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PaintballCLE
03-25-2010, 09:04 AM
http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/writers/don_banks/03/23/nfl.draft.marijuana/index.html?xid=FanHouse&icid=main|htmlws-main-n|dl4|link4|http%3A%2F%2Fsportsillustrated.cnn.com %2F2010%2Fwriters%2Fdon_banks%2F03%2F23%2Fnfl.draf t.marijuana%2Findex.html%3Fxid%3DFanHouse

ORLANDO -- There's a widespread belief within the NFL that the 2010 draft represents one of the deepest and most promising pools of collegiate talent in years. But in addition to the vast potential of this year's draft class, numerous NFL personnel evaluators told SI.com they are concerned about the increased number of prospects who have a history of marijuana use in their background, with players often acknowledging a failed drug test for pot in college in interviews with team executives.

SI.com interviewed four NFL head coaches, four general managers and two other high-level club personnel executives for this story. Due to the sensitivity of the topic, all requested anonymity in order to speak candidly about the issue.

According to one veteran club personnel man, 10 or 11 players who carry first-round draft grades on their board this year have been red-flagged for marijuana use in college, an estimate echoed by two clubs' head coaches. Another NFL head coach estimated that "one-third'' of the players on his club's draft board had some sort of history with marijuana use and would thus require an extra level of evaluation as part of the pre-draft scouting process.

"Marijuana use is almost epidemic, with more guys having tested positive for marijuana at some point in their college background than I can ever remember,'' said a longtime team personnel man. "It's almost as if we are having to figure out a new way to evaluate it as part of the character and background report, because it's so prevalent. There're enough instances of it that it's hard to know how to set your board. You can't throw out that many guys. You have to go case-by-case and do your homework on them.''

It's important to note that NFL club officials in this case are only referencing failed drug tests administered by the prospect's college that wind up on his background report, not the drug tests the league conducts as part of the scouting process at last month's NFL Scouting Combine in Indianapolis. Players with drug test failures in college are not automatically enrolled in the NFL's drug-testing program upon being drafted, but those players can be added at the league's discretion, depending on the type of drug used, how recent the failed test occurred and if there were multiple failures.

"It's something that's concerning to all coaches and general managers in this league,'' one veteran NFL head coach said at the league's annual meeting in Orlando. "It has been trending the wrong way in recent years. But it's something that has to be dealt with from on high, at the league level, and not just dealt with on a club by club basis. It's partly a societal issue, but it's something we're having to deal with more and more.''

In many cases these days, club officials say, players are much more open to admitting to past marijuana use or experimentation in college as part of their pre-draft interviews with NFL teams.

"The kids are admitting it much more now, and part of that is what they've been coached to do [by their agents or handlers],'' one club general manager said. "They want to get the truth out and give you an explanation for their use. That's seen as better than letting someone else put it out there for you and making you look like you were being evasive.

"But we've had that same conversation internally on our club: 'Wow, there's a lot of kids this year.' It seems much more common now, across the draft.''

One NFL head coach told me this week that in this era of some states decriminalizing marijuana for medicinal purposes, he has interviewed potential draft picks who didn't even seem to recognize their marijuana smoking constituted drug use in the eyes of the NFL.

"It's pretty significant as a trend,'' the head coach said. "But if you knocked everyone off your board who has experimented with weed, you'd lose about 20 percent of your board, not to mention disqualify a few recent presidents. A third sounds a little high to me, but it's not a rare occurrence to have a player with some pot use in his background. You have to make a judgment on each individual guy.''

That same head coach said that earlier in his NFL coaching career, if a player had failed a drug test for pot in college, his name would be quickly removed from the draft boards of most teams. But times have changed. Clubs are doing more work to try and identify whether a prospect's pot use falls under the experimentation heading, or is done with regularity.

"It's a matter of figuring out which ones smoke, and which ones have to smoke, because they really [are addicted],'' another head coach said. "It's like the drinking issue. You want to know if a guy drinks, or if he has a drinking problem. You're trying to find out and make that distinction with some guys.''

The reaction to a prospect's collegiate marijuana use varies from club to club, team executives and coaches said. The mentality of personnel evaluators and coaches making case-by-case decisions on players with marijuana use in their background has grown more prevalent with the league's infusion of younger coaches and general managers in recent years.

"Overall in the league there's a bit of a different generation of decision-makers and people doing the evaluating,'' one team's general manager said. "Even among those of us who didn't [smoke pot], we had some friends who did and we didn't judge them that harshly. So for some, it's a less damaging red flag for a player to have that on his record. Now, maybe [longtime Colts president] Bill Polian's perception of that is different. Maybe those players are still completely off his board. But it can be generational in that sense, yes. Definitely.''

Even among the club officials who expressed the most concern about the prevalence of prospects in this draft who have failed at least one test for marijuana in college, none said they would automatically remove any such player from their draft board.

"There are probably different shades of red to the red flag you give that player these days, different degrees of how it impacts their grade,'' one head coach said. "I know of one guy who told me he smoked with his mom. It was just something they did together. You have to find out something about the specifics and see if it was a habit, and or if it was experimenting in college. For one thing, it could be a case of colleges testing more, and having better tests. It may not be that use is up, but detection is up.''

Some players suspected of marijuana use in college in recent years, Philadelphia receiver DeSean Jackson and Minnesota receiver-return man Percy Harvin most notably, have been two of the top offensive players in the draft the past two years. Their early success in the NFL has possibly led some teams to take a more lenient approach to drafting talented players who are suspected of collegiate marijuana use, one team front office executive said.

"If you passed on Jackson and you passed on Harvin the past two years, maybe you can't afford to just completely write off that kind of prospect every time, or you won't have a job at some point because you won't win any games,'' one team front office executive said. "But you don't want to take guys and see them be in the [league's drug] program the whole time, because they may never get out of it. You want to determine if it's in their environment and if they're bringing that environment with them [to the NFL]?''

One team's head coach said organizations are doing more and more extensive background checks on draft prospects every year to find out as much information as possible about the practices of their potential employees.

"You have to, because some guys aren't telling you the whole truth about their habits and things that have happened while they're in college,'' the head coach said. "It depends on the team's individual approach, but you can get in trouble if you're just overlooking everything when it comes to that kind of history in their background.''

Another NFL general manager interviewed this week said he has a discussion with his team's owner every time the club is even considering a player who has a red flag on their record for marijuana use in college. And you can't have too many of those talks on a year-in, year-out basis, he said.

"That's a topic of conversation for a lot of GMs with their owners,'' the general manager said. "You have a number of prospects who are quality people, but who might have [screwed] up early on in college. As long as it's not a habitual thing, there's more of a discussion about those players, rather than just jettisoning them off your board. Which is what a lot of teams have done in the past. But I think we're all a little more realistic these days.

"I've gone and scouted players at colleges and their coaches really talk them up, but then they add that 'He has this in his background.' It's definitely something we're going to have to get to the bottom of, but what are you going to do? If the kid has one thing in his past, are you going to throw away a third of your board? That's the reality of the situation we face.''



Read More: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2010/writers/don_banks/03/23/nfl.draft.marijuana/index.html?xid=FanHouse&icid=main|htmlws-main-n|dl4|link4|http%3A%2F%2Fsportsillustrated.cnn.com %2F2010%2Fwriters%2Fdon_banks%2F03%2F23%2Fnfl.draf t.marijuana%2Findex.html%3Fxid%3DFanHouse#ixzz0jCW 0FTc3
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Popps
03-25-2010, 09:19 AM
http://filmfanatic.org/reviews/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/fast-times-spicoli.png

oubronco
03-25-2010, 09:22 AM
http://filmfanatic.org/reviews/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/fast-times-spicoli.png

I just look at that wave and say "Hey bud let's party"

Dagmar
03-25-2010, 09:22 AM
These people that are worried are pretty retarded.

SonOfLe-loLang
03-25-2010, 09:23 AM
These people that are worried are pretty retarded.

I agree, its such a non issue

Meck77
03-25-2010, 09:25 AM
"It's something that's concerning to all coaches and general managers in this league,''

It's a good thing they don't test owners, coaches, and GMs.:pimp:

The Joker
03-25-2010, 09:37 AM
These people that are worried are pretty retarded.

The problem lies in the generation gap, most likely.

The majority of people in their twenties/late teens know that smoking the odd bit of weed here and there is more or less harmless, in the same way that having a few drinks now and then is. Weed use is so widespread these days that the younger generation are pretty much fine with it.

Most of your GM's and HC's howeve are aged 40+, and I think in that generation there's still an element of the unknown about weed and what it actually does to you. With the unknown comes fear, so you can't blame some of them for being wary of guys who smoke a bit of weed because they don't realise that it's pretty tame.

Now if you've got a guy who is smoking a few times a week, every week, then that's a different story. I don't want to go drafting that guy and giving him a contract. But I doubt that's the case with these guys, in all honesty.

Flex Gunmetal
03-25-2010, 09:39 AM
Anyone still concerned about marijuana use is out of touch. It's really not an issue.

DawnBTVS
03-25-2010, 09:55 AM
I think it's still a credible fear... wasn't Charles Rogers known to smoke marijuana (that and his entire attitude ruined his career off the bat)?

Granted, marijuana use in general isn't "a big deal" but when you're paying a 1st round pick who's usually anywhere from 21-23 years old millions over 3 or 4 years, you'd better have some concern whether it's warranted or not. The article mentions DeSean Jackson and Percy Harvin but they're still really young.

Also keep in mind that using marijuana can still get a guy suspended, big deal or not. It happened to Kevin Faulk last year IIRC. So if you're associated with marijuana, there's a potential risk down the line that you could get suspended.

Beantown Bronco
03-25-2010, 10:19 AM
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snowspot66
03-26-2010, 12:58 PM
Anyone still concerned about marijuana use is out of touch. It's really not an issue.

When your 50 million dollar first round pick is suspended for pot use it becomes an issue.

DBroncos4life
03-26-2010, 01:10 PM
When your 50 million dollar first round pick is suspended for pot use it becomes an issue.

You would think posters would understand this. You still get suspended for this "non issue".

Dedhed
03-26-2010, 01:13 PM
When your 50 million dollar first round pick is suspended for pot use it becomes an issue.

Character issues are a far greater concern in this regard than toking.

plummershelper
03-26-2010, 01:55 PM
I don't think the issue is necessarily whether it's good or bad for you. Here are guys who know explicity that they are not to participate in that as athletes, also knowing that their future could well be on the line. They are dumb enough to do it anyways and get caught several times. I think it's an issue of being smart enough to stay away from it with your job on the line and a willingness to commit to your sport.

Dagmar
03-26-2010, 03:09 PM
http://cheezburger.com/lolbuilder.aspx?preview=1&source=http%3A//images.cheezburger.com/imagestore/2010/3/26/fda20092-6435-40cb-a748-7edf584ac027.jpg&top=Stoner%20dog...&bottom=...loves%20cookies...&middle=&font=Impact&color=White&size=50&bold=true&italic=false&underlined=false&style=outline&opacity=100&topalignment=left&middlealignment=left&bottomalignment=right

watermock
03-26-2010, 03:13 PM
It's pretty significant as a trend,'' the head coach said. "But if you knocked everyone off your board who has experimented with weed, you'd lose about 20 percent of your board,

Try 80%.

DBroncos4life
03-26-2010, 03:19 PM
I don't think the issue is necessarily whether it's good or bad for you. Here are guys who know explicity that they are not to participate in that as athletes, also knowing that their future could well be on the line. They are dumb enough to do it anyways and get caught several times. I think it's an issue of being smart enough to stay away from it with your job on the line and a willingness to commit to your sport.

See LaMarcus Coker. 5-11 205 pounds and a sub 4.4. Getting kicked off the Vols for flunking a drug test 4 f'ing times. I guess he hasn't been in trouble since playing for Hampton College. He didn't even bother showing up to his pro day. A guy with his size and speed without a drug problem would more then likely drafted. Now I doubt it. I even considered him a late round sleeper till I found out he didn't even show up to his pro day.

bpc
03-26-2010, 03:21 PM
Just more of the problems eating at the heart of this society. Let's all get medicated!!!

Dedhed
03-26-2010, 03:31 PM
Just more of the problems eating at the heart of this society. Let's all get medicated!!!

Prescription drugs and alcohol are a far bigger problem than weed.

Archer81
03-26-2010, 03:33 PM
I generally dont care either way about weed. But if you know you have a future making millions of dollars in a league that tests and bans for illegal drug use...why do it?

:Broncos:

BroncoBuff
03-26-2010, 03:33 PM
I say we have ALL the draftees smoke some pot. Then they'll all test positive, and we won't have to read these dumb articles quoting Neanderthal scouts and "personnel evaluators" as if they had anything interesting to say.

Dagmar
03-26-2010, 03:46 PM
I say we have ALL the draftees smoke some pot. Then they'll all test positive, and we won't have to read these dumb articles quoting Neanderthal scouts and "personnel evaluators" as if they had anything interesting to say.

I like. :thumbs:

snowspot66
03-26-2010, 03:53 PM
Character issues are a far greater concern in this regard than toking.

I have no issue with pot other than it smells like **** and isn't good for you. But I don't care if others use it. But NFL front offices are always going to be concerned about pot. Not because of potential character issues but because no matter how nice the guy is if he gets caught with it the team is ****ed.

TexanBob
03-26-2010, 04:10 PM
You would think posters would understand this. You still get suspended for this "non issue".

It's still an illegal substance so the fact that these people are breaking the law by smoking pot certainly raises a character concern.

GMs and scouts will have to discern between the "I tried it once or twice" types and the "I'm smoking it 4-5 times a week" types. You can't lump them all into one pool.

TexanBob
03-26-2010, 04:12 PM
See LaMarcus Coker. 5-11 205 pounds and a sub 4.4. Getting kicked off the Vols for flunking a drug test 4 f'ing times.

Sometimes, there's some truth in a name...

fdf
03-26-2010, 05:00 PM
The majority of people in their twenties/late teens know that smoking the odd bit of weed here and there is more or less harmless, in the same way that having a few drinks now and then is. Weed use is so widespread these days that the younger generation are pretty much fine with it.

That's kind of cute. This post has to be written by someone who has absolutely no idea what went on ten years ago, twenty years ago, thirty years ago, and up to forty years ago. But, when I was in college, we were all pretty sure on some level that our generation had invented sex and that our parents obviously never understood or enjoyed it. The wisdom of yutes.

gunns
03-26-2010, 05:08 PM
I don't see a problem with it. It doesn't enhance their performance and I would rather see that than them drinking and inevitably doing something stupid. But I have to wonder about a kid who has the potential to make millions working for a few years and they jeopardize that by smoking. It's not addictive so what's the problem to give it up for those few years and then you can buy the creme of the pot after you've made your nest egg.

Originally Posted by McSchism
The majority of people in their twenties/late teens know that smoking the odd bit of weed here and there is more or less harmless, in the same way that having a few drinks now and then is. Weed use is so widespread these days that the younger generation are pretty much fine with it.

Sorry dude, there's probably more in my generation that know there's not a problem with it. The one's who act as if there is are the one's who have to speak that way because of their job (and there's plenty of law enforcement that don't have a problem with it) or they've never tried it.

Hercules Rockefeller
03-26-2010, 05:16 PM
When your 50 million dollar first round pick is suspended for pot use it becomes an issue.

/thread

A perceived generational gap is irrelevant, and it's not a big deal is incorrect. As long as it's a banned substance that you can be suspended for by the NFL, then it's going to be a BFD to all the teams that are investing money and draft picks in these guys.

Cool Breeze
03-26-2010, 05:47 PM
They're not the only ones dealing with an epidemic...
Flood of medical-marijuana applications forces change

<!--subtitle--><!--byline-->The Denver Post
<!--date-->Posted: 03/26/2010 01:00:00 AM MDT
<!--secondary date-->Updated: 03/26/2010 02:15:46 PM MDT


<SCRIPT language=JavaScript> var requestedWidth = 0; </SCRIPT>
<SCRIPT language=JavaScript> if(requestedWidth > 0){ document.getElementById('articleViewerGroup').styl e.width = requestedWidth + "px"; document.getElementById('articleViewerGroup').styl e.margin = "0px 0px 10px 10px"; } </SCRIPT>Inundated with medical-marijuana patient applications, Colorado's health department has changed one way it handles the flood of paperwork.
Starting April 1, health department workers will no longer review applications submitted at the department's walk-up window to make sure they are complete before accepting them. In a news release, the health department said that practice unfairly gave walk-up applications priority and contributed to a backlog of mailed-in applications.
The department has been receiving about 1,000 applications per workday, nearly quadruple the number it was receiving per day over the summer, according to the release.
The lag between when an application is received and when a license is issued has now stretched to six months. The department is awaiting legislative approval of funding to add temporary workers to help with the backlog.



Read more: http://www.denverpost.com/ci_14760247#ixzz0jKUeunsG (http://www.denverpost.com/ci_14760247#ixzz0jKUeunsG)

Pony Boy
03-26-2010, 05:49 PM
Ricky says no problem

26282

Dedhed
03-26-2010, 06:28 PM
I have no issue with pot other than it smells like **** and isn't good for you. But I don't care if others use it. But NFL front offices are always going to be concerned about pot. Not because of potential character issues but because no matter how nice the guy is if he gets caught with it the team is ****ed.

I agree...in a way. If guys aren't smart enough to stay clear when they're going to be tested, that's a character issue to me.

I was tested all through college, and never failed a test because, duh, I didn't smoke during the testing season. If a guy can't stay away from any vice (night clubs, alcohol, McDonalds, etc) while in season, that's a character flaw to me and something coaches should be concerned about.

If they're concerned that a guy toked up during college when he was home on summer break, then that's dumb to me.

Dedhed
03-26-2010, 06:34 PM
Sorry dude, there's probably more in my generation that know there's not a problem with it. The one's who act as if there is are the one's who have to speak that way because of their job (and there's plenty of law enforcement that don't have a problem with it) or they've never tried it.
That's true, but I think the difference is that in your generation the people who smoked weed knew that, but those who didn't were vehemently opposed to weed (think "Reefer Madness").

In the current generations that opposition is fading and even those who don't care for it, aren't opposed to it.