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View Full Version : For You Runners Out There - Vibram Fivefingers


Harvitz81
01-30-2010, 08:34 AM
I just got a pair of these Vibram Fiverfingers for lifting weights and running as I wanted a shoe that I could go to the gym and do both. I got to say that these are some of the best shoes I've ever owned. I feel so much more stable on my squats and deadlifts. I used to do these barefoot, but I always worried about picking up something in the gym. Now I can can get the foot protection in addition to the feel and stability of doing these barefoot.

Running - I'm just a casual runner and only run about 2-3 miles/day five days a week. The first run I had in these I was absolutely amazed. It felt like I wasn't even wearing anything and I just breezed through the run. I will never run in anything else. NOTE- a word of caution - I noticed that you engage a ton more muscles in the calves using these, so be careful and be ready for some soreness.

They look a little funky and are hard to put on, but they are really comfortable and have become my new favorite shoe. Anyone else here use these?

http://www.vibramfivefingers.com/

azbroncfan
01-30-2010, 12:25 PM
The half marathon I just did I saw someone running in those. How is it running with hardly any cushion? Maybe the cushion is better in them than it looks.

tsiguy96
01-30-2010, 05:48 PM
during a seminar we listened to on form running someone talked about these shoes for barefoot running, heard they are good

Harvitz81
01-30-2010, 06:25 PM
There are a lot of studies that indicate that barefoot running is much better for you than the typical running shoes today. As far as cushion, they don't have any. It is basically running barefoot with a rubber sole.

When I used to run before in regular running shoes, my thighs and hips used to get really sore. With these I have absolutely no pain in those areas. My calves actually get quite a workout now, which I read is because barefoot running engages more muscles in your foot and calves.

So far I absolutely love them (I've only had them for a week though). It is also funny to see all the puzzled look on the people in the gym when I workout in them. I've also been bombarded with questions from a few. I could honestly care less how they look, they are really comfortable and work great for my needs. I really got them for deadlifting and squats - running is just an added bonus.

tsiguy96
01-30-2010, 07:03 PM
There are a lot of studies that indicate that barefoot running is much better for you than the typical running shoes today. As far as cushion, they don't have any. It is basically running barefoot with a rubber sole.

When I used to run before in regular running shoes, my thighs and hips used to get really sore. With these I have absolutely no pain in those areas. My calves actually get quite a workout now, which I read is because barefoot running engages more muscles in your foot and calves.

So far I absolutely love them (I've only had them for a week though). It is also funny to see all the puzzled look on the people in the gym when I workout in them. I've also been bombarded with questions from a few. I could honestly care less how they look, they are really comfortable and work great for my needs. I really got them for deadlifting and squats - running is just an added bonus.

one of the big reasons is they unconsciously make you run with your feet under your hips, pushing your body forward, as opposed to taking unnecessarily long strides that make you PULL your body forward (by striking with your heel to the ground as opposed to your toes which you use more with shoes like these)

tsiguy96
01-30-2010, 07:04 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8EPxga-gMoY

azbroncfan
01-31-2010, 12:27 AM
one of the big reasons is they unconsciously make you run with your feet under your hips, pushing your body forward, as opposed to taking unnecessarily long strides that make you PULL your body forward (by striking with your heel to the ground as opposed to your toes which you use more with shoes like these)

Yeah barefoot running will make you run with much better form and make you run off the forefront instead of the heel like you said. There are many disadvantages though.

Barefoot isn't really practical on surfaces other than grass, track, or sand. So you get no protection from goathead thorns, glass, rocks or whatever debris might be out there.

Increased Achilles strain which doesn't help with tendonitis and increased Calf strain.

Plantar fasciitis will most likely become a bigger issue now. It already is a common injury and without the protection of a stiff sole your chances are really going to go up for this garbage.

Blisters til you get some serious callusus.

I think barefoot running is good in shorter runs but it isn't a magical cure all or podiatrists would tell people to go barefoot more instead of prescribing arc supports.

I don't see myself trying it because I don't have problems now with shoes but I have seen people using them. I don't see many competition runners running barefoot either.

meangene
01-31-2010, 04:51 AM
I have low arches and am an overpronator so running barefoot or with no support would be unthinkable. What has made all the difference for me was getting some custom orthotics. My feet used to hurt all the time and, being a fairly thick (6'0" 190lbs.) runner, I was getting a lot of achilles tendonitis. Now, I can do a 10-12 mile run every week with no ill effects. I have to think that, unless you are lean, keep your runs short and have a soft surface, you are going to have foot problems down the road without some support.

loborugger
01-31-2010, 08:01 PM
On days I do power stuff... deadlifts, cleans, etc, I wear an old pair of Chucks to the gym. I always warm up running a 1/4 mile on the tread mill at a nice gentle pace... 10 minute miles. Anyways, I cant imagine running miles in those Chucks.

And these things kinda look like the same thing... something I wouldnt wanna run long distances in.

Gotta question, Harvitz. How old are you? Cuz, in my teens and 20s, I probably coulda done miles in those shoes. Today, not so much.

Boobs McGee
01-31-2010, 08:10 PM
Yeah barefoot running will make you run with much better form and make you run off the forefront instead of the heel like you said. There are many disadvantages though.

Barefoot isn't really practical on surfaces other than grass, track, or sand. So you get no protection from goathead thorns, glass, rocks or whatever debris might be out there.

Increased Achilles strain which doesn't help with tendonitis and increased Calf strain.

Plantar fasciitis will most likely become a bigger issue now. It already is a common injury and without the protection of a stiff sole your chances are really going to go up for this garbage.

Blisters til you get some serious callusus.

I think barefoot running is good in shorter runs but it isn't a magical cure all or podiatrists would tell people to go barefoot more instead of prescribing arc supports.

I don't see myself trying it because I don't have problems now with shoes but I have seen people using them. I don't see many competition runners running barefoot either.

I've been doing some research, and IF you run barefoot properly, it actually reduces the chance for inuries, specifically plantar fasciitis and achilles strain...allegedly, when actually RUNNING barefoot, the balls of your feet are hitting first, vs. the heel as is coming with shoe wearers.

azbroncfan
01-31-2010, 08:33 PM
I've been doing some research, and IF you run barefoot properly, it actually reduces the chance for inuries, specifically plantar fasciitis and achilles strain...allegedly, when actually RUNNING barefoot, the balls of your feet are hitting first, vs. the heel as is coming with shoe wearers.

That is what they say. I just don't see a lot of doctors suggesting it. The reasoning behind it makes a lot of sense I just would never do it here in AZ. You would fight sharp rocks, multiple types of thorns/stickers, and hot pavement. It is an interesting concept though.

tsiguy96
01-31-2010, 08:53 PM
I've been doing some research, and IF you run barefoot properly, it actually reduces the chance for inuries, specifically plantar fasciitis and achilles strain...allegedly, when actually RUNNING barefoot, the balls of your feet are hitting first, vs. the heel as is coming with shoe wearers.


this is what ive heard as well, see the video and my post above. when running barefoot you push, increasing stride frequency while keeping your feet under your hips. when wearing thick running shoes a lot of times people take longer strides and strike with their heel first first, think of how inefficient that motion is, to have your heel hit, the rest of your foot finally go flat, heel raise off ground then push from tip of your foot, as opposed to landing on the ball of your feet and pushing off immediately.

Harvitz81
01-31-2010, 09:01 PM
On days I do power stuff... deadlifts, cleans, etc, I wear an old pair of Chucks to the gym. I always warm up running a 1/4 mile on the tread mill at a nice gentle pace... 10 minute miles. Anyways, I cant imagine running miles in those Chucks.

And these things kinda look like the same thing... something I wouldnt wanna run long distances in.

Gotta question, Harvitz. How old are you? Cuz, in my teens and 20s, I probably coulda done miles in those shoes. Today, not so much.

I'm 28 going on 29. To be honest I'm not really much of a runner. I definitely do more lifting and deadlifts and squats are essential to me. I was looking for some good shoes for those, and was about to buy some Chuck Taylors for that.

However, I'm cutting atm and have started incorporating about 15-20 minutes of cardio after I lift. I always liked running, but am a little big to really be good at it (6'2" 200lbs). I can easily go 2-3 miles in these things after lifting at anywhere from 7.5 to 9 m/h. I don't know how they would work for longer runs, but I've read that people run marathons in these things no problem.

I'm currently at 9-10% BF and once I get to 6%, I may not do as much running as I slowly want to bulk after that to 205lbs while maintaining 6% Bf. These things have certainly helped though for getting me back running and off the elliptical.

Beantown Bronco
02-01-2010, 09:46 AM
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Taco John
02-02-2010, 08:16 PM
I"ve actually been looking at these for trekking. When I'm backpacking, I usually take a pair of Teva water moccasins for around the camp fire, and creek hiking (which is a ton of fun). I saw these and considered them, but am turned off by the whole "five finger" thing. Maybe I should get over it.

Harvitz81
02-02-2010, 11:24 PM
I"ve actually been looking at these for trekking. When I'm backpacking, I usually take a pair of Teva water moccasins for around the camp fire, and creek hiking (which is a ton of fun). I saw these and considered them, but am turned off by the whole "five finger" thing. Maybe I should get over it.

They are actually quite comfortable. I would just go try some on and see how you like them to see if they are right for you.

Chris
02-10-2011, 10:05 AM
Well my vibrams just got stolen at the gym after a month of use. My fault for leaving them there by accident but is there a gym in the world frequented by honest people?

Man that's ruined my day.

loborugger
02-10-2011, 11:13 AM
So, have the dropped in price at all yet? I find that a pair of old school Chuck's is basically the same and half the price.

Chris
02-21-2011, 08:26 AM
Mine were 85 bucks.