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mhgaffney
05-03-2010, 04:12 AM
Leaked report: Government fears Deepwater Horizon well could become unchecked gusher

By Ben Raines
April 30, 2010, 2:18PM

http://blog.al.com/live/2010/04/deepwater_horizon_secret_memo.html

'The following is not public' document states...

A confidential government report on the unfolding spill disaster in the Gulf makes clear the Coast Guard now fears the well could become an unchecked gusher shooting millions of gallons of oil per day into the Gulf.

"The following is not public," reads the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration's Emergency Response document dated April 28. "Two additional release points were found today in the tangled riser. If the riser pipe deteriorates further, the flow could become unchecked resulting in a release volume an order of magnitude higher than previously thought."

Asked Friday to comment on the document, NOAA spokesman Scott Smullen said that the additional leaks described were reported to the public late Wednesday night. Regarding the possibility of the spill becoming an order of magnitude larger, Smullen said, "I'm letting the document you have speak for itself."

In scientific circles, an order of magnitude means something is 10 times larger. In this case, an order of magnitude higher would mean the volume of oil coming from the well could be 10 times higher than the 5,000 barrels a day coming out now. That would mean 50,000 barrels a day, or 2.1 million gallons a day. It appears the new leaks mentioned in the Wednesday release are the leaks reported to the public late Wednesday night.

"There is no official change in the volume released but the USCG is no longer stating that the release rate is 1,000 barrels a day," continues the document, referred to as report No. 12. "Instead they are saying that they are preparing for a worst-case release and bringing all assets to bear."

The emergency document also states that the spill has grown in size so quickly that only 1 to 2 percent of it has been sprayed with dispersants.

The Press-Register obtained the emergency report from a government official. The White House, NOAA, the Coast Guard and BP Plc did not immediately return calls for comment made early this morning.

The worst-case scenario for the broken and leaking well pouring oil into the Gulf of Mexico would be the loss of the wellhead and kinked piping currently restricting the flow to 5,000 barrels -- or 210,000 gallons -- per day.

If the wellhead is lost, oil could leave the well at a much greater rate.

"Typically, a very good well in the Gulf can produce 30,000 barrels a day, but that's under control. I have no idea what an uncontrolled release could be," said Stephen Sears, chairman of the petroleum engineering department at Louisiana State University.

On Thursday, federal officials said they were preparing for the worst-case scenario but didn't elaborate.

Kinks in the piping created as the rig sank to the seafloor may be all that is preventing the Deepwater Horizon well from releasing its maximum flow. BP is now drilling a relief well as the ultimate fix. The company said Thursday that process would take up to 3 months.

"I'm not sure what's happening down there right now. I have heard there is a kink in what's called the riser. The riser is a long pipe that connects the wellhead to the rig. I really don't know if that kink is a big restriction. Is that really a big restriction? There could be another restriction further down," said LSU's Sears.

"An analogy would be if you have a kink in a garden hose. You suspect that kink is restricting the flow, but there could be another restriction or kink somewhere else closer to the faucet.

BP Plc executive Doug Suttles said Thursday the company was worried about "erosion" of the pipe at the wellhead.

Sand is an integral part of the formations that hold oil under the Gulf. That sand, carried in the oil as it shoots through the piping, is blamed for the ongoing erosion described by BP.

"The pipe could disintegrate. You've got sand getting into the pipe, it's eroding the pipe all the time, like a sandblaster," said Ron Gouget, a former oil spill response coordinator for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.

"When the oil is removed normally, it comes out at a controlled rate. You can still have abrasive particles in that. Well, now, at this well, its coming out at fairly high velocity," Gouget continued. "Any erosive grains are abrading the inside of the pipe and all the steel that comes in contact with the liquid. It's essentially sanding away the pipe."

Gouget said the loss of a wellhead is totally unprecedented.

"How bad it could get from that, you will have a tremendous volume of oil that is going to be offgassing on the coast. Depending on how much wind is there, and how those gases build up, that's a significant health concern," he said.

The formation that was being drilled by Deepwater Horizon when it exploded and sank last week is reported to have tens of millions of barrels of oil. A barrel contains 42 gallons.

Smullen described the NOAA document as a regular daily briefing. "Your report makes it sound pretty dire. It's a scenario," he said, "It's a regular daily briefing sheet that considered different scenarios much like any first responder would."

colonelbeef
05-03-2010, 05:05 AM
drill baby drill

kappys
05-03-2010, 09:39 AM
I've heard that the only solution if this transpires is to slant drill into the area of the leak and fill the thing with concrete - a process that could take 2-3 months or more.

Rohirrim
05-03-2010, 10:01 AM
Here comes $4 gas for the summer.

TailgateNut
05-03-2010, 10:15 AM
Here comes $4 gas for the summer.


...and $10lb 51/60 shrimp....The fishing/oystering industry is going to be decimated. This SUCKS!
Lat time I was down in Nawlins i fished the Chandeleur islands, and from what I understand they are already being hit by the slick.
....the real price of gas rears its' ugly head!

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 10:54 AM
I'm feeling bad about my constant pimping fast cars and fast bikes. My thirst for oil contributed to this.

However, I haven't owned a V8 for a long time, I've always gone for the 4's and 6's. I did have a '96 F150 with the Mustang engine, the 4.6L V8 DOHC. Only V8 since my '701/2 Falcon. I've used Amsoil synthetic oil in all our vehicles since 1992, engine, transmissions, transfer case, rear ends, everything. I'm trying to rationalize away my part in this.

This Gulf spill could turn out to be an epic disaster.

HAT
05-03-2010, 11:57 AM
Here comes $4 gas for the summer.

Gas hits $4/Gal every summer in SoCal. I'm thinking $5 this year.

oubronco
05-03-2010, 12:05 PM
Here comes $4 gas for the summer.

They were saying it was going to be $4 before this disaster now what can we expect 5-6

baja
05-03-2010, 12:07 PM
Just another event bringing us closer to the end of the world as we know it.

Archer81
05-03-2010, 12:13 PM
Anyone else notice the title of this thread is ironic?


:Broncos:

Meck77
05-03-2010, 12:16 PM
Just another event bringing us closer to the end of the world as we know it.

The world is always changing. Not everyone is a paranoid old man like yourself. The young and the positive minded people of this planet will be just fine.

Tombstone RJ
05-03-2010, 12:18 PM
More people are going to be driving this summer too. I can hardly wait for $4.89 a gal gas prices, wooohooo!

We've got such a screwed up oil industry. Not enough refineries for the oil already coming in and now this disaster.

baja
05-03-2010, 12:18 PM
The world is always changing you scared old man.

Don't you have a bus to buff or something?

Rohirrim
05-03-2010, 12:51 PM
Now they're worried the Gulf Stream will start carrying the oil up the East Coast.

baja
05-03-2010, 01:05 PM
This will create a new product, black shrimp.

TailgateNut
05-03-2010, 01:09 PM
This will create a new product, black shrimp.

New recipe: Deep fried shrimp, no oil required!

...oh, and oyster will slide down even easier now!:spit:

Not really funny.

baja
05-03-2010, 01:11 PM
New recipe: Deep fried shrimp, no oil required!

...oh, and oyster will slide down even easier now!:spit:

Not really funny.

If we were to really look into this I am sure we would find it is Bush's fault.

UberBroncoMan
05-03-2010, 03:09 PM
I still think we should do offshore drilling... there is always risks. Still, this ****ing sucks. I feel so ****ing bad for the hardworking fishermen, and the ecosystem that's getting ****ed up.

gtown
05-03-2010, 03:20 PM
What's troubling is that Tebow stands by and does nothing about this.

In all seriousness, the infrastructure required to retap this leak from a different point to either stop or divert it takes years to put in place. We aren't gonna be drinking BP's milkshake on this one. What a tragedy.

Tombstone RJ
05-03-2010, 03:27 PM
If they can't stop the flow of crude coming up through the well head, then they better find a way to capture that oil at least temporarily. If it's going to take months and months and months to drill down at an angle and stop the flow, then they have to put all their efforts into capturing the crude before it saturates the ocean bed and the gulf coast waters.

Rohirrim
05-03-2010, 03:49 PM
Too bad it won't drift South to Venezuela. Then we could just go, "Here, Hugo. Accept this oil as our gift."

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 04:16 PM
Now they're worried the Gulf Stream will start carrying the oil up the East Coast.

They should be worried.

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 04:22 PM
New recipe: Deep fried shrimp, no oil required!

...oh, and oyster will slide down even easier now!:spit:

Not really funny.

No, this could be very painful. I'm not a guy that's get into hyperbole, but if this isn't corrected fast, it's gonna end up in the Atlantic, it could get fugly, the Gulf Stream carries all the way up the US East Coast, up to Newfoundland, then east to Ireland, then right down past France to complete the circle back to the Caribbean.

This problem has to be taken care of fast. Trouble is, nobody knows how to solve the problem.

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 04:34 PM
This is getting real ugly. 5000 feet undersea, how to cap it? That little tiny hole, one mile down, you can't just pile rocks on top of it.

This low-tech idea to form a tower to direct the oil up to somewhere where we can at least attack the problem is a good scramble. We'll have to attack the problem from there, looks like.

PRBronco
05-03-2010, 04:52 PM
This is getting real ugly. 5000 feet undersea, how to cap it? That little tiny hole, one mile down, you can't just pile rocks on top of it.

This low-tech idea to form a tower to direct the oil up to somewhere where we can at least attack the problem is a good scramble. We'll have to attack the problem from there, looks like.

I kept reading about some shut off mechanism down on the floor that they were trying to activate with an unmanned sub, is that officially not going to work, or are they still trying?

Tombstone RJ
05-03-2010, 04:59 PM
I kept reading about some shut off mechanism down on the floor that they were trying to activate with an unmanned sub, is that officially not going to work, or are they still trying?

That was plan "A" and it didn't work. Seems these idiots have no plan "B" and it aggrevates the hell out of me.

PRBronco
05-03-2010, 05:03 PM
That was plan "A" and it didn't work. Seems these idiots have no plan "B" and it aggrevates the hell out of me.

I'm speechless. I can't believe it was acceptable to build something like this.

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 05:04 PM
I kept reading about some shut off mechanism down on the floor that they were trying to activate with an unmanned sub, is that officially not going to work, or are they still trying?

Dead idea, but yes that was the original plan. Dead idea now, the shutoff valve is not gonna respond.

The plan now is to build a tube around the gusher, a tube of welded sections that will direct the oil closer to the surface where at least it can be dealt with more easily. They don't want to fool around too much with the tube itself that is on the seabed, if they break the tube coming out of the seabed, then they have absolutely no way to control the gush. They're attacking the problem as well as they know how to, and avoiding making the problem worse.

DenverBrit
05-03-2010, 05:37 PM
This is just the beginning of what looks like an epic disaster in the making.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/47766000/gif/_47766776_oil_spill_466_static_4may.gif

Boobs McGee
05-03-2010, 05:50 PM
holy ****

DenverBrit
05-03-2010, 05:55 PM
Dead idea, but yes that was the original plan. Dead idea now, the shutoff valve is not gonna respond.

The plan now is to build a tube around the gusher, a tube of welded sections that will direct the oil closer to the surface where at least it can be dealt with more easily. They don't want to fool around too much with the tube itself that is on the seabed, if they break the tube coming out of the seabed, then they have absolutely no way to control the gush. They're attacking the problem as well as they know how to, and avoiding making the problem worse.

This seems to be the latest plan, along with a dispersant that prevents the oil from surfacing.

BP's new strategy: Containment boxes will be placed over spilled oil in Gulf
By The Associated Press
May 02, 2010, 12:52PM

BP spokesman Steve Rinehart said Sunday that Wild Well Control is building three rectangular boxes that can be lowered onto each of the three leaks. The work is being conducted in Port Fourchon.

The concrete-and-steel chambers could be in place at the leak site in six to eight days.

Crews have had little success stemming the flow from the ruptured well on the sea floor off Louisiana or removing oil from the surface by skimming it, burning it or dispersing it with chemicals.

The blowout preventer typically activates after a blast or other event to cut off any oil that may spill. But Rinehart says the preventer failed.

http://media.nola.com/2010_gulf_oil_spill/photo/oil-spill-containment-boxjpg-e07fd793a2be31bb_medium.jpg

oil-spill-containment-box.
The base of a pollution containment chamber is moved to a construction area at Wild Well Control, Inc. in Port Fourchon on April 26.
The chamber will be one of the largest ever built and will be used in an attempt to contain the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico.
BP PLC will place huge containment boxes over the well as the next available short-term strategy in fighting the Gulf oil spill.

UberBroncoMan
05-03-2010, 05:58 PM
This is just the beginning of what looks like an epic disaster in the making.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/47766000/gif/_47766776_oil_spill_466_static_4may.gif

:(

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 06:08 PM
It's looking like this is gonna be bad. How can that mf'r be capped? There's a pipe sticking up out of the seabed one mile down, gushing. How to cap that? It has to be welded shut or valve it closed. It's a pipe, I've seen the pictures. Can a human go down there one mile and cap it? Can't be done robotically.

This idea about drilling another hole to release pressure seems like a solution, but the pipe has to be capped or piped to the surface. I really do feel bad about my infatuation with gasoline right now.

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 06:14 PM
Maybe the best idea is to make a flexible tube that can encompass the pipe tightly and have that gusher go into tankers on the surface. I can't think of anything better than that.

Taco John
05-03-2010, 06:33 PM
The Oil Chernobyl

ScottXray
05-03-2010, 06:56 PM
If we were to really look into this I am sure we would find it is Bush's fault.

nope...its the lord of the dark side....Cheney..... that we can thank for this mess.

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 07:07 PM
You negative Nellies.

Build that caisson around the pipe, then snake a pipe down to guide the gusher up to a platform. BP had a platform there, they have to get one there again. If the caisson works with the platform, problem solved. Just do it fast.

If there is a stable caisson, and a stable platform above it, it's possible to guide a pipe down to cover the gusher.

BP built a platform over the hole in the seabed in the first place, so BP is gonna have to do it again. They just have to do it fast, and that caisson has to be built at the same time.

baja
05-03-2010, 07:14 PM
We need Red Adair & The Little mermaid on this one.

scorpio
05-03-2010, 07:24 PM
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ixtoc_I

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 07:40 PM
We need Red Adair & The Little mermaid on this one.

Red Adair & Co. dealt with oilwell blowouts on land. If his ingenuity will work with this, that's fine with me.

Nobody has had to deal with an oilwell blowout at 5000 ft below the surface til now.

I figure the idea to build a caisson around it as fast as possible is a good idea. The ultimate object is to make the blowout have no impact. That will require a platform above the well to do what the original platform did.

These modern platforms in the Gulf are mobile, correct? You shut down a well, and move the platform over to cover he blowout.

Building the caisson is a key.

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 08:39 PM
This seems to be the latest plan, along with a dispersant that prevents the oil from surfacing.

BP's new strategy: Containment boxes will be placed over spilled oil in Gulf
By The Associated Press
May 02, 2010, 12:52PM

BP spokesman Steve Rinehart said Sunday that Wild Well Control is building three rectangular boxes that can be lowered onto each of the three leaks. The work is being conducted in Port Fourchon.

The concrete-and-steel chambers could be in place at the leak site in six to eight days.

Crews have had little success stemming the flow from the ruptured well on the sea floor off Louisiana or removing oil from the surface by skimming it, burning it or dispersing it with chemicals.

The blowout preventer typically activates after a blast or other event to cut off any oil that may spill. But Rinehart says the preventer failed.

http://media.nola.com/2010_gulf_oil_spill/photo/oil-spill-containment-boxjpg-e07fd793a2be31bb_medium.jpg

oil-spill-containment-box.
The base of a pollution containment chamber is moved to a construction area at Wild Well Control, Inc. in Port Fourchon on April 26.
The chamber will be one of the largest ever built and will be used in an attempt to contain the oil leak in the Gulf of Mexico.
BP PLC will place huge containment boxes over the well as the next available short-term strategy in fighting the Gulf oil spill.


Yeah, those are the caissons in that pic. They have to be stacked a mile high, 5000 feet. There has to be a plan beyond those caissons. Those caissons will only direct the oil up, there has to be a platform above the caissons to contain the oil. And the platform has to be able to snake a pipe down to cover the pipe that is presently gushing.

What did BP do with the oil they got from the well? A pipeline, download it into tankers? Whatever they did with it before the blowout, the same method has to be in place once the caissons are in place, and it better be in place fast.

DenverBrit
05-03-2010, 08:44 PM
Yeah, those are the caissons in that pic. They have to be stacked a mile high, 5000 feet. There has to be a plan beyond those caissons. Those caissons will only direct the oil up, there has to be a platform above the caissons to contain the oil. And the platform has to be able to snake a pipe down to cover the pipe that is presently gushing.

What did BP do with the oil they got from the well? A pipeline, download it into tankers? Whatever they did with it before the blowout, the same method has to be in place once the caissons are in place, and it better be in place fast.

I sense doldrums, someone needs to kick somebody's ass. The problem is so overwhelming people just stumble around. Somebody has to start kicking some ass.

My understanding is that the oil will be loaded directly into tankers.

tsiguy96
05-03-2010, 08:47 PM
any estimate on the number of animals killed by this?

just wondering. people ****ed up big time once again, it seriously makes you wonder how much more of this the planet can really take?

Doc
05-03-2010, 08:48 PM
I spent the weekend on Dauphin Island, AL. The local scientists are collecting as much "before" data as they can and are expecting the worst.

HAT
05-03-2010, 08:55 PM
We need Red Adair & The Little mermaid on this one.

Dirk Pitt & NUMA would know what to do.

Archer81
05-03-2010, 09:01 PM
any estimate on the number of animals killed by this?

just wondering. people ****ed up big time once again, it seriously makes you wonder how much more of this the planet can really take?


This eco moment brought to you by GE.


:Broncos:

DenverBrit
05-03-2010, 09:07 PM
There's another potential problem in the Gulf.

Another disaster waiting? Shell Oil running "sister rig" in Gulf nearly identical to ill-fated Deepwater Horizon

Given their nearly identical designs, Nautilus may suffer from the same design flaws that destroyed Horizon. For example, one possible explanation for the April 20 blowout is a failure in the "cementing" process that creates a seal between the pipe and the hole drilled into the ocean floor. Halliburton/KBR has been fingered as the company in charge of cementing for Deepwater Horizon; right now, Transocean's website merely lists "third party" as being responsible for Deepwater Nautilus' cementing.


http://www.southernstudies.org/2010/05/another-disaster-waiting-shell-oil-running-sister-rig-in-gulf.html

tsiguy96
05-03-2010, 09:08 PM
This eco moment brought to you by GE.


:Broncos:

explain to me how millions and millions of animals dying over this is not a bigger issue than any other problems surrounding it?

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 09:12 PM
My understanding is that the oil will be loaded directly into tankers.

So there is still hope.

Archer81
05-03-2010, 09:17 PM
explain to me how millions and millions of animals dying over this is not a bigger issue than any other problems surrounding it?


Not disagreeing with the message, Tsi. The overwrought emotionalism of "how much more can the earth take" is what ellicted the comment.


:Broncos:

Cito Pelon
05-03-2010, 09:31 PM
I spent the weekend on Dauphin Island, AL. The local scientists are collecting as much "before" data as they can and are expecting the worst.

That's wise. Depressing, but wise.

tsiguy96
05-03-2010, 09:35 PM
Not disagreeing with the message, Tsi. The overwrought emotionalism of "how much more can the earth take" is what ellicted the comment.


:Broncos:

oh. is this going to destroy the earth? no. but seriously, look at the **** people do to it, its not sustainable under any circumstance. stuff like this just makes it worse.

mhgaffney
05-03-2010, 11:14 PM
What I find most disappointing about the responses is the absence of constructive ideas.

Evidently few if any posters here do any original thinking. I mean out of the box.

So where's the determination to move beyond the oil-based economy?

Where's the outrage that we are destroying the Gulf of Mexico?

Where's the political will to do something about it?

Has our collective ability to act and solve problems gone the way of the Dodo?

DenverBrit
05-03-2010, 11:22 PM
What I find most disappointing about the responses is the absence of constructive ideas.

Evidently few if any posters here do any original thinking. I mean out of the box.

So where's the determination to move beyond the oil-based economy?

Where's the outrage that we are destroying the Gulf of Mexico?

Where's the political will to do something about it?

Has our collective ability to act and solve problems gone the way of the Dodo?

No, but you have.

baja
05-03-2010, 11:23 PM
What I find most disappointing about the responses is the absence of constructive ideas.

Evidently few if any posters here do any original thinking. I mean out of the box.

So where's the determination to move beyond the oil-based economy?

Where's the outrage that we are destroying the Gulf of Mexico?

Where's the political will to do something about it?

Has our collective ability to act and solve problems gone the way of the Dodo?

Simple drain the Gulf and plug the ****er

Killericon
05-03-2010, 11:30 PM
oh. is this going to destroy the earth? no. but seriously, look at the **** people do to it, its not sustainable under any circumstance. stuff like this just makes it worse.

The earth's ecosystem has endured whatever killed the dinosaurs, and I'm sure plenty of crap before that. We aren't gonna kill the earth, but we might kill ourselves.

Anyways, this is pretty sickening. Has there ever been any single ecological event that been as damaging as it seems like this will turn out to be?

Taco John
05-04-2010, 12:07 AM
What I find most disappointing about the responses is the absence of constructive ideas.

Evidently few if any posters here do any original thinking. I mean out of the box.

So where's the determination to move beyond the oil-based economy?

Where's the outrage that we are destroying the Gulf of Mexico?

Where's the political will to do something about it?

Has our collective ability to act and solve problems gone the way of the Dodo?



If Obama calls me looking for solutions, I'll have him send you a PM.

Kid A
05-04-2010, 12:21 AM
The earth's ecosystem has endured whatever killed the dinosaurs, and I'm sure plenty of crap before that. We aren't gonna kill the earth, but we might kill ourselves.

Anyways, this is pretty sickening. Has there ever been any single ecological event that been as damaging as it seems like this will turn out to be?

Just in terms of oil spills this one has a ways to go to top a couple of them:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/05/04/us/04enviro.html

Two worst:

Gulf War oil spill: 36 billion gallons of oil

Ixtoc I oil well: 140 million gallons

So this one will have to go on for a while to reach the magnitude of some we've seen before. We'll see what kind of havoc it wreaks on the gulf coast line. It's going to suck pretty bad, even if it doesn't approach those previous disasters.

uk bronco
05-04-2010, 02:08 AM
you guys bitching about gas prices just makes me laugh, just worked out it costs $6.90 a gallon here already

watermock
05-04-2010, 03:36 AM
What I find most disappointing about the responses is the absence of constructive ideas.

Evidently few if any posters here do any original thinking. I mean out of the box.

So where's the determination to move beyond the oil-based economy?

Where's the outrage that we are destroying the Gulf of Mexico?

Where's the political will to do something about it?

Has our collective ability to act and solve problems gone the way of the Dodo?

I'll tell you,

1. Obviously this was a major oil find in anorexic oil.

2. Halbritron was in charge, i.e. shoot first.

3. A Cap and siphon? WTF? These idiots have no clue about the pressures 1m deep.

I'm a dumb farmer and I know concrete will crack in an unformed set at 10,000 psi.

Thet never built a form. Just pour concrete in the drill scarring.

Jesus, hey are in deep water.

An inverse bell tower is 500k.

Good luck with that now.

GOD PRAY that pipe holds.

Halibitron needs to be killed along with Goldman.

TDmvp
05-04-2010, 04:00 AM
I'll tell you,

1. Obviously this was a major oil find in anorexic oil.

2. Halbritron was in charge, i.e. shoot first.

3. A Cap and siphon? WTF? These idiots have no clue about the pressures 1m deep.

I'm a dumb farmer and I know concrete will crack in an unformed set at 10,000 psi.

Thet never built a form. Just pour concrete in the drill scarring.

Jesus, hey are in deep water.

An inverse bell tower is 500k.

Good luck with that now.

GOD PRAY that pipe holds.

Halibitron needs to be killed along with Goldman.


They are making them out of metal btw ...

http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/03/oil.spill.desperate.measure/
http://i.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2010/US/05/03/oil.spill.desperate.measure/t1larg.jpg


Carry on .

mhgaffney
05-04-2010, 04:36 AM
If that thing is the answer -- to drop this contraption over the well hole -- then the "real experts" must be desperate.


Time to start praying...

Arkie
05-04-2010, 12:03 PM
They were hinting at $7 a gallon 2 months ago

March 2, 2010, 6:35 PM
Fuel Taxes Must Rise, Harvard Researchers Say
By SINDYA N. BHANOO
To meet the Obama administrationís targets for cutting greenhouse gas emissions, some researchers say, Americans may have to experience a sobering reality: gas at $7 a gallon.

http://dotearth.blogs.nytimes.com/2010/03/02/fuel-taxes-must-rise-harvard-researchers-say/

Rohirrim
05-04-2010, 12:09 PM
Not disagreeing with the message, Tsi. The overwrought emotionalism of "how much more can the earth take" is what ellicted the comment.


:Broncos:

You're right. The Earth has been covered by fire and ice, at various stages. I'm sure it would be just fine if all the life on it's surface was eradicated. It would still be a giant rock orbiting the sun.

DenverBrit
05-04-2010, 12:17 PM
Updated look at the 'Dome'....or 'funnel'.

http://newsimg.bbc.co.uk/media/images/47774000/gif/_47774616_funnel_image_466.gif

-The funnel is a 40ft tall iron box, weighing 98 tonnes
-It will be placed over the leak, 5,000ft down on the seabed
-BP hopes it will collect 85% of the leaking oil and pipe it to the surface


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/8659398.stm

bronco militia
05-04-2010, 12:18 PM
you guys b****ing about gas prices just makes me laugh, just worked out it costs $6.90 a gallon here already

your taxes are higher per gallon of gas...

congrats

DenverBrit
05-04-2010, 12:23 PM
you guys b****ing about gas prices just makes me laugh, just worked out it costs $6.90 a gallon here already


Imperial or US gallon?

loborugger
05-04-2010, 12:24 PM
your taxes are higher per gallon of gas...

congrats

All in effort by their gov't to control their behavior.

Of course, we shouldnt laugh too hard. That same crap is coming here.

DenverBrit
05-04-2010, 12:25 PM
If that thing is the answer -- to drop this contraption over the well hole -- then the "real experts" must be desperate.


Time to start praying...

Couldn't you contact your 'Mothership' and see if they can help? :peace:

Taco John
05-04-2010, 02:33 PM
If that thing is the answer -- to drop this contraption over the well hole -- then the "real experts" must be desperate.


Time to start praying...


What's wrong with this solution? Seems like the only plausible solution to me.

Archer81
05-04-2010, 02:46 PM
I am sure mininukes and a Zionist consirpacy is at the heart of this disaster...


:Broncos:

Tombstone RJ
05-04-2010, 02:54 PM
you guys b****ing about gas prices just makes me laugh, just worked out it costs $6.90 a gallon here already

We are quickly catching up.

Archer81
05-04-2010, 02:57 PM
What I find most disappointing about the responses is the absence of constructive ideas.

Evidently few if any posters here do any original thinking. I mean out of the box.

So where's the determination to move beyond the oil-based economy?

Where's the outrage that we are destroying the Gulf of Mexico?

Where's the political will to do something about it?

Has our collective ability to act and solve problems gone the way of the Dodo?


We could talk to the oil. It seems to be working with Iran and North Korea.

Oops.

:Broncos:

DenverBrit
05-04-2010, 03:06 PM
What's wrong with this solution? Seems like the only plausible solution to me.

Apparently a similar solution has worked before.


Mr Curry was quoted by the Associated Press news agency as saying BP hoped to have the funnel in the water by the end of the week to cover the main leak at the well site.
A second, back-up funnel is also under construction, AP said.

Mr Holvey said similar containment devices had been used in the Gulf before, but in shallow waters.
They were used, for instance, after Hurricane Katrina to channel oil to the surface that had spilled from platforms.

Bronco Yoda
05-04-2010, 03:23 PM
http://image.catalog.zune.net/v3.0/image/58b1d623-0622-48bc-a446-901edc10fad6?resize=true&width=300&height=300No worries...they're going to trap that oil.

Bringing in the big guns now.

Que
05-04-2010, 03:54 PM
What makes this ridiculously tragic is the location. The well is a short few miles away from 40% of this nation's wetlands. 98% of all sea life begins in a wetland environment. If the crude ends up hitting the wetlands it will devastate the gulf for decades. God help us if it hits the everglades.

Also, back in the 90's I worked on a study the assessed the economic impact of fishing. I can't remember the exact numbers but the economic impact generated by a commercially caught fish was just under $1/pound (not of flesh but of the full fish). As I recall, the economic impact of a recreational caught fish was above $9/pound. That's why so many gulf states banned in shore netting - to boost their fish stocks for recreational anglers.

Not only will this destroy the commercial fishery but it will also destroy a pretty profitable and substantial recreational fishery. Absolutely tragic.

snowspot66
05-04-2010, 10:56 PM
you guys b****ing about gas prices just makes me laugh, just worked out it costs $6.90 a gallon here already

My home state is larger than most countries. Driving is kind of important.

Archer81
05-05-2010, 12:22 AM
My home state is larger than most countries. Driving is kind of important.


Sometimes I dont think Europeans understand the size and distance between places in the United States. Its a 40 hour drive from San Fran to Washington DC. In that same 40 hours in Europe you can go from Madrid to Moscow and wind up going through 5 different countries. Easier to just get a rail ticket and take the train there.

In the US, so many people live out of the way that its simpler to drive...which requires cheaper gasoline. And considering how long its been so relatively cheap, its going to annoy Americans if it goes over $3 a gallon and stays that way. The year I turned 16 (1997) gas was at 88 cents a gallon...88 ****ing cents.

:Broncos:

extralife
05-05-2010, 12:28 AM
It's one thing to "be annoyed," but it is quite another thing to completely model our economy, foreign policy, and environmental politics around said "annoyance."

DenverBrit
05-05-2010, 10:21 AM
One pipe capped, now waiting for the 'funnel' to be towed out and put in place.

Let's hope they can get it to function at the depths they're working.

http://msnbcmedia1.msn.com/i/MSNBC/Components/Interactives/_swf/US_News/Deep-Horizon-oil-spill/Plugging-the-Gulf-leak-bCol2.gif

PRBronco
05-05-2010, 10:24 AM
One pipe capped, now waiting for the 'funnel' to be towed out and put in place.

Let's hope they can get it to function at the depths they're working.



Thanks for the link. How exactly did they stop the one leak? All I've heard is that they did.

DenverBrit
05-05-2010, 10:45 AM
Thanks for the link. How exactly did they stop the one leak? All I've heard is that they did.

No real specifics, only that they used a remote vehicle.

London-based energy giant BP used remote-operated undersea vehicles to cap one of three leaks in the ruptured well but oil still flowed at an unchanged rate of 5,000 barrels (210,000 gallons/795,000 liters) per day.

http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE6430AR20100505

Slideshow of the spill.

http://www.reuters.com/article/slideshow?articleId=USTRE6430AR20100505#a=1

baja
05-05-2010, 10:49 AM
Thanks for the link. How exactly did they stop the one leak? All I've heard is that they did.

I heard they brought out Mel Kiper's hair and it absorbed all the oil.

PRBronco
05-05-2010, 11:39 AM
Oh ffs: http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/05/gulf.oil.spill/index.html?hpt=C1 How much time did they waste painting the ****ing box?

DenverBrit
05-05-2010, 11:53 AM
Oh ffs: http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/05/gulf.oil.spill/index.html?hpt=C1 How much time did they waste painting the ****ing box?

Don't want to pollute the Gulf with rust.

Rohirrim
05-05-2010, 12:04 PM
Interesting bit of history from RFK, Jr. explaining how this was allowed to happen.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-f-kennedy-jr/sex-lies-and-oil-spills_b_564163.html

That One Guy
05-05-2010, 12:24 PM
I know some people want to just cast blame endlessly but I'm really impressed with the progress being made after reading some of the worst case scenarios that were thrown out there. Lets hope the progress continues.

TailgateNut
05-05-2010, 12:25 PM
Interesting bit of history from RFK, Jr. explaining how this was allowed to happen.
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/robert-f-kennedy-jr/sex-lies-and-oil-spills_b_564163.html


(Cheney+Halliburton+Oil)=(fraud=disaster=massive profits)

snowspot66
05-05-2010, 01:41 PM
It's one thing to "be annoyed," but it is quite another thing to completely model our economy, foreign policy, and environmental politics around said "annoyance."

The day trains become a viable mode of transportation for the entire country is the day I will start riding them. It's a six hour drive from my house just to get to the station and I live right off the interstate.