of course, if you're starting from scratch that's a different story. If you're going barebones for now, with the option of improving later, I agree with Ratboy, get a good Mobo for now, worry about graphics card and the CPU later. Honestly, it's hard for me to see the difference between the mid and high end CPUs at the moment. Maybe later, but the current crop of games just aren't pushing the boundaries yet. D3 probably won't either.

Don't even think about going SLI/Crossfire. Get one card, and if you need to go dual cards later on then you can, but I have one card(Radeon 5850), and there's no game I can't run on full settings at present, plus I have the option of upgrading my rig by getting another one. If you get 2 mid-low range cards, then you need to toss both of them to upgrade.

Ram is dirt cheap, so don't even concern yourself with that.

For me, personally, if you're serious about the upgrading later thing, invest in a good case. I have a Silverstone Fortress, and even though it cost $300, it's one of the best purchases I've ever made. No dust, the back is on the top, there's TONS of room, it's tidy, I can change out the CPU/CPU cooler without removing the Mobo...It's great. Don't skimp out on the case if you're serious about upgrading later.

Also, don't even bother getting a disc drive. You can install windows from a USB stick, and you can download all your games(I don't think there is a game you can't buy online right now). Steal the one from your old rig if you must, as I did, but it's not worth more money.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-23-2011, 11:12 AM
Tigerdirect is where I buy my PC components. There are always some really good deals there, especially if you buy the stuff that is about 6 months behind the state of the art. Building your own PC is fun, and you'll get about twice the performance for half the price of a name brand.

extralife
01-23-2011, 12:54 PM
The overclocking benchmarks for the 1075t were dominant from all the reviews I have read so far... this for instance http://www.overclockers.com/amd-phenom-ii-x6-1075t-review/

That's a rather suspect testing suite. For instance, I could link <a href="http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/sandy-bridge-core-i7-2600k-core-i5-2500k,2833.html">this</a> which shows all the new Intel chips beating a better version of that six core in pretty much every benchmark. But even before those, the 15 750 was the undisputed king at that price range. The motherboard socket is also a factor, as someone else said. Intel is rather fond of swapping sockets a little too often, but the AMD AM3 socket is at the end of its lifespan. If you go with that chip you will not be able to upgrade your processor without buying a new motherboard in the future.

As far as going dual GPU with SLI or Crossfire: it depends. I would not recommend it for you with that monitor and either of those cards because the memory limits are not doubled in dual GPU configurations. As far as video memory is concerned, there is no difference between 1 460 card and 2 460 cards. Keep in mind that SLI/Crossfire do not scale perfectly either. 2 cards are never twice as good as 1.

But the resolution of your monitor is the biggest factor here. if it is 1900x1080 you probably want a card with 1 gig of RAM. if it is higher than that you absolutely require a gig or more or you will suffer very noticeable frame rate hits in any game that requires reasonable graphic muscle.

If you are building this machine primarily with gaming in mind or even with gaming as a strong factor, I would eliminate that first card out of hand. The video card is the most important part of your PC for gaming and your budget should reflect that.

edit: also you should not budget a CPU with extreme overclock numbers in mind, especially if you don't have a lot of experience overclocking. that processor you linked is not a black edition, which means overclocking is slightly complicated and depends heavily on your motherboard and your RAM. also if you plan on doing any significant overclocking you are going to need a third party CPU cooler because the stock ones simply won't get the job done (though stock AMD coolers are noticeably better than stock Intel ones).

briane
01-23-2011, 01:04 PM
oh hey I accidentally closed the tab while responding!

long story short:

you have a problem with your priorities of processor vs. video card. if you want a gaming machine, the video card is far more important. you do not need or even want that six core processor. for one thing, if you want to spend $200 on a processor, an Intel Sandy Bridge model will straight murder that 6-core in any game (or anything else, really) you could care to name. You can get a cheaper processor from Intel or AMD that will outperform that one in games.

The first video card you linked will not be sufficient. If you are using a 50 inch monitor, you are going to be running games at a resolution of at leas 1900x1080. At those resolutions, even the second card, with it's limited 768mb of video RAM, is going to be problematic. You're going to need to spend more on the video card regardless of whether or not you go cheaper on the processor (and, again, you should pick a different processor whether you go cheaper or not).

That case is a luxury you cannot afford at that budget (particularly given the demands of your monitor). There's nothing wrong with something like <a href="http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129042&cm_re=antec_300-_-11-129-042-_-Product">this</a>, for instance (though you may want to get additional/better fans).


agreed....well said

Doggcow
01-23-2011, 07:16 PM
That's a rather suspect testing suite. For instance, I could link <a href="http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/sandy-bridge-core-i7-2600k-core-i5-2500k,2833.html">this</a> which shows all the new Intel chips beating a better version of that six core in pretty much every benchmark. But even before those, the 15 750 was the undisputed king at that price range. The motherboard socket is also a factor, as someone else said. Intel is rather fond of swapping sockets a little too often, but the AMD AM3 socket is at the end of its lifespan. If you go with that chip you will not be able to upgrade your processor without buying a new motherboard in the future.

As far as going dual GPU with SLI or Crossfire: it depends. I would not recommend it for you with that monitor and either of those cards because the memory limits are not doubled in dual GPU configurations. As far as video memory is concerned, there is no difference between 1 460 card and 2 460 cards. Keep in mind that SLI/Crossfire do not scale perfectly either. 2 cards are never twice as good as 1.

But the resolution of your monitor is the biggest factor here. if it is 1900x1080 you probably want a card with 1 gig of RAM. if it is higher than that you absolutely require a gig or more or you will suffer very noticeable frame rate hits in any game that requires reasonable graphic muscle.

If you are building this machine primarily with gaming in mind or even with gaming as a strong factor, I would eliminate that first card out of hand. The video card is the most important part of your PC for gaming and your budget should reflect that.

edit: also you should not budget a CPU with extreme overclock numbers in mind, especially if you don't have a lot of experience overclocking. that processor you linked is not a black edition, which means overclocking is slightly complicated and depends heavily on your motherboard and your RAM. also if you plan on doing any significant overclocking you are going to need a third party CPU cooler because the stock ones simply won't get the job done (though stock AMD coolers are noticeably better than stock Intel ones).

Ok so should I go with Drek's computer and your Video card? In the future Ill probably upgrade both the processor and gpu, and turn my current setup into a an alternate PC.

Drek
01-23-2011, 07:36 PM
Ok so should I go with Drek's computer and your Video card? In the future Ill probably upgrade both the processor and gpu, and turn my current setup into a an alternate PC.

If you want to upgrade the CPU, GPU, etc. down the road then look towards things like what I recommended.

I'm not saying get those exact items straight from New Egg, just think along those lines.

Concentrate your money in the parts that can last through several updates, like the power supply, mobo, etc..

Here's examples as to why the setup I'd suggested works well:

1. the mobo uses the new 1155 chipset Intel rolled out with Sandy Bridge, so you know its going to be getting new front end chips for at least another year or two. You'll therefore have options to upgrade into that aren't even on the market yet.

2. It sets you up with a solid 700W power supply that is SLI and Crossfire compatible. That coupled with the mobo (also SLI/Crossfire compatible) lets you go that route as a GPU upgrade instead of just buying a whole new card for less bang:buck.

3. You'll start with a serious amount of ram, but better yet it runs at the peak clock speed your mobo will allow and comes in 2x4G sticks, meaning its about as big a stick as you'll be buying for the system period. So when you want more mem you're just adding sticks. If you get mem that runs at a lower clock than the max your mobo can support its entirely possible in a couple years you'll upgrade your memory and end up discarding those old sticks because memory only runs as fast as the slowest clock rate stick plugged in. I.e. if you have a 1600 stick plugged in and buy some 1866 to add to it you'll see everything just run at 1600, making the new ram run at less than peak performance.

4. Keep a mobo with RAID features in mind. I'll reiterate the fact that the mobo I pointed out offers not just 6.0 GB/s SATA speeds (awesome for even a single drive) but it can also run a RAID over the two 6.0 GB/s SATA ports. That means when/if you want more storage you can go the route of adding a new 6.0 GB/s compatible HDD (aim for same exact brand and if possible model as the previous one) and see the whole deal run smooth as butter over a RAID 0.

GPUs and CPUs turn over quickly. The core technologies on your mobo, PSU, ram, and HDDs see longer life cycles. Set yourself up so that those four aspects will stick around, maybe add to them like ram or HDD but still using the original purchase, and then you can swap out CPUs and GPUs as the market dictates.

broncosteven
01-23-2011, 07:36 PM
I would go I5 with the ASUS P7p55d board

Get the fastest best RAM you can afford.

Get the best Video card you can afford.

I would get a case that you can water cool with.

Search via buy.com, they search all the above listed sites, newegg and tiger among others.

Make sure you pop for 64 bit Win7 or your not getting the most out of your hardware.

Buy at least 4 gig of ram, I would consider 8 gig if you can afford it.

Buy at least 1 extra case fan for cooling the video card.

Make sure your Power supply can handle the extra voltage of the gear your going to throw at it.

Make sure your HD spins at 7500 or 10k or consider going solid state, the faster the drive spins the better.

I built an I5 system last year, I have never experienced such a great jump from one system to another. I can't bog it down.

Bob's your Information Minister
01-23-2011, 07:54 PM
Get the 460.

gyldenlove
01-23-2011, 09:15 PM
If you want to upgrade the CPU, GPU, etc. down the road then look towards things like what I recommended.

I'm not saying get those exact items straight from New Egg, just think along those lines.

Concentrate your money in the parts that can last through several updates, like the power supply, mobo, etc..

Here's examples as to why the setup I'd suggested works well:

1. the mobo uses the new 1155 chipset Intel rolled out with Sandy Bridge, so you know its going to be getting new front end chips for at least another year or two. You'll therefore have options to upgrade into that aren't even on the market yet.

2. It sets you up with a solid 700W power supply that is SLI and Crossfire compatible. That coupled with the mobo (also SLI/Crossfire compatible) lets you go that route as a GPU upgrade instead of just buying a whole new card for less bang:buck.

3. You'll start with a serious amount of ram, but better yet it runs at the peak clock speed your mobo will allow and comes in 2x4G sticks, meaning its about as big a stick as you'll be buying for the system period. So when you want more mem you're just adding sticks. If you get mem that runs at a lower clock than the max your mobo can support its entirely possible in a couple years you'll upgrade your memory and end up discarding those old sticks because memory only runs as fast as the slowest clock rate stick plugged in. I.e. if you have a 1600 stick plugged in and buy some 1866 to add to it you'll see everything just run at 1600, making the new ram run at less than peak performance.

4. Keep a mobo with RAID features in mind. I'll reiterate the fact that the mobo I pointed out offers not just 6.0 GB/s SATA speeds (awesome for even a single drive) but it can also run a RAID over the two 6.0 GB/s SATA ports. That means when/if you want more storage you can go the route of adding a new 6.0 GB/s compatible HDD (aim for same exact brand and if possible model as the previous one) and see the whole deal run smooth as butter over a RAID 0.

GPUs and CPUs turn over quickly. The core technologies on your mobo, PSU, ram, and HDDs see longer life cycles. Set yourself up so that those four aspects will stick around, maybe add to them like ram or HDD but still using the original purchase, and then you can swap out CPUs and GPUs as the market dictates.

I Agree with this, I am running the same HDD, PSU and case that I did on previous box, upgraded MOBO, ram, CPU and GPU, later added a 2nd GPU.

Depending what games you want to play, getting a good CPU is highly underrated, if you want to pull the next far cry game, then yeah splash on GPU, but for many current games you are going to be limited by the hardware that is in an XBOX 360 or PS3 neither of which is good compared to a good gaming box. A better CPU will decrease load times and inrease reliability, overclocking especially if you are going to game heavily is only as good as your cooling and if you are looking to save money then don't overclock because a stock fan won't handle it.

Your graphics card should largely be determined by your MOBO - CPU combo, get ATI if you are leaning towards AMD, and get nvidia if you are going intel.

Doggcow
01-23-2011, 10:28 PM
I'm at about $810

Went with Drek's suggestion. Extra's gfx card, and an i5 2500k.

What do you all think?

floats
01-24-2011, 12:05 AM
I just built two Sandy Bridge systems in the last week, one for my friend and one for myself. He went with an i7-2600k and a few other splurges. I went with an i5-2500K (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115072), ASUS P8P67 PRO motherboard (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131682&cm_re=Asus_P8P67_Pro-_-13-131-682-_-Product), 8 GB of Corsair RAM (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145315) and an Asus EAH6860 video card (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121419&cm_re=EAH6850-_-14-121-419-_-Product). He gave me an 850 watt power supply and I already had an HD and DVD burner from a previous system. I went with the Scythe Mugen-2 heatsink (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835185142) as the stock one is rather puny. If you live near a Micro Center, they have some nice in-store only deals on i5/i7 combos (http://www.microcenter.com/specials/email/CPlanding0121.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=E0978%20Computer%20Parts%2020110121&utm_source=ACT_BYO&). BTW, I've got my i5-2500k (stock 3.3 GHz) running at 4.7 GHz with my case (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129043&cm_re=antec_twelve_hundred-_-11-129-043-_-Product) fans running on low. Granted, it's got three 120 mm fans in the front, two 120 mm fans in the rear and a 200 mm fan up top. I would have went with a much smaller and tamer looking case like the Antec Three Hundred mentioned earlier in this thread, but the power supply my friend gave me only fits in a handful of cases. I think Antec Twelve Hundred is a bit ridiculous, but it'll be sitting underneath my desk and with all the fans on low, it's actually pretty quiet.

Note that the Sandy Bridge i5s and i7s have integrated video on the chip and, as such, don't respond as well to overclocking of the bus. That's where the i5-2500k and i7-2600k show their value, as their multipliers are unlocked. I'd skip Drek's recommendation of the i5-2400 and go straight to the i5-2500K. You'd spend $30 more, but you don't need the faster memory he recommended. Oh, both the video card and memory I have listed each have $20 mail in rebates, so you'll save even more there.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 12:49 AM
I just built two Sandy Bridge systems in the last week, one for my friend and one for myself. He went with an i7-2600k and a few other splurges. I went with an i5-2500K (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115072), ASUS P8P67 PRO motherboard (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131682&cm_re=Asus_P8P67_Pro-_-13-131-682-_-Product), 8 GB of Corsair RAM (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820145315) and an Asus EAH6860 video card (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814121419&cm_re=EAH6850-_-14-121-419-_-Product). He gave me an 850 watt power supply and I already had an HD and DVD burner from a previous system. I went with the Scythe Mugen-2 heatsink (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835185142) as the stock one is rather puny. If you live near a Micro Center, they have some nice in-store only deals on i5/i7 combos (http://www.microcenter.com/specials/email/CPlanding0121.html?utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=E0978%20Computer%20Parts%2020110121&utm_source=ACT_BYO&). BTW, I've got my i5-2500k (stock 3.3 GHz) running at 4.7 GHz with my case (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811129043&cm_re=antec_twelve_hundred-_-11-129-043-_-Product) fans running on low. Granted, it's got three 120 mm fans in the front, two 120 mm fans in the rear and a 200 mm fan up top. I would have went with a much smaller and tamer looking case like the Antec Three Hundred mentioned earlier in this thread, but the power supply my friend gave me only fits in a handful of cases. I think Antec Twelve Hundred is a bit ridiculous, but it'll be sitting underneath my desk and with all the fans on low, it's actually pretty quiet.

Note that the Sandy Bridge i5s and i7s have integrated video on the chip and, as such, don't respond as well to overclocking of the bus. That's where the i5-2500k and i7-2600k show their value, as their multipliers are unlocked. I'd skip Drek's recommendation of the i5-2400 and go straight to the i5-2500K. You'd spend $30 more, but you don't need the faster memory he recommended. Oh, both the video card and memory I have listed each have $20 mail in rebates, so you'll save even more there.

I was going i5 2500k. I think I like his mobo potential, and I'm fine with splurging on the ram right now as I just found out I'm getting a little bonus funding (graduation money!). So I'm at around 800 with everything and fairly happy with the rig.

Btw, will anyone be playing Rift? I'm looking to try it, and some D3 later.

Drek
01-24-2011, 04:20 AM
Note that the Sandy Bridge i5s and i7s have integrated video on the chip and, as such, don't respond as well to overclocking of the bus. That's where the i5-2500k and i7-2600k show their value, as their multipliers are unlocked. I'd skip Drek's recommendation of the i5-2400 and go straight to the i5-2500K. You'd spend $30 more, but you don't need the faster memory he recommended. Oh, both the video card and memory I have listed each have $20 mail in rebates, so you'll save even more there.

I'd personally recommend the 2500k myself, just trying to cut corners as best as possible for him.

Also, the mobo and memory are a combo pack that saves him $30 off the pair and nets him a free copy of 3DMark 11.

Like I said previously, the mobo can handle up to 1866, which you can overclock on it to 2133 if you desire. No point buying ram that is lower than the mobo's top speed for a gaming rig/long term frame. When he upgrades the ram will stay viable this way, not end up forcing the rest of his mem to run at a lower clock speed.

Doggcow, if you're flexible with your pricing you might also want to check out this bundle:
$284 mobo/mem pair, next series up from my previous recommendation (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.576627)

Its the next step up in mobos from the previous one I pointed out, its $15 more but gives you two extra 6.0 GB/s SATA ports that can also RAID. Its very possibly something you won't really need but it does offer a nice little extra if you want to go that route.

When I build my next rig in the fall I'll probably go with something like that because I'm going to pair a couple SSDs in RAID 0 for the master drive and slave a couple big 6.0 GB/s HDDs on the second set of ports as a RAID 0 as well. Of course my rig isn't really going to be in the same pricing range as yours and that kind of setup isn't for everyone.

In short, the extra RAID is worth the $15, but only if you're going to use it. If you don't think you'll have more than two or three drives in the box then don't worry about it.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 06:17 PM
I'd personally recommend the 2500k myself, just trying to cut corners as best as possible for him.

Also, the mobo and memory are a combo pack that saves him $30 off the pair and nets him a free copy of 3DMark 11.

Like I said previously, the mobo can handle up to 1866, which you can overclock on it to 2133 if you desire. No point buying ram that is lower than the mobo's top speed for a gaming rig/long term frame. When he upgrades the ram will stay viable this way, not end up forcing the rest of his mem to run at a lower clock speed.

Doggcow, if you're flexible with your pricing you might also want to check out this bundle:
$284 mobo/mem pair, next series up from my previous recommendation (http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboDealDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.576627)

Its the next step up in mobos from the previous one I pointed out, its $15 more but gives you two extra 6.0 GB/s SATA ports that can also RAID. Its very possibly something you won't really need but it does offer a nice little extra if you want to go that route.

When I build my next rig in the fall I'll probably go with something like that because I'm going to pair a couple SSDs in RAID 0 for the master drive and slave a couple big 6.0 GB/s HDDs on the second set of ports as a RAID 0 as well. Of course my rig isn't really going to be in the same pricing range as yours and that kind of setup isn't for everyone.

In short, the extra RAID is worth the $15, but only if you're going to use it. If you don't think you'll have more than two or three drives in the box then don't worry about it.

What is raid? tbh, I dont know that much about computers. This one will just be for gaming really. Does RAID make it run faster? Is it hard to set up?

Majik
01-24-2011, 06:19 PM
What is raid? tbh, I dont know that much about computers. This one will just be for gaming really. Does RAID make it run faster? Is it hard to set up?

Save yourself the trouble and just buy a Wii.

Houshyamama
01-24-2011, 06:23 PM
What is raid? tbh, I dont know that much about computers. This one will just be for gaming really. Does RAID make it run faster? Is it hard to set up?

increase data reliability and increase input/output performance

Read Here (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RAID)

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 08:37 PM
Save yourself the trouble and just buy a Wii.

Sorry that I'm not a compsci junkie like you? were you born knowing what everything to do with computers? Or did you, at some point, figure it out, like I am doing now?

Thanks for bringing your douchebaggary to the thread though, I'd be disappointed if a ****hat like you didn't show up on the Omane to act like they were the best thing to happen to this planet since Tim Tebow.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-24-2011, 08:57 PM
What is raid? tbh, I dont know that much about computers. This one will just be for gaming really. Does RAID make it run faster? Is it hard to set up?

RAID = redundant array of independent discs. It can be a misnomer, especially in the mode the typical gamer / home user runs a RAID set. It requires multimpe hard drives. The idea is to split the work of one drive to multiple drives and / or provide backup in the event of disc failure. The typical home user is talking about RAID 0, which splits the work up between (typically) two drives. It can get fairly elaborate, much more than I can explain. I use a RAID 0 set with two solid state drives as the primary drive with the operating system, and keep all of my can't lose data on multiple SATA drives (one in a safe deposit box out of the house). There is nothing "independent" in the array of RAID 0. If one disc fails, the whole array is gone.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:05 PM
RAID = redundant array of independent discs. It can be a misnomer, especially in the mode the typical gamer / home user runs a RAID set. It requires multimpe hard drives. The idea is to split the work of one drive to multiple drives and / or provide backup in the event of disc failure. The typical home user is talking about RAID 0, which splits the work up between (typically) two drives. It can get fairly elaborate, much more than I can explain. I use a RAID 0 set with two solid state drives as the primary drive with the operating system, and keep all of my can't lose data on multiple SATA drives (one in a safe deposit box out of the house). There is nothing "independent" in the array of RAID 0. If one disc fails, the whole array is gone.

Ok I guess more my question was. Is it viable for someone who will just be playing a few games to bother with it if they don't know how to set it up, and have a minimal budget. Is the effort required really going to increase my performance as much the effort, or the say $80 I put towards the other hd over my gpu/cpu?

FYI I don't plan on running high intensive FPSs like Farcry or Crysis. I may down the road, but at this point its more just for Rift, SC2, and D3 (less intensive games).

Mr. Elway
01-24-2011, 09:16 PM
My recommendation is to use a pair of identical disks in a RAID 1 array IF you are storing data that you can't afford to lose. There is technically a slight dip in performance but nothing you'll ever notice (apps and games don't use a lot of I/O).

RAID 1, or mirroring, maintains two identical copies of the disk automatically. When one fails (as they all do eventually) the other will contain all of the data. You replace the bad drive with a new of of equal or greater capacity and redundancy is restored. It's great because it basically eliminates most of the need for backup, unless you are really hard core about that sort of thing. Having seen a lot of hard drives fail, RAID 1 is a no brainer for me since many newer motherboards have the hardware on board. I set it up on an Intel board and it was a cinch, just follow the instructions.

RAID 0 is done purely to improve I/O performance. It won't make most games or apps run any faster. I personally don't see the practicality of it in a home PC, unless you have a very specific reason.

broncosteven
01-24-2011, 09:18 PM
RAID = redundant array of independent discs. It can be a misnomer, especially in the mode the typical gamer / home user runs a RAID set. It requires multimpe hard drives. The idea is to split the work of one drive to multiple drives and / or provide backup in the event of disc failure. The typical home user is talking about RAID 0, which splits the work up between (typically) two drives. It can get fairly elaborate, much more than I can explain. I use a RAID 0 set with two solid state drives as the primary drive with the operating system, and keep all of my can't lose data on multiple SATA drives (one in a safe deposit box out of the house). There is nothing "independent" in the array of RAID 0. If one disc fails, the whole array is gone.

Raid 0 provides no redundancy, just speed because it writes to 2 disks it can spread the load but with the higher diskspeeds and the price dropping on Solid state drives it is not worth setting up.

If your talking Raid 0+1 or 1+0 then that is way more complex and each has some fault tolerance either way in one of those configs a recovery from a failure of a disk takes forever because you have to stripe the entire disk at block level I believe.

Raid 1 is a mirror stripe, the same data is written in 2 places at once. It is way slower because everything is written twice.

Raid 5/10 is most common in Network servers because you can lose 1 (raid 5) drive and not crash, you can usually hotswap (these days) the failed drive and never go down. With Raid 5 if you lose 2 drives or more your hosed and looking for backup tapes.

Network servers are usually built with Raid 1 (mirrored) OS drives and then Raid 5 Data drives that n -1 capacity (where n=# of disks).

Really if you took the time to setup anything other than a Raid1 setup you might as well use your spare parts and build a Raid 5 Linux box to host your important data.

If you want real speed buy a Solid state C: drive, install and store only the basic OS on that partition/drive and store all your data on a 2nd Data Drive (sata or SS) and have a USB external drive that you backup to as needed and keep it offsite. If you lose your OS drive, you can reinstall faster than restriping esp with Win7, and your data is still on the D: drive and USB external BU.

There are issues with Solid State drives having a finite # of reads/writes but by the time you hit that you will have a whole new system.

The Linux server is nice because you can virtualize that with Hypervisor and have built in redundancy and play with both Virtual systems of all types and flavors as well as have a redundant storage silo.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:19 PM
My recommendation is to use a pair of identical disks in a RAID 1 array IF you are storing data that you can't afford to lose. There is technically a slight dip in performance but nothing you'll ever notice (apps and games don't use a lot of I/O).

RAID 1, or mirroring, maintains two identical copies of the disk automatically. When one fails (as they all do eventually) the other will contain all of the data. You replace the bad drive with a new of of equal or greater capacity and redundancy is restored. It's great because it basically eliminates most of the need for backup, unless you are really hard core about that sort of thing. Having seen a lot of hard drives fail, RAID 1 is a no brainer for me since many newer motherboards have the hardware on board. I set it up on an Intel board and it was a cinch, just follow the instructions.

RAID 0 is done purely to improve I/O performance. It won't make most games or apps run any faster. I personally don't see the practicality of it in a home PC, unless you have a very specific reason.

I don't really have anything I can't afford to lose.

But if it's easy, I guess I'll go with the one that I can set up later (for only $15), since this rig will probably keep me for a while.

Mr. Elway
01-24-2011, 09:22 PM
I don't really have anything I can't afford to lose.

But if it's easy, I guess I'll go with the one that I can set up later (for only $15), since this rig will probably keep me for a while.

Makes sense to me. Have fun and don't forget the arctic silver thermal paste!

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:23 PM
Makes sense to me. Have fun and don't forget the arctic silver thermal paste!

what?

broncosteven
01-24-2011, 09:24 PM
I don't really have anything I can't afford to lose.

But if it's easy, I guess I'll go with the one that I can set up later (for only $15), since this rig will probably keep me for a while.

If you have a 50 gig SATA drive laying around install your OS on that, buy a huge SATA drive to host your data then later you can buy a USB or thumb drive to backup files you can't afford to lose.

Drop your $ into a video card, RAM and 64 bit OS.

broncosteven
01-24-2011, 09:25 PM
I don't really have anything I can't afford to lose.

But if it's easy, I guess I'll go with the one that I can set up later (for only $15), since this rig will probably keep me for a while.

The other thing you have to remember is that unless your running Solid state the more RAID you have the more disks you have in the system and the bigger the Power supply you will need then you have to remember to cool it all.

Use the KISS method.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:26 PM
If you have a 50 gig SATA drive laying around install your OS on that, buy a huge SATA drive to host your data then later you can buy a USB or thumb drive to backup files you can't afford to lose.

Drop your $ into a video card, RAM and 64 bit OS.

That was what I was thinking of doing, if a need arises for backing up files.

Thanks!

jutang
01-24-2011, 09:26 PM
Be sure to get an SSD drive... that was probably the biggest upgrade in terms of daily performance. Boot up times for computer gets down to ~15-20sec and load times for games like dragon age become so short it doesn't take you out of the game at all.

My main C drive is a 60 gig for windows and I have a 120 gig for the games I play most often.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:28 PM
The other thing you have to remember is that unless your running Solid state the more RAID you have the more disks you have in the system and the bigger the Power supply you will need then you have to remember to cool it all.

Use the KISS method.

the 700 that Drek suggested should be fine right? Same with the case?

Btw I live in Washington, temperatures stay pretty low.

broncosteven
01-24-2011, 09:29 PM
Be sure to get an SSD drive... that was probably the biggest upgrade in terms of daily performance. Boot up times for computer gets down to ~15-20sec and load times for games like dragon age become so short it doesn't take you out of the game at all.

My main C drive is a 60 gig for windows and I have a 120 gig for the games I play most often.

This is the way I would go. SSD were way too high for me last year but I hear they are coming down and even if you get a small boot drive of 35-50 gig you can always copy the data from a SATA disk to a SSD disk down the road.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:31 PM
Be sure to get an SSD drive... that was probably the biggest upgrade in terms of daily performance. Boot up times for computer gets down to ~15-20sec and load times for games like dragon age become so short it doesn't take you out of the game at all.

My main C drive is a 60 gig for windows and I have a 120 gig for the games I play most often.

Wait, so I should buy a SATA and an SSD Drive?

I don't mind an extra 30 or so seconds on boot up. What I'm worried about is speed after that really.

So I get a SATA for windows/Data and then a D: that is a SSD for installing games to?

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:32 PM
This is the way I would go. SSD were way too high for me last year but I hear they are coming down and even if you get a small boot drive of 35-50 gig you can always copy the data from a SATA disk to a SSD disk down the road.

How big is windows nowadays? I'd prefer not to be spending more money on two drives...

are SSD's quite a bit better?

broncosteven
01-24-2011, 09:36 PM
the 700 that Drek suggested should be fine right? Same with the case?

Btw I live in Washington, temperatures stay pretty low.

Yes a 700 watt PS should be more than enough.

You cannot base PC cooling on ambient temps, it is all about airflow through the system to cool the CPU, Ram. Video card and disks, unless you go with a fluid type coolant system which just adds to the complexity.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:39 PM
Yes a 700 watt PS should be more than enough.

You cannot base PC cooling on ambient temps, it is all about airflow through the system to cool the CPU, Ram. Video card and disks, unless you go with a fluid type coolant system which just adds to the complexity.

Yeah I understand I was just saying that my ambient temps are generally lower. Will the cases suggested work? I'm afraid to mess around with a water cooling system.

How do you keep track of temps? Are there monitors on the c/gpus?

extralife
01-24-2011, 09:39 PM
I think you guys are forgetting the budget part of a budget build. RAID, SSD and water cooling in a $700 system being built from scratch? I suppose you could toss them all in a box and use the power of your imagination to replace the core components that you can no long afford.

broncosteven
01-24-2011, 09:39 PM
How big is windows nowadays? I'd prefer not to be spending more money on two drives...

are SSD's quite a bit better?

SSD's are extremely fast but I would not recommend just 1 disk in the system.

Use an old SATA format it and install your OS there and then get a bigger newer SATA for data drive. You will thank me when it is time to upgrade in a couple years or if the PC crashes.

Micro Center sells used drives for a fair price.

Sounds like your working in a budget and 1 small SSD would likely crush that budget.

Get at least a 10k SATA drive.
RAM VC, and 64 bit OS is where you will get your speed bump

broncosteven
01-24-2011, 09:43 PM
Yeah I understand I was just saying that my ambient temps are generally lower. Will the cases suggested work? I'm afraid to mess around with a water cooling system.

How do you keep track of temps? Are there monitors on the c/gpus?

yep my Asus came with all kinds of probe options.

Doggcow
01-24-2011, 09:46 PM
SSD's are extremely fast but I would not recommend just 1 disk in the system.

Use an old SATA format it and install your OS there and then get a bigger newer SATA for data drive. You will thank me when it is time to upgrade in a couple years or if the PC crashes.

Micro Center sells used drives for a fair price.

Sounds like your working in a budget and 1 small SSD would likely crush that budget.

Get at least a 10k SATA drive.
RAM VC, and 64 bit OS is where you will get your speed bump

I don't need a lot of HD Space, maybe about 20gigs after my OS. So instead of buying a SATA drive I could replace it with an 80g SSD for now and upgrade later if I need more, right?

for instance: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820167030

For my OS/whichever game I'm playing at the time, and then use an old SATA for any extra stuff I need?

mr007
01-24-2011, 09:50 PM
Wait, so I should buy a SATA and an SSD Drive?

I don't mind an extra 30 or so seconds on boot up. What I'm worried about is speed after that really.

So I get a SATA for windows/Data and then a D: that is a SSD for installing games to?

If you don't mind boot up times, SSD is not going to make a difference in gaming for you. 7200+RPM drives with like 16MB cache and decent read/write speeds is going to be fine for any game... gaming does not do excessive reads/writes from disk so your hard drive is the least of your concerns.

Also, you don't need a crazy video card even on the 50" monitor unless you're doing intense FPS games. The card you mentioned would be fine for the more casual strategy and RPG games because they don't require you have high FPS. If you're playing something like COD etc where there's tons of action online, this is where your video card really makes a big difference.

Doggcow
01-25-2011, 12:00 AM
If you don't mind boot up times, SSD is not going to make a difference in gaming for you. 7200+RPM drives with like 16MB cache and decent read/write speeds is going to be fine for any game... gaming does not do excessive reads/writes from disk so your hard drive is the least of your concerns.

Also, you don't need a crazy video card even on the 50" monitor unless you're doing intense FPS games. The card you mentioned would be fine for the more casual strategy and RPG games because they don't require you have high FPS. If you're playing something like COD etc where there's tons of action online, this is where your video card really makes a big difference.

Wait. So SSD's aren't going to improve performance much? I thought everyone else just said they do?

Doggcow
01-25-2011, 12:19 AM
I think I'm just gonna pull my 100g SATA out of my old old comp and use that for now. Then buy a new HD later. I'll save the funds and put them into the rest of my comp :)

Doggcow
01-25-2011, 12:28 PM
Looks like the mobo/ram combo is no longer available :(

Idk anything about the mobos. what should I go with now?

New promo deals are out, any of these ones good? http://promotions.newegg.com/neemail/jan-0-2011/AllStarSale/index-landing.html?nm_mc=EMC-IGNEFL012511&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL012511-_-EMC-012511-Index-_-E0H-_-LCD#Home

Mr. Elway
01-25-2011, 02:35 PM
Wait. So SSD's aren't going to improve performance much? I thought everyone else just said they do?

SSD's improve input/output (I/O) performance ONLY. I/O is when data is read to and from the hard drive. In most situations, it only improves things like load time. Once a game or app is running, the data is all read from memory, and improved I/O speed makes little or no difference provided you have plenty of memory. In fact the most compelling reason to go with a SSD is because the lack of moving parts makes them more reliable. This is why they are well suited for laptops, which take much more physical abuse. Right now they are still fairly expensive, and SATA drives are cheaper, but still fast and they work great in PCs.

BTW Arctic Silver is thermal paste that you put on the bottom of your CPU, and it helps to regulate heat transfer from the chip to the board. It's a really cheap way to help ensure the life and performance of your CPU.

jhns
01-25-2011, 02:46 PM
BTW Arctic Silver is thermal paste that you put on the bottom of your CPU, and it helps to regulate heat transfer from the chip to the board. It's a really cheap way to help ensure the life and performance of your CPU.

No, it goes on top of the CPU. It seperates the CPUs heat sink (fan) and the top of the CPU. If you put thermal paste between your CPU and motherboard, you will break both.

Maybe I am just reading this wrong.

Mr. Elway
01-25-2011, 02:53 PM
No, it goes on top of the CPU. It seperates the CPUs heat sink (fan) and the top of the CPU. If you put thermal paste between your CPU and motherboard, you will break both.

Maybe I am just reading this wrong.

You're right, I remembered that completely wrong. It regulates the dispersal of heat from the CPU to the heatsink. Egg on face :) I stand by everything else I wrote!

Majik
01-25-2011, 03:14 PM
Sorry that I'm not a compsci junkie like you? were you born knowing what everything to do with computers? Or did you, at some point, figure it out, like I am doing now?

Thanks for bringing your douchebaggary to the thread though, I'd be disappointed if a ****hat like you didn't show up on the Omane to act like they were the best thing to happen to this planet since Tim Tebow.

Sorry, thought you could take a joke. I didn't realize you were on your period. My bad.

jhns
01-25-2011, 03:18 PM
I stand by everything else I wrote!

I stand by everything else you wrote as well! It is what I would say.

Doggcow
01-25-2011, 03:31 PM
how is this combo deal? + the gigabyte gpu (about 1k total)

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ComboBundleDetails.aspx?ItemList=Combo.584330

I know it's a little more spendy than I was looking at originally, but like I said, I got a little extra funding.

I have no idea what to look for in the mobo... I dont know what the stuff means. Lol. I assume I just need the 6gb/s ones and enough room for around 16g ram?

That one has faster ram? Is that right? Would I be able to upgrade with cheaper ram, or would it decrease the performance of all of my ram if I put 1866 in?

Doggcow
01-25-2011, 04:44 PM
Would this one be good? Open box saves $50.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131620R

Or what about this? I dont mind spending the extra on my mobo if this is worth it.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131693

Doggcow
01-25-2011, 05:24 PM
Or should I go with this setup

This is what I just made since the deals just changed.

GPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814125348 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125348)

$179

PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006

$90 after MIR

CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115072

$224, Should be more than enough power.

Mobo: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131693 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131693)

$214, but seems like a really good one, that I should have to worry less about with the heatsinks, right?

Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811133094&nm_mc=EMC-IGNEFL012511&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL012511-_-EMC-012511-Index-_-ComputerCases-_-11133094-L03A

$30 after MIR, seems like a no brainer

RAM: tbd (15% off on Newegg though, yay!) what kind of memory can I get for that mobo? On the ASUS site it says "* Due to CPU behavior, DDR3 1800 MHz memory module will run at DDR3 1600 MHz frequency as default. "

So is that a bad thing? lol should I get a different mobo?

Im at $780 with memory left to purchase, and windows 7.

Doggcow
01-25-2011, 08:55 PM
I was thinking about going with these guys and calling it good.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231428

I know they're slower, but I can upgrade later.

broncosteven
01-26-2011, 12:16 PM
Or should I go with this setup

This is what I just made since the deals just changed.

GPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814125348 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125348)

$179

PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006

$90 after MIR

CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115072

$224, Should be more than enough power.

Mobo: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131693 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131693)

$214, but seems like a really good one, that I should have to worry less about with the heatsinks, right?

Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811133094&nm_mc=EMC-IGNEFL012511&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL012511-_-EMC-012511-Index-_-ComputerCases-_-11133094-L03A

$30 after MIR, seems like a no brainer

RAM: tbd (15% off on Newegg though, yay!) what kind of memory can I get for that mobo? On the ASUS site it says "* Due to CPU behavior, DDR3 1800 MHz memory module will run at DDR3 1600 MHz frequency as default. "

So is that a bad thing? lol should I get a different mobo?

Im at $780 with memory left to purchase, and windows 7.

I really like my p7p55d asus board. I don't think you need the tuff series board.

Everything else looks good.

alkemical
01-26-2011, 02:54 PM
HP Z class workstations have a special running on the z200/z200SFF/z400 models.

Blart
01-26-2011, 03:16 PM
Always check Techreport's system guide before building/upgrading.

http://techreport.com/articles.x/20138

Their cheapest build ($500) is awesomely powerful. As in, blows the doors off of PS3 and any $1000 crap from Dell.

Econobox:

http://techreport.com/articles.x/19868/2

alkemical
01-26-2011, 03:20 PM
Z class workstations also come with a 3-3-3 warranty.

:)

mr007
01-26-2011, 03:28 PM
Wait. So SSD's aren't going to improve performance much? I thought everyone else just said they do?

No, SSD's will not affect your *gaming* performance.

As someone stated earlier - SSD affect I/O calls (reads/writes) specifically to disk. So loading of your Operating System (boot times), opening/launching applications, etc will all go faster. Once you have an application/program/game open SSDs really don't buy you anything.

Highly recommend them for Laptops, but I really don't see their use or cost benefit in a gaming machine.

Doggcow
01-26-2011, 03:38 PM
I really like my p7p55d asus board. I don't think you need the tuff series board.

Everything else looks good.

I decided to drop the price on the Mobo, and put it towards the CPU in this combo.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231436

Anyone want Civ 5? Ill sell it for $20 :p

I also decided to upgrade the ram to these guys since there is a sale on it now anyway. and for future upgrades.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820231436

floats
01-27-2011, 02:59 PM
Or should I go with this setup

This is what I just made since the deals just changed.

GPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16814125348 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814125348)

$179

PSU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139006

$90 after MIR

CPU: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16819115072

$224, Should be more than enough power.

Mobo: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Produc...82E16813131693 (http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131693)

$214, but seems like a really good one, that I should have to worry less about with the heatsinks, right?

Case: http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16811133094&nm_mc=EMC-IGNEFL012511&cm_mmc=EMC-IGNEFL012511-_-EMC-012511-Index-_-ComputerCases-_-11133094-L03A

$30 after MIR, seems like a no brainer

RAM: tbd (15% off on Newegg though, yay!) what kind of memory can I get for that mobo? On the ASUS site it says "* Due to CPU behavior, DDR3 1800 MHz memory module will run at DDR3 1600 MHz frequency as default. "

So is that a bad thing? lol should I get a different mobo?

Im at $780 with memory left to purchase, and windows 7.

That motherboard seems a bit overkill compared to the rest of your components. If I were you, I'd get a cheaper motherboard:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157217
$152 - Asrock with good reviews

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813131693
$184 - Asus (I have this one and am pretty happy with it)

With the money saved, I'd invest in a better video card like the recently announced GTX 560:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814127565&cm_re=GTX_560-_-14-127-565-_-Product
$249 - I like this one because of the heatsink and cooler. Runs quieter and cooler than others that use the reference cooling design.

Or a 6950:
http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16814161355&cm_re=6950-_-14-161-355-_-Product
$289, $259 after mail in rebate - Apparently you can flash the bios on these and effectively have a 6970. There are some potential drawbacks, but google "flash 6950 to 6970" for more information.

You'll end up with a much better gaming machine for about the same amount or just a little more money. Well worth it if you plan on playing any games that require a better video card.

If you plan on overclocking the i5-2500K (and why wouldn't you if you're getting the K over the non-K), you might want to invest in a nice heatsink as the stock cooler is pretty small in comparison. With most setups, you'll have to take the motherboard out of the case to install an aftermarket heatsink as they require you to access the underside of the motherboard. Some cases have a cutout for this purpose, but I'm not sure about the one you selected. Search for a 1156 compatible heatsink, as the 1155 (Sandy Bridge) may not be listed as it is so new. Keep in mind that the memory slots are pretty close to the cpu socket so they may interfere with memory with large heatsinks. Heatsinks where the fan is blowing on the side towards the back of the case are especially prone to clearance issues. Also, taller heatsinks may have problems fitting in some narrower cases. This is the one I have:

http://www.directron.com/scmg2100.html
$33 plus shipping - It's HUGE, but very quiet as it comes with a PWM controlled fan (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fan_control). During idle, the fan spins as low a 200 RPM and is virtually inaudible.

jutang
01-27-2011, 03:25 PM
No, SSD's will not affect your *gaming* performance.

As someone stated earlier - SSD affect I/O calls (reads/writes) specifically to disk. So loading of your Operating System (boot times), opening/launching applications, etc will all go faster. Once you have an application/program/game open SSDs really don't buy you anything.

Highly recommend them for Laptops, but I really don't see their use or cost benefit in a gaming machine.

Load times can really affect overall gaming experience. Games like Dragon age, Mass effect 2 are much more seamless in their transitions with an SSD. Granted, for someone who only plays 1st person shooters, then the benefit is not as evident. Overall, I feel there is a huge difference playing games off my SSD versus regular HD.