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Archer81
03-12-2010, 01:38 AM
Its 1:37am, Im bored and cant sleep. But a couple of posts in the NY Banned Salt thread got me thinking. What books do you believe should be read?



:Broncos:

Houshyamama
03-12-2010, 01:45 AM
Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene

watermock
03-12-2010, 01:45 AM
"Going Rougue" by Sarah Palin.

watermock
03-12-2010, 01:50 AM
Try this and wake up.
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/False%2520Religions/Wicca%2520%26%2520Witchcraft/bohemian_grove.jpg&imgrefurl=http://norcaltruth.org/bohemian-grove/&h=384&w=518&sz=24&tbnid=GZsLsENm98SniM:&tbnh=97&tbnw=131&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dbohemian%2Bgrove&hl=en&usg=__4btj5MKV6SFkdpivF1QSIYcEyJg=&ei=1v-ZS8fGL8L38AbenNycDg&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=7&ct=image&ved=0CBsQ9QEwBg

CHANGSTER
03-12-2010, 01:58 AM
http://www.ineedprettythings.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/08/everybody-poops-collage.png

watermock
03-12-2010, 01:59 AM
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=http://www.jesus-is-savior.com/False%2520Religions/Wicca%2520%26%2520Witchcraft/bohemian_grove.jpg&imgrefurl=http://norcaltruth.org/bohemian-grove/&h=384&w=518&sz=24&tbnid=GZsLsENm98SniM:&tbnh=97&tbnw=131&prev=/images%3Fq%3Dbohemian%2Bgrove&hl=en&usg=__4btj5MKV6SFkdpivF1QSIYcEyJg=&ei=1v-ZS8fGL8L38AbenNycDg&sa=X&oi=image_result&resnum=7&ct=image&ved=0CBsQ9QEwBg.
.

watermock
03-12-2010, 02:10 AM
Bush, McCain & Obama To Visit Bohemian Grove?



Paul Joseph Watson
Prison Planet
Friday, July 11, 2008

Outgoing President George W. Bush and both of his presumptive replacements John McCain and Barack Obama are rumored to be in attendance at this year’s Bohemian Grove gathering, an annual get-together of the global elite staged inside a sprawling forest encampment which kicks off tonight and runs until July 27.

Bohemian Grove is a 136-year-old all-male encampment complete with restaurants, bars, stages and lodges, which caters to around 2,000 members of the global elite along with Californian hoi polloi on a yearly basis in July. The camp is set within a 2,700 acre secluded forest replete with giant redwood trees.

Former attendees include Ronald Reagan and Richard Nixon, who both went on to become President, as well as regulars like Henry Kissinger, Alan Greenspan, David Rockefeller, Colin Powell, as well as George W. Bush and his father.

In 2000 radio host and film maker Alex Jones infiltrated the gathering and caught exclusive video footage of a bizarre mock human sacrifice ritual, known as “the cremation of care”, under a 40 foot stone owl that the members refer to as Molech.

http://www.prisonplanet.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/110708bushmccain.jpg

extralife
03-12-2010, 02:54 AM
I like how the implication here is that there are like five books that we should read and then we'd be all good and can go back to football and video games.

DBroncos4life
03-12-2010, 04:27 AM
Until They Bring The Streetcars Back. There are a few other books that he wrote from the different people in the original story. I read them all and I thought they were good as well.

http://www.litlovers.com/guide_until_they_bring_streetcars.html

Hey Nostradamus! Was amazing.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Hey-Nostradamus-Playaway-Adult-Fiction/dp/product-description/1606409344

Ramathorn
03-12-2010, 05:08 AM
Growing up bin laden by Omar bin laden. I would like to read this book at some point.

Dagmar
03-12-2010, 06:08 AM
I'm impressed mock tried to hijack this and everyone ignored him. Maybe soon he'll just go away.

Hey nostrodamus was brilliant, if you like that one try Life After God. It's my favorite book of all time.

Dukes
03-12-2010, 06:47 AM
All of Vince Flynn's books.

ColoradoDarin
03-12-2010, 06:48 AM
The Bible. It'll take a year, but it's well worth it. Amazing how many stories and sayings you already know are in there, the sayings especially, but didn't realize it. (I tried to specifically leave out any reference to religion here since we have a few who like to start Holy Wars around here)

TheElusiveKyleOrton
03-12-2010, 07:39 AM
I'm sure everyone's read it, but it's worth mentioning again:

A Few Seconds of Panic by Stefan Fatsis. Great read. I couldn't put it down, and I'm actually about to start reading it again.

God Save the Fan by Will Leitch is a pretty good dismantling of ESPN and some of the questionable practices of tWWL.

I'm currently working on A Course Called Ireland by Tom Coyne. Golf book. Life book. Mixed together. Good read.

This stuff might be flavor-of-the-month fare for you guys, but they're all good reads and I would recommend each one.

DBroncos4life
03-12-2010, 07:46 AM
I'm impressed mock tried to hijack this and everyone ignored him. Maybe soon he'll just go away.

Hey nostrodamus was brilliant, if you like that one try Life After God. It's my favorite book of all time.

Is it by the same author? I will try and find a copy of it.

Has anyone read The Glass Castle? I thought it was a pretty good book. A Million Little Pieces was a good read as well, even if it wasn't completely true.

Rabb
03-12-2010, 07:59 AM
Zombie survival guide

gyldenlove
03-12-2010, 08:34 AM
Catch-22
Kite runner
Lies my teacher told me

Kid A
03-12-2010, 08:44 AM
Fabric of the Cosmos by Brian Greene

Yes! I love Greene. Makes the concepts comprehensible without it feeling too dumbed down. He also does a great job of pausing occasionally to bring home the point of just how damn cool some that stuff really is.

Mr.Meanie
03-12-2010, 09:00 AM
I would say:

Rich Dad Poor Dad - Robert Kiyosaki
Richest Man in Babylon - George S. Clason
How to Win Friends and Influence People - Dale Carnegie
Cosmos - Carl Sagan

bowtown
03-12-2010, 09:08 AM
For Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest Hemingway
London Fields - Martin Amis
The Wonder Clock - Howard Pyle
Shogun - James Clavell
Roughing It - Mark Twain

baja
03-12-2010, 09:15 AM
"The Presence Process" by Michael Brown.

Drunk Monkey
03-12-2010, 09:16 AM
For Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest Hemingway
London Fields - Martin Amis
The Wonder Clock - Howard Pyle
Shogun - James Clavell
Roughing It - Mark Twain

Tai-Pan is also a great Clavell book.

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 09:21 AM
The Education of Henry Adams
James Michener's books, all of them
The Proud Tower
The Guns of August
In Flanders Fields
Goodbye To All That
The Road to Oxiana
The Source of the Nile
A Secret Pilgrimage to Mecca and Medina
Democracy in America
All Quiet On the Western Front
Graham Greene's novels
The Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire
The Gulag Archipelago
One Day in the Life of Ivan Denisovich
Confucius
An Embassy to China

www.foliosociety.com has one of the best reading lists available. Their books are beautifully bound and illustrated, books you can pass onto your kids. Low cost and they're not an intrusive "book club" kind of thing.

bowtown
03-12-2010, 09:23 AM
Tai-Pan is also a great Clavell book.

Yes, it is an excellent book. The series drops off a little after that, but they are all very readable.

UberBroncoMan
03-12-2010, 09:31 AM
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels (seriously it's interesting to read a about a radical process of thought).

The Darth Bane trilogy by Drew Karpyshyn (if you like BioWare games you'll like this).

Victor
03-12-2010, 10:03 AM
The Razor's Edge
Stranger in a Strange Land
The Fountainhead
Shogun
Anything by Jim Harrison (start with the Legends of the Fall novelas)
Lucky Jim (Kingsly Amos)
Veronica by Nicholas Christopher
A Trip to the Stars by Nicholas Christopher
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Gates of Fire by Stephen Pressfield
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
Club Dumas
Billy Bathgate

I don't know if i'd say you "must read these", but they've been enjoyable and meaningful to me...to name but a few

bowtown
03-12-2010, 10:07 AM
The Razor's Edge
Stranger in a Strange Land
The Fountainhead
Shogun
Anything by Jim Harrison (start with the Legends of the Fall novelas)
Lucky Jim (Kingsly Amos)
Veronica by Nicholas Christopher
A Trip to the Stars by Nicholas Christopher
Meditations by Marcus Aurelius
Gates of Fire by Stephen Pressfield
Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas
Club Dumas
Billy Bathgate

I don't know if i'd say you "must read these", but they've been enjoyable and meaningful to me...to name but a few

If you like Kingsly Amis, you should read his son, Martin ... easily one of the greatest living wordsmiths. And I agree, Lucky Jim was a hilarious book.

Drunk Monkey
03-12-2010, 10:10 AM
If you like Sci-Fi anything by Alastair Reynolds and Peter Hamilton. Not "must" reads but I impatiently wait for them to release new stuff.

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 10:16 AM
For Whom the Bell Tolls - Ernest Hemingway
London Fields - Martin Amis
The Wonder Clock - Howard Pyle
Shogun - James Clavell
Roughing It - Mark Twain

Shogun and Tai-pan are excellent.

John LeCarre's spy novels.

gyldenlove
03-12-2010, 10:18 AM
All books related to the Ringworld universe.

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 10:19 AM
The Communist Manifesto by Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels (seriously it's interesting to read a about a radical process of thought).

The Darth Bane trilogy by Drew Karpyshyn (if you like BioWare games you'll like this).

True. It was one of the most influential reading material of all time. It's just good for people to read that to broaden their knowledge of history.

Cleo McDowell
03-12-2010, 10:20 AM
http://stuffwhitepeoplelike.files.wordpress.com/2008/06/availablenow.jpg?w=500&h=500


This is CLASSIC.


131 Conan O’Brien
January 13, 2010 by clander

The recent news that Conan O’Brien will be replaced by Jay Leno has caused white people to erupt with rage and hostility. You might even expect them to lash out and do something about it like take to the streets or write a letter to NBC to voice their dissatisfaction with the network. But no, white people will solve this problem the way that they solved the election crisis in Iran – through Facebook and Twitter status updates. In 2009, millions of white people took 35 seconds to turn their twitter profiles green, and consequently sent a very powerful message to the leaders of Iran. Their message was that they wanted their friends to know that they would stop at nothing to ensure freedom and democracy for the Iranian people. Thanks in large part to that effort Iran is now completely democratic. With that issue settled, white people are launching a similar campaign for Conan that is sure to have similar results.

It is not hard to understand why white people love Conan O’Brien, he embodies so many of the things they already like before he even opens his mouth: Ivy League Schools, Red Hair, the Boston Red Sox, Self Deprecating Humor, The Simpsons, and Bad Memories of High School (likely, but not confirmed). Seeing him on television five nights a week is a comforting reminder of community to the white people who still have televisions.

But if your plan is to try to use Conan O’Brien as a way to get white people to become more interested you, then it is imperative that you understand a few key rules. Firstly, all white people love “the masturbating bear,” if you don’t know what this is, do not worry. Just state your love for the character, and the white person you are talking to will simply fill in the rest. Secondly, all white people believe that Andy Richter never should have left the show. And finally, you should do your best to develop a “Triumph the Insult Comic Dog” impression. All white people already have one, so you might as well try to fit in. Complete these steps and watch your friendship with white people become considerably smoother.

Now, the biggest and most important thing to remember is to never, under any circumstances bring up a Conan O’Brien sketch or joke that has taken place in the last three years. You will be met with only blank stares. For you see, while white people will fiercely support Conan O’Brien in any public forum, they always fail to support him in the only way that actually helps – by watching his show.

Note: Under no circumstances should you ever mention that you prefer Jay Leno. This might cause white people to think you have the same taste in humor as the wrong kind of white people, or worse, their parents.

SJ Bronco
03-12-2010, 10:22 AM
http://www.santaclaracountylib.org/milpitas/images/Not%20a%20genuine%20black%20man%20jackeet.jpg

Archer81
03-12-2010, 10:22 AM
Zombie survival guide


Max Brooks also wrote World War Z. Good books. I wrote a college english paper using the Zombie survival guide as source material. Got an A.


:Broncos:

bombay
03-12-2010, 10:24 AM
Nightfall

Nelson DeMille

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 10:28 AM
Henry Kissinger's memoirs
Nuclear Weapons and Foreign Policy
The Power Elite
The Prince
Collected Works of Shakespeare

Smiling Assassin27
03-12-2010, 10:30 AM
1. Confessions by St. Augustine
2. Summa Theologica by St. Thomas Aquinas
3. Othodoxy by G.K. Chesterton
4. Life After Death by Dinesh D'Souza
5. World War II Behind Closed Doors: Stalin, the Nazis, and the West by Laurence Rees

* the last two are relatively contemporary but also must-reads, IMO.

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 10:33 AM
Native Son
Bury My Heart at Wounded Knee
Uncle Tom's Cabin

Archer81
03-12-2010, 10:34 AM
1. The Gospel Accord to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal-Christopher Moore

2. Winds of War/War and Rememberance-Herman Wouk

3. LOTR Trilogy or The Hobbit

4. Island of the Sequined Love Nun-Christopher Moore

5. First Man in Rome-Colleen McCullough

:Broncos:

BroncoInferno
03-12-2010, 10:39 AM
Some of my favorites:

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
A Fan's Notes by Frederick Exley
The Floating Opera by John Barth
Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth (anything by Roth, really)
Girl with Curious Hair by David Foster Wallace
Underworld by Don DeLillo
Bowl of Cherries by Millard Kaufman
A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh
The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad
Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
Twlight by William Gay
Jujitsu for Christ by Jack Butler
Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The Myth of Sysyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus
Invisible Man by Ralph Elison
Dog of the South by Charles Portis

Damn, I could go on and on...

Rohirrim
03-12-2010, 10:40 AM
The Odyssey

BroncoInferno
03-12-2010, 10:40 AM
Native Son


Great call. Richard Wright. I've read that one several times. Never read anything like it. The last third the deals with the trail is a bit too didatic, but until then it is as brutal and unflinching as anything in the language.

Blart
03-12-2010, 10:40 AM
Dianetics - L Ron Hubbard
The Da Vinci Code - Dan Brown
The Twilight Saga - Stephenie Meyer

watermock
03-12-2010, 10:44 AM
I'm impressed mock tried to hijack this and everyone ignored him. Maybe soon he'll just go away.

Hey nostrodamus was brilliant, if you like that one try Life After God. It's my favorite book of all time.


Actually, his survival made him famous.

He burned everything with fleas.

He was smart enouigh to see the contagion.

Dumbass.

Rabb
03-12-2010, 10:49 AM
Max Brooks also wrote World War Z. Good books. I wrote a college english paper using the Zombie survival guide as source material. Got an A.


:Broncos:

yessir, I read that one also

it overlaps a lot from the survival guide stories at the end, but still a great read if you are into that genre

I love them both

Archer81
03-12-2010, 10:50 AM
Running with Scissors
City of Bones
City of Ash
City of Glass
Caesar
The Grass Crown
Caesar's Women
Lincoln
Adams
Franklin

:Broncos:

Gob
03-12-2010, 11:00 AM
Some of my favorites:

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
A Fan's Notes by Frederick Exley
The Floating Opera by John Barth
Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth (anything by Roth, really)
Girl with Curious Hair by David Foster Wallace
Underworld by Don DeLillo
Bowl of Cherries by Millard Kaufman
A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh
The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad
Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
Twlight by William Gay
Jujitsu for Christ by Jack Butler
Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The Myth of Sysyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus
Invisible Man by Ralph Elison
Dog of the South by Charles Portis

Damn, I could go on and on...

Great list. I have read about half, will have to check out the other half.
The Selfish Gene and Godel, Escher, Bach are two more books I keep going back to, but they are not for everyone.

bombay
03-12-2010, 11:16 AM
Some of my favorites:

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
A Fan's Notes by Frederick Exley
The Floating Opera by John Barth
Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth (anything by Roth, really)
Girl with Curious Hair by David Foster Wallace
Underworld by Don DeLillo
Bowl of Cherries by Millard Kaufman
A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh
The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad
Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
Twlight by William Gay
Jujitsu for Christ by Jack Butler
Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The Myth of Sysyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus
Invisible Man by Ralph Elison
Dog of the South by Charles Portis

Damn, I could go on and on...


Probably actually laughed out loud at Confederacy Of Dunces more ofen than any other book I've read.

Rausch 2.0
03-12-2010, 11:28 AM
A Clockwork Orange
Johnny Got His Gun
All Quiet On The Western Front
Warday (http://www.amazon.com/Warday-Journey-Onward-Whitley-Strieber/dp/0030707315)
Of Mice And Men
Different Seasons (King)
Edgar Allan Poe - Collected Works

In visions of the dark night
I have dreamed of joy departed--
But a waking dream of life and light
Hath left me broken-hearted.

If that is not a Chiefs' fan...

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 11:35 AM
Great call. Richard Wright. I've read that one several times. Never read anything like it. The last third the deals with the trail is a bit too didatic, but until then it is as brutal and unflinching as anything in the language.

Yup. Ugly to read, but societies have to face their history.

The Cross and the Switchblade
Now I Lay Me Down to Sleep
The Fixer
Marathon Man
Things Fall Apart
Pincher Martin
The Good German
Heart of Jade
Berlin Diary
The Cathedral
Leon Uris' novels
The Idiot
Gary Jennings' novels - Aztec, The Journeyer

Jeez, I think I've exhausted my library now.

SoDak Bronco
03-12-2010, 11:36 AM
http://www.iowa-city.k12.ia.us/schools/city/LMC/HungerGames-701259.jpg

Archer81
03-12-2010, 11:39 AM
Lord of the Flies
Huck Finn
Tom Sawyer
It
Darwin Awards
Havana

:Broncos:

broncosteven
03-12-2010, 11:53 AM
FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION PERIOD!

Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451 (the book I have read the most in my life) Something wicked this way comes, dandelion wine, All his great early stories like S is for space and Martin chronicles

Steinbeck: East of Eden, Grapes of Wrath

Nelson Algren: Somebody in boots, Short Stories, Man with golden Arm, Walk on the wild side, Chicago City on the Make.

Everyone should attempt to read One Shakespeare play in their life, Hamlet is entertaining and much like the poster above who said the Bible there are a lot of quotes one would know.


Fitzgerald: Gatsby, short stories
Hemingway: Farewell to arms, For whom the bell tolls, Short Stories, Sun also rises
Dickens: Read at least one of his books, I liked David Copperfield and Tale of two cities.
Joe Campbell: Hero with a thousand faces
Emersons essay on Self Reliance
Sartre's Play No Exit
Ayn Rand Fountain Head, Atlas was good but I prefer Fountain head.
Tennesse Williams Short Stories, You should see his plays in person, his short stories are brilliant.

Any History or war accounts

Nasa books:
Collins: Carrying the Fire
Lovell: Apollo 13
Moon lander
Riding Rockets
Apollo EECOM

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 12:00 PM
Growing up bin laden by Omar bin laden. I would like to read this book at some point.

The Koran is one of the most impactful books of all time. I recommend reading it.

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 12:16 PM
FAILURE IS NOT AN OPTION PERIOD!

Ray Bradbury: Fahrenheit 451 (the book I have read the most in my life) Something wicked this way comes, dandelion wine, All his great early stories like S is for space and Martin chronicles

Steinbeck: East of Eden, Grapes of Wrath

Nelson Algren: Somebody in boots, Short Stories, Man with golden Arm, Walk on the wild side, Chicago City on the Make.

Everyone should attempt to read One Shakespeare play in their life, Hamlet is entertaining and much like the poster above who said the Bible there are a lot of quotes one would know.


Fitzgerald: Gatsby, short stories
Hemingway: Farewell to arms, For whom the bell tolls, Short Stories, Sun also rises
Dickens: Read at least one of his books, I liked David Copperfield and Tale of two cities.
Joe Campbell: Hero with a thousand faces
Emersons essay on Self Reliance
Sartre's Play No Exit
Ayn Rand Fountain Head, Atlas was good but I prefer Fountain head.
Tennesse Williams Short Stories, You should see his plays in person, his short stories are brilliant.

Any History or war accounts

Nasa books:
Collins: Carrying the Fire
Lovell: Apollo 13
Moon lander
Riding Rockets
Apollo EECOM

Dickens, Hemingway, Bradbury, Steinbeck, sure read 'em all. Dickens was so great, dude had such a great range of characters. The Pickwick Papers I reread that every few years.

"Any History or war accounts"

Absolutely. Check out The Folio Society web page. They have the best bibliography for history.

sixtimeseight
03-12-2010, 12:33 PM
probably actually laughed out loud at confederacy of dunces more ofen than any other book i've read.

+1

Houshyamama
03-12-2010, 12:46 PM
Yes! I love Greene. Makes the concepts comprehensible without it feeling too dumbed down. He also does a great job of pausing occasionally to bring home the point of just how damn cool some that stuff really is.

Agreed. He brings theoretical physics and math to the masses. Not that we're dumb, but I doubt any of us on this message board are one of the few hundred in the world who understand the math behind string theory.

Houshyamama
03-12-2010, 12:47 PM
The Odyssey

Not the Iliad? :welcome:

ayjackson
03-12-2010, 12:51 PM
Kite Runner

kappys
03-12-2010, 01:08 PM
Some nice choices so far, I'll add:

Fear and Loathing on the Campaign Trail - 1972 (as applicable to politics today as when Thompson wrote it)

The Good Earth - Buck classic, read this as a kid like 50 times, still good now

Cat's Cradle and Mother Night - Vonnegut at his best

Roots and the Autobiography of Malcolm X - Alex Haley is a true master

The Gambler - a great short Dostoevsky read - I like the long novels but they're demanding undertakings.

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 01:14 PM
Classics that must be read:

War and Peace, Leo Tolstoy
Walden, Henry David Thoreau
Uncle Tom's Cabin, Harriet Beecher Stowe
Metamorphosis, Franz Kafka
Slaughterhouse Five, Kurt Vonnegut


Recents that should be read:
A Long Way Gone, Ishmael Beah
A Time to Fight, Jim Webb
His Dark Materials, Philip Pullman

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 01:15 PM
Some of my favorites:

A Confederacy of Dunces by John Kennedy Toole
As I Lay Dying by William Faulkner
A Fan's Notes by Frederick Exley
The Floating Opera by John Barth
Portnoy's Complaint by Philip Roth (anything by Roth, really)
Girl with Curious Hair by David Foster Wallace
Underworld by Don DeLillo
Bowl of Cherries by Millard Kaufman
A Handful of Dust by Evelyn Waugh
The Secret Agent by Joseph Conrad
Guns, Germs and Steel by Jared Diamond
Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy
Twlight by William Gay
Jujitsu for Christ by Jack Butler
Cat's Cradle by Kurt Vonnegut
Chronicle of a Death Foretold by Gabriel Garcia Marquez
The Myth of Sysyphus and Other Essays by Albert Camus
Invisible Man by Ralph Elison
Dog of the South by Charles Portis

Damn, I could go on and on...

I read Portnoy's Complaint by Roth. It really turned me off to Roth... didn't like it.

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 01:19 PM
Agreed:

The Good Earth
War and Peace
Slaughterhouse Five

Kite Runner I guess I better check out.

BroncoInferno
03-12-2010, 01:21 PM
I read Portnoy's Complaint by Roth. It really turned me off to Roth... didn't like it.

Really? I think it is one of the funniest books ever written.

Paladin
03-12-2010, 01:27 PM
I'm impressed mock tried to hijack this and everyone ignored him. Maybe soon he'll just go away.

Hey nostrodamus was brilliant, if you like that one try Life After God. It's my favorite book of all time.

Mock is very easy to iignore.

Smiling Assassin27
03-12-2010, 01:38 PM
Mere Christianity-CS Lewis

Kristin Lavransdatter-Sigrid Undset

Howards End-E.M. Forster

The Jungle-Upton Sinclair

Jesus of Nazareth: Out of Egypt-Anne Rice

Waiting For Godot-Samuel Beckett

Gorgias by Plato

*The last two being plays/dialogues but are remarkable reads.

Requiem
03-12-2010, 01:49 PM
Books my Mark Gaffney. :)

Smiling Assassin27
03-12-2010, 01:52 PM
Books my Mark Gaffney. :)

:rofl:

i keep his works in my Charles Nelson Riley Wing...

http://t2.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:3dZmkqvmyjrbmM:http://www.crankfire.com/forum/download/file.php%3Favatar%3D15_1237573552.jpg

Cito Pelon
03-12-2010, 02:15 PM
Mere Christianity-CS Lewis

Kristin Lavransdatter-Sigrid Undset

Howards End-E.M. Forster

The Jungle-Upton Sinclair

Jesus of Nazareth: Out of Egypt-Anne Rice

Waiting For Godot-Samuel Beckett

Gorgias by Plato

*The last two being plays/dialogues but are remarkable reads.

E. M. Forster has been mentioned a couple times. I remember reading A Passage to India and Howards End. Well-written. Good characters. Captivating.

gyldenlove
03-12-2010, 03:57 PM
If you are going to read just 1 Dickens novel it has be to Great Expectations.

War and peace is a must read.
Crime and punishment is good if you are into very complicated characters.

For newer novels I definitely recommend The Gurnsey Literary and potato peel pie society.

PRBronco
03-12-2010, 04:12 PM
I recently finished "A Prayer for Owen Meany" by John Irving. It was a fantastic read that I'd definitely recommend everyone try. Took me a while to get into, but once I did I never wanted it to be over.

bombay
03-12-2010, 04:13 PM
Nick Hornby's High Fidelity is one of the most entertaining books I've ever read, but beginning to become dated. Don't let your women read it. It gives away too many of what few secrets we men have.

SonOfLe-loLang
03-12-2010, 04:15 PM
If you like Non fiction, Shadow Divers by Robert Kurson is great

ghwk
03-12-2010, 04:18 PM
Any Sci Fi written by Dan Simmons. The man is a genious.

Pony Boy
03-12-2010, 04:23 PM
26234

broncosteven
03-12-2010, 08:26 PM
War and peace is a must read.


.

I just finished Les Miserables and bought a 2nd hand copy of War and Peace and am trying to get pumped up to start it. The size is intimidating.

BroncoInferno
03-12-2010, 09:17 PM
I recently finished "A Prayer for Owen Meany" by John Irving. It was a fantastic read that I'd definitely recommend everyone try. Took me a while to get into, but once I did I never wanted it to be over.

I liked Owen Meany pretty well, though the religious imagery got a little heavy handed at times. If you liked that book, read Irving's The World According to Garp. Great book.

BroncoInferno
03-12-2010, 09:19 PM
Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov is a great read if you have to patience for it. If you want to start with a shorter Dostoensky work, you can't beat Notes from Underground.

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 09:39 PM
Really? I think it is one of the funniest books ever written.

Actually I honestly read half of it and stopped halfway. It was too bizarre. I wasn't interested in reading about a little boy getting caught masturbating by his mother.

OCBronco
03-12-2010, 10:53 PM
In no particular order:

Plato's complete works, but especially Apology, Crito, Euthyphro, Republic.

Aristotle's complete works, but especially Rhetoric, Poetics, Nicomachean Ethics, Politics.

Euclid's Elements

The Federalist Papers

J.S. Mill - On Liberty, Utilitarianism

Homer - Iliad, Odyssey

Epictetus - The Encheiridion, The Discourses

Epicurus - The Letters

The Death and Life of Great American Cities - Jane Jacobs

The Presentation of Self in Everyday Life - Erving Goffman

The Birth of a New Physics - I. Bernard Cohen

Cormac McCarthy - Blood Meridian, The Road

Plunkitt of Tammany Hall - William Riordan

Collected Fictions - Jorge Luis Borges

Rene Descartes - Meditations, Discourse on Method

Albert Camus - The Stranger, The Plague

The Concept of Mind - Gilbert Ryle

Anything by Thoreau or Emerson

Hunter S. Thompson - Hell's Angels, Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas, The Great Shark Hunt

Herodotus - Histories

Thucydides - History of the Peloponnesian War

Vladomir Nabokov - Lolita, Pale Fire

John Rawls - A Theory of Justice

OCBronco
03-12-2010, 10:55 PM
One more:

The Inner Game of Tennis, by Timothy Gallwey

OCBronco
03-12-2010, 11:09 PM
While I'm thinking about it, folks interested in ancient greek and roman authors should check out this site: http://classics.mit.edu/index.html

Many terrific on-line translations of important works. And all for free, too!

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 11:15 PM
Path of Destruction
Rule of Two
Dynasty of Evil

extralife
03-13-2010, 12:47 AM
While I'm thinking about it, folks interested in ancient greek and roman authors should check out this site: http://classics.mit.edu/index.html

Many terrific on-line translations of important works. And all for free, too!

yeah, I've had this thing bookmarked for a while. it's pretty sweet.

another site with a lot of free translations of important works: http://www.poetryintranslation.com/index.html

highlights include The Divine Comedy, Faust, Ovid's Metamorphoses, Homer, The Oresteia, and selections of Rilke.

TomServo
03-13-2010, 01:51 AM
Peter Gents North Dallas Forty. freakin funny and poltical. dallas-america-football, late 60's early 70s. every reference from tom landry,
don merideth,racism, drugs......the movie sucked. Read the book.

Killericon
03-13-2010, 03:13 AM
The Fountainhead, Ender's Game, Starship Troopers...I'll limit myself to 3.

16slayer24
03-13-2010, 03:31 AM
ok best ever evolution of the species charles darwin but on a funner note anything by edger rice burroghs louis laumore zane grey clancy ludlum all fun too read

Cito Pelon
03-13-2010, 09:06 AM
One of my favorite books in my library is a limited edition published by The Folio Society, "William Russell: Special Correspondent of The Times".

The Times being the London Times newspaper, and the book is a compilation of his letters and articles to the Times covering the Crimean War, the American Civil War, etc.

But it's no longer published, I just checked out their website, and it's not there.

You people that are serious about building a library for yourself and your kids should look at The Folio Society webpage. They have the classics and many limited editions they commission themselves.

There's also a section on Ebay for Folio Society books. I see there's a copy of the William Russell book available for $22.75. Grab it if you like to read history as it was seen at the time by a keen observer.

Cito Pelon
03-13-2010, 09:38 AM
Looking at Ebay right now and there's some nice Folio Society editions of War and Peace ($48.95), Suetonius The Twelve Caesars ($29.00), H. G. Wells trilogy ($50.00), Decline and Fall of the Roman Empire, eight volumes ($98.25), and plenty of the classics by Conrad, Dostoevsky, etc.

Smiling Assassin27
03-13-2010, 10:05 AM
Dostoevsky's The Brothers Karamazov is a great read if you have to patience for it. If you want to start with a shorter Dostoensky work, you can't beat Notes from Underground.

+1

:thumbsup:

bowtown
03-13-2010, 11:09 AM
Speaking of, anyone ever read The Brothers K by David James Duncan? It's one of my all time favorites.