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Taco John
01-28-2010, 10:40 PM
Bunch Of Phonies Mourn J.D. Salinger

January 28, 2010

CORNISH, NH—In this big dramatic production that didn't do anyone any good (and was pretty embarrassing, really, if you think about it), thousands upon thousands of phonies across the country mourned the death of author J.D. Salinger, who was 91 years old for crying out loud. "He had a real impact on the literary world and on millions of readers," said hot-shot English professor David Clarke, who is just like the rest of them, and even works at one of those crumby schools that rich people send their kids to so they don't have to look at them for four years. "There will never be another voice like his." Which is exactly the lousy kind of goddamn thing that people say, because really it could mean lots of things, or nothing at all even, and it's just a perfect example of why you should never tell anybody anything.

Source (http://www.theonion.com/content/news/bunch_of_phonies_mourn_j_d)

Taco John
01-28-2010, 10:40 PM
Thanks to the Onion for the splendid obituary. It put me right back in Caufield's head. :)

RIP Salinger.

Borks147
01-28-2010, 10:44 PM
He used to come in all the time and hang out at Dartmouth's library...until the undergrads caught on it was him and started gawking/stalking .

Taco John
01-28-2010, 10:49 PM
For those that haven't read Catcher in the Rye, you've done yourself a disservice. Great read. Just great.

✡✡ JOSHUA ✡✡
01-28-2010, 11:13 PM
:(

TheReverend
01-28-2010, 11:25 PM
That's a great article

Dr.5280
01-28-2010, 11:31 PM
Rich kid adjusting to life after the traumatic loss of his younger brother.

Killericon
01-28-2010, 11:52 PM
He used to come in all the time and hang out at Dartmouth's library...until the undergrads caught on it was him and started gawking/stalking .

As IF it was only the undergrads.

Great article. The Onion is fantastic.

ton80
01-29-2010, 12:50 AM
For those that haven't read Catcher in the Rye, you've done yourself a disservice. Great read. Just great.

A disservice? Seriously...

Mogulseeker
01-29-2010, 01:00 AM
Bunch Of Phonies Mourn J.D. Salinger

January 28, 2010

CORNISH, NH—In this big dramatic production that didn't do anyone any good (and was pretty embarrassing, really, if you think about it), thousands upon thousands of phonies across the country mourned the death of author J.D. Salinger, who was 91 years old for crying out loud. "He had a real impact on the literary world and on millions of readers," said hot-shot English professor David Clarke, who is just like the rest of them, and even works at one of those crumby schools that rich people send their kids to so they don't have to look at them for four years. "There will never be another voice like his." Which is exactly the lousy kind of goddamn thing that people say, because really it could mean lots of things, or nothing at all even, and it's just a perfect example of why you should never tell anybody anything.

Source (http://www.theonion.com/content/news/bunch_of_phonies_mourn_j_d)

This is a great tribute to one of the great American authors.

watermock
01-29-2010, 01:57 AM
that people say, because really it could mean lots of things, or nothing at all even, and it's just a perfect example of why you should never tell anybody anything.


meh. He never did anyhing for me, but required reading. In fact, I think I put it down and faked the exam.

RIP.

Bronco Rob
01-29-2010, 03:36 AM
"The mark of the immature man is that he wants to die nobly for a cause, while the mark of the mature man is that is wants to live humbly for one."




Brillant.

Play2win
01-29-2010, 03:36 AM
http://img189.imageshack.us/img189/7912/laughingmanelmex.png

watermock
01-29-2010, 03:44 AM
"The mark of the immature man is that he wants to die nobly for a cause, while the mark of the mature man is that is wants to live humbly for one."




Brillant.

What a brazen, "cultured" comment.

In other words, "Old men start wars, young men finish them.."

Bronco Rob
01-29-2010, 04:06 AM
What a brazen, "cultured" comment.

In other words, "Old men start wars, young men finish them.."


Me thinks you are a bit off the mark ole friend.....



:thumbsup:

watermock
01-29-2010, 04:23 AM
Wrong.

Bronco Rob
01-29-2010, 04:26 AM
Wrong.


HINT: Wisdom \Wis"dom\ (-d[u^]m), n. 1. The quality of being wise; knowledge, and the capacity to make due use of it; knowledge of the best ends and the best means; discernment and judgment; discretion; sagacity; skill; dexterity.



Just sayin'

Lev Vyvanse
01-29-2010, 04:46 AM
I hope they finally release some new books.

watermock
01-29-2010, 05:05 AM
It's funny really, how you would look to a mid 20th century fantstist that has no real moral identity.

Lev Vyvanse
01-29-2010, 05:15 AM
It's funny really, how you would look to a mid 20th century fantstist that has no real moral identity.

Look to him for what? A good book.

Rohirrim
01-29-2010, 05:39 AM
"I'm standing on the edge of some crazy cliff. What I have to do, I have to catch everybody if they start to go over the cliff - I mean if they're running and they don't look where they're going I have to come out from somewhere and catch them. That's all I'd do all day. I'd just be the catcher in the rye and all."

RIP

colonelbeef
01-29-2010, 06:17 AM
He used to come in all the time and hang out at Dartmouth's library...until the undergrads caught on it was him and started gawking/stalking .

Interesting... he really did lead a quiet life through and through.

TheElusiveKyleOrton
01-29-2010, 06:18 AM
meh. He never did anyhing for me, but required reading. In fact, I think I put it down and faked the exam.

RIP.

Shocking. I am shocked.

That's a really well-done obit. Nice find, TJ.

TheElusiveKyleOrton
01-29-2010, 06:20 AM
"I hope to hell that when I do die somebody has the sense to just dump me in the river or something. Anything except sticking me in a goddam cemetary. People coming and putting a bunch of flowers on your stomach on Sunday, and all that crap. Who wants flowers when you're dead? Nobody." - JD Salinger


He's getting his wish. No funeral for a man who craved solitude above all else.

Dagmar
01-29-2010, 06:30 AM
An RIP thread jacked by mock! Color me stunned...

Hogan11
01-29-2010, 06:44 AM
Great article. The Onion is fantastic.

This.

R.I.P. Sally

worm
01-29-2010, 06:45 AM
I wonder where the dead ducks go?

gunns
01-29-2010, 08:05 AM
I was an avid reader as a kid and my grandmother suggested Catcher in the Rye when I was 14. I liked the writing style but it was strange to me and I didn't "get it". I picked it up again at the age of 18 as required reading in college. I absolutely loved it. It was "where I was at". RIP Mr. Salinger.

Kid A
01-29-2010, 08:13 AM
Probably my favorite short story by him:

For Esmé - with Love and Squalor

http://www.freeweb.hu/tchl/salinger/squalor.html

Pony Boy
01-29-2010, 09:03 AM
For those that haven't read Catcher in the Rye, you've done yourself a disservice. Great read. Just great.

There are two kinds of people in the world, those who didn't get it and never will and those who will carry some of that book with them their entire life.
I think about it every time I pack a snowball.............

Taco John
01-29-2010, 09:09 AM
I've been trying to come up with a modern comparison to that story, but I haven't been able to. There is just no movie or book that I've come across that captures the essence of it. I can understand why it's never been made into a movie - and THANK GOD for that. There's no way that anyone could capture the splendidness of this book through the visual medium.

RhymesayersDU
01-29-2010, 09:17 AM
I should re-read CITR, I vaguely remember reading it in high school as required reading.

Taco John
01-29-2010, 09:23 AM
I should re-read CITR, I vaguely remember reading it in high school as required reading.

It's my opinion that if you read it as required reading, you're not going to get as much enjoyment out of it as if you read it because you want to read a good book.

Requiem
01-29-2010, 09:27 AM
R.I.P.

I opted not to read much of Salinger when I was younger, and thought Of Mice and Men would be a better read because they killed a retard in the story. Nonetheless, Catcher In the Rye helped out a lot of disgruntled teens getting through early-life limbo.

RhymesayersDU
01-29-2010, 09:31 AM
It's my opinion that if you read it as required reading, you're not going to get as much enjoyment out of it as if you read it because you want to read a good book.

Totally agree, I don't even know if I read the whole thing or just enough to get by quizzes and whatnot.

I know we read a couple classics back then. I vaguely remember Lord of the Flies and a couple others. It'd probably serve me well to re-read them.

Tombstone RJ
01-29-2010, 09:44 AM
I know I read it, but I honestly don't remember much about CintheR... sad, I need to read it again...

Kid A
01-29-2010, 10:17 AM
I've been trying to come up with a modern comparison to that story, but I haven't been able to. There is just no movie or book that I've come across that captures the essence of it. I can understand why it's never been made into a movie - and THANK GOD for that. There's no way that anyone could capture the splendidness of this book through the visual medium.

Any story that relies so much on internal monologue is bound to fail as a movie.

In terms of Salinger influence in the movies, I immediately think of Wes Anderson's films (particularly Royal Tenenbaums)as showing a large influence from Salinger's stories about the Glass family. Anderson obviously takes it in a quirkier more comedic direction, but he borrows heavily from J.D. in establishing the dysfunctional upper-class family dynamic, depressed characters, sibling interactions, etc.

SportinOne
01-29-2010, 10:18 AM
The movie Igby Goes Down for some reason reminded me of Catcher. I'm not saying it's as good as the book or that there are a ton of parallels, just something that popped into my head.

SonOfLe-loLang
01-29-2010, 10:20 AM
Am I the only person who didn't like this book. I remember being handed it in high school with the knowledge that many schools had banned it for it's subject matter. Maybe its because of lit I read before it, or the hype associated with it, but i just thought Holden was a miserable dude and that was that. Not to take anything away from the work, I know it had an effect on many people and is recognized as such, but, I don't know, never connected with me.

That said, RIP

Pony Boy
01-29-2010, 11:49 AM
I've been trying to come up with a modern comparison to that story, but I haven't been able to. There is just no movie or book that I've come across that captures the essence of it. I can understand why it's never been made into a movie - and THANK GOD for that. There's no way that anyone could capture the splendidness of this book through the visual medium.

Why he didn't want it made into a movie

Inkana7
01-29-2010, 12:20 PM
Am I the only person who didn't like this book. I remember being handed it in high school with the knowledge that many schools had banned it for it's subject matter. Maybe its because of lit I read before it, or the hype associated with it, but i just thought Holden was a miserable dude and that was that. Not to take anything away from the work, I know it had an effect on many people and is recognized as such, but, I don't know, never connected with me.

That said, RIP

I hated it, but liked his short stories.

TonyR
01-29-2010, 12:40 PM
For those that haven't read Catcher in the Rye, you've done yourself a disservice. Great read. Just great.

Agree. I read it as assigned once each in junior high school and high school, and then once again on my own in college. I thoroughly enjoyed it each time although the college reading depressed the hell out of me. I'm sure if I read it now I'd end up in the garage with the car running.

broncosteven
01-29-2010, 12:53 PM
I was an avid reader as a kid and my grandmother suggested Catcher in the Rye when I was 14. I liked the writing style but it was strange to me and I didn't "get it". I picked it up again at the age of 18 as required reading in college. I absolutely loved it. It was "where I was at". RIP Mr. Salinger.

It took me 2 reads to start to get it. I think it hits a nerve with people who read it and have a parallel with their own lives. For myself I wasn't an angry young teen.

I preferred Steinbeck's epics, Tennessee Williams short stories, Ray Bradbury, but the book that I clicked with in HS was Farewell to Arms and it didn't click until the last chapter up until then I had to force myself to read it the 1st time, then After I read the last chapter I jumped back and reread the whole thing in over the weekend and couldn't put it down.

Farewell to Arms and For whom the bell tolls are what got me through all my crushes or end of relationships since my junior year in HS. Nothing like the chick dying at the end to help one move on.

Beantown Bronco
01-29-2010, 01:01 PM
For those that haven't read Catcher in the Rye, you've done yourself a disservice. Great read. Just great.

I've never read it, but for whatever reason, every time I'm in a book store I have to buy a copy. Then these black helicopters seem to pop up out of nowhere and guys with machine guns try to kill me. Weird.

crowebomber
01-29-2010, 01:42 PM
Sex is something I really don't understand too hot. You never know where the hell you are. I keep making up these sex rules for myself, and then I break them right away. Last year I made a rule that I was going to quit horsing around with girls that, deep down, gave me a pain in the ass. I broke it, though, the same week I made it - the same night, as a matter of fact.

broncocalijohn
01-29-2010, 02:32 PM
An RIP thread jacked by mock! Color me stunned...

maybe salinger was irish and so mock had to put his hatred down on it. Hey Mock, maybe your life would have turned out for the better if you actually read the book and not faked it.

bombay
01-29-2010, 02:50 PM
RIP

I'm going to have to re-read Catcher. It's been a few... decades.

Rock Chalk
01-29-2010, 06:27 PM
It took me 2 reads to start to get it. I think it hits a nerve with people who read it and have a parallel with their own lives. For myself I wasn't an angry young teen.

I preferred Steinbeck's epics, Tennessee Williams short stories, Ray Bradbury, but the book that I clicked with in HS was Farewell to Arms and it didn't click until the last chapter up until then I had to force myself to read it the 1st time, then After I read the last chapter I jumped back and reread the whole thing in over the weekend and couldn't put it down.

Farewell to Arms and For whom the bell tolls are what got me through all my crushes or end of relationships since my junior year in HS. Nothing like the chick dying at the end to help one move on.

I didnt care fore Catcher in the Rye at all. I still don't get all the hoopla. While the story was well written and Salinger had a knack for verbose descriptive work, the story itself was not interesting at all. I think SonofLeLoLang said it best "Holden was a miserable dude and that was that".

Precisely. And Exactly.

Sometimes it's not how well you write, but the content of the story that makes a book a great read. Salinger was a terrific writer, its just the content that wasn't great.

Im with you on Steinbeck though, huge fan.

May you rest in peace J.D. Salinger, and may your wife and children never sell the movie rights so I dont ahve to take my wife to see it.

RhymesayersDU
01-29-2010, 06:34 PM
Steinbeck is indeed good stuff. More required reading from high school was Grapes of Wrath, Mice & Men, and Cannery Row.

Like CITR, they could probably use a re-read some day. I know I either didn't read the entire books or just couldn't appreciate them back then.

DBroncos4life
01-29-2010, 06:41 PM
They said he had tons notebooks full of writing. I could only imagine how many people want to get their hands on them.

Rohirrim
01-29-2010, 08:38 PM
may you rest in peace j.d. Salinger, and may your wife and children never sell the movie rights so i dont ahve to take my wife to see it.

Hilarious!

Bronco Bob
01-30-2010, 12:17 AM
Steinbeck is indeed good stuff. More required reading from high school was Grapes of Wrath, Mice & Men, and Cannery Row.

Like CITR, they could probably use a re-read some day. I know I either didn't read the entire books or just couldn't appreciate them back then.

Some books you read not because you have to but just because they are such a damn good read.
I remember reading The Grapes of Wrath in junior high. Not because it was
any class reading assignment, but it was just a book my mother had and
I picked it up and read it, and it blew me away.