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SoDak Bronco
05-15-2010, 12:08 PM
http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/nfl-giants-knocking-down-inglis-door/story-e6frf9if-1225867234815

GREG Inglis has received an invitation to trial with NFL clubs Buffalo and Denver as nine rugby league clubs target the Melbourne Storm champ.

As investigators continue their probe into Storm's $1.7 million salary cap breach, the Sunday Herald Sun can reveal the hunt for Inglis's signature has gone offshore.

Up to four American gridiron clubs want to trial the bustling Australian Test centre at three-day camps in September.

With the Storm out of finals contention and Australia's end-of-season Four Nations campaign not beginning until October 23, Inglis would be able to squeeze in a US trip to be assessed by the NFL clubs.

Inglis' manager, Alan Gainey, said he had received an approach from Australian-based NFL scouts even before news of Storm's salary-cap breach.

Inglis is contracted to the Storm until the end of 2012, but with the club facing a purge to get under the salary cap next season, there are fears the 23-year-old could go in the cleanout.

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The Brisbane Broncos have made informal inquiries about Inglis, but OzPunt, an Australian-based organisation, says NFL teams are receptive to the Queensland Origin star flying to the US to test his wares in the rugby league off-season.

"There are definite opportunities for Greg Inglis in the NFL," said OzPunt's Cameron McGillivray.

"We've sent tapes of him to NFL clubs and I know for a fact, if Greg was keen, there would be four clubs who would take him tomorrow.

"If Greg is interested, there is an offer for him to attend a mini-camp, where under NFL rules he would be allowed to trial for three days.

"The Storm won't be in the finals, so he would have the opportunity. The NFL scouts don't know a lot about NRL players unless we alert them, but they've seen footage of Greg and they believe he's an amazing talent who could succeed as a kick returner or a linebacker."

The minimum wage in the NFL is $325,000 and Inglis is understood to earn about $500,000 at the Storm, but McGillivray said Inglis could earn $2 million a season within two years if he was successful.

Inglis's interest in the NFL was piqued in December when he met American boxer Roy Jones Jr, who told the Storm ace he'd be a smash hit in the US.

Gainey said Inglis was committed to the Storm, but had not ruled out an NFL experiment later in his career.

"I've had inquiries from just about every sport, including (the NFL)," Gainey said.

"They've got some scouts out here and a few of the scouts thought Greg would be a sensation in the game.

"It's something that might interest Greg down the track. He'd have time to fly over there this year for a look around and to test himself out, but his preference is to stay at the Storm."

SoDak Bronco
05-15-2010, 12:11 PM
Rugby star gets interest from NFL teams (http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2010/05/15/rugby-star-gets-interest-from-nfl-teams/)

Posted by Gregg Rosenthal on May 15, 2010 1:08 PM ET
NFL teams including the Broncos and Bills have expressed some interest (http://www.heraldsun.com.au/sport/nfl-giants-knocking-down-inglis-door/story-e6frf9if-1225867234815) in Austrailian rugby star Greg Inglis, according to the Sunday Mail in Australia.

The 23-year-old won the "Golden Boot" award as the best rugby player in the world last year. He likely would just get a tryout, and he seems likely to continue playing rugby for the immediate future.

If Inglis tried to cross over, the 238-pounder would probably try out as a kick returner and linebacker.

"I know for a fact, if Greg was keen, there would be four clubs who would take him tomorrow," said Cameron McGillivray, who works for an Australian Academy that helps prepare players -- mostly kickers and punters -- to prepare for American football.

"They've got some scouts out here and a few of the scouts thought Greg would be a sensation in the game," Melbourne Storm manager Allan Gainey said.

(Thanks to Mac's football blog passing this link along (http://www.macsfootballblog.com/2010/05/rugby-star-greg-inglis-drawing-nfl.html).)

Dagmar
05-15-2010, 12:12 PM
Hmmmm. The only other team interested are Buffalo?

SoDak Bronco
05-15-2010, 12:20 PM
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SoDak Bronco
05-15-2010, 12:25 PM
this dude is a beast...and he wouldn't be affraid to go across the middle..those rugby players are crazy

Swedish Extrovert
05-15-2010, 12:38 PM
Tight End? Fullback? Linebacker?

Shoemaker
05-15-2010, 12:52 PM
Tight End? Fullback? Linebacker?

Article says he would most likely try out as a kick returner and linebacker.

baja
05-15-2010, 12:54 PM
The new Hillis, the five tool player

HEAV
05-15-2010, 01:09 PM
Rugby or NFL - Who's the better athlete?

by Alex Goff
It's an easy trap to fall into, watching Deion Sanders strut over the gridiron field; watching the speedy Warrick Dunn; or watching the power and intensity of Zach Thomas, you wonder, "Man, if we could only get those tremendous athletes on the rugby field, then those Wallabies and All Blacks would be shaking." But are NFL athletes better than those in American rugby to start with? Well, that's certainly hard to measure, but we'll try to make some comparisons.

Strength:
We all hear the stories of NFL players who can bench 500 pounds and squat 600. That is certainly strength in it's own right, and most rugby players will say they won't be able to match that. But there's more to strength than power and size. There's technique, there's intensity, there's knowledge. Just ask Tom Billups. Recently retired Eagle hooker and now the team's fitness instructor, he knows as much about working out for rugby as anyone.
"Speaking with the new national team coach, Duncan Hall, he relayed to me that the Wallabies felt we were as physically strong as any team they had played in the RWC '99. That said, we got pushed badly in the scrums and cut to ribbons in the backline," said Billups.
Then again, the Americans have something to teach rugby players overseas. Many players have learned while in college athletics how to train and prepare for sports in general.
"My own professional playing experiences would reinforce the belief that as Americans, with American sporting experiences, we are better athletes in general," said Billups "This isn't to say that the Carlings and Brookes of the rugby world aren't great athletes, because they certainly are. My point is that we get such a great experience at the university level sportswise, that it benefits us tremendously when we go onto other endeavors. If you play sport in University in America, you are a professional athlete in the way you schedule your time, training, nutrition etc. When I first arrived in London, with the game struggling to realize what it is to be professional, my teammates, who were great rugby players, didn't know what to eat, how much to eat, when to train, when to rest, even what to wear. Imagine the tighty-whitey rugby shorts, a polo shirt with the collar up, and some Englishman who is now a professional player, standing in the gym not having a clue as to what to do. This is where the likes of Luke Gross and Dan Lyle stand out even more than on the rugby field. Luke Gross was one of the fastest and strongest players at the Harlequins. I was the most fit. Luke would win some testing categories and I would win others. Dan Lyle is the strongest man in the gym at Bath, with the best technique, (although I have some work to do with him). Dave Hodges is a complete freak. He eats very clean, strength trains at a high intensity, and runs harder in training than anyone else in Wales now."

Size:
There, for the most part, NFL players win. They are bigger by far than almost any rugby players throughout the world (Os Du Randt excluded). Take Dan Lyle, for example. At 6-4, 245 he is a big man. He possesses tremendous speed and agility for his size, and his huge hands increase his ball handling skills. But he's below average for an NFL tight end (his position in college), where he'd be expected to be about two inches taller. On the lower end, there are players in the NFL who check in at about 5-7 or so, but they are few and far between. On the Eagles of 1999, Tom Billups, Kevin Dalzell, Vaea Anitoni, and Brian Hightower were all 5-8. The NFL minimum for running back is considered to be 5-8, 195. Strangely enough, the Eagles also boast Luke Gross, who at 6-8 would be perhaps too tall for survive the NFL. "If you are fit and skilled you will out-play any big fast football player with no skill," explained Eagle center Juan Grobler. "I have seen countless guys like that, and I always think, 'Oh no, this guy is going to be a handful, but you always get the better of him though experience and skill. Look at the Aussies, those guys are no bigger than the Eagles but possess tremendous skills and knowledge of the game. Tim Horan weighs around 190 pounds and stands about 5-feet-7, yet was the MVP of the 1999 World Cup because of the skills he showed."

Speed:
NFL prospects routinely clock in at 4.4 seconds for the 40-yard dash. Some have claimed 4.2. It's hard to think of any rugby player in the world who could match that (although often the NFL-ers take a running start, which is pretty sleazy). "My 40 time is about a 4.7 or 4.8 -- pretty slow compared to NFL standards," demurred Dalzell, one of the fastest current Eagles. "I would say that athletically we match up in the States pretty well with the rugby players in Europe."

Endurance:
Possibly only cornerbacks and wide receivers can lay any claim to endurance required to play rugby. It's not easy to measure, but rugby players can run farther and last longer than and NFL player (with perhaps some notable exceptions). If you are to measure athleticism, endurance is there, as well. "I think that international rugby players are way fitter aerobically than your average NFL player," confirms Grobler. "You have to be, it is the nature of the game." Adds Hodges, "the strength is probably in favor of the U.S. players as most have a football background and have been lifting since age 14," said Hodges, who runs a 4.8 40-yards and benches 370. "As far as the NFL goes they are a lot stronger, more explosive, and probably generally quicker off the mark. However, their aerobic fitness is not at the level of a Rugby player as they don't need to be able to run for 80 minutes."

Hand-Eye Coordination:
Another one that's difficult to measure, but consider what happens when there's a fumble in an NFL game, and how many of these tremendous athletes flounder around trying to pick up that ball. Now think of any rugby player ... prop, wing, eighteen ... and what you'd expect him to do. Rugby players have better ball skills and better coordination than a large number of football players, and it's only right, since most football players never touch the ball on a regular basis.

So should we be bringing in players who are NFL caliber and molding rugby players out of them? Maybe. Maybe we already are. Lyle has done well, Hodges was quite a football player and Richard Tardits did it professionally. For younger players, look at newly minted Eagle Sinapati Uiagalelei, who is 6'2", 230 lbs and runs a 10.6 100 meters. He's got a football scholarship to UCLA, but we hope to keep him in the older game. But bringing in lots of football players can lead to other problems.
"Where we fall short is in the knowledge and instinct of the game," said Dalzell. "Years of learning correct running lines, etcetera, makes a huge difference. In the US there is plenty of size and strength, but what really matters, I think, is experience at the top level of the game. Hey, if any of those NFL rejects want to play some rugby, give them my number!" That would be 011-33 ...

In the end, though, as Billups points out eloquently, the American experience in college sports can be a huge advantage in the world of rugby. We just have to marry the physical preparation with the mental preparation and development of that magical thing called instinct. Billups once more: "So what we do as Americans, and specifically as Eagles, is continue to refine the groundwork that was laid down years ago, when we were in school. Be consistent, train hard, and be accountable for your performances."

http://www.ballsout.com/art_rugbynfl.htm
------------

If some consider Tebow a project at QB...then a rugby player would be chemistry experiment at line-backer.

razorwire77
05-15-2010, 01:28 PM
I seriously doubt there is any legitimate debate as far as NFL players being superior pure athletes to Rugby players. As far as Greg Inglis is concerned, he does seem to have NFL caliber athleticism though.

Dagmar
05-15-2010, 01:32 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/sport2/hi/rugby_union/irish/2854671.stm

hookemhess
05-15-2010, 01:39 PM
This would be fun to watch him give it a go in camp. At 6'5" 240 lbs., he could probably line up at H-Back.

KipCorrington25
05-15-2010, 01:43 PM
He's got some Gordie Lockbaum written all over him.

Flex Gunmetal
05-15-2010, 01:43 PM
I seriously doubt there is any legitimate debate as far as NFL players being superior pure athletes to Rugby players. As far as Greg Inglis is concerned, he does seem to have NFL caliber athleticism though.

They are incomparable. Rugby requires much more stamina, football requires explosiveness and strength.

Swedish Extrovert
05-15-2010, 01:46 PM
This would be fun to watch him give it a go in camp. At 6'5" 240 lbs., he could probably line up at H-Back.

A position that is never used in McD's system.

Popps
05-15-2010, 02:06 PM
The new Hillis, the five tool player

/lock thread.

extralife
05-15-2010, 02:08 PM
Seems like a waste of time to me. Who wants some guy that's never played football before? And why would the best rugby player in the world suddenly decide to play some sport he probably never heard of until five years ago? Don't see a whole lot of linebackers returning kicks, either.

Hamrob
05-15-2010, 02:14 PM
I don't know about LB. I think you'd want to get the ball in his hands. I wonder what his 40 time would be. He could be another Brandon Marshall type WR. He'd dominate smaller CB's.

Paladin
05-15-2010, 02:17 PM
Seems like a waste of time to me. Who wants some guy that's never played football before? And why would the best rugby player in the world suddenly decide to play some sport he probably never heard of until five years ago? Don't see a whole lot of linebackers returning kicks, either.

Well, h3ll. Dream a bit.......

theAPAOps5
05-15-2010, 02:20 PM
That guy is fast and has an amazing stiff arm. He makes the other team look like scrubs.

Swedish Extrovert
05-15-2010, 02:52 PM
Seems like a waste of time to me. Who wants some guy that's never played football before? And why would the best rugby player in the world suddenly decide to play some sport he probably never heard of until five years ago? Don't see a whole lot of linebackers returning kicks, either.

You ever hear of this thing called money that a lot of people in the world do some crazy things for?

UberBroncoMan
05-15-2010, 03:08 PM
This dude is ****ing 6 foot 5 and fast as ****. He's 108 kg which is about 238 pounds. He's basically got a Brandon Marshall body when it comes to weight and height. He plays in a sports without pads and helmets. He's a star in his own sport. As in he got the equivalent of the MVP trophy... ****ing get this guy on the squad ASAP. I love what I see so far. Lets see if he can run routs though.

Oh... and he JUST turned 23.

baja
05-15-2010, 03:11 PM
We'll sign him or Westbrook tomorrow because it's Sunday and we always make roster news on Sunday.

Josh never sleeps!

Bronco Yoda
05-15-2010, 03:38 PM
Big difference between running around in shorts and football equipment.

cmhargrove
05-15-2010, 03:42 PM
Big difference between running around in shorts and football equipment.

I don't quite see people tackling him as well...

Not that he couldn't be a good player, but i'm not holding my breath. I'm still getting over the failure of Wesley Duke.

bombay
05-15-2010, 03:45 PM
A heat-seeking missile at linebacker might not be a bad thing.

UberBroncoMan
05-15-2010, 05:26 PM
I don't quite see people tackling him as well...

Not that he couldn't be a good player, but i'm not holding my breath. I'm still getting over the failure of Wesley Duke.

An NCAA Basketball player there wasn't even good enough to get into the NBA is completely different than a professional Rugby player (much closer to Football) who is quite literally the superstar of his sport.

i4jelway7
05-15-2010, 06:42 PM
I approve... get it done

snowspot66
05-15-2010, 07:40 PM
Lets bring him in as a WR.

UberBroncoMan
05-15-2010, 07:48 PM
Lets bring him in as a WR.

I'd like that too, but I don't see any room.

Decker + Thomas + Royal + Gaffney + Stokley + McKinley (one which would be inactive on gameday)

LLoyd would probably be cut too.

If we were going to cut Stokley we would have done it already so he could get work. Kind of like Andra Davis.

listopencil
05-15-2010, 07:49 PM
This dude is ****ing 6 foot 5 and fast as ****. He's 108 kg which is about 238 pounds. He's basically got a Brandon Marshall body when it comes to weight and height. He plays in a sports without pads and helmets. He's a star in his own sport. As in he got the equivalent of the MVP trophy... ****ing get this guy on the squad ASAP. I love what I see so far. Lets see if he can run routs though.

Oh... and he JUST turned 23.

Oh ****, he's 6'5"? I didn't see that. I hope they do bring him in for a look.

listopencil
05-15-2010, 07:50 PM
I'd like that too, but I don't see any room.

Decker + Thomas + Royal + Gaffney + Stokley + McKinley (one which would be inactive on gameday)

LLoyd would probably be cut too.

If we were going to cut Stokley we would have done it already so he could get work. Kind of like Andra Davis.

Same thing I was thinking, I doubt there is room for him as a WR. But worth keeping on the roster for Special Teams and trying to find plays for him, see if we can work him in.

snowspot66
05-15-2010, 07:59 PM
I'd like that too, but I don't see any room.

Decker + Thomas + Royal + Gaffney + Stokley + McKinley (one which would be inactive on gameday)

LLoyd would probably be cut too.

If we were going to cut Stokley we would have done it already so he could get work. Kind of like Andra Davis.

Well it depends. If it's going to take a lot of money to get him here, which it might since he's such a rugby star, it might be a difficult decision.

But if it's cheap then there's no issue in seeing what he has in the pre-season. Especially since our two draft picks are still recovering.

eddie mac
05-15-2010, 08:06 PM
He'd save the team a fortune in pads.

McD "Son are you not wearing any pads?"

Inglis "No way McDobber, them things only slow me down"

McD "But what about when you get hit or tackled"

Inglis "No worries mate. The sheila's hit harder back home"

mwill07
05-15-2010, 08:09 PM
dude could be a special teams beast, but I think that's all I'd trust him with. No way I'd put someone who has never played football in @ LB, opposing teams would catch him out of position soo often it wouldn't be funny. I don't even think I'd want him playing O, unless it was just bubble screens and the like, but you could only do that so often until the D catches on.

I could definately see him as a star in all kick returns and kick return coverages...At best he would be Devin Hester and Steve Tasker, rolled up in one. That's probably worth a look.

Tombstone RJ
05-15-2010, 08:16 PM
punter maybe? seriously, that's where I'd start him at. As a rugby player he has to punt the ball good. I can't believe that people here are saying its gonna take Tebow 3 years to be a decent QB in the NFL yet they think this guy can come in (never having played a down of American football) and play? Special Teams is all he would play. No way he steps in as a LBer and does anything. His brains would be fried just trying to lean the verbiage.

UberBroncoMan
05-15-2010, 08:23 PM
Well it depends. If it's going to take a lot of money to get him here, which it might since he's such a rugby star, it might be a difficult decision.

But if it's cheap then there's no issue in seeing what he has in the pre-season. Especially since our two draft picks are still recovering.

Not really.

He makes $500,000 a year as a Rugby player... a 23 years old super star Rugby player.

$310,000 is the minimum salary in the NFL. So yeah. Wouldn't be that hard to get him.

He seems to be quite the physical specimen and clearly gifted athletically.

snowspot66
05-15-2010, 09:10 PM
Not really.

He makes $500,000 a year as a Rugby player... a 23 years old super star Rugby player.

$310,000 is the minimum salary in the NFL. So yeah. Wouldn't be that hard to get him.

He seems to be quite the physical specimen and clearly gifted athletically.

Getting how much in endorsements and other sources of income? I don't know how much they promote rugby players. But if he's all that then he might have other considerations as well.

But if he really is that cheap to bring in then it's definitely worth a shot in TC. People can complain about him never playing football before. But so what. We bring in dozens of UDFA every year and they don't have half of his athleticism.

extralife
05-15-2010, 09:57 PM
I like how you guys are assuming all you have to do is match his rugby salary and it's a done deal. If he's one of the best rugby players in the world, I'm going to assume he enjoys doing that and being good at it a little more than he'd enjoy riding the pine in Denver playing a sport he knows nothing about.

Williams
05-15-2010, 10:47 PM
he'd save the team a fortune in pads.

Mcd "son are you not wearing any pads?"

inglis "no way mcdobber, them things only slow me down"

mcd "but what about when you get hit or tackled"

inglis "no worries mate. The sheila's hit harder back home"

Hilarious!

FireFly
05-16-2010, 12:32 AM
He plays league, not rugby and he is a very good player.

But the skills that he has are not going to translate into the NFL. He is athletic yes, but NFL players are bred to play, they grow up living and breathing the sport. League players generally just aren't like that.

He will NOT be signed by the Broncos, I would bet my life on it.

FireFly
05-16-2010, 12:33 AM
punter maybe? seriously, that's where I'd start him at. As a rugby player he has to punt the ball good. I can't believe that people here are saying its gonna take Tebow 3 years to be a decent QB in the NFL yet they think this guy can come in (never having played a down of American football) and play? Special Teams is all he would play. No way he steps in as a LBer and does anything. His brains would be fried just trying to lean the verbiage.

If you want an Australian punter, you'd look in the AFL not the NRL

FireFly
05-16-2010, 12:34 AM
I'd like that too, but I don't see any room.

Decker + Thomas + Royal + Gaffney + Stokley + McKinley (one which would be inactive on gameday)

LLoyd would probably be cut too.

If we were going to cut Stokley we would have done it already so he could get work. Kind of like Andra Davis.

His catching skills are not going to be that great and he's never run a route in his life.

FireFly
05-16-2010, 12:34 AM
A heat-seeking missile at linebacker might not be a bad thing.

He would get BLOWN up at line backer.

OABB
05-16-2010, 12:36 AM
Can he do a backflip?

Quoydogs
05-16-2010, 01:24 AM
Can he do a backflip?

Or can he jump a car driving down the street.

I all fairness athletes are athletes, you take 80 percent of the Nfl players and put them on a Basketball court or let them play baseball and they would be big hitters in the game.

He worth a look. His stiff arm is great, he can catch and rugby players are stuff as ****.

ZONA
05-16-2010, 02:12 AM
Rugby sucks. Half the guys don't even run full speed to try and tackle a guy. Just watch some clips, they sorta just run about, and only a few guys seem to try and make tackles.

The Joker
05-16-2010, 03:24 AM
Rugby sucks. Half the guys don't even run full speed to try and tackle a guy. Just watch some clips, they sorta just run about, and only a few guys seem to try and make tackles.

Seriously, why comment when you obviously don't know much about how the sport is played?

I'm not much of a rugby fan, but I can appreciate that there's a lot of skill to it.

The reason not everyone is flying to the ball trying to make a tackle is that you'd leave yourself incredibly vulnerable if the guy plays it out wide or kicks it and you've got 15 guys descending on a guy who doesn't have the ball anymore.

Your comment is essentially the equivalent of someone who doesn't watch a lot of football seeing a highlight video of Larry Fitzgerald and saying "The NFL sucks, there were only one or two guys actually trying to stop him catching the ball each time. The rest of them were scattered all over the pitch doing nothing."

As for this rugby guy coming over, the only spot I can really see much hope for him is as a rush linebacker/3rd down pass rusher. Having never played the sport before he's going to be a liability in coverage, and he doesn't have the frame to hold up against the run. He's damn fast though and seems to play physical so maybe he could get after the QB a few plays a game.

I wouldn't hold my breath though, dude should probably just stick to rugby where he looks like a phenomenal prospect.

SoDak Bronco
05-16-2010, 05:47 AM
I think with his 6'5" frame and ball skills he'd be a great TE prospect. We obviously have a need for that, as do the bills..I'd bet that is where we'd want him.

GoBroncos DownUnder
05-16-2010, 10:21 AM
If Inglis is considered to be "worth the effort" and going to play in the NFL it WILL be in Denver if we want him, ... Members of the Melbourne Storm board made it a point to meet and play host with Denver's management back in 2000, for the Broncos v Chargers game in Sydney! ;)

BUT, Inglis will need to go WAY back to basics and learn how to "hit" in the NFL. Rugby players use their shoulder more in contact, so if you put them in with an NFL team for the day, a rugby player will dislocate a shoulder before the sun sets!

Next "OzPunt's Cameron McGillivray" ... WTF? You're talking to a guy who's trying to place PUNTERS in the NFL, and is still YET to place any, "linebacker or kick-returner" who the **** is he kidding?

SportinOne
05-16-2010, 10:40 AM
he looks good in those videos, but put a guy like moreno out there, who isn't really considered fast for an NFL running back and see what happens.

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SportinOne
05-16-2010, 10:42 AM
my only point is to illustrate the fact that no matter how good he looks compared to the other players, he'd be lucky to make the team for the Broncos and even then he'd be a special teamer. but at league minimum if he can be better than someone else then go for it.. just don't expect Hills 2.0. Hillis would have been a great rugby player BTW.

GoBroncos DownUnder
05-16-2010, 10:49 AM
By the way, the comparisons between sports is stupid, Rugby League is an "All Round" sport, where players must be able to do everything on the field to some degree (run, chase, catch, punt, tackle, pass, drop-kick a field goal, etc), American Football is a specialised sport where players can do a few things EXTREMELY well, in relation to their position.
In Olympic terms, a Rugby League team is like a group of Decathletes, while NFL players would be the rest of the Track and Field team! ;)

Tombstone RJ
05-16-2010, 11:00 AM
By the way, the comparisons between sports is stupid, Rugby League is an "All Round" sport, where players must be able to do everything on the field to some degree (run, chase, catch, punt, tackle, pass, drop-kick a field goal, etc), American Football is a specialised sport where players can do a few things EXTREMELY well, in relation to their position.
In Olympic terms, a Rugby League team is like a group of Decathletes, while NFL players would be the rest of the Track and Field team! ;)

In countries where American football is played (outside the USA) you don't see many good teams (none that I know of). NFL Europe had some foreign players but none of them made it to the NFL. Comparing rugby to American football does not really translate very well, it's not comparing apples to apples, its more like comparing apples to pears. Similar in some ways, different in others. Rejects from the NFL go to Canada to play football and even the CFL is different in it's rules and how the field is set up to the NFL and American rules football.

Seriously, if you took an NFL linebacker like Spencer Larsen and put him on a rugby team (Euro rules, Aussie rules, South African rules, whatever) he'd be able to play and compete just fine. He'd need much better conditioning, but overall, he'd have less trouble getting on a team and being productive than vice versa. JMHO.

bombay
05-16-2010, 01:00 PM
I don't know that football is such a complicated game that a big strong fast fearless guy couldn't make some kind of contribution.

snowspot66
05-16-2010, 01:36 PM
I don't know that football is such a complicated game that a big strong fast fearless guy couldn't make some kind of contribution.

It's not. People make it out to be rocket science. It's just repetition.

Kids in Pee Wee football manage to remember a dozen plays with only a couple of hours of practice per week. I would have to hope this guy is brighter than a 10 year old.

Tombstone RJ
05-16-2010, 02:45 PM
I don't know that football is such a complicated game that a big strong fast fearless guy couldn't make some kind of contribution.

Hopefully the guy gives it a try, I'd love to see if he can do it.

BlaK-Argentina
05-16-2010, 03:34 PM
He would pitch the ball back to no one on his first play.

GoBroncos DownUnder
05-16-2010, 03:50 PM
He would pitch the ball back to no one on his first play.
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