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View Full Version : Wonderlic scores for wide receivers


BowlenBall
03-16-2010, 08:50 PM
http://www.nationalfootballpost.com/Minnesotas-Decker-scores-a-43-on-the-Wonderlic.html

Arrelious Benn = no rocket scientist

Doggcow
03-16-2010, 09:19 PM
Doesn't really matter for a WR IMO

meangene
03-17-2010, 03:12 AM
I'm surprised Dez Bryant showed up for the test - got the date and time right, didn't oversleep... ROFL!

Drek
03-17-2010, 03:35 AM
Typically there are a bunch of single digit guys at the WR and RB positions, Benn and Spiller putting up an 11 and 10 respectively isn't that bad from a historical standpoint, just not so great compared to this year's draft class.

Wasn't there a string of like 5 years where DJ was the only Miami player to break double digits, with a 15? Sure didn't hurt their NFL productivity.

QB and OL, that is where wonderlic matters. At everything else there are much more important skills to have.

Mediator12
03-17-2010, 07:27 AM
Typically there are a bunch of single digit guys at the WR and RB positions, Benn and Spiller putting up an 11 and 10 respectively isn't that bad from a historical standpoint, just not so great compared to this year's draft class.

Wasn't there a string of like 5 years where DJ was the only Miami player to break double digits, with a 15? Sure didn't hurt their NFL productivity.

QB and OL, that is where wonderlic matters. At everything else there are much more important skills to have.

The wonderlic jumped the shark in the 80's. Players today are not the representative sample of what the test is supposed to measure. They have "revised" the standard test for the draft, but it really still has no meaning since the early 80's. It is an employee aptitude test and this is a business where the skills measured are not applicable any more.

The combine still uses it becausee its simple, quick, and easy to administer. No one has really devised a truly useful alternative, because it is impossible to get the relevant information from that short a test. Employers use it to weed out applicants who do not meet their standards. The NFL teams use it only as a cross check for their Player profiles. If a player drops below the standard deviation for his position, it requires additional work by the scouting team to evaluate the players grade and mental acuity.

That being said, almost every team has a psychologist that screens the players deemed lacking in intelligence. A lot of teams do personality, behavioral, and aptitude testing of their own. These are much more valuable and reliable tools. However, each team does this seperately and there is no standard to compare it against with other tools. The wonderlic is just a bad habit with no forseeable alternative.

The Joker
03-17-2010, 08:59 AM
I can't believe that nobody has gone about trying to develop some sort of football specific intelligence test.

Would be very interesting if the test was in the least bit related to what actually goes on when they take the field.

Mediator12
03-17-2010, 03:24 PM
I can't believe that nobody has gone about trying to develop some sort of football specific intelligence test.

Would be very interesting if the test was in the least bit related to what actually goes on when they take the field.

People have tried to get the data needed to do just that thing. However, the NFL, NFLPA, and agents have all kept the data from becoming available.

Each team has their own way of measuring "football Intelligence". The biggest problem is they have no way of tracking "Applied football Intelligence" to performance. They also can not get information on learning and length to impact mental ability.

IMHO, the biggest single impediment to drafting success is getting a clear cut mental picture of the player as it applies to being a pro. There are players in every draft who get overlooked, despite being very well suited to play in the NFL over some of the physical freaks who have no idea how to actually learn, work, and apply at the next level.

Mr.Meanie
03-17-2010, 03:34 PM
People have tried to get the data needed to do just that thing. However, the NFL, NFLPA, and agents have all kept the data from becoming available.

Each team has their own way of measuring "football Intelligence". The biggest problem is they have no way of tracking "Applied football Intelligence" to performance. They also can not get information on learning and length to impact mental ability.

IMHO, the biggest single impediment to drafting success is getting a clear cut mental picture of the player as it applies to being a pro. There are players in every draft who get overlooked, despite being very well suited to play in the NFL over some of the physical freaks who have no idea how to actually learn, work, and apply at the next level.

That's what makes the draft so exciting. Any team can hit a homerun in the later rounds, or they can totally whiff on a "can't lose" prospect. I love it!

gyldenlove
03-17-2010, 07:07 PM
Typically there are a bunch of single digit guys at the WR and RB positions, Benn and Spiller putting up an 11 and 10 respectively isn't that bad from a historical standpoint, just not so great compared to this year's draft class.

Wasn't there a string of like 5 years where DJ was the only Miami player to break double digits, with a 15? Sure didn't hurt their NFL productivity.

QB and OL, that is where wonderlic matters. At everything else there are much more important skills to have.

Safety, CB and ILB as well, they all have to be pretty good.

gyldenlove
03-17-2010, 07:45 PM
That's very true.

I mean really when you break it down, football IQ is what's most important.

It would have to be position specific, what a QB has to know has no relevance to an OC or a CB.

FireFly
03-17-2010, 08:02 PM
I can't believe that nobody has gone about trying to develop some sort of football specific intelligence test.

Would be very interesting if the test was in the least bit related to what actually goes on when they take the field.

That's very true.

I mean really when you break it down, football IQ is what's most important.