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cmhargrove
01-18-2011, 02:26 PM
Just a question.

I was thinking about going to a workshop this weekend, and thought I might give it a try. I thought I might ask others here first if they had a good or bad experience, or if it was just a waste of time/money.

So, do you / have you homebrewed? Any advice?

OBF1
01-18-2011, 02:27 PM
Bro... just head to the local liquor store, will save money and time + you will get beer you actully like the taste of.

Taco John
01-18-2011, 02:32 PM
Homebrewing is a lot of fun, but it's very, very challenging. I haven't done it in probably 3 years, but I'm about to put my apron back on this next month and stur up a batch of IPA.

There's nothing quite as satisfying as finishing an awesome brew of your own that you've tended for weeks on end... But likewise, there's nothing quite as soul crushing as having a batch turn sour on you due to infection.

Chris
01-18-2011, 02:32 PM
I thought this was about software.

***NERD ALERT***

Pony Boy
01-18-2011, 02:36 PM
Just don't try to make your friends drink it..... trust me on this.

White Horses Inc.
01-18-2011, 02:37 PM
Very simple....nothing better than cracking your own homebrew! Find a local home brew store...usually very helpful, Check out the "Good Eats" Episode on homebrewing

If You follow instructions and clean everything very well you will have success and if your interested start collecting pop off bottles now save you money later...

briane
01-18-2011, 02:40 PM
I thought this was about software.

***NERD ALERT***

lol...me too!

gyldenlove
01-18-2011, 02:43 PM
No, but I cook and I am funny, that is what makes me so attractive to women.

mwill07
01-18-2011, 02:43 PM
I do...it's not very hard...it really isn't.

I've done probably 12-13 batches, and only had one go bad (unfortunately, it was my last one). Typically, my beer is really, really good.

I do extract batches only. For me. time commitment is generally 3 hours to brew, and 3 hours for bottling (including cleanup for both steps). It takes me at least 2 weeks to ferment, a week for carbonation, and a few weeks for conditioning. I generally plan for 7 weeks, brew to drinking.

Cost: for me, it's between $30-$40, which makes about 2 cases. That's cheaper than you can buy it, but not really cheap enough to justify doing it just to cut costs. I do it because I like to learn about what makes different styles of beer different and it's just cool to be able to make your own supply.

Chris
01-18-2011, 02:45 PM
No, but I cook and I am funny, that is what makes me so attractive to women.

http://fastfood.ocregister.com/files/2009/05/guyfieri_web.jpg

tsiguy96
01-18-2011, 02:45 PM
i make my own wine, ghetto style, but its still wine. i have 3 gallons cooking up right now, i will post a pic of it later. fermenting in 1 gallon jugs right now!

Pony Boy
01-18-2011, 02:56 PM
i make my own wine, ghetto style, but its still wine. i have 3 gallons cooking up right now, i will post a pic of it later. fermenting in 1 gallon jugs right now!

Tebow could save you from going to all that trouble

Ray Finkle
01-18-2011, 03:00 PM
I do....2 points to remember. 1. Clean the hell out of the kit (buy a glass one and not that crap plastic one). 2. Get your yeast from a local micro brew....it's worth the extra few bucks.

elsid13
01-18-2011, 03:05 PM
My brother and I just did are first test batch this weekend, with a starter kit. If that works out then we will see about getting more involved and brewing more of our own stuff.

Taco John
01-18-2011, 03:12 PM
Anyone who likes beer and wants to gain an appreciation for the complex tastes of microbrews should homebrew. You could drink microbrew every day, and it won't be until you finally brew up a batch of your own will you get a real appreciation for some of the subtilties of flavor in a good beer.

The down side of that is that you will realize that some of the beers you previously liked are actually bum piss with a pretty label on it (I'm looking at you Fat Tire).

Ray Finkle
01-18-2011, 03:14 PM
Anyone who likes beer and wants to gain an appreciation for the complex tastes of microbrews should homebrew. You could drink microbrew every day, and it won't be until you finally brew up a batch of your own will you get a real appreciation for some of the subtilties of flavor in a good beer.

The down side of that is that you will realize that some of the beers you previously liked are actually bum piss with a pretty label on it (I'm looking at you Fat Tire).

or your batch comes out tasting like band aids.....(bad yeast)...luckily the head brewer from Starr Brewery helped me a lot.

Taco John
01-18-2011, 03:16 PM
or your batch comes out tasting like band aids.....(bad yeast)...luckily the head brewer from Starr Brewery helped me a lot.

I had a hefeweisen that was awesome for the first two weeks before an infection set in. It felt like someone stole my awesome hot girlfirend and left me with their credit card bill to Hawaii.

tsiguy96
01-18-2011, 03:17 PM
Tebow could save you from going to all that trouble

true. you should see this stuff, totally ghetto.

Taco John
01-18-2011, 03:18 PM
The other funny thing is when I go home to a farmtown in Idaho, and they're all drinking Coors, Bud Light, and PBR. I feel like a douchebag snob when I'm drinking a Hefeweisen.

"Dude, what's that, drink a real beer!"

*hands me a Coors*

"Uh, no thanks. I am."

"Whatever brosef! Check out poindexter over here and his fancy beer!"

gyldenlove
01-18-2011, 03:22 PM
http://fastfood.ocregister.com/files/2009/05/guyfieri_web.jpg

Not cool, that was uncalled for.

PRBronco
01-18-2011, 03:42 PM
I thought this was about software.

***NERD ALERT***

Tbqh at first glance I thought it was about Hebrew and was like "wtf is Joshua up to now?"

underrated29
01-18-2011, 04:04 PM
a guy on my hockey team does. He has gotten really good at it over the years.


He makes this vodka that is retardedly strong. I am no heavyweight, nor lightweight but dayum. This stuff, a couple shots and you are friggin toast. The cool thing is it goes down soooooo smooth. He experiments with all these flavors, and this one, his best one imo so far, tastes like liquid cherry. Cant even taste the vodka. Incredible.


He gets by or around the law or whatever because he says he uses it to run his lawnmower or something.....? not exactly sure, nor do I care, all I know is it was good, strong as hell and totally free! 3 of my favorite things.

Taco John
01-18-2011, 04:10 PM
a guy on my hockey team does. He has gotten really good at it over the years.


He makes this vodka that is retardedly strong. I am no heavyweight, nor lightweight but dayum. This stuff, a couple shots and you are friggin toast. The cool thing is it goes down soooooo smooth. He experiments with all these flavors, and this one, his best one imo so far, tastes like liquid cherry. Cant even taste the vodka. Incredible.


He gets by or around the law or whatever because he says he uses it to run his lawnmower or something.....? not exactly sure, nor do I care, all I know is it was good, strong as hell and totally free! 3 of my favorite things.


It's all fun until someone goes blind!

Ray Finkle
01-18-2011, 04:15 PM
I had a hefeweisen that was awesome for the first two weeks before an infection set in. It felt like someone stole my awesome hot girlfirend and left me with their credit card bill to Hawaii.

I made an IPA that would put Stone Brewery's Ruination to shame and the same thing happened. I did drink one of the infected beers (half way) to see what it would do. A quick sit on the toilet made me realize the error of my ways.

Taco John
01-18-2011, 04:17 PM
I made an IPA that would put Stone Brewery's Ruination to shame and the same thing happened. I did drink one of the infected beers (half way) to see what it would do. A quick sit on the toilet made me realize the error of my ways.

They're just fine until the infection sets in. I drank the finest Hefe I'd ever drank for two weeks, but once the infection started to show up, it was complete crap. I was so disgusted.

It took it out of me for a few years. I'm starting to get the bug again, and IPA is in my sights.

Ray Finkle
01-18-2011, 04:23 PM
They're just fine until the infection sets in. I drank the finest Hefe I'd ever drank for two weeks, but once the infection started to show up, it was complete crap. I was so disgusted.

It took it out of me for a few years. I'm starting to get the bug again, and IPA is in my sights.

get the good yeast and you'll be golden...

enjolras
01-18-2011, 04:26 PM
I'm a homebrewer, and I absolutely love it. Met a bunch of cool people and have done some really nice stuff. It's not necessarily cost effective (particularly until you're doing all-grain), but it's really satisfying to me. It's also pretty easy. Sanitation (as the guys above have found out:>) is really important. I've been lucky enough to avoid any infections, but it does happen. Brewing is really the art of washing dishes after all.

There are a few really great homebrew stores here in Denver, particularly the Brew Hut in Aurora (attached to Dry Dock Brewing). Those guys know their stuff and will do wonders in getting you started.

I also do a lot of winemaking. I started with the kits (which you can get surprisingly good results out of) and have since graduated to buying grapes from Palisade once a year. That's a much longer investment in time (this years Pinot won't even begin to be ready for another 9 months), but it's most definitely cost effective (something like $1.50 a bottle for the 120 bottles I'll produce).

Mogulseeker
01-18-2011, 05:15 PM
This is one of those things I want to get into eventually when I have things like money and time.

Sodak
01-18-2011, 05:24 PM
Nope.

Mogulseeker
01-18-2011, 05:47 PM
The other funny thing is when I go home to a farmtown in Idaho, and they're all drinking Coors, Bud Light, and PBR. I feel like a douchebag snob when I'm drinking a Hefeweisen.

"Dude, what's that, drink a real beer!"

*hands me a Coors*

"Uh, no thanks. I am."

"Whatever brosef! Check out poindexter over here and his fancy beer!"

Not a fan if hefes, but a good IPA is not beaten.

Coors Light is a good cheap beer, but most of that stuff tastes like dirty water. I cant even drink Bud Light.

maven
01-18-2011, 06:45 PM
I thought this was about software.

***NERD ALERT***

First thing I thought of was the PSP....

epicSocialism4tw
01-18-2011, 07:13 PM
a guy on my hockey team does. He has gotten really good at it over the years.


He makes this vodka that is retardedly strong. I am no heavyweight, nor lightweight but dayum. This stuff, a couple shots and you are friggin toast. The cool thing is it goes down soooooo smooth. He experiments with all these flavors, and this one, his best one imo so far, tastes like liquid cherry. Cant even taste the vodka. Incredible.


He gets by or around the law or whatever because he says he uses it to run his lawnmower or something.....? not exactly sure, nor do I care, all I know is it was good, strong as hell and totally free! 3 of my favorite things.

I think they call that "Moonshine" in the deep South. ;D

Brewer
01-18-2011, 07:59 PM
I started homebrewing in 1997. Both of my older brothers did it. One of them bought me a bunch of equipment for Christmas that year. I started brewing and never stopped. I've never lost a batch to spoilage. Not even a single bottle. Keep things sanitary and you'll be fine. Not clean. Sanitary.

I won lots of medals at various homebrew competitions and it was really fun. Medals at the State Fair are cool. The very first all-grain batch I made took a 2nd place in a large competition. Then I started brewing professionally, and I still brew at home. Brewing beer is as easy as you want to make it, or as hard. It can be really cheap, or it can become an obsessive hobby that makes you spend thousands of dollars on brewing equipment. Either way, cheap or spendy, you can still make the same quality of beer. It's kind of like running. You can be be a solid runner with cheap shoes, or you can be the dude who just dropped $200 on shoes, another couple hundred on socks/shorts/shirts/GPS watch and he's not going to be a better runner. It's still all about running. In beer's case, it's all about the recipe and sanitation. Be passionate about beer. Life is too short to drink bad beer.

Denver Crush
01-18-2011, 08:32 PM
I do...it's not very hard...it really isn't.

I've done probably 12-13 batches, and only had one go bad (unfortunately, it was my last one). Typically, my beer is really, really good.

I do extract batches only. For me. time commitment is generally 3 hours to brew, and 3 hours for bottling (including cleanup for both steps). It takes me at least 2 weeks to ferment, a week for carbonation, and a few weeks for conditioning. I generally plan for 7 weeks, brew to drinking.

Cost: for me, it's between $30-$40, which makes about 2 cases. That's cheaper than you can buy it, but not really cheap enough to justify doing it just to cut costs. I do it because I like to learn about what makes different styles of beer different and it's just cool to be able to make your own supply.

This.... haven't taken the step to all grain brewing yet. Kinda scared of it.

rugbythug
01-18-2011, 09:00 PM
I believe I have a Beer Infection. My Abdomen has swollen a lot.

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-18-2011, 09:17 PM
http://fastfood.ocregister.com/files/2009/05/guyfieri_web.jpg

LOL!!!!!!LOL:yayaya:

ØrangeÇrush
01-18-2011, 10:28 PM
Just a question.

I was thinking about going to a workshop this weekend, and thought I might give it a try. I thought I might ask others here first if they had a good or bad experience, or if it was just a waste of time/money.

So, do you / have you homebrewed? Any advice?

I have a 2.5 gallon that is fermenting as I type. Just remember, the #1 piece of homebrewing is sanitation. Absolutely anything that is unsanitized will make your beer taste like crap! The number two rule is make sure the yeast is fresh and the number three rule is keep plugging away.

ØrangeÇrush
01-18-2011, 10:29 PM
eventually I will move to all grain, but first I have to convince the wife that its worth it.

Odysseus
01-19-2011, 02:18 AM
I had a hefeweisen that was awesome for the first two weeks before an infection set in. It felt like someone stole my awesome hot girlfirend and left me with their credit card bill to Hawaii.

Home brewing rocks!

cmhargrove
01-19-2011, 08:34 AM
Anyone care to mention a few recipes / kits / yeast strains / malt + hops combinations that gave them a great result.

I would especially like to hear recipes for a good nutty brown ale (similar to Left Hand "Deep Cover Brown Ale"), and maybe even something more amber (Like Mendocino Brewery "Eye of the Hawk").

Any suggestions or recipes?

STBumpkin
01-19-2011, 08:47 AM
Anyone care to mention a few recipes / kits / yeast strains / malt + hops combinations that gave them a great result.

I would especially like to hear recipes for a good nutty brown ale (similar to Left Hand "Deep Cover Brown Ale"), and maybe even something more amber (Like Mendocino Brewery "Eye of the Hawk").

Any suggestions or recipes?

I've got 2 good homebrewing recipe books, each recipe with all grain and extract method. They are "Brewing Classic Styles" and "Beer Captured". Both explain the process pretty well. I brew almost exclusively ales, with a few porters and stouts thrown in. No lagers because I can't control my fermentation temp well enough. I built my own mash tun for all-grain brewing out of a 10 gallon cooler and love it. Homebrewing is a great hobby and my friends always love me showing up at a party with a case of my beer.

Rohirrim
01-19-2011, 08:48 AM
Why would I bother home brewing when I can have an ice cold Bud anytime I want? ;)

worm
01-19-2011, 08:58 AM
Why would I bother home brewing when I can have an ice cold Bud anytime I want? ;)

savage.

Rohirrim
01-19-2011, 08:58 AM
savage.

:spit:

TheElusiveKyleOrton
01-19-2011, 09:02 AM
I started homebrewing in 1997. Both of my older brothers did it. One of them bought me a bunch of equipment for Christmas that year. I started brewing and never stopped. I've never lost a batch to spoilage. Not even a single bottle. Keep things sanitary and you'll be fine. Not clean. Sanitary.

I won lots of medals at various homebrew competitions and it was really fun. Medals at the State Fair are cool. The very first all-grain batch I made took a 2nd place in a large competition. Then I started brewing professionally, and I still brew at home. Brewing beer is as easy as you want to make it, or as hard. It can be really cheap, or it can become an obsessive hobby that makes you spend thousands of dollars on brewing equipment. Either way, cheap or spendy, you can still make the same quality of beer. It's kind of like running. You can be be a solid runner with cheap shoes, or you can be the dude who just dropped $200 on shoes, another couple hundred on socks/shorts/shirts/GPS watch and he's not going to be a better runner. It's still all about running. In beer's case, it's all about the recipe and sanitation. Be passionate about beer. Life is too short to drink bad beer.

Do you work at/own Dry Dock? Love that porter you guys do over there...

I've got the equipment, just have to find a little time to start my first homebrew. Wicked excited about it.

Peoples Champ
01-19-2011, 09:22 AM
Yes I have done a few batches. Its really fun, and its fun to give to your friends and tell everyone you made it. You dont really do it to save money, you just about break even on the $ per bottle then at the store, sometimes its a little cheaper to brew your own. You do it for the fun.

My recommendation is that if they sell ingredient kits to buy those first before you start trying to wing it with your own ingredients and quantities. The kits come with the right amount of hops or barely and grain you need. They even come with step by step intructions, that way there is no way you can screw it up. I suck at cooking and my roomate and I made some delicous beers. Buy the kits if you can, if not then you can still try recipes from the internet.


Does anyone here have advice on brewing beer into kegs? We have brewed it into bottles, but that takes forever to sanitize every bottle and put all the beer into bottles. Is it easier for KEGS?

Pony Boy
01-19-2011, 10:05 AM
Homebrewing is a great hobby and my friends always love me showing up at a party with a case of my beer.

I had some at a friends house and he was really proud of it, I guess he worked his ass off to make it. The only way to describe it was it was like drinking something that looked like beer filtered through a skunks ass.

Quoydogs
01-19-2011, 10:33 AM
I brew my own. Follow these simple rules and you will have no problem.

#1 decide whether you are going to go All Grain or Extract.

( Ok good you decided to go extract cause you've never done it before. Move on to step #2 )

#2 Go to the brew store, talk with the guys at the counter and ask what they recommend for what you are wanting to brew. IE Heff, Amber, Russian Imperial ^5 )
( This is also a good time to decide how long you want to wait before you can drink your beer. Move to step 3. )

#3 Find a good friend go to the store and buy yourself at least a 6 pack of your favorite beer.

( Rule #1 The cook must be sauced in order to create a good sauce. )

# 4 Get supplies ready you will need. 1 glass carboy, 1 fermentation bucket, 1 bubbler cap thingy, 1 wart chiller, a good long stirring stick, 1 garden hose for wort chiller, a good thick pair of insulated gloves, 1 bottle of Iodine or other sterilizer, a burner, and a big ass pot.

( Don't go buying a expensive wort chiller. Go to home depoe buy yourself some brass tubing and rap it around a 2 liter bottle then make another loop one inch in from the inside of your boiling pan. There your hundred and fifty dollar double rapped wort chiller just cost you 35 bucks. oh you will need a couple small peices of plastic hose and 2 garden hose adapters also. )

#5 This being the most important rule. Clean, I mean really clean the one thing that can make your home brew taste like Banana's is this. You can not sterilize yourself and all of your tools too many time. We even keep a bucket of sterile water next to the working station for our hands before do anything with the beer,.

#6 Drink beer and have fun. Follow your Brew Masters instructions he gives you and enjoy your beer.

enjolras
01-19-2011, 10:57 AM
eventually I will move to all grain, but first I have to convince the wife that its worth it.

It's really cheaper in the end. You can find a lot of resources online for building most of the components from off-the-shelf stuff.

bendog
01-19-2011, 11:04 AM
I did for years. I may start again when my kid goes to college and I have time. But, I'd move it outside because the heat was bad on my old stove. I really quit too because I thought I was wasting a lot of water with cooling the wort (the stuff you have before the yeast turns some of the sugar to alc.) Eventually I routed it out into the backyard and at least watered my grass and shrubs, but I still considered that 'waste.' If I find a way to efficiently cool the boiled wort, I may give it another go. I brewed a pretty good IPA with lots of cascade nose. I also had good results with a california type ale like anchor steam that is sort of lagerish, and did some hefewisens too.

PS, I got tired of cleaning bottles too. If I do it again, I think I'll keg it and use gas to carbonate the stuff.

chadta
01-19-2011, 12:56 PM
alot of people brew up here in canada, alot because our beer is so damn expensive, the industry has set it up so its pretty well foolproof, basically you go in to the brew shops, and all you have to do is dump the yeast in, everything else is done for ya, you get i think it works out to about 6 cases for 50 bucks, keeping in mind that 1 case of beer is 35 - 40 bucks here. go back later and bottle the beer, and away you go.

ive done it twice, once was cuz i was having a big party and needed a cheap supply of beer, and once cuz i split on it with a buddy.

i guess thats not really home brew, but i do have the homebrew channel on my wii

bendog
01-19-2011, 12:58 PM
alot of people brew up here in canada, alot because our beer is so damn expensive, the industry has set it up so its pretty well foolproof, basically you go in to the brew shops, and all you have to do is dump the yeast in, everything else is done for ya, you get i think it works out to about 6 cases for 50 bucks, keeping in mind that 1 case of beer is 35 - 40 bucks here. go back later and bottle the beer, and away you go.

ive done it twice, once was cuz i was having a big party and needed a cheap supply of beer, and once cuz i split on it with a buddy.

i guess thats not really home brew, but i do have the homebrew channel on my wii

Good god, that sounds like home brewing in the era of prohibition. How do you store that stuff till it's consumed?

Brewer
01-19-2011, 06:05 PM
Do you work at/own Dry Dock? Love that porter you guys do over there...

I've got the equipment, just have to find a little time to start my first homebrew. Wicked excited about it.

I am the brewer there. Head Brewer is Bill.

Also, to whomever recommended using brass as a wort chiller- WTF? Brass has LEAD in it, that's why it's so soft. Do not use a brass wort chiller. There is a way to pickle brass to leach out the lead, but if you can't see the material (ie. the entire INSIDE of the tubing) it's just not a good risk.

Further, to the dude who decided that the way to "make your homebrew not taste like bananas" or some such nonsense: WTF? Isoamyl acetate (banana flavor) is a common flavor compound produced by yeast in some Belgian style beers and most German style Hefeweizens. You want that flavor. Trust me.
If you meant to say band-aids, well, that comes from chlorophenols and possibly certain wild yeasts. There is so much bad information on the web about beer. Read books about brewing. Start with this one: www.howtobrew.com and definitely read Charlie Papazian's books, too.^5

Lachlan

AZorange1
01-19-2011, 06:24 PM
Never made it, but drank a lot of it one weekend (A friend made me do it)and woke up/came to with black magic marker lines on my pecker and most of my hair burned off. Great stuff!

Quoydogs
01-19-2011, 06:36 PM
Never made it, but drank a lot of it one weekend (A friend made me do it)and woke up/came to with black magic marker lines on my pecker and most of my hair burned off. Great stuff!

WOW! Thats all I got.

mwill07
01-19-2011, 06:38 PM
I did for years. I may start again when my kid goes to college and I have time. But, I'd move it outside because the heat was bad on my old stove. I really quit too because I thought I was wasting a lot of water with cooling the wort (the stuff you have before the yeast turns some of the sugar to alc.) Eventually I routed it out into the backyard and at least watered my grass and shrubs, but I still considered that 'waste.' If I find a way to efficiently cool the boiled wort, I may give it another go. I brewed a pretty good IPA with lots of cascade nose. I also had good results with a california type ale like anchor steam that is sort of lagerish, and did some hefewisens too.

PS, I got tired of cleaning bottles too. If I do it again, I think I'll keg it and use gas to carbonate the stuff.

I take my brew pot (I do a partial boil - maybe 3 gallons) and just stick it into a utility sink, filled with ice water. After about 15 minutes, I drain the ice water, re-fill the tub with fresh, cool water and dump more ice in. I can have the 3 gallons of wort down to about 120F in about a half hour or so. Once it hits 120, I pour into my spigoted bottling bucket through a cheese-cloth filter. The bucket happens to have 2 gallons of cold water waiting in it. From the bucket it goes into the carboy. at about 65 degrees or so.

No need for a wort cooler if you are doing a partial boil. You just have to have two batches of as much ice as you can make ready to go, and 2 or 3 gallons of chilled water.

I typically buy some spring water for brewing as I'm scared to have my tap water sitting around for a couple of weeks - chloramines and the like.

mwill07
01-19-2011, 06:39 PM
I am the brewer there. Head Brewer is Bill.

Also, to whomever recommended using brass as a wort chiller- WTF? Brass has LEAD in it, that's why it's so soft. Do not use a brass wort chiller. There is a way to pickle brass to leach out the lead, but if you can't see the material (ie. the entire INSIDE of the tubing) it's just not a good risk.

Further, to the dude who decided that the way to "make your homebrew not taste like bananas" or some such nonsense: WTF? Isoamyl acetate (banana flavor) is a common flavor compound produced by yeast in some Belgian style beers and most German style Hefeweizens. You want that flavor. Trust me.
If you meant to say band-aids, well, that comes from chlorophenols and possibly certain wild yeasts. There is so much bad information on the web about beer. Read books about brewing. Start with this one: www.howtobrew.com and definitely read Charlie Papazian's books, too.^5

Lachlan

I've read Papazian book cover to cover several times and Palmer's web page too...good info there.

Pony Boy
01-19-2011, 08:39 PM
Never made it, but drank a lot of it one weekend (A friend made me do it)and woke up/came to with black magic marker lines on my pecker and most of my hair burned off. Great stuff!

Yep, when I was a young pup, I woke up one Sunday morning and my truck was in the driveway with 2 rolls of sod hanging underneath. I never did figure that one out but used the sod to fill a couple of bare spots in the yard.

AZorange1
01-19-2011, 09:41 PM
Yep, when I was a young pup, I woke up one Sunday morning and my truck was in the driveway with 2 rolls of sod hanging underneath. I never did figure that one out but used the sod to fill a couple of bare spots in the yard.

So your the guy! You were in a green Toyota Landcruiser that had a bumper sticker that said, "I only work to fish".