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Ratboy
03-11-2010, 03:53 AM
What certs do you have?

What did you study to get them?
*Book or online websites

Did you attend boot camps?
*What company?
*Cost?

I know what I want and how to get them. I am just looking for study material (I could find myself too, but I am lazy. I also think feedback is important)

If you have no certs, which company do you work for? (please do not include BestBuy's Geek Squad) ;)

Garcia Bronco
03-11-2010, 05:28 AM
MCSE, VCP4, CCNA.

I use test king. The VCP 4 requires 4 days of class.

i4jelway7
03-11-2010, 06:12 AM
Net+ & A+ is all I have.. I'm a field service technician for a healthcare organization. I need to get some more, think I'll just take some windows 7 cert and that will give me the MCP at least

I'm required to have the A+ & net + for my job, I've had the A+ since 1999, just got the net + in 2008.

IMO these 2 sites are all you need

www.visualcertexam.com

www.examcollection.com

mr007
03-11-2010, 07:10 AM
CISSP, Juniper VPNs/FWs, and working on CCIE routing/switching.

Garcia Bronco
03-11-2010, 07:12 AM
CISSP, Juniper VPNs/FWs, and working on CCIE routing/switching.

Security jerk. :)

Popcorn Sutton
03-11-2010, 07:23 AM
RHCE, Solaris Certified Systems Administrator and Solaris Certified Network Engineer

I am contemplating getting my VCP here in the near future. VMware is a good place to be right now.

Popcorn Sutton
03-11-2010, 07:24 AM
Security jerk. :)

Not a bad place to be these days...

Garcia Bronco
03-11-2010, 08:08 AM
Not a bad place to be these days...

I am always fighting with mine. The simple truth is we don't have the staff to manage all the things he wants to do. It's not even that I disagree with his ideas.

VCP is somewhat easy, but you have to take the class and you want vSphere (VCP4)

Popcorn Sutton
03-11-2010, 08:16 AM
I am always fighting with mine. The simple truth is we don't have the staff to manage all the things he wants to do. It's not even that I disagree with his ideas.

VCP is somewhat easy, but you have to take the class and you want vSphere (VCP4)

We fight the battle with our Security group as well. I spend half of my time trying to teach them how to be a Sysadmin because they come up with these hair brained ideas that have absolutely no bearing on our environment.

All I'm saying is Security is a good place to be these days in terms of job opportunities.

Ratboy
03-11-2010, 08:19 AM
MCSE, VCP4, CCNA.

I use test king. The VCP 4 requires 4 days of class.

I have heard of Test King.. Not sure where though. MCSE and CCNA are both certs I want to get within the year, not sure how likely that will be. I am quite busy these days with work and pursuing my Bachelors.

I also have goals to get A+, Net+, Server+ for CompTIA. (Yeah yeah, A+ is worthless, I just want to show some progression)

As for VCP, we just started using this in our shop, though I probably will not get a chance to use it as much as others will. I want to play around with it, hopefully I'll gain some experience.

DrFate
03-11-2010, 08:23 AM
There is a serious disconnect between front-line IT people and security people in a lot of places these days.

Ratboy
03-11-2010, 08:24 AM
Net+ & A+ is all I have.. I'm a field service technician for a healthcare organization. I need to get some more, think I'll just take some windows 7 cert and that will give me the MCP at least

I'm required to have the A+ & net + for my job, I've had the A+ since 1999, just got the net + in 2008.

IMO these 2 sites are all you need

www.visualcertexam.com

www.examcollection.com

Cool sites.

If you don't mind me asking, how much do you make? I am just getting feelers, just in case I hit the open market.

tsr28
03-11-2010, 08:25 AM
If anyone is going for any CompTIA certs, get it done this year. After 2010 the certs don't give you certification for life and will have to be renewed every 3 years.

http://www.preplogic-training.com/index.php/2010/02/01/comptia-announces-changes-to-a-network-and-security-twice/

Ratboy
03-11-2010, 08:25 AM
I am always fighting with mine. The simple truth is we don't have the staff to manage all the things he wants to do. It's not even that I disagree with his ideas.

VCP is somewhat easy, but you have to take the class and you want vSphere (VCP4)

I will have to look into this class. How much is it?

Ratboy
03-11-2010, 08:26 AM
If anyone is going for any CompTIA certs, get it done this year. After 2010 the certs don't give you certification for life and will have to be renewed every 3 years.

http://www.preplogic-training.com/index.php/2010/02/01/comptia-announces-changes-to-a-network-and-security-twice/

Totally. I read about this not too long ago. I am glad I have my Sec+, but I need to get the other ones out of the way now.

Garcia Bronco
03-11-2010, 09:15 AM
There is a serious disconnect between front-line IT people and security people in a lot of places these days.

Yes there is.

Garcia Bronco
03-11-2010, 09:15 AM
I will have to look into this class. How much is it?

3k for the class and the test was like 100 or something. My company paid for it.

Garcia Bronco
03-11-2010, 09:16 AM
Totally. I read about this not too long ago. I am glad I have my Sec+, but I need to get the other ones out of the way now.

I have an aplus from Comptia from about 10 years ago. I'll bet much hasn't changed, but it was helpful.

Ratboy
03-11-2010, 08:03 PM
3k for the class and the test was like 100 or something. My company paid for it.

A company paying for stuff!? I'd like that place.

My squadron is broke, I'll be paying for all my certs.

lostknight
03-11-2010, 08:11 PM
CCNA and most the way to a CCIE before I changed positions into Application Development.

My companies official strategy was to deliberately not hire MCSE, since the MCSE people tended to be droids.

Ambiguous
03-11-2010, 08:44 PM
RHCE, Solaris Certified Systems Administrator and Solaris Certified Network Engineer

I am contemplating getting my VCP here in the near future. VMware is a good place to be right now.

Absolutely, it's everywhere now. If you don't know it, you better learn it if you are at all involved with any flavor of servers.

Problem is, that cert is very expensive since it requires the official VMWare training. If you can get your employer to pay for it, jump on it - they are getting you your next higher paying job. :)

I currently have:

A+, N+, Server+ <---worthless, btw.
MCSE 2000, 2003, MCITP:EA, CCNA

There is really no need for training if you are already in the industry working. Read some books, set up a lab, and get Test King. Cert's aren't what are going to help you know what you are doing - experience will. But the certs can help you get the experience.

Ambiguous
03-11-2010, 08:47 PM
CCNA and most the way to a CCIE before I changed positions into Application Development.

My companies official strategy was to deliberately not hire MCSE, since the MCSE people tended to be droids.

I agree, but I think you're talking about people with MCSE's that work help desk or something. I do nothing but work with Windows Server in a 2000+ server environment, and you could probably ask a person 5-10 questions and know whether they know their **** or not.

Mogulseeker
03-11-2010, 09:27 PM
I have a Phd in IT from Harvard... Rhode Scholar at Oxford.

Meck77
03-11-2010, 09:57 PM
I'm atari and Omane certified.

enjolras
03-11-2010, 10:14 PM
I have no idea when it comes to certs, but I can tell you that we have a really difficult time hiring Linux sys-admins. Particularly anyone who can competently handle intelligently setting up federated systems.

We've also had trouble finding anyone who is competent with document store DB's (we use Cassandra).

Aftermath
03-11-2010, 10:22 PM
im currently taking cisco classes and networking classes.. then plan to take ccna cert exams and possibly a+

atomicbloke
03-12-2010, 03:13 AM
IT is one of the hardest working, most stressful, and most under appreciated vertical in any organization. It is also the most thankless job out there. When the slightest thing goes wrong, everyone idiot blames the IT department. But when everything runs smoothly, no one puts in a good word for them.

I, personally feel, that the IT department at my place is the best there is. Without the IT support in my firm, I doubt I could get anything useful done at my work place. It's a miracle that my IT folks can keep me up and running considering the abuse I put on to my servers and bandwidth.

i4jelway7
03-12-2010, 03:17 AM
If anyone is going for any CompTIA certs, get it done this year. After 2010 the certs don't give you certification for life and will have to be renewed every 3 years.

http://www.preplogic-training.com/index.php/2010/02/01/comptia-announces-changes-to-a-network-and-security-twice/

very true... so get those A+, Net+, and security+ tests done this year

lostknight
03-12-2010, 06:22 AM
Honestly, the only cert you need is a college degree in C.S form a good school of engineering (I've had too many problems with IT/IS degrees from schools of arts and parties). You need to be able to prove that you can learn.

HILife
03-12-2010, 06:44 AM
CISSP, Juniper VPNs/FWs, and working on CCIE routing/switching.

bringing out the big guns.

Security+, currently studying for CISSP. Didn't know there were this many IT/IA people on the Mane.

Ratboy
03-12-2010, 06:55 AM
IT is one of the hardest working, most stressful, and most under appreciated vertical in any organization. It is also the most thankless job out there. When the slightest thing goes wrong, everyone idiot blames the IT department. But when everything runs smoothly, no one puts in a good word for them.

I, personally feel, that the IT department at my place is the best there is. Without the IT support in my firm, I doubt I could get anything useful done at my work place. It's a miracle that my IT folks can keep me up and running considering the abuse I put on to my servers and bandwidth.

Thanks for reminding me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=355xjy-Kk14

Watch the first few minutes of that. IT Crowd is such an amazing show.

Ratboy
03-12-2010, 07:07 AM
Honestly, the only cert you need is a college degree in C.S form a good school of engineering (I've had too many problems with IT/IS degrees from schools of arts and parties). You need to be able to prove that you can learn.

I am not sure I can agree with you. These job posting I have been reading are always requiring certs.

Wes Mantooth
03-12-2010, 07:09 AM
Thanks for reminding me.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=355xjy-Kk14

Watch the first few minutes of that. IT Crowd is such an amazing show.

I second that! love that show.

I have CCNA, CNA (from the old school days). My certs never really fell in line with my job. Really would be nice to have CISSP and VCP, but I am moving into management. CISSP would still have value though and probably ITIL.

mr007
03-12-2010, 07:09 AM
Security jerk. :)

Haha, I've actually moved from security to networking. It's funny, my last company the security team controlled firewalls, vpns, etc. This job, I joined the security team and the network team had all the cool equipment. The security team here is really policy oriented and host based protection which is pretty boring to me.

It's a great change of pace though, I really love the network side of the house as well.

mr007
03-12-2010, 07:11 AM
We fight the battle with our Security group as well. I spend half of my time trying to teach them how to be a Sysadmin because they come up with these hair brained ideas that have absolutely no bearing on our environment.

All I'm saying is Security is a good place to be these days in terms of job opportunities.

Good Security people started as Sysadmins. For the most part, they really should understand the impact of any solution on the environment as a whole, and if they don't that is pretty silly.

Ratboy
03-12-2010, 07:12 AM
Haha, I've actually moved from security to networking. It's funny, my last company the security team controlled firewalls, vpns, etc. This job, I joined the security team and the network team had all the cool equipment. The security team here is really policy oriented and host based protection which is pretty boring to me.

It's a great change of pace though, I really love the network side of the house as well.

I know how you feel. My current job blows, I wish I actually could control our boundary equipment.

Wes Mantooth
03-12-2010, 07:19 AM
Good Security people started as Sysadmins. For the most part, they really should understand the impact of any solution on the environment as a whole, and if they don't that is pretty silly.

agreed, although I think it would be nice if the Security people were still Sys admins so they could eat their own dogfood.

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 07:22 AM
I agree, but I think you're talking about people with MCSE's that work help desk or something. I do nothing but work with Windows Server in a 2000+ server environment, and you could probably ask a person 5-10 questions and know whether they know their **** or not.

I'll take that test. :)

pink_feet
03-12-2010, 07:28 AM
I have the following:

A+, N+, Security+
MCSE 2000/2003 (even though I am not a windows fan these days..give me *BSD any day)
CCNA, CCNP
CISSP

GPEN, GCIH, GCIA and GREM <---All SANS certs....

I paid for my Comptia and Microsoft certs.
The ISP I worked at paid for my Cisco training and certs.

My security certs and training were all paid for by my current company.

Ratboy
03-12-2010, 07:55 AM
Looks like there is a strong IT presence on OM. I definitely need to make some friends in here.

Ratboy
03-12-2010, 07:57 AM
What kind of software and equipment is being used in the civilian sector?

LordHelmchen
03-12-2010, 09:33 AM
SCSA, CCNA, just completed BCMSN. Will probably wait 2 years or so to make the next exam towards the CCNP lol

Made the CCNA three years ago, learned with a book and Testking. CCNA was very useful for my career, but I'm not sure if I'm going to even complete the CCNP. I think I rather do something like ITIL and Prince2.

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 09:58 AM
What kind of software and equipment is being used in the civilian sector?

Dude, you want to do networking. Servers are a pain in the ass. You have to worry about resources (and not that these concerns aren't a part of networking, but they are much more frequent and pervasive in servers.), storage, updates and it's a never ending cycle.

mr007
03-12-2010, 11:41 AM
Honestly, the only cert you need is a college degree in C.S form a good school of engineering (I've had too many problems with IT/IS degrees from schools of arts and parties). You need to be able to prove that you can learn.

A degree does not prove anything.

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 12:05 PM
I took a class in IT at Southern New Hampshire University. It was the easiest class I ever took.

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 12:06 PM
A degree does not prove anything.

It proves a ton. Like, you are capable of going through 4 years of challenging work. It proves you're smart enough to work the system. It proves you can learn and adapt to a variety of different situations. It proves you know things.

sixtimeseight
03-12-2010, 01:02 PM
A degree does not prove anything.

Sounds like somebody couldn't get a degree

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 01:29 PM
It proves a ton. Like, you are capable of going through 4 years of challenging work. It proves you're smart enough to work the system. It proves you can learn and adapt to a variety of different situations. It proves you know things.

Strangely its no indictator on whether you can get the job done or not.

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 01:31 PM
A degree does not prove anything.

I would say it doesn't prove everything. I hire people all the time. The first thing I do is throw out the people with Masters degrees if they have little to no experience. 9 times out of 10 they know what's in the book, but they aren't smart enough to know how to open and close it.

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 01:39 PM
You must be working in a field that doesn't require a lot of thinking. When I go looking for a Doctor or Lawyer, usually one of the first things I ask is where they got their degree.

Kent Hovind has a Phd. Doesn't mean he isn't an idiot.

My doctor went to the University of Colorado and Johns Hopkins Medical School.
My fraternity's advisor/lawyer went to University of Denver and Harvard Law.

They're also two of the most respected men in their field in the state of Colorado.

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 01:49 PM
You must be working in a field that doesn't require a lot of thinking. When I go looking for a Doctor or Lawyer, usually one of the first things I ask is where they got their degree.

You lie like a rug. First off anybody can frame a picture and put it on the wall and anybody can put anything on a resume. What you want to see is their licsense to operate and then check with your state. Which you wouldn't do either.

My team and I have great deal of responsibilty. Not only do we have to think, we have to be able to react and be successful in critcal situations which could result in loss of life or company stability. You put too much stock in degrees and certifications. They are literally pieces of paper. What I want to know is can you communicate, be successful, be cool and calm in face of pressure, and are you willing to learn. I can teach you anything.

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 01:54 PM
Kent Hovind has a Phd. Doesn't mean he isn't an idiot.

My doctor went to the University of Colorado and Johns Hopkins Medical School.
My fraternity's advisor/lawyer went to University of Denver and Harvard Law.

They're also two of the most respected men in their field in the state of Colorado.

Just because they got a degree it doesn't mean they are capable, which is my point. You would glean much more information by getting reviews of them from peers and patients(HIPPA).

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 02:08 PM
College teaches you to be cool under pressure

scorpio
03-12-2010, 02:30 PM
You lie like a rug. First off anybody can frame a picture and put it on the wall and anybody can put anything on a resume. What you want to see is their licsense to operate and then check with your state. Which you wouldn't do either.

My team and I have great deal of responsibilty. Not only do we have to think, we have to be able to react and be successful in critcal situations which could result in loss of life or company stability. You put too much stock in degrees and certifications. They are literally pieces of paper. What I want to know is can you communicate, be successful, be cool and calm in face of pressure, and are you willing to learn. I can teach you anything.

You're wasting your time, he's in Joe Cool College mode.

I work in academia (IT for a university hospital), and many of the people I encounter every day seem to think that having an advanced degree excuses them from having to practice common sense.

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 02:36 PM
You're wasting your time, he's in Joe Cool College mode.

I work in academia (IT for a university hospital), and many of the people I encounter every day seem to think that having an advanced degree excuses them from having to practice common sense.

I was the same way I suppose.

Garcia Bronco
03-12-2010, 02:39 PM
College teaches you to be cool under pressure

I hear you and it can. But pressure in a job is on another level.

LordHelmchen
03-12-2010, 03:25 PM
Within the last few months I read many job applications and conducted about two interviews per week for open vacancies in my team. And while the applicants usually have degrees and all of them have certificates, I made the experience that all of that doesn't really say anything at all and by now, the only thing that I really care about is work experience and how they conduct themselves in the personal interview and how they react to the challenges I put up for them.
I am wary of ppl who have too many certificates and degrees.
Just a few weeks ago I had a candidate who had a masters and a Phd, actually in the networking field, plus just completed CCNA and CCNP, but was not able to do some basic subnetting.

Ratboy
03-12-2010, 06:29 PM
You must be working in a field that doesn't require a lot of thinking. When I go looking for a Doctor or Lawyer, usually one of the first things I ask is where they got their degree.

Kent Hovind has a Phd. Doesn't mean he isn't an idiot.

My doctor went to the University of Colorado and Johns Hopkins Medical School.
My fraternity's advisor/lawyer went to University of Denver and Harvard Law.

They're also two of the most respected men in their field in the state of Colorado.

http://villagethinker.files.wordpress.com/2009/08/obvioustroll.jpg

mr007
03-12-2010, 07:13 PM
I would say it doesn't prove everything. I hire people all the time. The first thing I do is throw out the people with Masters degrees if they have little to no experience. 9 times out of 10 they know what's in the book, but they aren't smart enough to know how to open and close it.

Couldn't agree more :).

mr007
03-12-2010, 07:15 PM
Sounds like somebody couldn't get a degree

Actually I've never needed one. Quite honestly, I haven't seen a difference between those with it or without it. I will say the most brilliant minds I've worked with in IT were those without it and several of them didn't even have any certs.

mr007
03-12-2010, 07:20 PM
You must be working in a field that doesn't require a lot of thinking. When I go looking for a Doctor or Lawyer, usually one of the first things I ask is where they got their degree.

Kent Hovind has a Phd. Doesn't mean he isn't an idiot.

My doctor went to the University of Colorado and Johns Hopkins Medical School.
My fraternity's advisor/lawyer went to University of Denver and Harvard Law.

They're also two of the most respected men in their field in the state of Colorado.

Doctors and Lawyers don't have nearly the variety of expertise that's required in IT (hence the literally 100s of certifications you can acquire). A PHD in those fields indicates a lot more than it does in this one.

When you can have a single CERTIFICATION (not degree) that has a median salary of $110k and doesn't require thinking that is just amazing!

broncosteven
03-12-2010, 07:22 PM
MCSE CCNA, working on CCNP but they keep changing the requirements. I know I will never get to CCIE but I would be happy with a Routing NP.

I got a few classes but had the most success just hitting the book and doing labs. Lots of hands on was key for me.

Check out your local Library rather than dump $80 on a book. You would be amazed at what they may have available for FREE with the CD that came with it.

longtimer
03-12-2010, 07:35 PM
Certs might get you in the door for a conversation with an employer but if all you know how to do is pass a cert test you will fail. Back in the 90's employers place a lot more credibility in certs. Now they want go old fashion experience. With that being said a cert can get an opportunity at an entry level job if you have no experience.

mr007
03-12-2010, 07:42 PM
Certs might get you in the door for a conversation with an employer but if all you know how to do is pass a cert test you will fail. Back in the 90's employers place a lot more credibility in certs. Now they want go old fashion experience. With that being said a cert can get an opportunity at an entry level job if you have no experience.

For sure... it's very similar to a degree. If you have no experience, it will get you an entry level job and you can work your way up from there.

Mogulseeker
03-12-2010, 08:09 PM
Doctors and Lawyers don't have nearly the variety of expertise that's required in IT (hence the literally 100s of certifications you can acquire). A PHD in those fields indicates a lot more than it does in this one.

When you can have a single CERTIFICATION (not degree) that has a median salary of $110k and doesn't require thinking that is just amazing!

You know there're different types of Doctors and Lawyers, right?

I wouldn't want a pediatrist giving me heart surgery.

I wouldn't want a real estate lawyer representing me in a murder trial.

mr007
03-12-2010, 08:13 PM
You know there're different types of Doctors and Lawyers, right?

You're a college boy and you're writing there're???? I thought proper use of contractions was taught in high school.

What do I know though, my job apparently requires little to no thought.

Ratboy
03-12-2010, 10:18 PM
Being in the military, I am not sure what I can expect in the civilian sector. This is a scary part of getting out and finding a job. Right now I am getting a pay check every 2 weeks and chances are if I don't royally **** something up, I will continue to get my pay checks.

I am not sure what I am worth. I just had a friend who got out and he's been getting interviews, so that gives me hope. I am waiting to see how much they offer him though. We just hired 2 contractors who are making 108k, and one of them had no experience in security, he was strictly networking, but he knew people.

I am currently trying to get out of Network Security, if they deny me, I will probably hit Free Agency.

mr007
03-13-2010, 10:11 AM
Being in the military, I am not sure what I can expect in the civilian sector. This is a scary part of getting out and finding a job. Right now I am getting a pay check every 2 weeks and chances are if I don't royally **** something up, I will continue to get my pay checks.

I am not sure what I am worth. I just had a friend who got out and he's been getting interviews, so that gives me hope. I am waiting to see how much they offer him though. We just hired 2 contractors who are making 108k, and one of them had no experience in security, he was strictly networking, but he knew people.

I am currently trying to get out of Network Security, if they deny me, I will probably hit Free Agency.

Do you have a clearance? Also, what branch? What are you trying to get into if not Network Security?

Cito Pelon
03-13-2010, 10:43 AM
I have no idea when it comes to certs, but I can tell you that we have a really difficult time hiring Linux sys-admins. Particularly anyone who can competently handle intelligently setting up federated systems.

We've also had trouble finding anyone who is competent with document store DB's (we use Cassandra).

UNIX/Linux is getting to be a lost art. It's surprising, since there's some things only UNIX can accomplish.

Cito Pelon
03-13-2010, 11:05 AM
I see there's a lot of network security debate in this thread. That's an area one should get into. Voice telephony is trending towards soft switches, TCP/IP transport of voice. There's a lot of security issues involved with TCP/IP voice transport.

Ratboy
03-13-2010, 11:13 AM
Do you have a clearance? Also, what branch? What are you trying to get into if not Network Security?

TS - Air Force

I want a Sys Admin position.

mr007
03-13-2010, 11:14 AM
I see there's a lot of network security debate in this thread. That's an area one should get into. Voice telephony is trending towards soft switches, TCP/IP transport of voice. There's a lot of security issues involved with TCP/IP voice transport.

What do you mean a lot of security issues? The only security issue with VOIP (that I can think of) is being able to sniff the network traffic and reproduce data. This is easily overcome with encryption, not sure if there's really any security issues other than that, unless you're talking about phones that have actual software on them which could be exploited via some vulnerability.

Cito Pelon
03-13-2010, 11:47 AM
What do you mean a lot of security issues? The only security issue with VOIP (that I can think of) is being able to sniff the network traffic and reproduce data. This is easily overcome with encryption, not sure if there's really any security issues other than that, unless you're talking about phones that have actual software on them which could be exploited via some vulnerability.

What encryption? There's a lot of security issues with VOIP. Hence the need for security professionals. Obviously there's a problem that it's easy to sniff the network traffic and reproduce the voice. VOIP network traffic from LA to NYC can go to Mexico or Hong Kong before it reaches NYC. Depends on least cost routing and time of day routing.

Mogulseeker
03-13-2010, 01:52 PM
You're a college boy and you're writing there're???? I thought proper use of contractions was taught in high school.

What do I know though, my job apparently requires little to no thought.

I just wanted to clear something up here... contractions are actually taught in 4th grade.

There're is not commonly used contraction, and is not usually used in scholarly papers. Actually, they tell you not to use words like there're, there are, there is, it is, etc in scholarly papers. Nevertheless, there're is an acceptable use of a contraction and in this situation, more proper than the use of there's.

enjolras
03-13-2010, 03:44 PM
I would say it doesn't prove everything. I hire people all the time. The first thing I do is throw out the people with Masters degrees if they have little to no experience. 9 times out of 10 they know what's in the book, but they aren't smart enough to know how to open and close it.

Which is great... it gives me the chance to hire them. If you're smart you're smart.

Ratboy
03-13-2010, 07:35 PM
I just wanted to clear something up here... contractions are actually taught in 4th grade.

There're is not commonly used contraction, and is not usually used in scholarly papers. Actually, they tell you not to use words like there're, there are, there is, it is, etc in scholarly papers. Nevertheless, there're is an acceptable use of a contraction and in this situation, more proper than the use of there's.


You have provided no insight in this thread what-so-ever. Please take your useless trolling elsewhere.

enjolras
03-14-2010, 12:38 AM
UNIX/Linux is getting to be a lost art. It's surprising, since there's some things only UNIX can accomplish.

It's interesting you say that... In my world EVERYTHING is run on some form of a POSIX environment. Outside of the business I.T. department, almost any tech. company is running something other than windows. Think of those millions of servers in various data centers. I can only name a handful of tech. companies that don't run some form of unix (or unix-like) system for their primary app and database layer servers.

Hell I'm typing this on an Ubuntu machine:)

If I was going to try to launch a career as any type of systems administrator, I'd be aiming it squarely at Linux. There is just so much need for folks who can effectively deal with the open source stack. Particularly as it's getting a lot more complicated. I'm finding that we're becoming more dependent on a wider range of technologies. It's simplified software complexity, but systems management has definitely gotten more difficult.

As an example. My company (we're a white-label company, you've likely never heard of us) does ~1 million page views a day spread out over a number of different sites. We do some pretty hardcore real-time stasts analysis. We've moved off of our Postgres backend and are now using Cassandra and Hadoop in different capacities. We have a AMQP task queue. We have a full text search engine, with all of the headaches that come with that (like managing indexes).

Oh ya and we do all of that with a few hundred instances on amazon's EC2. Our headache is finding folks who A) have the basic linux knowledge we need and B) the ability to internalize the system and make smart decisions based on that. We're highly distributed at each level of the stack. We have really smart systems architects, but that doesn't matter unless you have the actual administrators who can manage the day to day issues that come with actually managing the systems.

How do you propogate security patches? What impact does taking machine XXX down for a security update have? Why is mucking with this firewall setting a really bad idea? That sort of thing. Finding those guys has been tough. We've been able to do it, and we work like hell to keep them when we do.

If you want guaranteed job security, get good at those problems.

Cito Pelon
03-14-2010, 07:43 AM
It's interesting you say that... In my world EVERYTHING is run on some form of a POSIX environment. Outside of the business I.T. department, almost any tech. company is running something other than windows. Think of those millions of servers in various data centers. I can only name a handful of tech. companies that don't run some form of unix (or unix-like) system for their primary app and database layer servers.

Hell I'm typing this on an Ubuntu machine:)

If I was going to try to launch a career as any type of systems administrator, I'd be aiming it squarely at Linux. There is just so much need for folks who can effectively deal with the open source stack. Particularly as it's getting a lot more complicated. I'm finding that we're becoming more dependent on a wider range of technologies. It's simplified software complexity, but systems management has definitely gotten more difficult.

As an example. My company (we're a white-label company, you've likely never heard of us) does ~1 million page views a day spread out over a number of different sites. We do some pretty hardcore real-time stasts analysis. We've moved off of our Postgres backend and are now using Cassandra and Hadoop in different capacities. We have a AMQP task queue. We have a full text search engine, with all of the headaches that come with that (like managing indexes).

Oh ya and we do all of that with a few hundred instances on amazon's EC2. Our headache is finding folks who A) have the basic linux knowledge we need and B) the ability to internalize the system and make smart decisions based on that. We're highly distributed at each level of the stack. We have really smart systems architects, but that doesn't matter unless you have the actual administrators who can manage the day to day issues that come with actually managing the systems.

How do you propogate security patches? What impact does taking machine XXX down for a security update have? Why is mucking with this firewall setting a really bad idea? That sort of thing. Finding those guys has been tough. We've been able to do it, and we work like hell to keep them when we do.

If you want guaranteed job security, get good at those problems.

That was my point. :thumbsup:

robpco
03-14-2010, 12:17 PM
I manage the staffing department for an IT consulting company in the Bay area. We rarely look at certs when placing or hiring techs. Knowledge, work experience and cultural fit are the key. We don't see the Linux/Unix demand we thought we would, OS X is getting more popular. Most companies like to hire ex military. They are usually dependable, socially adept and well trained.
The ability to communicate, present yourself and have some business sense goes a long way. A lot of engineers could increase their salaries by working on their professional skills.

The only cert that makes sense to me is a CCIE. Companies will pay a lot for this, but the pay scales have been dropping the last two years.

mr007
03-14-2010, 01:25 PM
What encryption? There's a lot of security issues with VOIP. Hence the need for security professionals. Obviously there's a problem that it's easy to sniff the network traffic and reproduce the voice. VOIP network traffic from LA to NYC can go to Mexico or Hong Kong before it reaches NYC. Depends on least cost routing and time of day routing.

Ummm IPSEC, SSL?? I can make a call to anywhere I have a tunnel and you can sniff it all day and you'd never be able to decrypt the contents. Routing paths are completely irrelevant.

mr007
03-14-2010, 06:35 PM
TS - Air Force

I want a Sys Admin position.

I can definitely help you out, let's talk offline.