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Kaylore
02-15-2010, 08:01 PM
We're looking at getting a our first 50+ inch TV as a couple. I've concluded a couple of things.


Plasmas not lasting as long is largely a myth anymore due to advances in technology.
Plasmas can be suseptible to burn-in.
LCD's work better at higher altitude.
Plasmas are cheaper in larger sizes.
LCD's are more energy friendly.
Plasmas have better picture concerning motion and deeper darks.


We're trying to decide, and I would choose a Plasma were it not for the altitude issue. Has anyone tested this and do they notice a difference?

OBF1
02-15-2010, 08:06 PM
LCD. The new 55" I saw at best buy was plain sick... Less than an inch thick.

FWIW: I have a 73" Mitsubishi DLP currantly.

Lev Vyvanse
02-15-2010, 08:12 PM
What altitude?

hades
02-15-2010, 08:12 PM
LED is the new shiznit, but all are darn good. Does you room have much light in it? Plasma's are not as good if you have a light room, especially direct sun light.

DeuceOfClub
02-15-2010, 08:14 PM
If you're looking for better picture go with a quality plasma. (Not sure about the alt' issue though)
Most plasma issues (mainly IR) can be prevented by "breaking in" the TV.
Also, if you can afford it, professional tuning ($250-$400) can do wonders.
Check some of the TV msg boards for more info.

Rabb
02-15-2010, 08:16 PM
go plasma, most of them have some anti-burn in features now

I have had a 42" Samsung for about 4 years and it is still partying like a rock star...we just got a 65" Mitsubishi DLP which is really the cat's ass as well

Rabb
02-15-2010, 08:17 PM
If you're looking for better picture go with a quality plasma. (Not sure about the alt' issue though)
Most plasma issues (mainly IR) can be prevented by "breaking in" the TV.
Also, if you can afford it, professional tuning ($250-$400) can do wonders.
Check some of the TV msg boards for more info.

absolutely this

or

get a DVD that helps you adjust your colors on any HD TV you get, it makes an enormous and worthwhile difference

Kaylore
02-15-2010, 08:21 PM
What altitude?

Same as you.

orange crusher
02-15-2010, 08:23 PM
I bought a 46" Samsung LED about a month ago. Can't complain at all. It's only 1.2" thick and picture quality is probably just as good as a plasma. The fact that a plasma can't be tipped was enough to scare me away from them. I believe the plasmas are supposed to have better viewing from angles and LED's are supposed to be better in bright lighting. I looked at a bunch of LCD's a few years back and went with a 46" Sony Bravia LCD. I would have had no problem going with another Sony on my recent purchase, but decided to go with an LED.

Broncoman13
02-15-2010, 08:25 PM
We're looking at getting a our first 50+ inch TV as a couple. I've concluded a couple of things.


Plasmas not lasting as long is largely a myth anymore due to advances in technology.
Plasmas can be suseptible to burn-in.
LCD's work better at higher altitude.
Plasmas are cheaper in larger sizes.
LCD's are more energy friendly.
Plasmas have better picture concerning motion and deeper darks.


We're trying to decide, and I would choose a Plasma were it not for the altitude issue. Has anyone tested this and do they notice a difference?


We have both. The Plasma has not had any issues in the altitude. The picture on the Plasma (52") is better than the LCD (37"). And since I know you like playing video games, the Plasma is much better b/c of the bazillion to 1 contrast ratio and faster response time. As for the longevity of the set, the half life on Plasma TVs is up around 8 years of average use 2000 hours per year is about what we average... Still have a good 10000 hours left on it! ;)

Arkie
02-15-2010, 08:25 PM
I had the same decision recently. I chose plasma for the picture quality.

Rabb
02-15-2010, 08:27 PM
We have both. The Plasma has not had any issues in the altitude. The picture on the Plasma (52") is better than the LCD (37"). And since I know you like playing video games, the Plasma is much better b/c of the bazillion to 1 contrast ratio and faster response time. As for the longevity of the set, the half life on Plasma TVs is up around 8 years of average use 2000 hours per year is about what we average... Still have a good 10000 hours left on it! ;)

that is a really good point about gaming, and I agree 100%

and the viewing angle point also, the Plasma is great there...better than my new DLP even

Kaylore
02-15-2010, 08:28 PM
LED is the new shiznit, but all are darn good. Does you room have much light in it? Plasma's are not as good if you have a light room, especially direct sun light.

I have a room that has a window on the south wall. We keep the blinds shut but light does come right into that window on occasion. Is this going to be a problem? Like I said, we keep the blinds shut but its like any other family room: brighter during the day.

Cosmo
02-15-2010, 08:30 PM
LCD is better with video games, Plasma is better with movies and sports.

Kaylore
02-15-2010, 08:35 PM
LCD is better with video games
I've heard the exact opposite is true, even in this thread. I understand Plasma to have richer colors and also the higher refresh rate means motion would display better on a Plasma than an LCD. Factor in the wider color palette used in games and it would seem Plasma would win going away, no? Explain why LCD does better...

Los Broncos
02-15-2010, 08:38 PM
I just bought an LED 42 inch, sweet TV is all I can say.

Jekyll15Hyde
02-15-2010, 08:40 PM
If you pay enough, Plasma is the easy winner. In other words, at the high end, Plasma is better than LCD in all qualities less maybe energy consumption. But still less than CRT

Drek
02-15-2010, 08:40 PM
LCD. The new 55" I saw at best buy was plain sick... Less than an inch thick.

FWIW: I have a 73" Mitsubishi DLP currantly.

The worst thing anyone can do is look at Best Buy and the like to grade sets.

Not all are given equal quality cabling, video source, etc. and all have stupidly jacked up contrast to give that bright "wow" factor that only degrades picture quality and shortens the life of your set.

We're looking at getting a our first 50+ inch TV as a couple. I've concluded a couple of things.


Plasmas not lasting as long is largely a myth anymore due to advances in technology.
Plasmas can be suseptible to burn-in.
LCD's work better at higher altitude.
Plasmas are cheaper in larger sizes.
LCD's are more energy friendly.
Plasmas have better picture concerning motion and deeper darks.


We're trying to decide, and I would choose a Plasma were it not for the altitude issue. Has anyone tested this and do they notice a difference?

1. Altitude. From what I understand this is largely not a big issue anymore. Quality plasma manufacturers generally rate their sets as altitude compliant up to ~7500 feet above sea level. If you are above that then you will possibly have issues though, NEC makes a set that is designed for >9000 feet but I don't care for their IQ.

2. Unlike most things in life, high quality TVs are all about the brand. They go as follows:
Plasma
Pioneer >>>> Panasonic >>>>>>> everything else.

LCD
Samsung = Sony >>>>>> everything else.

Panasonic makes a nice plasma, though I hear the most recent line have some technical issues requiring a firmware update so check on that before committing. Pioneer doesn't make retail sets anymore, which is a shame because the Kuro line was a good two or three years ahead of everyone else. The final Kuro sets won't be equaled for at least another year and that is with Panasonic licensing the technology for their own televisions.

The main difference between the two comes down to if you're willing to put in a little extra work breaking a set in over the first 200 hours and generally just not forgetting it on with a menu up or something like that for hours on end in exchange for better picture quality. If you take care of a plasma (correctly calibrated contrast and brightness, good 200 hour break in period, don't leave something static on the screen for 12 hours) you'll never have to worry about burn in. But with LCDs you don't have that concern at all. Of course, lower tier brand LCDs do suffer from stuck pixels from time to time, which most retailers and manufacturers won't replace/fix unless you have a set number, no matter the location.

Rabb
02-15-2010, 08:43 PM
LCD is better with video games, Plasma is better with movies and sports.

this is simply not true

Ratboy
02-15-2010, 08:44 PM
LCD is light years ahead of Plasma.

Rigs11
02-15-2010, 08:45 PM
Plasma=better blacks, more heat, bad glare, better viewing angles
LCD=better colors, less heat, less glare, worse viewing angles

good luck.

24champ
02-15-2010, 09:12 PM
I bought an LCD Sony Bravia not too long ago, it is pretty kick ass. I would recommend Sears, they always got good prices, and their customer service is the best in the biz.

Also would refer you to this thread, since I was in the same situation as you not too long ago.

http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showthread.php?t=88519

Some helpful info in there. Good luck in your search.

SonOfLe-loLang
02-15-2010, 09:18 PM
Maybe im a tard, but i cant even really tell the difference. Your eyes adjust to whatever anyway.

DenverBrit
02-15-2010, 09:30 PM
We're looking at getting a our first 50+ inch TV as a couple. I've concluded a couple of things.


Plasmas not lasting as long is largely a myth anymore due to advances in technology.
Plasmas can be suseptible to burn-in.
LCD's work better at higher altitude.
Plasmas are cheaper in larger sizes.
LCD's are more energy friendly.
Plasmas have better picture concerning motion and deeper darks.


We're trying to decide, and I would choose a Plasma were it not for the altitude issue. Has anyone tested this and do they notice a difference?

I have a plasma Pioneer 50" Model 5080. Unless you go to an 'Elite' model, there isn't a plasma that's better, IMHO.

No altitude problems at all. I also have a Samsung plasma in the bedroom, again, no altitude issues.,......you mean the hum/buzz associated with earlier plasma's?

For a 50" or larger....plasma is cheaper and you can't beat the 'black'. I recently saw some new Sony LCD/Led backlite and they were impressive too. Though expensive.

BroncoMan4ever
02-15-2010, 10:21 PM
it really depends how much you are willing to spend. because when you get into the higher quality top of the line product, Plasma is the way to go. but if you are planning on spending modestly then i would say go with LCD.

baja
02-15-2010, 10:39 PM
I buy TV's here;

http://www.gtmstores.com/comingsoon.shtml

They have new in the box with factory warrantee all sorts of TVs. I have seen a Sony Bravia 50 inch for $1,200. This store sells retail outlets (Cosco and others) returns and open box or overstock merchandise. They also sell on ebay.

baja
02-15-2010, 10:41 PM
I got a new in a factory sealed box 42 inch Sharp Aquos for $460 total.

Kaylore
02-15-2010, 11:47 PM
I have a plasma Pioneer 50" Model 5080. Unless you go to an 'Elite' model, there isn't a plasma that's better, IMHO.

No altitude problems at all. I also have a Samsung plasma in the bedroom, again, no altitude issues.,......you mean the hum/buzz associated with earlier plasma's?

No, because Plasma works off a fluorescing gas in a finite enclosure, at higher altitudes the pressure in each cell is lower and supposedly this results in performance loss. It apparently only starts to occur at 6500 ft though, so I think I'm good.

Lev Vyvanse
02-16-2010, 03:46 AM
Same as you.

I bought a plasma 4 months ago and have had no altitude issues.

Eldorado
02-16-2010, 04:04 AM
Lev's plasma is sick. It is a dark room, though.

Lev Vyvanse
02-16-2010, 04:16 AM
Lev's plasma is sick. It is a dark room, though.

Yea, I have seen plasma's with a bunch of light in the room and it really washes out the picture.

ColoradoDarin
02-16-2010, 06:04 AM
I have a room that has a window on the south wall. We keep the blinds shut but light does come right into that window on occasion. Is this going to be a problem? Like I said, we keep the blinds shut but its like any other family room: brighter during the day.

For this reason only, I say go with an LCD (or LED). Most games you will watch are going to be afternoon.

In general, Plasma > LCD, but Plasma requires that sheet of glass on the front and any light gets reflected. I bought a 46" Sony last year because it was the model that reflected light the least (living room has SE facing windows, doors and the kitchen lights). And I got it calibrated - I recommend that.

oubronco
02-16-2010, 06:08 AM
Samsung 55" 240hz LCD

Mediator12
02-16-2010, 06:27 AM
I have a 50+ Samsung Plasma and a 50+ Samsung LCD. The plasma is in a very bright room, but as long as the light is not direct, it does not suffer from washout. On the other hand, the LCD also suffers some trouble in direct sunlight.

I have been very happy watching film on both. The motion is definitely better on the Plasma though, but the LCD does a better job with computer and being on more as a dual use computer monitor. I know people say the pioneer and panasonic screens used to be better for Plasma so I bought a panasonic with the Samsung to compare. I kept the Samsung after a month of watching games. It was the better for games.

Hope that helps.

Broncoman13
02-16-2010, 06:30 AM
Maybe im a tard, but i cant even really tell the difference. Your eyes adjust to whatever anyway.

I was just going to say something similar.

Really we're talking the difference between a Lexus and an Acura. It really comes down to preference but you're probably going to be happy with either one.

I saw a post that referenced the top going models (Drek I think) and the Pioneer and Pannys are listed as the one-two. My set is a Phillips Ambilight and we love it... not sure they're still making the ambilight any more. But a 52" set looks closer to 80" b/c of the glow it casts on the walls around the TV itself. Very pleased with our set and I play tons of COD and Madden on it. The LCD in our bed room (Sharp Aquos) has a Blue Ray player hooked up to it (That I purchased from Raj @ Best Buy ;D) and has a great picture as well. I prefer the Phillips but that's probably b/c of the size difference and the ambilight more than anything.

One word of caution, once you get one you'll never go back to a regular set and will be spoiled for the rest of your viewing life. ;D

Beej
02-16-2010, 06:30 AM
No, because Plasma works off a fluorescing gas in a finite enclosure, at higher altitudes the pressure in each cell is lower and supposedly this results in performance loss. It apparently only starts to occur at 6500 ft though, so I think I'm good.

Also, I've read somewhere that the gases used in plasma TVs have a
half-life of somewhere around 10 years, which means that your plasma
picture will be only about half as bright after that period of time.

And, believe it or not, LCD screens WILL burn in. I have seen this
firsthand. It takes a lot but it can happen.

I'd go with the LCD or LED.

orangemonkey
02-16-2010, 06:43 AM
I have a plasma Pioneer 50" Model 5080. Unless you go to an 'Elite' model, there isn't a plasma that's better, IMHO.

No altitude problems at all. I also have a Samsung plasma in the bedroom, again, no altitude issues.,......you mean the hum/buzz associated with earlier plasma's?

For a 50" or larger....plasma is cheaper and you can't beat the 'black'. I recently saw some new Sony LCD/Led backlite and they were impressive too. Though expensive.

Agree with this 100%. I've been a TV nut for a while and have both LCDs and Plasma's at the higher end of the spectrum (Pioneer, Samsung, Sony XBR).

The Pioneer plasma hands down has the best picture for reasons stated above. If you go LCD, look at the higher (240 hertz) refresh rates. More expensive but Plasma-like quality.

Also, buying from a reputable online retailer can net you huge savings but be sure to pony up for the extended (2-4 year) warranty. Extended warranties especially on higher end models is mandatory.

jhat01
02-16-2010, 07:05 AM
One word of caution, once you get one you'll never go back to a regular set and will be spoiled for the rest of your viewing life. ;D

Ain't that the truth! It's hard for me to watch anything that's not broadcast in HD. One thing I'll say too, and maybe it's just me, but the difference between 720 and 1080 is very small IMO. I'm going to get another TV for the bedroom and I'll be getting one that's just 720. Don't get me wrong, the 1080/240 we have in the living room is fantastic, but we're gonna go bargain in the bedroom.

kamakazi_kal
02-16-2010, 07:08 AM
Samsung LED backlit LCD's are money ............ I've got 2 55"

Best TV investment you can make. 5x hdmi 1xpc-dvi 2xusb2

PS3 games are glorious as a side note.

TheDave
02-16-2010, 07:14 AM
We're looking at getting a our first 50+ inch TV as a couple. I've concluded a couple of things.


Plasmas not lasting as long is largely a myth anymore due to advances in technology.
Plasmas can be suseptible to burn-in.
LCD's work better at higher altitude.
Plasmas are cheaper in larger sizes.
LCD's are more energy friendly.
Plasmas have better picture concerning motion and deeper darks.


We're trying to decide, and I would choose a Plasma were it not for the altitude issue. Has anyone tested this and do they notice a difference?

Everything I read before buying my plasma said that Denver is not considered "High Altitude" for a Plasma. Supposedly the problems begin above 6000 ft.

HILife
02-16-2010, 07:16 AM
Get a hybrid, it will be more energy efficent.

Rohirrim
02-16-2010, 07:33 AM
I just got a Panasonic Viera 50" a couple of months ago through Amazon. Also got their theater sound system and blu-ray. Very happy with all of it. We do have to close the curtains to watch it during the day but's that's no big deal. When I was shopping I thought the LCDs had a plastic look to them. I like the plasma much more. Plus, we got a dvi to hdmi cord to hook up the laptop and now we can watch shows we buy on Itunes. So, every week we can watch Lost with no commercials. ;D

IHaveALight
02-16-2010, 07:40 AM
If you haven't already found it, http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/ is a great place to spend some time researching. I must warn you though, that place will make you want to go over your budget.

Mountain Bronco
02-16-2010, 08:39 AM
The worst thing anyone can do is look at Best Buy and the like to grade sets.

Not all are given equal quality cabling, video source, etc. and all have stupidly jacked up contrast to give that bright "wow" factor that only degrades picture quality and shortens the life of your set.



1. Altitude. From what I understand this is largely not a big issue anymore. Quality plasma manufacturers generally rate their sets as altitude compliant up to ~7500 feet above sea level. If you are above that then you will possibly have issues though, NEC makes a set that is designed for >9000 feet but I don't care for their IQ.

2. Unlike most things in life, high quality TVs are all about the brand. They go as follows:
Plasma
Pioneer >>>> Panasonic >>>>>>> everything else.

LCD
Samsung = Sony >>>>>> everything else.

Panasonic makes a nice plasma, though I hear the most recent line have some technical issues requiring a firmware update so check on that before committing. Pioneer doesn't make retail sets anymore, which is a shame because the Kuro line was a good two or three years ahead of everyone else. The final Kuro sets won't be equaled for at least another year and that is with Panasonic licensing the technology for their own televisions.

The main difference between the two comes down to if you're willing to put in a little extra work breaking a set in over the first 200 hours and generally just not forgetting it on with a menu up or something like that for hours on end in exchange for better picture quality. If you take care of a plasma (correctly calibrated contrast and brightness, good 200 hour break in period, don't leave something static on the screen for 12 hours) you'll never have to worry about burn in. But with LCDs you don't have that concern at all. Of course, lower tier brand LCDs do suffer from stuck pixels from time to time, which most retailers and manufacturers won't replace/fix unless you have a set number, no matter the location.

I live obove 8500 feet and plazmas are not acceptable at this altitude. Denver or lower, no problem though.

want2bAbronco2
02-16-2010, 09:21 AM
Friend of mine use to sell tvs and he just bought a LG Plasma..he loves it. I have a 60" DLP Samsung Love it, but bad in light. I am looking at buying a 55" for my gaming tv now, and I am torn between Plasma and LED.

Doggcow
02-16-2010, 09:26 AM
Friend of mine use to sell tvs and he just bought a LG Plasma..he loves it. I have a 60" DLP Samsung Love it, but bad in light. I am looking at buying a 55" for my gaming tv now, and I am torn between Plasma and LED.

At that size, if money is no issue, LED is an easy choice...

strafen
02-16-2010, 09:28 AM
Samsung LED backlit LCD's are money ............ I've got 2 55"

Best TV investment you can make. 5x hdmi 1xpc-dvi 2xusb2

PS3 games are glorious as a side note.+1
LCD for me...

Doggcow
02-16-2010, 09:30 AM
I just got a Panasonic Viera 50" a couple of months ago through Amazon. Also got their theater sound system and blu-ray. Very happy with all of it. We do have to close the curtains to watch it during the day but's that's no big deal. When I was shopping I thought the LCDs had a plastic look to them. I like the plasma much more. Plus, we got a dvi to hdmi cord to hook up the laptop and now we can watch shows we buy on Itunes. So, every week we can watch Lost with no commercials. ;D

Lost is embarrassingly bad now...

Why not just Download the shows for free anyway?

worm
02-16-2010, 09:33 AM
Off axis viewing is still pretty poor with LCD\LED. If you have a light controlled environment with a dispersed seating area, plasma is still the way to go IMO.

Doggcow
02-16-2010, 09:52 AM
Off axis viewing is still pretty poor with LCD\LED. If you have a light controlled environment with a dispersed seating area, plasma is still the way to go IMO.

I've watched my LCD from about 120 degrees of different POV's and never had a problem.

broncosteven
02-16-2010, 10:26 AM
LED is the new shiznit, but all are darn good. Does you room have much light in it? Plasma's are not as good if you have a light room, especially direct sun light.

I love my plasma, but I have it in the basement and there is not a lot of light being reflected off the glass.

I love it for all the reasons in Kahn's 1st post but I am also close to if not at sea level so cannot comment on the altitude.

I still think going the cheaper route on a TV is the best route, eventually they all burn out and unless you have a lot of cash to burn or are a videophile getting one close to the ideal cheaper is the way to go.

Good luck!

kamakazi_kal
02-16-2010, 12:53 PM
Off axis viewing is still pretty poor with LCD\LED. If you have a light controlled environment with a dispersed seating area, plasma is still the way to go IMO.

Not the backlit LED's I can watch tv with the shades open no problem. Glare is minor compared to the flat matted LCD side lit's ....... go into a best buy and check all the angles ...... no problems and those are all florecents in those stores.

this is just the samsung one's .. another thing is their so light like 40lbs light I can pick one up easy. If anyone is intrested I also know where you can get the wall mounts for like 40 bucks instead of ~300

Drek
02-16-2010, 01:28 PM
I have a plasma Pioneer 50" Model 5080. Unless you go to an 'Elite' model, there isn't a plasma that's better, IMHO.
The 5020FD actually replaced the 5080 shortly before Pioneer pulled themselves out of the retail game, and the elite line is obviously above them.

To this day nothing beats Pioneer's plasmas. Their plasmas from three years ago are better than what the competition is starting to roll out now. They are the absolute cream of the crop for HDTVs.


No, because Plasma works off a fluorescing gas in a finite enclosure, at higher altitudes the pressure in each cell is lower and supposedly this results in performance loss. It apparently only starts to occur at 6500 ft though, so I think I'm good.

It doesn't actually result in performance loss, the tv just needs to work harder to excite the gases up to the target levels, and as a result produces more heat. This requires more fan cooling and the result is a buzzing/humming noise from a fan running beyond what it was designed to run at. It could also shorten set life (fan burn out).

Its not an issue if you're below ~6500 ft, and if you buy Pioneer or Panasonic (the only plasmas you should be looking at) its good to a little over 7000 ft.

I live obove 8500 feet and plazmas are not acceptable at this altitude. Denver or lower, no problem though.

Pretty sure that is what I said. Anything over ~7300 ft. or so and you need a special set from NEC. Sony used to make high altitude plasmas but they don't make plasmas period anymore.

At that size, if money is no issue, LED is an easy choice...

If money isn't an issue he should be spending what it takes to get a last generation Pioneer Elite plasma. Nothing will match them for at least another year.

I have a room that has a window on the south wall. We keep the blinds shut but light does come right into that window on occasion. Is this going to be a problem? Like I said, we keep the blinds shut but its like any other family room: brighter during the day.

Double paned curtains/blinds will let you block out about 90% of all incoming sunlight, more than enough to remove glare from basically any set. Also, high end sets of either design often have anti-glare coatings.

Boltjolt
02-16-2010, 03:51 PM
Get the new LED TV. They dont run hot, no burn in, ...(which you shouldnt have any worries anyway with an LCD...i dont have any on either of mine), slimmer, lighter will last longer.

Plama's are outdated. I wouldnt bother with those and they have already stopped making some of them.

~Crash~
02-16-2010, 04:11 PM
plain ass TV !

Florida_Bronco
02-16-2010, 04:17 PM
Plama's are outdated.

Sorry, that's incorrect.

Bob
02-16-2010, 06:02 PM
We're looking at getting a our first 50+ inch TV as a couple. I've concluded a couple of things.


Plasmas not lasting as long is largely a myth anymore due to advances in technology.
Plasmas can be suseptible to burn-in.
LCD's work better at higher altitude.
Plasmas are cheaper in larger sizes.
LCD's are more energy friendly.
Plasmas have better picture concerning motion and deeper darks.


We're trying to decide, and I would choose a Plasma were it not for the altitude issue. Has anyone tested this and do they notice a difference?

This may have been brought up, but if you have young kids, I would steer clear of an LCD unit -- as they can't take much punishment -- if your playing the Wii, or if a ball gets thrown into it, you'll be out a wad of cash. I'm sure no one here has roudy kids though...

ZONA
02-16-2010, 08:54 PM
All I can really do is say what I have and how happy I am with the quality. I bought a 55" Diamond Series rear projection 1080i Mitsubishi 8 years ago and to this day, that's right, never had one cleaning or one adjustment and the picture (when watching HD) looks almost as good as my 2008 SONY LCD 1080P. That's no lie. Mitsubishi sure can make a quality TV. My next door neighbor has his own TV repair shop and he runs it out of his garage so I get to see all the broken down newer crap in there, like Visio. I would never buy one of those in a million years. They are total junk.

Doggcow
02-17-2010, 12:38 AM
Get the new LED TV. They dont run hot, no burn in, ...(which you shouldnt have any worries anyway with an LCD...i dont have any on either of mine), slimmer, lighter will last longer.

Plama's are outdated. I wouldnt bother with those and they have already stopped making some of them.

Heat generation is awesome though. Nothing better than warming your living room with a giganto-**** LCD TV while you watch the game on Sunday.

I love it! The only other source of heat I bother turning on is the oven for the digiorno.

zdoor
02-17-2010, 06:42 AM
If you're going to go over 60", Plasma is a much better value than LCD. Just got a Panasonic 65" for 2199.00. Love the Picture.

spdirty
02-17-2010, 08:31 AM
I got this from this site about a month ago and its great. TV looks great, at a good price, no issues with it. Free shipping, the delivery guys helped set it up, real happy with this TV.

http://www.tigerdirect.com/applications/SearchTools/item-details.asp?EdpNo=5226289&CatId=37

BroncosSR
02-17-2010, 08:37 AM
If there's a lot of ambient light in the room, lean towards the LCD. If there isn't, lean towards the Plasma...

Kaylore
02-18-2010, 07:59 AM
Thanks for the help, guys. Looks like I'll be heading toward a Plasma for the price factor considering the size and also the need for a better refresh rate than I can afford for the LCD's. Since most of viewing involves video games and sports, that is the big qualifier and most of my concerns revolved around Plasma's performance at higher altitude, which in this thread I learned isn't an image issue but actually a heat issue and only above 6,000 ft. I learned a lot in this thread though!:thumbsup:

Rock Chalk
02-18-2010, 09:56 AM
I gave Kahn my input on this in PM but I agree with Drek about the plasma brands completely.

Pioneer was awesome, but also pricey. Panasonic Viera's were the best buy period. Picture quality matched or exceeded all but Pioneer and the price was 20-40% lower than Sony or Samsung. I got my plasma in the "Year of the HD TV", that first Christmas when everyone and their mother got HD TVs about 5 years ago and then recently I got a LCD TV of the same size and my 5 year old Plasma owns my brand spanking new LCD TV as far as picture quality.

LED TVs will last about 5 years and then you will have to replace them. Unlike traditional LEDs, the LEDs in the TVs are OLED and their lifespan is much shorter than LCD or Plasmas. The organic LED suffers from the actual organic components and the blue in particular will only give you 14,000 hours. There are new experimental OLEDs out but I dont know if they are in production yet that push the blue up to around LCD/Plasma times but again I dont know if those are in production TVs yet. If you purchased an LED you are going to be buying a new TV in 5 years anyway.

Sucker.

Beantown Bronco
02-18-2010, 10:04 AM
LED TVs will last about 5 years and then you will have to replace them. Unlike traditional LEDs, the LEDs in the TVs are OLED and their lifespan is much shorter than LCD or Plasmas. The organic LED suffers from the actual organic components and the blue in particular will only give you 14,000 hours. There are new experimental OLEDs out but I dont know if they are in production yet that push the blue up to around LCD/Plasma times but again I dont know if those are in production TVs yet. If you purchased an LED you are going to be buying a new TV in 5 years anyway.Sucker.

For you to burn out a 14,000 hour TV in 5 years, you'd be talking about 8 hrs of TV viewing per day on a single TV. If that's the case, you've probably got bigger problems in life than having to buy a new TV every 5 years (which, in today's "throw the old tech away" day and age, people are going to do no matter what technology they buy).

cousinal11
02-18-2010, 10:18 AM
Buy the ****ing warranty. Dammit.

worm
02-18-2010, 10:21 AM
Buy the ****ing warranty. Dammit.

Glad to see those Best Buy sales orientation classes\brainwashing have worked

Irish Stout
02-18-2010, 10:26 AM
I buy my tvs at Costco. Best damn return policy in the world.

cousinal11
02-18-2010, 10:38 AM
Glad to see those Best Buy sales orientation classes\brainwashing have worked

Bought my first plasma in 2004 from Best Buy. After 2 1/2 years a vertical black line appeared on the screen. I remember I was watching "The Departed" and thought it was a split-screen scene. It wasn't. I had bought the 4-year warranty, so after they tried 3 different repairs with no success, I got a free replacement, a HD 42'' Samsung Plasma. I again purchased a 4-year warranty.

Loved it until December 22nd, 2009. It suddenly cut off on its own, then made a clicking sound like it was trying to cut itself back on. Anyway, yesterday was the 3rd repair attempt on this TV, with no success.

Waiting now to have my replacement approved, and when it does, I'll buy the warranty again.

Beantown Bronco
02-18-2010, 10:44 AM
Glad to see those Best Buy sales orientation classes\brainwashing have worked

Sure Best Buy's extended warranties are overpriced, but you'd be foolish not to buy one of the many extended warranties offered online through places like Amazon, etc. that are reputable and offer peace of mind on that big investment for $100-200 on average. It really doesn't make much sense not to, considering it would cost that much simply for someone to walk through the door to look at your broken tv without even touching it.

worm
02-18-2010, 11:14 AM
Bought my first plasma in 2004 from Best Buy. After 2 1/2 years a vertical black line appeared on the screen. I remember I was watching "The Departed" and thought it was a split-screen scene. It wasn't. I had bought the 4-year warranty, so after they tried 3 different repairs with no success, I got a free replacement, a HD 42'' Samsung Plasma. I again purchased a 4-year warranty.

Loved it until December 22nd, 2009. It suddenly cut off on its own, then made a clicking sound like it was trying to cut itself back on. Anyway, yesterday was the 3rd repair attempt on this TV, with no success.

Waiting now to have my replacement approved, and when it does, I'll buy the warranty again.

This worked out perfect for you then. Past the manufactures warranty but still in the extended period. The fact that it happened twice under those conditions is pretty unusual IMO.

I am just not that big of a believer in extended warranties. Especially when the price is ~25% of the product price...and not when you can still negotiate with the manufactures customer service department even when the item is out of warranty (complain effectively and loudly enough and they will reach some sort of agreement with you).

My GF is the insurance queen....I prefer assuming the risk.

worm
02-18-2010, 11:17 AM
Sure Best Buy's extended warranties are overpriced, but you'd be foolish not to buy one of the many extended warranties offered online through places like Amazon, etc. that are reputable and offer peace of mind on that big investment for $100-200 on average. It really doesn't make much sense not to, considering it would cost that much simply for someone to walk through the door to look at your broken tv without even touching it.

If you can get the price down to ~10% of the purchase price for an additional 4 year extended, in-home warranty....then I would definitely consider it.

Beantown Bronco
02-18-2010, 11:19 AM
If you can get the price down to ~10% of the purchase price for an additional 4 year extended, in-home warranty....then I would definitely consider it.

Agreed. That's generally the type I've been looking at through amazon. You can generally lock in that type of coverage for 10%.

Boltjolt
02-18-2010, 01:43 PM
Sorry, that's incorrect.

The fact that some companies have stopped making them means they are being phased out and outdated. LED's are the new thing and LCD's are better than plasma's.

This is a year old on the subject of Plasmas going away and being outdated. Sony, Pioneer and Vizio have stopped making them.

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/plasma-tv-pioneer-vizio-panasonic,news-3478.html

Beantown Bronco
02-18-2010, 01:58 PM
The fact that some companies have stopped making them means they are being phased out and outdated.

No it doesn't.

Phased out and outdated are two completely different words with very different meanings.

Phased out? Sure, by those certain companies you listed. But not by Panasonic and Samsung who are still cranking them out.

Outdated? Do you know the definition of this word? Find me one reputable technology site that believes Pioneer and current Panasonic plasmas are outdated technology.

LCD's are better than plasma's

In what way? Not picture quality, motion blurring, etc. Energy use, sure, but that's it.

Boltjolt
02-18-2010, 02:03 PM
No it doesn't.

Phased out and outdated are two completely different words with very different meanings.

Phased out? Sure, by those certain companies you listed. But not by Panasonic and Samsung who are still cranking them out.

Outdated? Do you know the definition of this word? Find me one reputable technology site that believes Pioneer and current Panasonic plasmas are outdated technology.



In what way? Not picture quality, motion blurring, etc. Energy use, sure, but that's it.

To each their own. I think the picture is better on a LCD and that isnt to say the plasma is bad. However, they will eventually stop making them.

Doggcow
02-18-2010, 02:13 PM
To each their own. I think the picture is better on a LCD and that isnt to say the plasma is bad. However, they will eventually stop making them.

Whether they stop making them or not, means nothing when it comes to buying one now.

Obligatory jab: The only things that are eternal are Championships.

epicSocialism4tw
02-18-2010, 02:20 PM
I recently bought a Sony LED. Love it.

Bright, vivid colors come alive. Brilliant. I am now even more addicted to nature shows. I was watching a show the other day that was done by the producers of "Planet Earth", and the sailfish that they showed looked like they were almost glowing because of the way that they reflected light.

worm
02-18-2010, 02:23 PM
I recently bought a Sony LED. Love it.

Bright, vivid colors come alive. Brilliant. I am now even more addicted to nature shows. I was watching a show the other day that was done by the producers of "Planet Earth", and the sailfish that they showed looked like they were almost glowing because of the way that they reflected light.

Actually that 'glowing' was because the contrast and brightness were set too high. ;D

epicSocialism4tw
02-18-2010, 02:35 PM
Actually that 'glowing' was because the contrast and brightness were set too high. ;D

I'm using the factory "vivid" preset...which could be bad, I dont know, but it looked great. It almost looked real.

Drek
02-18-2010, 05:50 PM
The fact that some companies have stopped making them means they are being phased out and outdated. LED's are the new thing and LCD's are better than plasma's.

This is a year old on the subject of Plasmas going away and being outdated. Sony, Pioneer and Vizio have stopped making them.

http://www.tomsguide.com/us/plasma-tv-pioneer-vizio-panasonic,news-3478.html

Pioneer didn't stop, they've just pulled out of the retail game and are pushing their cutting edge plasma tech through Panasonic.

Sony pulled out of plasmas for the same reason that Samsung should, their plasmas where second rate while their LCDs are cutting edge.

Vizio is all about what they can sell with minimal warranty hassle and maximum profit margins.

Plasmas are not outdated. Pioneer's Kuro line is still the best in home picture money can buy.

Drek
02-18-2010, 05:56 PM
I'm using the factory "vivid" preset...which could be bad, I dont know, but it looked great. It almost looked real.

Then your contrast is almost definitely too high.

Avia or Digital Video Essentials are both two very good calibration discs that will help you set your television to optimal settings for both picture quality and life of the set. A high contrast not only produces color bleeding and blurriness, it also reduces the lifespan of your television.

Calibration with at least a decent DVD based alternative is a must. Professional calibration is even a good option if you have the money to spare, but give any plasmas the first 200 hrs. of use before you pay to have someone calibrate it, the picture will change over time.

Of course, there is always the Kuro Elite series and their built in optical lens that adjusts all of its settings on the fly according to pre-programmed picture settings (that don't have stupidly jacked contrast) relative to room lighting. Once again proving why the Kuros > all other sets.

DeusExManning
02-18-2010, 06:08 PM
If you need it flat that is one thing but you can get a perfect plasma 65" HD 3D 2500 free shipping at onecall.com

Fedaykin
02-18-2010, 06:21 PM
We're looking at getting a our first 50+ inch TV as a couple. I've concluded a couple of things.


Plasmas not lasting as long is largely a myth anymore due to advances in technology.
Plasmas can be suseptible to burn-in.
LCD's work better at higher altitude.
Plasmas are cheaper in larger sizes.
LCD's are more energy friendly.
Plasmas have better picture concerning motion and deeper darks.


We're trying to decide, and I would choose a Plasma were it not for the altitude issue. Has anyone tested this and do they notice a difference?

Plasma seems to be going the way of the Betamax, except it's not actually superior.

With 120/240hz LED backlit LCDs, most of the advantages of the Plasma (contrast, motion) are minimized or no longer exist.

Both 120 and 240hz provide perfect frame by frame reproduction at both 24fps (movies) and 30fps (tv). No more work arounds like the 3:4 pulldown needed (and hated) with 60hz.

With LED backlit LCDs, you're going to get blacklevels and color consistency that is on par with Plasmas and backlight fade is no longer a problem.

El Minion
02-18-2010, 06:45 PM
Plasma seems to be going the way of the Betamax, except it's not actually superior.

With 120/240hz LED backlit LCDs, most of the advantages of the Plasma (contrast, motion) are minimized or no longer exist.

Both 120 and 240hz provide perfect frame by frame reproduction at both 24fps (movies) and 30fps (tv). No more work arounds like the 3:4 pulldown needed (and hated) with 60hz.

With LED backlit LCDs, you're going to get blacklevels and color consistency that is on par with Plasmas and backlight fade is no longer a problem.

That and Sony is coming out with 3D LED LCD HDTV line:


Sony's Bravia LED LCD HDTV Lineup: XBR-LX900 and XBR-HX900 Go 3D, and Wi-Fi Abounds
(http://gizmodo.com/5442019/sonys-bravia-led-lcd-hdtv-lineup-xbr+lx900-and-xbr+hx900-go-3d-and-wi+fi-abounds)

http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/4/2010/01/500x_bravialx990000.jpg
Sony's launching thirty-eight TVs. The best, the XBR-LX900, is a 3D-ready edge-lit LED set that goes up to 60 inches with 240Hz, Wi-Fi (for video services like Netflix), face detection (for auto-backlight dimming) and an anti-reflective panel. And Three-Dee.
http://cache.gawker.com/assets/images/4/2010/01/500x_monolithic.jpg
I'd personally go with the XBR-HX900, which is 3D like the LX900, but it's got LED backlighting with local dimming. It's just smaller, only going up to 52 inches. The new "Monolithic" design language looks like classic Sony, but hey, it's really nice. They're available for pre-order tonight on Sony Style.

Stepping down further, past the warm comfort of XBR, 3D continues in the HX800, but you lose perks like built-in Wi-Fi. Or with the NX800, you can trade in 3D for Wi-Fi, and going further, 240Hz gives way to 120Hz, on down the line.


BRAVIA XBR-LX900 Series 3D HDTV
Available this summer, the BRAVIA XBR-LX900 series features integrated 3D functionality and screen sizes including 60 (XBR-60LX900), 52 (XBR-52LX900), 46 (XBR-46LX900), and 40-inch (XBR-40LX900).

The full HD 1080p (1920 x 1080) models feature Edge LED backlight, Sony's new Monolithic Design and Motionflow™ PRO 240Hz motion compensation technology, which helps produces smooth images in fast moving content such as sport and action movies. Sony's 240Hz technology also reduces the mixing of images of 3D content assigned to the left and right eyes, while the BRAVIA Engine™ 3 full digital video processor uses a collection of enhanced algorithms to significantly reduce noise, enhance overall image detail, and optimize contrast so every scene produces sharp, vibrant, life-like images.

The LX900 models also feature Sony's new OptiContrast panel. Designed with a clear surface treatment and a resin sheet sandwiched between the LCD display panel and glass plate, the OptiContrast panel minimizes the reflection and refraction of external and internal light producing deeper images with superior black levels even in bright rooms.

The models include integrated Wi-Fi for an easy connection to broadband home networks. Once connected, users can access thousands of streaming movies, videos, music and more from Netflix, Amazon Video on Demand, YouTube™, Slacker® Internet Radio, Pandora®, NPR, Sony Pictures, Sony Music, and over 25 total providers through the Sony BRAVIA Internet Video platform.

Also, with the touch of a button, users can access the latest in news, weather, USA Today sports, Yahoo Finance, Twitter, Flickr photos, and FrameChannel through small applications called BRAVIA Internet Widgets. The widgets can be uniquely positioned anywhere on the TV screen for a custom viewing experience.

The models also feature playback of personal content including digital pictures, video, and music through USB and DLNA® certified network connections.

Another new feature is Sony's Intelligent Presence Sensor with face detection. The sensor detects if you've stepped away from the TV or are not watching the screen and automatically dims the backlight. After an extended period, the TV will turn off if no one has re-entered the viewing area. Additionally, the Intelligent Presence Sensor's newly added Position Control feature detects a user's viewing position to deliver optimized video/sound balance, while the Distance Alert feature helps to keep small children at an eye-friendly distance.

The models also offer Sony's BRAVIA Sync™ for easy operation with other BRAVIA Sync devices such as AV receivers and Blu-ray Disc™ players, and TVGuide® on-screen channel guide.

[continues (http://gizmodo.com/5442019/sonys-bravia-led-lcd-hdtv-lineup-xbr+lx900-and-xbr+hx900-go-3d-and-wi+fi-abounds)]

cousinal11
02-19-2010, 05:34 AM
This worked out perfect for you then. Past the manufactures warranty but still in the extended period. The fact that it happened twice under those conditions is pretty unusual IMO.

I am just not that big of a believer in extended warranties. Especially when the price is ~25% of the product price...and not when you can still negotiate with the manufactures customer service department even when the item is out of warranty (complain effectively and loudly enough and they will reach some sort of agreement with you).

My GF is the insurance queen....I prefer assuming the risk.


First one I bought in 04' was ~$2,400, warranty was $280, little over 10%. That TV wasn't HD, but since all they made in 07' was HD, I upgraded, so that worked out perfect for me.

The replacement I got was free, so buying the warranty, ~$240, was worth it.

I usually don't buy extended warranties, but I was talked into it by my GF in 2004 and it was obviously a wise decision.

Still waiting on approval for my replacement, but I'm heading into Best Buy tonight after work. Thinking of carrying my TV in with my warranty and gathering innocent customers around for the show. "See how they treat people!" :~ohyah!:

lostknight
02-19-2010, 09:16 AM
I have a 47" inch plasma. No issues at all with either dead spots, or with altitude. Sports look better on plasma in my experience. The 250hz LCD's are obviously great for gaming, but honestly, I've never liked the way movies look on them.

Do not under any circumstances buy HDMI cables at a retailer. They are the worst consumer rip off going today. I have a 50 ft HDMI cable from monoprice between my equipment bay and my theatre room.

Save some cash for a receiver. Good sound is worth it. I have a Denon AVR-590 that does HD upscaling and HD-DTS/Dolby and it's worth every penny.

Broncoman13
02-19-2010, 01:04 PM
So what did you get Birthday Boy???

zdoor
02-19-2010, 03:26 PM
I have a 47" inch plasma. No issues at all with either dead spots, or with altitude. Sports look better on plasma in my experience. The 250hz LCD's are obviously great for gaming, but honestly, I've never liked the way movies look on them.

Do not under any circumstances buy HDMI cables at a retailer. They are the worst consumer rip off going today. I have a 50 ft HDMI cable from monoprice between my equipment bay and my theatre room.

Save some cash for a receiver. Good sound is worth it. I have a Denon AVR-590 that does HD upscaling and HD-DTS/Dolby and it's worth every penny.

I run that same receiver in our bedroom and really like it....

Kaylore
02-19-2010, 11:03 PM
So what did you get Birthday Boy???

Wife got me a blu-ray player. The TV is happening after our tax return comes back.