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Los Broncos
03-31-2010, 03:42 PM
Just wondering if anyone has some recommendations on a decent pair of hiking boots.

Wanting to get into it a bit since I go to the mountains a lot and there are some trails not to far from where I live.

Looking to spend about $100.00, thanks.

Drek
03-31-2010, 05:43 PM
Just wondering if anyone has some recommendations on a decent pair of hiking boots.

Wanting to get into it a bit since I go to the mountains a lot and there are some trails not to far from where I live.

Looking to spend about $100.00, thanks.

I'm a big fan of L.L. Bean.

Of course I'm biased, growing up in Maine and all.

But I bought a new pair of cresta hikers a month before field camp, had them broke in well by camp and basically only took them off while sleeping for the next 2.5 months with no issues.

These are what I bought, but they run $179. (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/14774?page=gore-tex-cresta-hikers&parentCategory=502773&cat4=505542&shop_method=pp&feat=505542-sub2&np=Y)

For your price range check out these (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/61231?page=beans-waterproof-trail-model-hikers-ii&parentCategory=503034&cat4=505542&shop_method=pp&feat=505542-sub2&np=Y) or these (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/63163?page=mens-gore-tex-ascent-day-hikers&parentCategory=503034&cat4=505542&shop_method=pp&feat=505542-sub2&np=Y).

Those are pretty good day hikers, but I wouldn't want to live out of them for a whole summer.

I strongly recommend a mid-cut or higher if you want to stray from well maintained trails. It'll be a bit harder to break in and feel a bit more restrictive until you get used to it, but if you do any real active hiking you'll sooner or later have an incident where some good ankle support will save you real injury.

Socks are hugely important as well. If you don't get your boots from Bean you should still at least consider their socks, they kick ass. Two good pairs of hiking socks (always keep a pair tucked in the bottom of your bag) is as essential as a good pair of boots.

Wes Mantooth
03-31-2010, 05:54 PM
I swear this thread title was Hiking boobs. Oh well.

worm
03-31-2010, 05:59 PM
Bought these Asolos last year.

http://www.sierratradingpost.com/p/347,72552_Asolo-FSN-95-Gore-Tex-Hiking-Boots-Waterproof-For-Men.html

They have been decent for a Goretex boot. Took me on multi-day trips in Glacier and Yellowstone last Summer.

elsid13
03-31-2010, 06:04 PM
VASQUEs - About 160 at REI but worth it.

scorpio
03-31-2010, 06:16 PM
Just wondering if anyone has some recommendations on a decent pair of hiking boots.

Wanting to get into it a bit since I go to the mountains a lot and there are some trails not to far from where I live.

Looking to spend about $100.00, thanks.



If you're just talking about dayhiking, lots of people make serviceable trail shoes now. Nike, Adidas, and New Balance have some pretty good/inexpensive models. Right now I have pair of Keens that I'm really impressed with. I've always liked Montrail for heavy duty boots.

I think your best bet is to go to a local running shop. If there are lots of trails around they probably have a selection of trail shoes. The good ones will watch you walk and recommend a shoe/insert based on that.

Mogulseeker
03-31-2010, 06:48 PM
I'm very satisfied with my Titanium Daska Pass boots.

I do pretty hardcore winter backpacking, ice climbing (with crampons), wilderness excursions, etc... had em for a year, and one of the shoelace clips broke while climbing St. Mary's Glacier, otherwise they've been great.

I've slept in them, crossed rivers and gone over some pretty steep snowy passes near Berthoud and Rocky Mountain National Park in them.

I did get pretty mean blisters on my ankles the first time I went backpacking with them last summer, so I would recommend breaking them in for a couple of weeks before taking them out for hardcore use.

http://www.livefortheoutdoors.com/upload/531970/images/300x200/Columbia%20Daska%20Pass.JPG

They're listed at like $150, which is what you'd pay at REI, but you can find them for cheaper. I paid $120 at the Army Surplus store in Englewood on Broadway and Hampden

Mogulseeker
03-31-2010, 07:00 PM
I'm a big fan of L.L. Bean.

Of course I'm biased, growing up in Maine and all.

But I bought a new pair of cresta hikers a month before field camp, had them broke in well by camp and basically only took them off while sleeping for the next 2.5 months with no issues.

These are what I bought, but they run $179. (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/14774?page=gore-tex-cresta-hikers&parentCategory=502773&cat4=505542&shop_method=pp&feat=505542-sub2&np=Y)

For your price range check out these (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/61231?page=beans-waterproof-trail-model-hikers-ii&parentCategory=503034&cat4=505542&shop_method=pp&feat=505542-sub2&np=Y) or these (http://www.llbean.com/llb/shop/63163?page=mens-gore-tex-ascent-day-hikers&parentCategory=503034&cat4=505542&shop_method=pp&feat=505542-sub2&np=Y).

Those are pretty good day hikers, but I wouldn't want to live out of them for a whole summer.

I strongly recommend a mid-cut or higher if you want to stray from well maintained trails. It'll be a bit harder to break in and feel a bit more restrictive until you get used to it, but if you do any real active hiking you'll sooner or later have an incident where some good ankle support will save you real injury.

Socks are hugely important as well. If you don't get your boots from Bean you should still at least consider their socks, they kick ass. Two good pairs of hiking socks (always keep a pair tucked in the bottom of your bag) is as essential as a good pair of boots.

I lived in Maine... in my opinion, LL Bean is like a cheap (in quality) version of North Face.

Meck77
03-31-2010, 07:10 PM
Danner....A bit pricey but you get what you pay for.

http://www.danner.com/category/boots.do

scorpio
03-31-2010, 07:17 PM
Danner....A bit pricey but you get what you pay for.

http://www.danner.com/category/boots.do

I don't think the guy wants to hike the Continental Divide Trail.

Yet.

Taco John
03-31-2010, 08:26 PM
What kind of hiking are you going to be doing? Light trail hiking or will you be carrying a load? If' you're doing light trail hiking, for a $100, you can pick up a pair of Merrill Moabs (http://www.rei.com/product/788740), a nice light canvas hiker that will give you 5 years of quality service. You can certainly pack in them, but they're canvas and probably will wear quicker and shorten their life span. For $100, they're a great value. If I had $100, and was just looking for a pair of day hike trail-hoppers, this is what I'd get.

But if you're looking for a serious boot that you'll wear for a decade and give you absolute top notch performance on the trail, I'd look into either Asolo, Zamberlan, or Lowa. These three brands are the Creme de la Creme as far as I'm concerned. The Asolo Powermatic (http://www.rei.com/product/733624) ($270) is a performance boot that will kick ass on the trail and keep your dogs comfortable and kickin' the whole way. The boot that I wear is the Zamberlan Vioz (http://www.rei.com/product/774690), which is a lot like strapping a cloud to your feet and hitting the trail. They are absolutely awesome boots that I expect to be wearing ten years from now after racking up some serious trail miles on them. These last few pairs are a little more pricey, but they are worth it if you're going to be packing a load, and want a long term relationship with a boot so that you're not having to break in a new pair after a few seasons.

azbroncfan
03-31-2010, 08:32 PM
Danner....A bit pricey but you get what you pay for.

http://www.danner.com/category/boots.do

Second but footwear is no place to cut corners. Infact I don't cut corners on any of my hunting gear. All other gear is waterproofed with gore tex too. Spent too many miserable times with cheap gear when I was younger and dumber. Boots would be first place I would start though and Danner's have done me right for many years.

Taco John
03-31-2010, 08:37 PM
Danners are a little too bulky for my tastes. They're definitely a quality boot, but they feel heavy to me for extended hiking. My buddy has a pair of Danner's though, and swears by them.

strafen
03-31-2010, 08:43 PM
Just wondering if anyone has some recommendations on a decent pair of hiking boots.

Wanting to get into it a bit since I go to the mountains a lot and there are some trails not to far from where I live.

Looking to spend about $100.00, thanks.You still can find some good hiking boots for that price.
As far as recommendations go, that's up to your taste.
I like mid ankle style. I like to have my feet supported as good as I can to avoid ankle injuries. It keeps my feet solid

Try this link from Cabela's (http://www.cabelas.com/cabelas/en/templates/subcategory/subcategory.jsp?id=cat601930&navCount=0&parentId=cat20564&navAction=jump) they have a nice selection of brand names and good prices...

strafen
03-31-2010, 08:46 PM
Danner....A bit pricey but you get what you pay for.

http://www.danner.com/category/boots.doCabelas carry some of the same Danner's listed in their website for $180.00 for S139.00

werdinm
03-31-2010, 09:04 PM
I grew up in Western Montana at the base of the Rockies and tried so many brands and kinds of boots over the years. After buying a pair of Garmont boots, I don't ever want to get anything else....

Los Broncos
03-31-2010, 11:37 PM
I'll just be day hiking, thanks for all the info on the boots.

Is there anything else I should take while hiking?

Of course I'll need fluids, but anything else important?

Thanks again.

elsid13
04-01-2010, 02:47 AM
I'll just be day hiking, thanks for all the info on the boots.

Is there anything else I should take while hiking?

Of course I'll need fluids, but anything else important?

Thanks again.

OK what you carry is dependent on where you are going and how maintained the trails are. In general stuff I carry, which is little on the overkill side, is

- extra pair of socks (I like the smart wool)
- sock liners prevent blisters
- foul weather gear, just in case the weather turns on you
- whistle - in case you need help
- food/lunch
- duck tape, wrapped around an unsharped pencil - in case something rips
- baby wipes
- first aid kit much sure you have Antihistamines in it
- a hat, and not a ball cap something that give you good shade
- suntan lotion/bug spray
- bright colored garbage bag
- two copies of the trail map - Marked in color to let you get a quick fix
- compass (optional)
- heavy duty gloves (optional)
- multitool
Forgot to add fire starter kit and camera
- Cell phone

In the car
Map of where I going in front seat
cooler full of beverages
change of cloths and shoe

Meck77
04-01-2010, 03:05 AM
OK what you carry is dependent on where you are going and how maintained the trails are. In general stuff I carry, which is little on the overkill side, is

- extra pair of socks (I like the smart wool)
- sock liners prevent blisters
- foul weather gear, just in case the weather turns on you
- whistle - in case you need help
- food/lunch
- duck tape, wrapped around an unsharped pencil - in case something rips
- baby wipes
- first aid kit much sure you have Antihistamines in it
- a hat, and not a ball cap something that give you good shade
- suntan lotion/bug spray
- bright colored garbage bag
- two copies of the trail map - Marked in color to let you get a quick fix
- compass (optional)
- heavy duty gloves (optional)
- multitool

- Cell phone

In the car
Map of where I going in front seat
cooler full of beverages
change of cloths and shoe

Sounds like my pack Day 1 of Elk Camp. By day three I'm down to water, Elk jerky, compass, bullets, knife, rifle, water proof matches.

watermock
04-01-2010, 03:22 AM
2 bic lighters, iodine, a rifle, and an injun scout.

alpine
04-01-2010, 03:28 AM
It's not just whether you are doing day-hiking or not, the more expensive (and sturdier) boots will often help your feet feel better at the end of the day if you are doing a lot of pounding walking on stuff like rock, scree, hard trails, etc.

At any rate, I would get something with a decent (Vibram or similar standard) sole. Different makes have different widths so it depends which fits your foot - my preferences for a fairly wide foot have been Lowa and lately Meindl (don't know if you can get those in the States).

hades
04-01-2010, 05:41 AM
Go old school and don't wear shoes!

Mediator12
04-01-2010, 07:28 AM
Iron Clady, it really depends on what you are going to do. For that price range and day hikes, I Recommend Keens if you have a wide foot. I do and it took several years to find boots that fit. Take Some serious advice and at least got to a shop and have them fit your foot so you know exactly what you need. Having the proper size and type of footwear is key to hiking.

For a more serious boot, I use the Lowa's. Unbelieveable fit to my foot and great features. I have put those boots through some serious hikes and never had a blister or problem.

Dedhed
04-01-2010, 07:37 AM
La Sportiva makes the best boots out there. Great range of light hikers all the way up to full on mountaineering boots.

I've logged 3,000 plus miles on a pair, and they're nowhere near retirement.

Irish Stout
04-01-2010, 10:15 AM
La Sportiva makes the best boots out there. Great range of light hikers all the way up to full on mountaineering boots.

I've logged 3,000 plus miles on a pair, and they're nowhere near retirement.

I just bought a pair of La Sportiva FC's (last years model on discount - paid under $80) for trail running/hiking. I'm real impressed with how well put together they are for the price and the real sturdy sole. They don't appear to be anything that will break down easily. I've taken them out twice since I've gotten them and they hold up well in snow and mud and provide great traction on slickrock.

strafen
04-01-2010, 10:28 AM
I'll just be day hiking, thanks for all the info on the boots.

Is there anything else I should take while hiking?

Of course I'll need fluids, but anything else important?

Thanks again.Whatever you do, pack some heat.
Some good advice here. Even if you plan to hike for one day, alwas go prepare. First aid basic supplies, water, food, lighter, knife, etc...
Just basic survivor tools...

Pony Boy
04-01-2010, 10:29 AM
i'll just be day hiking, thanks for all the info on the boots.

is there anything else i should take while hiking?

of course i'll need fluids, but anything else important?

Thanks again.

26296

strafen
04-01-2010, 10:34 AM
26296

I approve :thumbsup:

Master___Pain
04-01-2010, 10:39 AM
The Oakley Assault boot is great. Good enough for the special forces too.

Lots of other great suggestion too. Merrill makes some good boots as well. I have a great pair, not sure of the model name thought. Grey and black, water proof with gor-tex.

Los Broncos
04-01-2010, 11:00 AM
Thanks again for all the advice and jokes people.

I'll check out some local stores near here, REI etc...

azbroncfan
04-01-2010, 11:10 AM
Just remember if you splurge and pay 100 bucks for decent boots then upgrade later you will spend more than if you would of just bought top notch from the start. It's like my buddies that gave me crap years ago when I dropped the coin on Swarovski's bino's when they were 800 bucks. They have bought several pair of 200-300 dollar pairs and spent way more than I have and mine still out perform theirs.

Los Broncos
04-01-2010, 11:46 AM
Just remember if you splurge and pay 100 bucks for decent boots then upgrade later you will spend more than if you would of just bought top notch from the start. It's like my buddies that gave me crap years ago when I dropped the coin on Swarovski's bino's when they were 800 bucks. They have bought several pair of 200-300 dollar pairs and spent way more than I have and mine still out perform theirs.

Very good point sir.

Cito Pelon
04-01-2010, 12:02 PM
Cabela's has a huge selection of boots.

I like nubuck boots that can be resoled, so haven't bought a pair in 15 years. Keep the leather treated and clean and a good pair of boots will last many, many years. Nubuck stains easily, but for me it's not a fashion contest. Nubuck is tough and supple.

Los Broncos
04-01-2010, 12:08 PM
Cabela's has a huge selection of boots.

I like nubuck boots that can be resoled, so haven't bought a pair in 15 years. Keep the leather treated and clean and a good pair of boots will last many, many years. Nubuck stains easily, but for me it's not a fashion contest. Nubuck is tough and supple.

I checked out their site last night, good selection.

elsid13
04-01-2010, 02:06 PM
Sounds like my pack Day 1 of Elk Camp. By day three I'm down to water, Elk jerky, compass, bullets, knife, rifle, water proof matches.

Yeah, I know about 2/3 of way through the trek I cursing myself for bring that much ****. But in wild and usually by myself I rather carry the extra weight then worry about something happening. I have come across idiots on the appalachian trail carry bottle waters and nothing else.

Mogulseeker
04-01-2010, 02:09 PM
OK what you carry is dependent on where you are going and how maintained the trails are. In general stuff I carry, which is little on the overkill side, is

- extra pair of socks (I like the smart wool)
- sock liners prevent blisters
- foul weather gear, just in case the weather turns on you
- whistle - in case you need help
- food/lunch
- duck tape, wrapped around an unsharped pencil - in case something rips
- baby wipes
- first aid kit much sure you have Antihistamines in it
- a hat, and not a ball cap something that give you good shade
- suntan lotion/bug spray
- bright colored garbage bag
- two copies of the trail map - Marked in color to let you get a quick fix
- compass (optional)
- heavy duty gloves (optional)
- multitool
Forgot to add fire starter kit and camera
- Cell phone

In the car
Map of where I going in front seat
cooler full of beverages
change of cloths and shoe

Smart wool socks are a necessity.

elsid13
04-01-2010, 02:17 PM
Smart wool socks are a necessity.

Someone was trying to convince me that Bridgedale Ventum Light Hiker Sock was better. But it hard to argue with Smartwool sock since they been working for me.

strafen
04-01-2010, 03:54 PM
Also, if you want to visit a local place where you'll find a lot of cool stuff, do a search on your area for Army Surplus Stores. They carry all kind of goodies in there...

azbroncfan
04-01-2010, 08:29 PM
Cabela's has a huge selection of boots.

I like nubuck boots that can be resoled, so haven't bought a pair in 15 years. Keep the leather treated and clean and a good pair of boots will last many, many years. Nubuck stains easily, but for me it's not a fashion contest. Nubuck is tough and supple.

Yes Cabela's has a ton plus if an actual store is by you you can score deals in the bargain cave too.

OCBronco
04-01-2010, 09:18 PM
I've had really good luck with Columbia's Frontier Peak GTX boot. Very comfortable, holds up well. However, that boot has been discontinued, and I'm not sure what Columbia replaced it with.

For snacks on your hike, I recommend almonds or some other kind of nut, and a small vial of olive oil (and bring along a shot glass). Instant energy.

Also, if you're going to be hiking regularly, I recommend getting a camel-type attachment for water. Much better than a cantene, IMHO.

~Crash~
04-01-2010, 09:23 PM
I'll just be day hiking, thanks for all the info on the boots.

Is there anything else I should take while hiking?

Of course I'll need fluids, but anything else important?

Thanks again.

several lighters I am not joking...

~Crash~
04-01-2010, 09:32 PM
potassium and magnesium so you don't get cramps


watter only goes so far. salt the hell out of your food after the walk..

~Crash~
04-01-2010, 09:35 PM
I grew up in Western Montana at the base of the Rockies and tried so many brands and kinds of boots over the years. After buying a pair of Garmont boots, I don't ever want to get anything else....

What ones ?

baja
04-01-2010, 09:57 PM
Boots are a very personal item some makes work perfect for one while another brand will be better for another.

Some chiropractors have a computer program that has you stand on a pad hooked up to a laptop that will analyze your feet and match you with a brand found to be a good fit for your particular type of foot. It is worth the expense of the test. It will save you the trial and error method of finding you boots.

alpine
04-02-2010, 12:34 AM
potassium and magnesium so you don't get cramps
Otherwise known as bananas... :wave:

Seriously, one of the best ways to start out a day's hiking - bowl of muesli (the proper stuff with real oats, etc.) with chopped banana and whatever strength of milk you have.

Taco John
04-02-2010, 10:34 AM
Go old school and don't wear shoes!

There is a hiker who is often seen on the Pacific Crest Trail who hikes in such manner.

baja
04-02-2010, 10:40 AM
http://www.sunyoga.info/image/swamiumasankar.jpg

This guy, Sun Yogi, is a friend of mine I have seen him hiking Mt. Kalish bare foot

http://images.travelpod.com/users/lonelytraveller/1.1181725500.p1011033.jpg

alpine
04-02-2010, 11:33 AM
There is a hiker who is often seen on the Pacific Crest Trail who hikes in such manner.
These things (http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/indexNA.cfm) are getting rave reviews from several people at the moment (although a bit out of the original price range).

baja
04-02-2010, 11:57 AM
These things (http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/indexNA.cfm) are getting rave reviews from several people at the moment (although a bit out of the original price range).

Those as fantastic thank you so much for the link

kappys
04-02-2010, 12:15 PM
Go old school and don't wear shoes!

When i was in New Zealand i was shocked at how many shoeless outdoorsman i encountered.

Mediator12
04-02-2010, 12:22 PM
Some great advice here. The thing is everyone's foot is unique, and no boots are made the same. I found my favorites after about sending 6 different pairs back! The boots are key and do NOT force yourself to wear a boot that does not fit right and preferably even very comfortable.

I think someone earlier suggested not going cheap and then upgrading for more expense. While this is true, certain boots are OK to day hike in and are lightweight and get the job done. These are very different from pack boots and ones that are much more multipurpose. I have 2 pairs for different types of hiking and I really like it that way. The lightweight ones are excellent for just a light one day load, but sturdy enough that if something happened I could do extended wear and be alright.

Cito Pelon
04-03-2010, 08:45 AM
Elsid's list was a good one but here's a few more, all lightweight compact things.

-nail clippers
-sewing kit
-nylon zip ties
-shoelaces
-nylon rope
-tweezers
-wool glove liners
-hooded plastic ponchos
-gaiters
-extra glasses if you wear them, neckcord for glasses or sunglasses
-binoculars
-Bota bag
-small magnifying glass
-moleskin
-chamois

Los Broncos
04-03-2010, 08:48 AM
Elsid's list was a good one but here's a few more, all lightweight compact things.

-nail clippers
-sewing kit
-nylon zip ties
-shoelaces
-nylon rope
-tweezers
-wool glove liners
-hooded plastic ponchos
-gaiters
-extra glasses if you wear them, neckcord for glasses or sunglasses
-binoculars
-Bota bag
-small magnifying glass
-moleskin
-chamois

You forgot a portable DVD player.

strafen
04-03-2010, 03:28 PM
You forgot a portable DVD player.The last thing you want to do while on the wild is losing constant awareness of your surroundings...

Los Broncos
04-03-2010, 03:36 PM
The last thing you want to do while on the wild is losing constant awareness of your surroundings...

Yeah really :giggle:, the local trails around here are safe, when I go up to the cabin I'll be much more aware when hiking.

By the way, my snow boots are made by Kamik which are cheaper but still pretty good and have held up well.

They have a model of all trail series boots for a hundred bucks, gonna check those out.

strafen
04-03-2010, 03:43 PM
Yeah really :giggle:, the local trails around here are safe, when I go up to the cabin I'll be much more aware when hiking.

By the way, my snow boots are made by Kamik which are cheaper but still pretty good and have held up well.

They have a model of all trail series boots for a hundred bucks, gonna check those out.

A cabin in the mountains is cool.
As I've previously mentioned, check your local Army Surplus Stores.
They've ususally have some stuff you never knew existed.

Los Broncos
04-03-2010, 03:44 PM
A cabin in the mountains is cool.
As I've previously mentioned, check your local Army Surplus Stores.
They've ususally have some stuff you never knew existed.

The surplus store is next, my son likes going there and looking around.

We'll make a day out of it.

Los Broncos
04-21-2010, 09:28 PM
Thanks for all the advice on boots.

Over the last few weeks I did my research and tried on many pairs.

I end up going with the Merrell Moab Mid Gore-Tex XCR.

It was in my price range, went a half size larger, heal comes up just a bit.

Better then my toes being to close to the tip and losing a toenail or getting blisters.

$99.95 http://www.rei.com/product/754666

Taco John
04-21-2010, 09:53 PM
I WIN!

Wait. What did I win?

Taco John
04-21-2010, 09:54 PM
Though, I have to say I don't reccommend going a size too large or small. You're more likely to get blisters, or just as bad, heal burns. But the nice thing is you went to REI. If you have any trouble, they'll swap them out no questions asked.

Los Broncos
04-21-2010, 09:57 PM
Though, I have to say I don't reccommend going a size too large or small. You're more likely to get blisters, or just as bad, heal burns. But the nice thing is you went to REI. If you have any trouble, they'll swap them out no questions asked.

We'll soon find out, going a hike this weekend.

REI is good, love that place.

Los Broncos
04-21-2010, 09:58 PM
I WIN!

Wait. What did I win?

You win a three day ban just in time for the draft! :spit:

strafen
04-21-2010, 10:54 PM
Thanks for all the advice on boots.

Over the last few weeks I did my research and tried on many pairs.

I end up going with the Merrell Moab Mid Gore-Tex XCR.

It was in my price range, went a half size larger, heal comes up just a bit.

Better then my toes being to close to the tip and losing a toenail or getting blisters.

$99.95 http://www.rei.com/product/754666I like those. Good ankle support and not too big.
They also look light!

Los Broncos
04-21-2010, 11:26 PM
I like those. Good ankle support and not too big.
They also look light!

Yes very light, hopefully they do the job.

Cito Pelon
04-21-2010, 11:40 PM
Yes very light, hopefully they do the job.

I'm very disappointed. You went with the California boot instead of old school. With all due respect, you should have gone old school. Ah well, you'll have to learn in your own way.

Los Broncos
04-21-2010, 11:42 PM
I'm very disappointed. You went with the California boot instead of old school. With all due respect, you should have gone old school. Ah well, you'll have to learn in your own way.

Haha, I always learn things the hard way.

That's what she said!

Los Broncos
04-25-2010, 08:54 PM
Went on my first hike today with the new boots.

Felt great, handled the hike well.

baja
05-05-2010, 09:58 PM
I just got my Five Fingers hiking shoes and they are AWESOME

http://www.kayakshed.com/vibram-five-fingers/


Thank you Thank you to who ever posted the link.


http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/products/images/products/146C//large.jpg

SureShot
05-05-2010, 10:05 PM
VASQUEs - About 160 at REI but worth it.

This. I recommend the Sundowner, but only if they are made in Italy **** the ones made in China.

Los Broncos
05-05-2010, 10:54 PM
My boots feel great I've used them about five times.

The local trails are pretty challenging seen a **** load of snakes already, ran into a four foot rattler on my first hike.

Heading up to some real hiking next month.

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 07:53 AM
I just got my Five Fingers hiking shoes and they are AWESOME

http://www.kayakshed.com/vibram-five-fingers/


Thank you Thank you to who ever posted the link.


http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/products/images/products/146C//large.jpg

I had no idea Al Bundy's shoes inspired by a message from God were actually made by someone! I might get some myself.

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 08:26 AM
My boots feel great I've used them about five times.

The local trails are pretty challenging seen a **** load of snakes already, ran into a four foot rattler on my first hike.

Heading up to some real hiking next month.

Did you hear the rattle, or did you see it first? Did you fool around with it at all, if you saw it first?

If you see one just laying out, getting some sun, stamp your foot, circle it at wide range while you cause vibrations so you find out what sets it off, what gets it coiled up ready to strike. I recommend taking a long stick and smacking the ground around it, scratching the dirt, even poking it with a long stick so you can get an idea of the striking speed and range. Seriously, get used to 'em, the more you know about their behavior the better off you'll be. There's rattlers galore, and the more you learn about them, the better off you'll be.

Of course, make sure you have room to back away, make sure you're not gonna trip over some rocks or brush when you backpedal.

Knowledge is power, but don't get too foolish.

Los Broncos
05-06-2010, 08:51 AM
Did you hear the rattle, or did you see it first? Did you fool around with it at all, if you saw it first?

If you see one just laying out, getting some sun, stamp your foot, circle it at wide range while you cause vibrations so you find out what sets it off, what gets it coiled up ready to strike. I recommend taking a long stick and smacking the ground around it, scratching the dirt, even poking it with a long stick so you can get an idea of the striking speed and range. Seriously, get used to 'em, the more you know about their behavior the better off you'll be. There's rattlers galore, and the more you learn about them, the better off you'll be.

Of course, make sure you have room to back away, make sure you're not gonna trip over some rocks or brush when you backpedal.

Knowledge is power, but don't get too foolish.

He was just crossing the trail about 10 feet in front of me.

When he seen him he stopped and hit his rattle, then booked it.

I don't mess with snakes and I pay attention to things around me.

This past weekend I seen a nice King Snake, beautiful snake.

But I have a lot of respect for snakes, so I give them space.

Que
05-06-2010, 08:56 AM
+1 on the REI sentiment. I ended up swapping out four pairs until I got the ones that I needed. Living in Crested Butte I am pretty demanding on my boots so getting the right pair was critical. Hopefully won't need to replace them for another four years or so...

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 09:03 AM
He was just crossing the trail about 10 feet in front of me.

When he seen him he stopped and hit his rattle, then booked it.

I don't mess with snakes and I pay attention to things around me.

This past weekend I seen a nice King Snake, beautiful snake.

But I have a lot of respect for snakes, so I give them space.

That's fine, just thought I'd throw out some advice for manipulating what you see vs. what you can get.

Los Broncos
05-06-2010, 09:08 AM
That's fine, just thought I'd throw out some advice for manipulating what you see vs. what you can get.

Thanks for that, I'm always looking around for any dangers.

But for the most part, snakes will take the high road when they see human.

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 09:24 AM
He was just crossing the trail about 10 feet in front of me.

When he seen him he stopped and hit his rattle, then booked it.

I don't mess with snakes and I pay attention to things around me.

This past weekend I seen a nice King Snake, beautiful snake.

But I have a lot of respect for snakes, so I give them space.

One of these days if you hike enough you'll run into a fox snake, I believe its called. It's back coloration imitates a diamondback, it has fake rattlers on its tail that look just like a rattlesnake's tail, it will coil and vibrate that fake tail and make the rattle noise with its mouth. One of nature's wonders.

The key is the small head, it doesn't have the triangular head of a rattler. It can sure scare the adrenaline into you though. I've leapt back a couple times from those devils.

Los Broncos
05-06-2010, 09:32 AM
One of these days if you hike enough you'll run into a fox snake, I believe its called. It's back coloration imitates a diamondback, it has fake rattlers on its tail that look just like a rattlesnake's tail, it will coil and vibrate that fake tail and make the rattle noise with its mouth. One of nature's wonders.

The key is the small head, it doesn't have the triangular head of a rattler. It can sure scare the adrenaline into you though. I've leapt back a couple times from those devils.

I always wonderd how snakes learned that, how to mimic another snake.

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 09:53 AM
Thanks for that, I'm always looking around for any dangers.

But for the most part, snakes will take the high road when they see human.

With all due respect, don't count on this, my friend. Especially when it's a little cold and a snake is sunning himself on the trail to warm up in the morning, they don't respond to your footsteps, they stay right there. And sometimes it's hard to spot them if you're moving fast and not keeping your eyes down.

You gotta be careful sometimes about how fast you move along a trail, how much you look around at the scenery. And if you go off trail into long grass, you really gotta be careful about moving slow and scraping your feet. Depends on the time of year also. If the morning was cold, snakes are slow to respond, they depend on the warmth of the sun to get up to speed. I've come damn near to stepping on rattlers a couple times sunning themselves on a trail. Stamped by foot down real close to them but they didn't respond at all until I actually poked them with a stick.

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 09:58 AM
I always wonderd how snakes learned that, how to mimic another snake.

Me too. An argument for God, I guess. I mean, how does that happen? I can buy into evolution, but think of the amount of years for something like that to happen, without some kind of intervention? To evolve not only the fake rattles on the tail, but to make the rattle noise also? How does a dumb animal make those kind of leaps?

Los Broncos
05-06-2010, 10:33 AM
Good advice again, I'll always keep in eye out and stay alert.

What do you think about Mountain Lions, I mean if one was stalking you, you wouldn't know it till it hit you.

It happens every year around here, someone get attacked.

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 11:07 AM
Good advice again, I'll always keep in eye out and stay alert.

What do you think about Mountain Lions, I mean if one was stalking you, you wouldn't know it till it hit you.

It happens every year around here, someone get attacked.

Look for tracks in muddy areas or wet sand. Where you're at, you have to assume they're all around. In muddy/wet sand you can tell how fresh the tracks are by how clear the tracks are. Cougars have a distinctive middle lobe in their tracks. They also don't leave a claw print at the front of the track. A big dog's print is similar to a cougar's deteriorated print, but a dog's print will show more of a nail print, the nail print tends to stay longer over time more than the pad print.

From what I know, cougars don't have a smell to them like bears do. You can catch a whiff of a bear sometimes even if you don't see the tracks. Cougars also tend to cough when they're frustrated in a hunt, so if you hear a slight cough, you know one is stalking you and hasn't got you yet.

EDIT: YOUNG cougars will probably the one's you hear the coughs from.

Mountain Bronco
05-06-2010, 01:05 PM
Sounds like my pack Day 1 of Elk Camp. By day three I'm down to water, Elk jerky, compass, bullets, knife, rifle, water proof matches.

By Day 3 you should be hanging meat in the locker.

Lots of good advice. The biggest thing is don't skimp on your feet, it will cost your entire body in the long run.

Los Broncos
06-24-2010, 08:31 AM
Heading up to the cabin going to give the new boots a real test on the Pacific crest trail.

Hopefully I don't come back with a ton of blisters.

baja
06-24-2010, 08:43 AM
Will you be doing light back packing


http://articlealbum.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/04/_45429018_-5.jpg

Los Broncos
06-24-2010, 08:56 AM
No not gay hiking Baja, but we know your into that.

baja
06-24-2010, 08:57 AM
thats a guy and a girl dude

Los Broncos
06-24-2010, 09:03 AM
Well a guy with no shorts on, hiking with a solar panel looks pretty gay to me.

baja
06-24-2010, 09:07 AM
Well a guy with no shorts on, hiking with a solar panel looks pretty gay to me.

That is why I called it light back packing...

Los Broncos
06-24-2010, 09:24 AM
That is why I called it light back packing...

I got that part and it was funny.

strafen
06-24-2010, 08:36 PM
Good advice again, I'll always keep in eye out and stay alert.

What do you think about Mountain Lions, I mean if one was stalking you, you wouldn't know it till it hit you.

It happens every year around here, someone get attacked.Pack heat always helps. A rifle is more practical than a handgun as you can have it ready to fend off a surprise attack.
Or a handgun and a solid walking stick.
You could also get a "third-eye" miror to attach to your sunglasses that allows you to see what's going on behind your back as you walk.

Third Eye® Eye Glass Mirror (05) (http://www.3rd-eye.com/)
Second item from the top.
You can get them at any bicycle shop, I'd suppose...

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 09:25 AM
So my boots have passed the test.

Went to the cabin for four days and went on some major hikes.

Went up to Suicide rock, it's straight up hill for 1.5 miles.

And also did the Ernie Maxwell trail, not to bad but came close to getting bit by a snake.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 10:48 AM
So my boots have passed the test.

Went to the cabin for four days and went on some major hikes.

Went up to Suicide rock, it's straight up hill for 1.5 miles.

And also did the Ernie Maxwell trail, not to bad but came close to getting bit by a snake.

So have you seen any wild turkey? For some reason I really enjoy seeing them. For such huge birds they are actually the fastest animal on the planet. Hard to believe, but true. They can move on the ground too, it's surprising how fast they can run.

Was it a rattler?

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 10:51 AM
So have you seen any wild turkey? For some reason I really enjoy seeing them. For such huge birds they are actually the fastest animal on the planet. Hard to believe, but true. They can move on the ground too, it's surprising how fast they can run.

Was it a rattler?

Haven't see any of those and yes it was a young rattler.

He was a youngster, he hit is rattle right I stepped on a rock in the trail.

He could of bit me that's for sure.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 10:54 AM
Oh and it's crazy how they blend into the area, I always look ahead to where I'm stepping and I didn't see him till I almost stepped right on him.

azbroncfan
06-28-2010, 10:55 AM
Haven't see any of those and yes it was a young rattler.

He was a youngster, he hit is rattle right I stepped on a rock in the trail.

He could of bit me that's for sure.

It's amazing for how many snakes there actually is vs what you even see. When I am cycling I bet I see a road kill one every 3-5 miles. I play golf, hike and run in the desert and probably have only seen 4 in 8 years in AZ in the wild but they are everywear. Cougars are the same way.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 11:03 AM
It's amazing for how many snakes there actually is vs what you even see. When I am cycling I bet I see a road kill one every 3-5 miles. I play golf, hike and run in the desert and probably have only seen 4 in 8 years in AZ in the wild but they are everywear. Cougars are the same way.

Good point, I'm surprised we didn't see more for the area we were in.

And it was pretty warm out with plenty of places for them to lay out in the sun.

As for mountain lions, the haven't seen one up in this area for years

But there are a lot of coyotes up there and they are fearless.

They wonder around the outside of town during the day.

Beantown Bronco
06-28-2010, 11:05 AM
It's amazing for how many snakes there actually is vs what you even see. When I am cycling I bet I see a road kill one every 3-5 miles. I play golf, hike and run in the desert and probably have only seen 4 in 8 years in AZ in the wild but they are everywear. Cougars are the same way.

I found a cougar in my car once. Now that was an adventure.

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azbroncfan
06-28-2010, 11:06 AM
Good point, I'm surprised we didn't see more for the area we were in.

And it was pretty warm out with plenty of places for them to lay out in the sun.

As for mountain lions, the haven't seen one up in this area for years

But there are a lot of coyotes up there and they are fearless.

They wonder around the outside of town during the day.

I have spent more time in the mountains than most people have in their life with all the hunting and outdoor activities I have done. I have seen exactly 0 mt lions. Closest I ever came was buddies and I were driving and one ran behind my truck and in front of his but I didn't see it. I have glassed mountain tops til my eyes popped out too. Now bobcats are a different story I have seen a million of those and even a bear or two. In fact I shot an elk 50 yards from where a black bear and a cub were standing. Sitting there watching the bears and low and behold a bull popped out of no where. I am sure they ate well that night.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 11:17 AM
Oh and it's crazy how they blend into the area, I always look ahead to where I'm stepping and I didn't see him till I almost stepped right on him.

Man, I like to walk fast on open trails, route-march speed, but you can't do it in rattler country. Snakes love to lay right in the middle of the trail to catch the warmth from the sand underneath and from the sun above.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 11:19 AM
Man, I like to walk fast on open trails, route-march speed, but you can't do it in rattler country. Snakes love to lay right in the middle of the trail to catch the warmth from the sand underneath and from the sun above.

There are a lot of snakes even around here in the local hills, have to be very careful where you step.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 11:25 AM
I have spent more time in the mountains than most people have in their life with all the hunting and outdoor activities I have done. I have seen exactly 0 mt lions. Closest I ever came was buddies and I were driving and one ran behind my truck and in front of his but I didn't see it. I have glassed mountain tops til my eyes popped out too. Now bobcats are a different story I have seen a million of those and even a bear or two. In fact I shot an elk 50 yards from where a black bear and a cub were standing. Sitting there watching the bears and low and behold a bull popped out of no where. I am sure they ate well that night.

Same with me. I've seen their track several times, heard a coughing sound behind me one time that I believe was a cougar tracking me. I was being very careful since I was passing an outcrop, and I had seen a track a couple miles back, so I was mostly keeping my eyes up on that outcrop waving my walking stick (which is a carved down branch from an oak tree) up in the air.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 11:35 AM
There are a lot of snakes even around here in the local hills, have to be very careful where you step.

No kidding. Ever seen a Mojave Green rattler around there? You're in their range. The beauty of the Mojave Green is they are actually kind of greenish on their backs so are easy(er) to spot on the sand of a trail. I saw one once and I was surprised how green it was. I didn't even think it was a rattler it was so green.

azbroncfan
06-28-2010, 11:36 AM
No kidding. Ever seen a Mojave Green rattler around there? You're in their range. The beauty of the Mojave Green is they are actually kind of greenish on their backs so are easy(er) to spot on the sand of a trail. I saw one once and I was surprised how green it was. I didn't even think it was a rattler it was so green.

I used to run into those in wyoming hunting Antelope. It is crazy how green they are.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 11:38 AM
No kidding. Ever seen a Mojave Green rattler around there? You're in their range. The beauty of the Mojave Green is they are actually kind of greenish on their backs so are easy(er) to spot on the sand of a trail. I saw one once and I was surprised how green it was. I didn't even think it was a rattler it was so green.

No I haven't seen any of those, but I have seen a lot of Rubber Boa's and California King's which kill other snakes.

Those green Mojove sound beatiful, I'll keep a look out.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 11:51 AM
No I haven't seen any of those, but I have seen a lot of Rubber Boa's and California King's which kill other snakes.

Those green Mojove sound beatiful, I'll keep a look out.

Yeah, those King snakes and Bull snakes are some big bastards, eh? I had to laugh one time I was fishing on the Colorado plains and I saw something thrashing around on the lake, but it was steadily moving toward me and it sure wasn't a fish. It was a bull snake, just cavalierly decide he was gonna relocate from one side of the reservoir to the other. It was like 600 yards it swam, about a five-footer.

What's a rubber boa?

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 11:54 AM
Yeah, those King snakes and Bull snakes are some big bastards, eh? I had to laugh one time I was fishing on the Colorado plains and I saw something thrashing around on the lake, but it was steadily moving toward me and it sure wasn't a fish. It was a bull snake, just cavalierly decide he was gonna relocate from one side of the reservoir to the other. It was like 600 yards it swam, about a five-footer.

What's a rubber boa?

The Rubber Boa is a snake in the family Boidae that is native to the Western United States.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 12:16 PM
The Rubber Boa is a snake in the family Boidae that is native to the Western United States.

Good lord, I've never seen anything like that. Looks like a wet country snake, not something I'd expect to see in the West.

I've never seen a King snake, either. They hunt rattlers, true? I see a lot of bull snakes, have the molted skin of one stapled on my garage wall, it's about six-foot.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 12:28 PM
Good lord, I've never seen anything like that. Looks like a wet country snake, not something I'd expect to see in the West.

I've never seen a King snake, either. They hunt rattlers, true? I see a lot of bull snakes, have the molted skin of one stapled on my garage wall, it's about six-foot.

I've seen a lot of King Snakes which hunt rattlers, the rubber Boa looks like a big worm but can be nasty towards other snakes.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 01:07 PM
I've seen a lot of King Snakes which hunt rattlers, the rubber Boa looks like a big worm but can be nasty towards other snakes.

It's amazing that there is actually a snake that hunts rattlers. A non-venomous snake that actively hunts rattlers. Amazing. There's a niche for everything in nature, I guess.

baja
06-28-2010, 01:15 PM
My Indian name is "he who sleeps with snakes"

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 01:52 PM
My Indian name is "he who sleeps with snakes"

Well, so much for having a serious discussion . . . .

My Indian name is "Lucky to not have been bit"

azbroncfan
06-28-2010, 01:54 PM
It's amazing that there is actually a snake that hunts rattlers. A non-venomous snake that actively hunts rattlers. Amazing. There's a niche for everything in nature, I guess.

King snakes are cool. Love the black and white stripes. My buddy had one as a pet when we were little and we loved feeding it mice.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 02:14 PM
King snakes are cool. Love the black and white stripes. My buddy had one as a pet when we were little and we loved feeding it mice.

Their colors vary here, some are black and white and some are white orange and black.

I've also seen black and red but cant really confirm if it's a king snake.

azbroncfan
06-28-2010, 02:18 PM
Their colors vary here, some are black and white and some are white orange and black.

I've also seen black and red but cant really confirm if it's a king snake.

I was thinking the California king but yeah there are several color variations. Just make sure the red color isn't touching the yellow or you probably will get very sick at best if not die if it bites you. Coral Snake.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 02:24 PM
I was thinking the California king but yeah there are several color variations. Just make sure the red color isn't touching the yellow or you probably will get very sick at best if not die if it bites you. Coral Snake.

Haha, the forest service has a great king snake on display.

They bring it out for the kids to play with sometimes.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 02:25 PM
King snakes are cool. Love the black and white stripes. My buddy had one as a pet when we were little and we loved feeding it mice.

I guess they were named 'King' snakes for a good reason. It's awesome they actually hunt rattlesnakes. I guess they've developed over the millenia a resistance to the venom?

I've always been curious about how snakes and reptiles in general have been able to survive the various calamities the earth has seen. That fox snake or whatever it's called that I've run into a couple times is absolutely amazing. It must have been around for millions of years to evolve into the imitation rattlesnake. And the rattlesnake obviously must have been around for the same millions of years.

You ever seen that imitation rattlesnake?

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 02:38 PM
Their colors vary here, some are black and white and some are white orange and black.

I've also seen black and red but cant really confirm if it's a king snake.

Ya know, I've done some research since this thread started, and I've noticed there isn't a lot of info about snakes on the net. I bet there's plenty of local variations. Black and red were what I thought a King snake was, but I bet there's plenty of local variations. That's how they survive. The Mohave green is a good example. I did some research and found that the Mojave green varies its colors depending on what the predominant color of groundcover it lives in. Sort of like the octopus and cuttlefish.

Cito Pelon
06-28-2010, 02:59 PM
I was thinking the California king but yeah there are several color variations. Just make sure the red color isn't touching the yellow or you probably will get very sick at best if not die if it bites you. Coral Snake.

Watermocassin's are the worst, they're territorial. Snakes usually are not territorial at all, only watermoc's are as far as I know.

Requiem
06-28-2010, 03:05 PM
What are those shoes called that are in the shape of feet again? I'd like to get some. Anyone have a link to where I can get a pair?

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 03:37 PM
Here is some info on the king.

Kingsnakes are a type of colubrid snake that are members of the Lampropeltis genus, which also includes the milk snake along with another four species and 45 sub-species.

Lampropeltis means "shiny shield" (from Greek λαμπρος, "shine" + πελτα, "small shield"), a name given to them in reference to their dorsal scales. The majority of kingsnakes have quite vibrant patterns on their skin. Kingsnakes use constriction to kill their prey and tend to be opportunistic when it comes to their diet; they will eat other snakes (ophiophagy), including venomous snakes, lizards, rodents, birds and eggs. The Common Kingsnake genus are known to be immune to the venom of other snakes and are known to eat rattlesnakes (note — Kingsnakes are not necessarily immune to the venom of snakes from different localities.). The "king" in their name (as with the king cobra) references their taste for other snakes.

Some species of kingsnake, such as the Scarlet Kingsnake, have coloration and patterning which can cause them to be confused with the venomous coral snakes. There are mnemonic rhymes to help people distinguish between the coral snake and its non-venomous look-alikes, including "Red and yellow kills a fellow. Red and black is safe for Jack."

Taxonomic reclassification is an ongoing process, and different sources often disagree, granting full species status to a group of these snakes that another source considers a subspecies. In the case of Lampropeltis catalinensis, for example, only a single specimen exists, and therefore classification is not necessarily finite. In addition, hybridization between species which have overlapping geographic ranges is not uncommon, confusing taxonomists further.

Kingsnakes are commonly kept as pets, due to their ease of care. Kingsnakes are overall hardy and simple to care for. Their captive diet usually consists of appropriately sized rodents, prekilled. Giving live rodents is an illegal offense in some countries and may be bad for the snake's health, as live rodents are capable of delivering powerful bites, potentially injuring the snake. Kingsnakes are generally docile, curious and gentle.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kingsnake

elsid13
06-28-2010, 03:44 PM
So does anyone have any suggestions on good trail food for lunch. Something easy and not to hard to carry.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 03:47 PM
So does anyone have any suggestions on good trail food for lunch. Something easy and not to hard to carry.

I get some of those trail mix bars and bananas with plenty of fluids.

Or beef jerky is good as well.

elsid13
06-28-2010, 03:54 PM
I get some of those trail mix bars and bananas with plenty of fluids.

Or beef jerky is good as well.

I'm getting tried of the cliff bars and jerky, so I'm just seeing if folks had any other suggestions.

Los Broncos
06-28-2010, 03:56 PM
I'm getting tried of the cliff bars and jerky, so I'm just seeing if folks had any other suggestions.

Sorry man.

elsid13
06-28-2010, 04:09 PM
Sorry man.

Nothing to be sorry about. I was a little vague on my question. I was thinking about pickup a "civilian" MRE from REI, but hear those taste like ****.

Irish Stout
06-29-2010, 09:56 AM
What are those shoes called that are in the shape of feet again? I'd like to get some. Anyone have a link to where I can get a pair?

http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/

I dont know if I would recommend hiking in them, but to each his own.

azbroncfan
06-29-2010, 10:01 AM
What are those shoes called that are in the shape of feet again? I'd like to get some. Anyone have a link to where I can get a pair?

I think REI sells them or SPORTSCHALET. Can't remember which one I saw them at but think it was REI.

Irish Stout
06-29-2010, 10:05 AM
I'm getting tried of the cliff bars and jerky, so I'm just seeing if folks had any other suggestions.

Peanut butter is my new deal - whether PB&Js, or PB and crackers or PB and celery and carrots or a combo of all 3. I usually will scoop some PB into a little plastic container for hiking.

Also, I like to take an apple, but not sure if thats getting too bulky.

If I'm hiking specifically to get somewhere nice to eat lunch, I don't mind loading the pack up more with a loaf of bread, olives, a tomato, and some cream cheese (store it next to the water pack). Granted, I'm not hiking more than an hour or so out in the summer, I may also bring a bottle of yellow jersey wine (bought like 4 cases of this stuff for incredibly cheap, not terrible and is in a plastic bottle with screw off top).

Otherwise its the old stand by of trail mix, energy bars, and nature valley bars.

Los Broncos
06-29-2010, 10:05 AM
I think REI sells them or SPORTSCHALET. Can't remember which one I saw them at but think it was REI.

Seen them at REI, cool shoes.

Beantown Bronco
06-29-2010, 10:15 AM
I'm getting tried of the cliff bars and jerky, so I'm just seeing if folks had any other suggestions.

I'm loving these right now for snacking.

http://www.amazon.com/Nature-Valley-Granola-Chocolate-6-Count/dp/B0032GHKXO

elsid13
06-29-2010, 02:08 PM
Peanut butter is my new deal - whether PB&Js, or PB and crackers or PB and celery and carrots or a combo of all 3. I usually will scoop some PB into a little plastic container for hiking.

Also, I like to take an apple, but not sure if thats getting too bulky.

If I'm hiking specifically to get somewhere nice to eat lunch, I don't mind loading the pack up more with a loaf of bread, olives, a tomato, and some cream cheese (store it next to the water pack). Granted, I'm not hiking more than an hour or so out in the summer, I may also bring a bottle of yellow jersey wine (bought like 4 cases of this stuff for incredibly cheap, not terrible and is in a plastic bottle with screw off top).

Otherwise its the old stand by of trail mix, energy bars, and nature valley bars.

I've done PB too, but with the humidity you get in VA, MD and WVU this time of year, the PB seems to suck the moisture out my mouth.

elsid13
06-29-2010, 02:08 PM
I'm loving these right now for snacking.

http://www.amazon.com/Nature-Valley-Granola-Chocolate-6-Count/dp/B0032GHKXO

thanks, but the link broken.

Irish Stout
06-29-2010, 02:13 PM
I've done PB too, but with the humidity you get in VA, MD and WVU this time of year, the PB seems to suck the moisture out my mouth.

Ahhh humidity. My old foe. How I detest you!

Irish Stout
06-29-2010, 02:14 PM
thanks, but the link broken.

Its the nature valley sweet and salty granola bars with chocolate chunks and raisins (I think). Not sure why its an amazon link.

elsid13
06-29-2010, 02:34 PM
Ahhh humidity. My old foe. How I detest you!

I had to cancel my hikes last week, because with the humidity. The heat index was 112 with everything factored in. It ****ing sucks this time of year near DC.

Los Broncos
06-29-2010, 02:39 PM
The weather this past weekend was great for hiking here.

Not to hot, was perfect for an evening hike as well.

I only take the Nature Valley bars they seem to hold up pretty well.

elsid13
06-29-2010, 02:47 PM
The weather this past weekend was great for hiking here.

Not to hot, was perfect for an evening hike as well.

I only take the Nature Valley bars they seem to hold up pretty well.

Try the Cliff bars, they hold up extremely well and fill you up.

Los Broncos
06-29-2010, 02:49 PM
Try the Cliff bars, they hold up extremely well and fill you up.

Cool I'll give them a try.

Cito Pelon
07-01-2010, 09:16 AM
Peanut butter is my new deal - whether PB&Js, or PB and crackers or PB and celery and carrots or a combo of all 3. I usually will scoop some PB into a little plastic container for hiking.

Also, I like to take an apple, but not sure if thats getting too bulky.

If I'm hiking specifically to get somewhere nice to eat lunch, I don't mind loading the pack up more with a loaf of bread, olives, a tomato, and some cream cheese (store it next to the water pack). Granted, I'm not hiking more than an hour or so out in the summer, I may also bring a bottle of yellow jersey wine (bought like 4 cases of this stuff for incredibly cheap, not terrible and is in a plastic bottle with screw off top).

Otherwise its the old stand by of trail mix, energy bars, and nature valley bars.

Yeah, trail mix seems to be the all-time, all-around best. I'll make bean & bacon burritos for the all-day and overnight hikes, and usually I'm the only person packing them.

But I'm not the only one eating them. I throw that bag of burritos out in the sun to warm up and my fellow hikers can't take their eyes off of them. I'm a very popular guy.

Meck77
07-01-2010, 09:39 AM
Hold the PBJ and give me the PBR with a side of brookies!

http://img685.imageshack.us/img685/82/brookies.jpg (http://img685.imageshack.us/i/brookies.jpg/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

elsid13
05-30-2011, 05:00 PM
Summer here and I was wondering if anyone got any new cool gear or has any special trips planned.