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zdoor
01-17-2011, 03:07 PM
Just curious if anyone else has been through ACL reconstruction by Hamstring allograft? I have an injury that I've been putting off since college but had to finally get it done after several issue with it this year. Chose hamstring for the graft site after talking with my surgeon and researching on the net. Anyways had the surgery last Weds and am going kinda stir crazy.... Been doing my rehab for the first week on my own, which is mostly range of motion to 90 degrees, ankle pumps and quad/hammy contractions, and start supervised PT on Thursday after my post op... Knee hurts but is not unbearable, most of the soreness I am experiencing is in the hammy just above the knee and the inside of the knee where most of my meniscus damage was....

So far surgeon wants me to keep weight off it until after post op visit. Stopped taking pain meds Friday as I have issues taking most narcotics and would rather just endure the pain... Anyways was wondering what other peoples experience was as far as time to walk/ run resuming weight training?? I've worked out regularly since i was a teen and would say I am in far above average condition with a lot of muscle mass. Being stuck doing pretty much nothing is killing me mentally... Want to resume exercising and lifting the rest of my body but doc wants me to wait a bit... How did other people handle the monotony of doing nothing? Any tips for rehab?

footstepsfrom#27
01-17-2011, 03:13 PM
How did other people handle the monotony of doing nothing?
You're doing it now.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2011, 03:25 PM
There is a blog about it with first hand patient experiences that you might find interesting.

http://www.acl-repair.com/

I tore my ACL in '09 on the wakeboard. I didn't get it fixed because it's not killing me (after the swelling went down) except when I try to wakeboard (oddly enough). It's cool though because I wake surf nowadays. What specific symptoms were you having that made you chose surgery?

zdoor
01-17-2011, 03:36 PM
There is a blog about it with first hand patient experiences that you might find interesting.

http://www.acl-repair.com/

I tore my ACL in '09 on the wakeboard. I didn't get it fixed because it's not killing me (after the swelling went down) except when I try to wakeboard (oddly enough). It's cool though because I wake surf nowadays. What specific symptoms were you having that made you chose surgery?

Like you I waited. Ended up waiting almost 20 years with very few episodes. When I first did it I was walking normally about 2 weeks later and could run after about a month. Was doing everything, including most of what I shouldn't and was pretty much fine. Could still squat over 4 hundo and do most sports pretty much without issue.

About 2 months ago was playing in our annual coaches vs players game (i asst at the local high school) and jumped for a pass that was behind me and pushed off mthe bad leg when I was sprinting, the knee buckled badly and Heard audible tearing noises... Knee swole up but like before could walk normal again after 2 weeks or so. Unfortunately itbwas no longer stable and buckled on me a couple times after with the last time being pretty much nothing but walking down stairs. Knocked myself completely out that time and decided after that, it was time to fix it. I just didn't trust it anymore...

loborugger
01-17-2011, 03:38 PM
I went thru this in 1996, ACL with the hammy graft. I was aggressive in my re-hab. My doc was often telling me to take it ez. But, I was 26 and wanted to get back at it. I was running at about 4 months. But dont expect much. The first time I ran it, it was about 3/4 of a mile and it took 14 minutes.

zdoor
01-17-2011, 03:39 PM
Thanks for the site link.

zdoor
01-17-2011, 03:40 PM
I went thru this in 1996, ACL with the hammy graft. I was aggressive in my re-hab. My doc was often telling me to take it ez. But, I was 26 and wanted to get back at it. I was running at about 4 months. But dont expect much. The first time I ran it, it was about 3/4 of a mile and it took 14 minutes.

How long until you were off crutches?

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2011, 03:41 PM
Like you I waited. Ended up waiting almost 20 years with very few episodes. When I first did it I was walking normally about 2 weeks later and could run after about a month. Was doing everything, including most of what I shouldn't and was pretty much fine. Could still squat over 4 hundo and do most sports pretty much without issue.

About 2 months ago was playing in our annual coaches vs players game (i asst at the local high school) and jumped for a pass that was behind me and pushed off mthe bad leg when I was sprinting, the knee buckled badly and Heard audible tearing noises... Knee swole up but like before could walk normal again after 2 weeks or so. Unfortunately itbwas no longer stable and buckled on me a couple times after with the last time being pretty much nothing but walking down stairs. Knocked myself completely out that time and decided after that, it was time to fix it. I just didn't trust it anymore...

Sounds like a pretty good reason. I'm going to wait until my leg blows up as well.

zdoor
01-17-2011, 03:44 PM
Sounds like a pretty good reason. I'm going to wait until my leg blows up as well.

I don't regret waiting at all. The surgery, or at least immediate aftermath, is pretty painful and I was fine for a long time. I'm sure the procedure is better now than it was when I first injured it as well...

loborugger
01-17-2011, 04:46 PM
How long until you were off crutches?

On crutches? I was on them for a week, maybe less. I was supposed to be on them 3 or so weeks, as I remember. Also, now that I am thinking about it - I got my graft from a cadaver. I think things have probably changed dramatically since the mid 90s.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2011, 04:55 PM
Also, for cool story bro points:

Allograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same species (ie cadaver or living donor)

Autograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same patient, or occasionally an identical twin (genetically identical, also called an isograft).

Xenograft -- tissue or organ from another species

Vegas_Bronco
01-17-2011, 05:09 PM
I went with allograph just to avoid a hamstring problem later on...I am now part Tongan. I had a torn acl, pcl, stretched out my mcl and severed the artery all in one days work. Funny thing was, when I was doing rehab after my first surgery, I pulled my hammy working it to hard to get back on the field...so all in all it may not have been a bad idea to go autograph. I was having a tough time getting full range of motion back until I hit a freshly mopped floor hopping around the house w/o crutches and checked my knee up against the dishwasher...after passing out from pain...it was back in full range the next day at pt and the therapist was impressed although it was too sore to work it. Painkillers were the worse part...make you stink like a dog.

And my wife still says that doesn't compare to child birth....

zdoor
01-17-2011, 05:15 PM
Also, for cool story bro points:

Allograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same species (ie cadaver or living donor)

Autograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same patient, or occasionally an identical twin (genetically identical, also called an isograft).

Xenograft -- tissue or organ from another species

I had autograft from my own hammy. Mistake in original post.... You docs have to make things so confusing

Vegas_Bronco
01-17-2011, 05:17 PM
I learned to play guitar while I was down...never hurts to do something you'd love to do while your out of commission.

zdoor
01-17-2011, 05:18 PM
I went with allograph just to avoid a hamstring problem later on...I am now part Tongan. I had a torn acl, pcl, stretched out my mcl and severed the artery all in one days work. Funny thing was, when I was doing rehab after my first surgery, I pulled my hammy working it to hard to get back on the field...so all in all it may not have been a bad idea to go autograph. I was having a tough time getting full range of motion back until I hit a freshly mopped floor hopping around the house w/o crutches and checked my knee up against the dishwasher...after passing out from pain...it was back in full range the next day at pt and the therapist was impressed although it was too sore to work it. Painkillers were the worse part...make you stink like a dog.

And my wife still says that doesn't compare to child birth....

Lol, my wife keeps saying the same thing... Women are sssoooo sympathetic....

zdoor
01-17-2011, 05:21 PM
I went with allograph just to avoid a hamstring problem later on...I am now part Tongan. I had a torn acl, pcl, stretched out my mcl and severed the artery all in one days work. Funny thing was, when I was doing rehab after my first surgery, I pulled my hammy working it to hard to get back on the field...so all in all it may not have been a bad idea to go autograph. I was having a tough time getting full range of motion back until I hit a freshly mopped floor hopping around the house w/o crutches and checked my knee up against the dishwasher...after passing out from pain...it was back in full range the next day at pt and the therapist was impressed although it was too sore to work it. Painkillers were the worse part...make you stink like a dog.

And my wife still says that doesn't compare to child birth....

The painkillers make me feel severely hungover and I end up puking most of the time... Hate the things.

Boogerboots
01-17-2011, 05:22 PM
Although my experience may not be exactly the same as your experience (the ACL deal sounds painful) I've had my share of surgery over the past few years (two knees scopes and a broken ankle) and the best thing is to learn how to be patient. If you rush things too early, it will make rehab a lot longer and more painful. My doc said that constant running is out of my regimen but after a while I could manage to play some rec softball and later on I managed to ski and skate.

I still have to get the metal work out of my ankle because it aches like a mother f'er on cold or damp days, but that pain is nothing compared to the pain and frustration the first month or so after a major surgery. Just gut it out and be patient and just be thankful that you will be able to walk and run again, hopefully pain free.

Vegas_Bronco
01-17-2011, 05:35 PM
that pain is nothing compared to the pain and frustration the first month or so after a major surgery. Just gut it out and be patient and just be thankful that you will be able to walk and run again, hopefully pain free.

Good advice and too true...definitely need some time and being patient is tough. I cried like a lil beotch many nights out of pain and frustration and had severe depression...but I think that had a lot to do with the meds. Just make sure you call people that you nver had time for and make a list of things to do each day...I ended up learning how to treat shoulders and backs when I was at pt...made it fun to help others who were in the dispair mode.

zdoor
01-17-2011, 06:22 PM
Thanks for the advice all. It's definitely not my nature to be patient.

HAT
01-17-2011, 07:20 PM
How did other people handle the monotony of doing nothing? Any tips for rehab?

I blew my ACL & MCL on the job when I was a lift Op @ Vail in '93 so there was no monotony. Steadman/Hawkins clinic surgery via work comp.... Rehabbed at the Athletic Club by day and Garf's & The Club by night.

No weight bearing necessary...Constant loop between Timber Ridge Apts., Lionshead & VTC thanks to many awesome Vail Transit drivers!

^5

HAT
01-17-2011, 07:21 PM
I learned to play guitar while I was down...never hurts to do something you'd love to do while your out of commission.

This too!

JJJ
01-17-2011, 08:04 PM
I had the same surgery.

I don't remember much severe pain after the first week or so but it was in the same place, where the tendon was taken out on the inside. When rehabbing you will probably find most of the pain is when you try and lift your leg off the ground while on your back or on your side and do slow leg kicks. Brutal. You will probably feel a lot pain during those exercises on the kneecap itself. This lasts a couple months but isn't bad pain as it only lasts during the exercises so I would drop the meds as quick as you can.

Getting off crutches in one week though doesn't sound reasonable or recommended. I didn't do much for first two weeks but hang on the couch and do leg lift exercises there. Didn't have the machine that exercises your legs while you sleep at night though, I hear those work quite well and really speed up the recovery. But I don't think they want you putting much direct pressure on it for 2 weeks or so.

I don't think I lost my crutch(es) completely until about six weeks. You use them less and less but it is good to have at least one for awhile as you start to put more pressure on the knee. Really good to have them if you trip.

I think if you lose them too early you will develop a hitchy walking style. They allow you to put as much pressure on the knee as you want at any given time. I also found the crutches helped with doing exercises while standing around, leg bends and stretches and stuff so I wouldn't be so quick to lose them.

If it is your right knee driving is an interesting one, especially braking. The problem is not pushing on brake but lifting your left off the gas pedal quickly. You don't have the ability to lift the leg back so well and you may not lift it high enough and hit the side of the brake instead of coming down on top of it. You may have to learn to brake with your left foot for a little while if you want to start driving very early in your recovery. Leave lots of space in front of you the first week driving.

The knee won't feel like your old knee for 12 to 18 months and probably closer to 18. You will feel some pain or it just won't feel like your old knee when you jump on it or try and cut for that long. Subconsciously you will probably favor the knee for that long or longer, especially going down stairs.

I know all of people who have swelling after they exercise on the knee years after the surgery. My doesn't. It is pretty much just as good as before but I can't jump as high anymore.

I thought the coolest thing about the surgery was watching it all live on the screen while the drill bits plows into the knee cavity or when your leg flies way above the table as he is tensioning in the new ligament.

JJJ
01-17-2011, 08:16 PM
Oh, and I wouldn't do much running until you rebuild the muscles through weight training. Your leg muscles, especially your thigh and the small muscles right above the knee that allow you to lift the knee, will definitely atrophe and become much smaller than your good leg. It will take you several months to get it back to the same size as your other leg. I would focus on weight training and slow exercises like walking up and down stairs for the first 6 months and skip the running.

wandlc
01-17-2011, 08:21 PM
I had a radial fracture of my tibia at the same time that I tore the ACL and MCL. Although mine was rebuilt in 81 I had similar issues. My MCL was replaced with something out of my quad and the quad actually is what gave me the most pain. As far as downtime I would go to the gym and lift even though I was on crutches and not supposed to. Just be smart about it and perform exercises that you are supported in and keep the weight down and your form up. Like previously stated I was feeling pretty normal by 12 months and strong by 18. Good luck with your recovery. I wish I could have waited but I had a similar experience to yours, except I was next to a handrail when my knee buckled and I was able to catch myself.

loborugger
01-17-2011, 09:14 PM
Be sure to eat well and get plenty of good nutrients, so your body can rebuild itself. If you are anything like me, your surgical repaired leg atrophied down to the size of 14 year old girl's leg.

Archer81
01-17-2011, 09:16 PM
Knock on wood, worst thing I have ever done is "stretch" the tendons in my right ankle. At some point in the future I might need to have surgery because the ****er hurts when I run.

Goddamned soccer...

:Broncos:

Que
01-17-2011, 09:49 PM
Also, for cool story bro points:

Allograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same species (ie cadaver or living donor)

Autograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same patient, or occasionally an identical twin (genetically identical, also called an isograft).

Xenograft -- tissue or organ from another species

I totally want Kangaroo grafts next time..... Them ****ers can jump! Seriously though, what other species can they use?

Archer81
01-17-2011, 09:51 PM
I totally want Kangaroo grafts next time..... Seriously though, what other species can they use?

Pigs, probably. Maybe bovine? Chimpanzees?


:Broncos:

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2011, 10:02 PM
I totally want Kangaroo grafts next time..... Them ****ers can jump! Seriously though, what other species can they use?

Pigs mainly... cows too. Don't know of any kangaroo xenografts.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2011, 10:09 PM
Pigs, probably. Maybe bovine? Chimpanzees?


:Broncos:

Porcine (pig) heart valves are fairly common, especially for people who can't tolerate the anticoagulation medications required for a mechanical valve. I'm not a heart surgeon, but I've assisted on more cases than I can remember as a resident with porcine valves.

A big area in general surgery where allografts and xenografts are used is the repair of complicated hernias -- and by complicated I mean hernias where synthetic mesh would likely become infected. There are several different brands of both pig and human cadaver grafts available.

I use some bovine (cow) xenografts from time to time. Most commonly as a staple line reinforcement material, or as an angioplasty patch.

OABB
01-17-2011, 10:42 PM
Porcine (pig) heart valves are fairly common, especially for people who can't tolerate the anticoagulation medications required for a mechanical valve. I'm not a heart surgeon, but I've assisted on more cases than I can remember as a resident with porcine valves.

A big area in general surgery where allografts and xenografts are used is the repair of complicated hernias -- and by complicated I mean hernias where synthetic mesh would likely become infected. There are several different brands of both pig and human cadaver grafts available.

I use some bovine (cow) xenografts from time to time. Most commonly as a staple line reinforcement material, or as an angioplasty patch.

Cool story bro.

sgbfan
01-18-2011, 12:05 AM
Had surgery 11 months ago and I'm doing great. I probably started everything a bit earlier than most, but to give you an idea, I was without crutches in a few days, no pain pills after about 3 or 4 days, running at 4 months (1 to 2 miles) and basketball at about 7 months. I started playing without my brace last week. Now I probably did all of those things a little earlier than my doctor would like, but I felt pretty good (I think my doctor might have released me early if I hadn't moved away though).

I just tell you this because there are cases where you do pretty well, and its hard to predict what will happen. I also had the hamstring graft. I originally hurt my knee wakeboarding and didn't think it had any acl involvement and was just mcl, do I let it heal. It later gave out on me twice playing basketball, and when I finally got better insurance I got it taken care of (about 8 months after the original injury).

I think one of the biggest factors is involvement of other structures. I didn't have any other ligament damage and only had about 15 percent of my meniscus removed. I'm also in my 20's and was fairly active before. The most important thing is to know your body and work hard without pushing it too much. And listen to your doc and PT, they've seen hundreds of people go through the exact same thing.

zdoor
05-23-2011, 07:18 PM
A little more than 4 months out from surgery. Started jogging 2 weeks ago and have been doing strength training for about 1 month now. Getting the size back in my calf, and quad and hammy are about 10-15 percent or so behind the other leg. Working the operated leg about 2 to 1 to catch it up and it's getting there. Overall recovery is very good and doc has moved up the rehab from the first month on.

Got a question for anyone that's been through an ACL reconstruction. About 2 weeks ago we had rain out here and a few days before it started, I began to get some clicking in the knee and a little bit of stiffness. The stiffness is gone but still getting a little clicking from what seems like my knee cap. Wondering if anyone else has had any symptoms like this? Doc said I would go up and down a bit through about the 6th month. Havent been back to see him yet. There is no pain but the clicking is a little irritating. Not getting any detectable swelling but wondering if anyone went thru anything similar...

JJG
05-24-2011, 08:18 AM
been there. Had the same surgery in 2001. I probably rushed a bit as well. I can still feel it in my knee when its damp out. Doesn't really hurt so much, but theres something different about it. At times my knee clicks quite a bit, but no pain. I've played various sports pretty regulary since then and it's done ok for the most part. I have a history of other issues in that knee and with my ankles/feet and I'm sure they are all somewhat rellated, but the knee has never been quite the same for me.

Ive been playing indoor soccer for the past 4 years again. Lots of cutting lots of stress on the knee. Its been giving out recently again. x ray show the knee cap itself is pulling toward the outside more than it should, and then will kinda correct itself back to center, which is when I feel it give. The doc also says the repaired ACL is stretched and not as tight as it should be, which im sure adds to the instability.

my history:
corrective braces(Casts) at birth for club feet (not effective enough)
surgery on club feet at 1-2 years old.
Torn MCL and fractured tibea where the ACL attaches freshman year of highschool
Torn ACL senior yeart of highschool

all in all, I can't complain. I have mobility. Im still active playing sports I love, usually pain free with occasional buckling and swelling. A big up yours to the docs who said I wouldn't be able to walk by the time I was 20

DomCasual
05-24-2011, 08:36 AM
A little more than 4 months out from surgery. Started jogging 2 weeks ago and have been doing strength training for about 1 month now. Getting the size back in my calf, and quad and hammy are about 10-15 percent or so behind the other leg. Working the operated leg about 2 to 1 to catch it up and it's getting there. Overall recovery is very good and doc has moved up the rehab from the first month on.

Got a question for anyone that's been through an ACL reconstruction. About 2 weeks ago we had rain out here and a few days before it started, I began to get some clicking in the knee and a little bit of stiffness. The stiffness is gone but still getting a little clicking from what seems like my knee cap. Wondering if anyone else has had any symptoms like this? Doc said I would go up and down a bit through about the 6th month. Havent been back to see him yet. There is no pain but the clicking is a little irritating. Not getting any detectable swelling but wondering if anyone went thru anything similar...

I don't think it's too bad. Definitely ask him about it, though. It's definitely not something that should happen, long-term. But both times I've had it done, I had weird stuff happen that made me panic a little. All of it eventually went away.

Drunk Monkey
05-24-2011, 08:40 AM
I have more experience with Knee surgery then I should. ACL and meniscus in 95 (patellae Graft). Tore my ACL again 6 months later being a jack ass and doing to much. LISTEN TO YOUR DOC, DON'T RUSH IT ISN'T WORTH IT!!! Second ACL was a pig graft. Hurt my knee again playing Rugby and had micro fracture surgery and some BS thing where they tried to shrink the stretched out tendon with some UV type gun thing. It has since been determined that that doesn't work. I had my final ACL about 5 years ago and it was a hammy graft. It was a complicated one due to the past surgeries and the tendon is a little out of the usual position. My knee is still weak, I avoid contact sports and try to stick to things that don't require a lot of lateral movement. I can still jog and ski but in moderation. I am 32 and will probably get a knee replacement in my 40's. Take care of your joints and take rehab seriously.

broncocalijohn
05-24-2011, 09:26 AM
Also, for cool story bro points:

Allograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same species (ie cadaver or living donor)

Autograft -- transplanted tissue or organ from same patient, or occasionally an identical twin (genetically identical, also called an isograft).

Xenograft -- tissue or organ from another species

Hey Doc,
I probably sprained a ligament while batting in softball (u know you are getting old when you dont need anything hitting your knee to get it injured). Swelling is still there after (over) 4 weeks but able to walk and semi run awkwardly. Went to the doc and if swelling still isnt down by next week, MRI time. It isnt comfy crossing my leg onto my other knee (90 degree angle). Does this look like a possible sprain or tear? I figure after this long of time, the swelling would have gone back to normal. Still wearing those athletic knee braces.

Also, dont recommend Ambien. I don't have a basement and the fruits of that labor would be wasted on me.

Traveler
05-24-2011, 09:42 AM
Got a question for anyone that's been through an ACL reconstruction. About 2 weeks ago we had rain out here and a few days before it started, I began to get some clicking in the knee and a little bit of stiffness. The stiffness is gone but still getting a little clicking from what seems like my knee cap. Wondering if anyone else has had any symptoms like this? Doc said I would go up and down a bit through about the 6th month. Havent been back to see him yet. There is no pain but the clicking is a little irritating. Not getting any detectable swelling but wondering if anyone went thru anything similar...

I had total left knee reconstruction back in 87. Had the hammy grafts in 89. Also dealt with the clicking issue. Cause for mine was a portion of the graft was rubbing against the screw they drilled into my bone. Once the graft was adhered enough to the bone, they removed the screws. Clicking was gone.

zdoor
05-25-2011, 07:20 AM
Thanks for the feedback. Got an appt next week to get checked out. Figure better safe than sorry...

55CrushEm
05-25-2011, 07:43 AM
Not bragging (at least not in a good way).....but my injury beats all of yours.

I actually dislocated my knee.....yes, dislocated it. Very rare....in fact the only other person that I know of that has had a knee dislocation was Robert Edwards of the Patriots.

I was laying on the ground and my knee was bent in a L-shape.....where it shouldn't have bent.

3 of my 4 ligaments tore (only the LCL remained in tact), and all the cartilage was shattered. Like Edwards, I was told that I could be an amputee from the knee down. But fortunately for me (and somehow miraculously), my femural artery did NOT tear when the dislocation occurred).

I was told that I had the best knee surgeon at Mass General Hospital at the time (back in 1996), and he said it was the worst knee injury he had ever seen. Two quotes from him that I remember are "It looked like a grenade had gone off in your knee." and "Basically, about the only thing holding your lower leg to your upper leg was the skin."

Additionally, I had badly stretched one of the nerves running down my leg (deep peroneal? I forget...)....so I had a drop (paralyzed) foot. Fortunately, it was not torn, either....and worked itself back so I can now lift my foot at the heal, and can therefore walk properly.

Bottom line....surgeon was fantastic.....and I can do almost everything I could before the injury. I was only 23 when it happened, so I'm sure youth played a nice factor in it too.

MplsBronco
05-25-2011, 09:00 AM
Not bragging (at least not in a good way).....but my injury beats all of yours.

I actually dislocated my knee.....yes, dislocated it. Very rare....in fact the only other person that I know of that has had a knee dislocation was Robert Edwards of the Patriots.

I was laying on the ground and my knee was bent in a L-shape.....where it shouldn't have bent.

3 of my 4 ligaments tore (only the LCL remained in tact), and all the cartilage was shattered. Like Edwards, I was told that I could be an amputee from the knee down. But fortunately for me (and somehow miraculously), my femural artery did NOT tear when the dislocation occurred).

I was told that I had the best knee surgeon at Mass General Hospital at the time (back in 1996), and he said it was the worst knee injury he had ever seen. Two quotes from him that I remember are "It looked like a grenade had gone off in your knee." and "Basically, about the only thing holding your lower leg to your upper leg was the skin."

Additionally, I had badly stretched one of the nerves running down my leg (deep peroneal? I forget...)....so I had a drop (paralyzed) foot. Fortunately, it was not torn, either....and worked itself back so I can now lift my foot at the heal, and can therefore walk properly.

Bottom line....surgeon was fantastic.....and I can do almost everything I could before the injury. I was only 23 when it happened, so I'm sure youth played a nice factor in it too.

Christ! Sounds like Napolean McCallum. I'll never forget watching that happen with my dad's cousin who used to be the trainer for the Minnesota North Stars. He was taken aback at that sight.

Drunk Monkey
05-25-2011, 09:05 AM
Not bragging (at least not in a good way).....but my injury beats all of yours.

I actually dislocated my knee.....yes, dislocated it. Very rare....in fact the only other person that I know of that has had a knee dislocation was Robert Edwards of the Patriots.

I was laying on the ground and my knee was bent in a L-shape.....where it shouldn't have bent.

3 of my 4 ligaments tore (only the LCL remained in tact), and all the cartilage was shattered. Like Edwards, I was told that I could be an amputee from the knee down. But fortunately for me (and somehow miraculously), my femural artery did NOT tear when the dislocation occurred).

I was told that I had the best knee surgeon at Mass General Hospital at the time (back in 1996), and he said it was the worst knee injury he had ever seen. Two quotes from him that I remember are "It looked like a grenade had gone off in your knee." and "Basically, about the only thing holding your lower leg to your upper leg was the skin."

Additionally, I had badly stretched one of the nerves running down my leg (deep peroneal? I forget...)....so I had a drop (paralyzed) foot. Fortunately, it was not torn, either....and worked itself back so I can now lift my foot at the heal, and can therefore walk properly.

Bottom line....surgeon was fantastic.....and I can do almost everything I could before the injury. I was only 23 when it happened, so I'm sure youth played a nice factor in it too.

How did you manage to do that? Ping Pong? Fight Club?

zdoor
05-25-2011, 09:15 AM
Not bragging (at least not in a good way).....but my injury beats all of yours.

I actually dislocated my knee.....yes, dislocated it. Very rare....in fact the only other person that I know of that has had a knee dislocation was Robert Edwards of the Patriots.

I was laying on the ground and my knee was bent in a L-shape.....where it shouldn't have bent.

3 of my 4 ligaments tore (only the LCL remained in tact), and all the cartilage was shattered. Like Edwards, I was told that I could be an amputee from the knee down. But fortunately for me (and somehow miraculously), my femural artery did NOT tear when the dislocation occurred).

I was told that I had the best knee surgeon at Mass General Hospital at the time (back in 1996), and he said it was the worst knee injury he had ever seen. Two quotes from him that I remember are "It looked like a grenade had gone off in your knee." and "Basically, about the only thing holding your lower leg to your upper leg was the skin."

Additionally, I had badly stretched one of the nerves running down my leg (deep peroneal? I forget...)....so I had a drop (paralyzed) foot. Fortunately, it was not torn, either....and worked itself back so I can now lift my foot at the heal, and can therefore walk properly.

Bottom line....surgeon was fantastic.....and I can do almost everything I could before the injury. I was only 23 when it happened, so I'm sure youth played a nice factor in it too.

Ouch. That sounds rough....

55CrushEm
05-25-2011, 09:40 AM
How did you manage to do that? Ping Pong? Fight Club?

Horsing around while drunk.

BroncoLifer
05-25-2011, 09:47 AM
Horsing around while drunk.

Wrestling with your brother, then slipped on a McDonald's bag?

55CrushEm
05-25-2011, 10:02 AM
Wrestling with your brother, then slipped on a McDonald's bag?

LOL. Walking in Boston from one bar to the next with a group of friends. Along Boston Common there is a small retaining wall in one section, no more than 2 feet high. We were walking along, jumping onto it, and off of it, over and over, as we moved along.

Then one of my friends decided to jump on my back.....and I took the leap anyway, landing on one leg......it collapsed.

Drunk Monkey
05-25-2011, 10:37 AM
LOL. Walking in Boston from one bar to the next with a group of friends. Along Boston Common there is a small retaining wall in one section, no more than 2 feet high. We were walking along, jumping onto it, and off of it, over and over, as we moved along.

Then one of my friends decided to jump on my back.....and I took the leap anyway, landing on one leg......it collapsed.

Ouch, I hope you were very very drunk when that happened.

55CrushEm
05-25-2011, 11:06 AM
Ouch, I hope you were very very drunk when that happened.

Extremely. But when I looked down at my leg.....I sobered up quickly. Then when I got to the hospital, it took several "tugs" for the staff person to relocate it. THAT was painful.

When he finally relocated it.....my knee was the size of a large cantaloupe.