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Broncoman13
01-17-2010, 08:45 AM
Sad. 26 years old is way too young. Sad news for the NFL, been a tough year.

BroncoBuff
01-17-2010, 08:46 AM
wtf?!

TheReverend
01-17-2010, 08:47 AM
Oh wow...

http://blogs.nfl.com/2010/01/17/bears-de-adams-dead-at-26/

BizzyBone7
01-17-2010, 08:47 AM
Wow... Truly sad news. RIP

TheReverend
01-17-2010, 08:47 AM
Not even a vague reference as to what cause of death might be.

Rocket 7
01-17-2010, 08:53 AM
Not even a vague reference as to what cause of death might be.

According to this report it may of been a heart attack.

http://clemson.rivals.com/content.asp?CID=1040784

BroncoBuff
01-17-2010, 08:55 AM
Heart attack + his age + offseason = we all know what.

That really really sucks.

TheReverend
01-17-2010, 08:59 AM
Heart attack + his age + offseason = we all know what.

That really really sucks.

might = what we all think, might not.

Broncoman13
01-17-2010, 09:02 AM
Heart attack + his age + offseason = we all know what.

That really really sucks.

What?

backup qb
01-17-2010, 09:06 AM
That is too bad.

Rulon Velvet Jones
01-17-2010, 09:06 AM
WTF indeed.

Hogan11
01-17-2010, 09:14 AM
Tragic R.I.P.

Cool Breeze
01-17-2010, 09:23 AM
My heart goes out to Gaines family. Way to young.
Dang, didn't the Bears just give up a 2nd for him?

bpc
01-17-2010, 09:33 AM
Man. Heart attack at 26? No words to describe how crazy this sounds.

RIP Gaines Adams. Condolences to his family.

Mr.Meanie
01-17-2010, 09:50 AM
Wow. Another young dead kid in the NFL. Sad.

OrangeShadow
01-17-2010, 09:55 AM
rest peacefully.

Captain 'Dre
01-17-2010, 09:58 AM
Very sad. Condolences to his family.

broncosteven
01-17-2010, 09:58 AM
Very sad, I can't imagine a parent having to bury their child at any age.

tsiguy96
01-17-2010, 10:14 AM
Heart attack + his age + offseason = we all know what.

That really really sucks.

died of enlarged heart. but continue making assumptions, its gotten you this far :notworthy

Los Broncos
01-17-2010, 10:20 AM
Very sad, thoughts go out to his family.

RIP :(

SouthStndJunkie
01-17-2010, 10:23 AM
That is ****ed up.

SoCalBronco
01-17-2010, 10:35 AM
Wtf.

Rip :(

rmsanger
01-17-2010, 10:40 AM
Nobody has expressed explicitly what they are implying on the COD? I assume you either initially assume cocaine or some other drug/performance enhancing substance. If you're implying differently please say so.

theAPAOps5
01-17-2010, 11:08 AM
Heart attack + his age + offseason = we all know what.

That really really sucks.

Isn't this a discussion to be had if something comes out? Not on the day the guy died.

bronco militia
01-17-2010, 11:10 AM
Update:

Chicago Bears defensive end Gaines Adams died Sunday morning after going into cardiac arrest because of an enlarged heart, Greenwood County Coroner Jim Coursey said.

theAPAOps5
01-17-2010, 11:11 AM
My question is do hearts just all of a sudden enlarge or even as time goes on? If not why isn't something like that caught by the physicals all these players routinely go through?

I assume something has to be a catalyst and thus isn't always caught soon enough.

Kid A
01-17-2010, 11:14 AM
That Div II college basketball player collapsed and later died during a game this week from an enlarged heart. I don't know the how that all works medically, but it must not be easily detected. Very sad.

Florida_Bronco
01-17-2010, 11:17 AM
Isn't this a discussion to be had if something comes out? Not on the day the guy died.

Yeah. Let's not forget Damien Nash.

Dedhed
01-17-2010, 11:49 AM
My question is do hearts just all of a sudden enlarge or even as time goes on? If not why isn't something like that caught by the physicals all these players routinely go through?

I assume something has to be a catalyst and thus isn't always caught soon enough.

Hearts do not all of a sudden enlarge. They generally enlarge over time due to a malformation somewhere in the heart. Sometimes those malformations can be discovered in a routine physical if a Dr. hears a murmur or something, but there are a lot of cardiac issues that would only be discovered with more advanced diagnostic tests.

The heart enlarges because the malformation leads to inefficiency, so the heart muscle has to work harder to move blood. Working harder causes the muscle to grow and thicken.

As the heart wall thickens it becomes rigid, the cavities of the heart shrink, and the heart can no longer move blood with enough efficiency to keep the body alive.

cutthemdown
01-17-2010, 11:51 AM
football players die young period. Some younger then others like this tragedy but young usually nonetheless. Notice you here a lot more about 50-60 yr old football players dying, then you do 80 yr old former football players being alive? The lifestyle and pounding can even take a toll on a young man in the NFL.

My sympathies to the young mans friends and family.

cutthemdown
01-17-2010, 11:52 AM
Hearts do not all of a sudden enlarge. They generally enlarge over time due to a malformation somewhere in the heart. Sometimes those malformations can be discovered in a routine physical if a Dr. hears a murmur or something, but there are a lot of cardiac issues that would only be discovered with more advanced diagnostic tests.

The heart enlarges because the malformation leads to inefficiency, so the heart muscle has to work harder to move blood. Working harder causes the muscle to grow and thicken.

As the heart wall thickens it becomes rigid, the cavities of the heart shrink, and the heart can no longer move blood with enough efficiency to keep the body alive.

So if you have low blood pressure would that being a sign that your heart not enlarged, or vice versa etc. Or is blood pressure not relalated?

what I am asking i guess is does blood pressure go up if heart is enlarging?

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2010, 11:54 AM
That Div II college basketball player collapsed and later died during a game this week from an enlarged heart. I don't know the how that all works medically, but it must not be easily detected. Very sad.

Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Usually, the first symptom is sudden cardiac death.

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/152913-overview

yavoon
01-17-2010, 11:57 AM
Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis. Usually, the first symptom is sudden cardiac death.

http://emedicine.medscape.com/article/152913-overview

that's one hell of a symptom.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2010, 12:00 PM
that's one hell of a symptom.

I know... for some reason that description always makes me snicker a little. Taken in context, obviously. I didn't write the phrase. I would have gone with something along the lines of "clinical presentation," but they didn't ask me.

eddie mac
01-17-2010, 12:01 PM
Horrible news. RIP big man.

HEAV
01-17-2010, 12:06 PM
RIP

I'm kinda stunned that with today's medical staff's teams can't test for this condition... with all the CAT,MRI's, ultrasounds you think one would show an enlarged heart.

listopencil
01-17-2010, 12:08 PM
My oldest child will turn 26 early this year. Horrible news. RIP.

sixtimeseight
01-17-2010, 12:16 PM
Heart attack + his age + offseason = we all know what.


Ugh. Do you ever stop embarrassing yourself?

RIP Adams

Dedhed
01-17-2010, 12:22 PM
So if you have low blood pressure would that being a sign that your heart not enlarged, or vice versa etc. Or is blood pressure not relalated?

what I am asking i guess is does blood pressure go up if heart is enlarging?

Blood pressure has more to do with the vascular system than the heart. But high blood pressure is dangerous for the same reasons as above. It forces the heart to work harder in order to move blood through the body.

HEAV
01-17-2010, 12:25 PM
Ugh. Do you ever stop embarrassing yourself?

RIP Adams

It's BroncoBuff...

TJ's lap-dog just doing what he does.

BroncoMan4ever
01-17-2010, 12:28 PM
I feel for his family. RIP

cutthemdown
01-17-2010, 12:31 PM
Blood pressure has more to do with the vascular system than the heart. But high blood pressure is dangerous for the same reasons as above. It forces the heart to work harder in order to move blood through the body.

So in other words even though my blood pressure is low and my resting heartbeat is like 58, I could still have a genetic problem in which my heart is enlarged? Or would the heart working harder show up in increased BPM?

sorry for 20 questioning you, just I am trying to get in shape because my dad died of a heart attack.

Blueflame
01-17-2010, 01:11 PM
Very sad news... condolences to his friends, family, and teammates. :(

SureShot
01-17-2010, 01:16 PM
football players die young period. Some younger then others like this tragedy but young usually nonetheless. Notice you here a lot more about 50-60 yr old football players dying, then you do 80 yr old former football players being alive? The lifestyle and pounding can even take a toll on a young man in the NFL.



This is the reason I will never hold against a player for trying to get paid.

DBroncos4life
01-17-2010, 01:33 PM
died of enlarged heart. but continue making assumptions, its gotten you this far :notworthy

You do understand the side effects of steroids don't you? There is some evidence that anabolic steroids can cause structural changes to the heart and that heart disease and strokes are possible with anabolic steroids especially oral types of the drug. HGH has been linked to cause growth in the heart.

I'm not going to say he used anything but to quote mock "buy a clue".

http://www.ironlife.com/mag/issue17/ugly.shtml

*Enlarged Heart~ On occasion , the long-term, heavy steroid user may develop cardia hypertrophy. This enlarged condition of the heart can be very dangerous. This effect is diagnosed by a chest x-ray or ultrasound. Enlargement of the heart is very rare, but has been associated with the long term use of high doses of AAS.

The NFL along with other sports needs to invest more money for Cardiac Scans for players. These guys work so hard all year round to stay in shape and better themselves you would think the NFL would have someway of making sure they are not putting themselves at risk for something like this.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-17-2010, 01:33 PM
This is the reason I will never hold against a player for trying to get paid.

Because they might die?

Mogulseeker
01-17-2010, 01:53 PM
What?

Well he died of cardiac arrest due to an enlarged heart.

What Casey was implying was cocaine.

It's extremely rare for someone in their 20's to die of heart failure unless there are outside factors - usually being stimulant drugs, ie cocaine, meth, crack, etc.

I wouldn't rule it out, but either way it's sad.

SureShot
01-17-2010, 01:54 PM
Because they might die?

Its a brutal sport.

Mogulseeker
01-17-2010, 01:55 PM
So in other words even though my blood pressure is low and my resting heartbeat is like 58, I could still have a genetic problem in which my heart is enlarged? Or would the heart working harder show up in increased BPM?

sorry for 20 questioning you, just I am trying to get in shape because my dad died of a heart attack.

How low is your blood pressure?

Extremely low blood pressure and low heart rate could be a symptom of a problem.

You should talk to your doctor.

theAPAOps5
01-17-2010, 01:59 PM
You do understand the side effects of steroids don't you? There is some evidence that anabolic steroids can cause structural changes to the heart and that heart disease and strokes are possible with anabolic steroids especially oral types of the drug. HGH has been linked to cause growth in the heart.

I'm not going to say he used anything but to quote mock "buy a clue".

Well if you are going to buy anything while quoting Mock its best to buy a vowel. As that is what he suggests. :)

I am sure the thought has crossed everyones mind about substances but its fair to not rush to judgment on the day he died.

Mogulseeker
01-17-2010, 02:00 PM
RIP

I'm kinda stunned that with today's medical staff's teams can't test for this condition... with all the CAT,MRI's, ultrasounds you think one would show an enlarged heart.

The only way to know definitively is a echocardiogram. Dude, if they tested for everything that could kill their players, NFL teams might go bankrupt.

Fact of the matter is, unless something else was wrong, a 26 years old should not have an enlarged heart.

theAPAOps5
01-17-2010, 02:03 PM
Exactly Mighty thats why I was curious if this is something that develops or is detectable early. I am glad Dr. Bronc weighed in because he put it in perspective when he says the first symptom is Cardiac Arrest.

DBroncos4life
01-17-2010, 02:11 PM
Well if you are going to buy anything while quoting Mock its best to buy a vowel. As that is what he suggests. :)

I am sure the thought has crossed everyones mind about substances but its fair to not rush to judgment on the day he died.

I added some more to that post. Clearly the cause could have been from a number of reason's. I wish the NFL would test players better to make sure they are not putting themselves at higher risk when they push themselves. Gaines had a lot of pressure riding on him. I am no way suggesting that he used any type of drug because of that either. It is possible that Gaines and his family even knew about the condition prior as well. We will find out more as it goes along, I was simply just pointed out to tsi that just because he had a enlarged heart doesn't mean you can rule out drug use.

theAPAOps5
01-17-2010, 02:13 PM
You are right DB4L and regardless a guy who is in his prime died early. Even if it comes out that it was self induced its still a sad story.

cutthemdown
01-17-2010, 02:31 PM
How low is your blood pressure?

Extremely low blood pressure and low heart rate could be a symptom of a problem.

You should talk to your doctor.

naw its just normal I was just wondering if people with enlarged hearts have high blood pressure because heart has to work harder.

Mogulseeker
01-17-2010, 02:41 PM
naw its just normal I was just wondering if people with enlarged hearts have high blood pressure because heart has to work harder.

Blood pressure is independent of the heart.

High blood pressure makes the heart work harder, not the other way around.

I spent the last two months reading every piece of information I could find on the cardiovascular system. The main cause of HBP is loss of elasticity in the arteries (ie, they don't stretch as much as the blood pumps through them).

DBroncos4life
01-17-2010, 02:43 PM
The only way to know definitively is a echocardiogram. Dude, if they tested for everything that could kill their players, NFL teams might go bankrupt.

Fact of the matter is, unless something else was wrong, a 26 years old should not have an enlarged heart.

I don't think a ECG test for players would break the NFL. It won't pick up all problems but it more then likely would have saved Gaines life.

Mogulseeker
01-17-2010, 02:47 PM
I don't think a ECG test for players would break the NFL. It won't pick up all problems but it more then likely would have saved Gaines life.

An ECG and Echocardiogram are completely different things.

I'm sure players are given ECG/EKGs as part of their team physical.

Mogulseeker
01-17-2010, 03:00 PM
My point is, either Adams had something chronic that brought on the enlarged hear - something like fibrosis, arthritis, HIV, hormone problem, etc... there's literally thousands of things that might have brought it on.

broncoblue
01-17-2010, 03:03 PM
Rip

Steve Prefontaine
01-17-2010, 03:35 PM
Very sad news. RIP.

FantomForce
01-17-2010, 03:50 PM
My medical past will not give any insight, and it is really sad news. I'm taking the role of the jerk, but now the Bears don't have a 1st or 2nd round pick, now they don't have one of the two guys that they gave up those picks for. Chicago has been dealt another blow right in the nuts

ro_50
01-17-2010, 04:35 PM
RIP.

I think it's about time -- all teams in both college and pro -- start monitoring this.

The kid from Division II Southern Indiana past away last week on the court and now this. It has gone on to long. Teams need to start testing. Who knows if it will prevent it but at least the person will know he has it.

DBroncos4life
01-17-2010, 05:45 PM
An ECG and Echocardiogram are completely different things.

I'm sure players are given ECG/EKGs as part of their team physical.

I called it a ECG and not a cardiac ECHO for a reason. ECG would cost much less and still should give you the result. (opinion/guess about the cost)

Heart Disease, Electrocardiogram, and Specialized EKGs

An electrocardiogram (also called EKG or ECG) is a test that records the electrical activity of your heart through small electrode patches attached to the skin of your chest, arms, and legs. An EKG may be part of a routine physical exam or it may be used as a test for heart disease. An EKG can be used to further investigate symptoms related to heart problems.

EKGs are quick, safe, painless, and inexpensive tests that are routinely performed if a heart condition is suspected.

Your doctor uses the EKG to:

* Assess your heart rhythm.
* Diagnose poor blood flow to the heart muscle (ischemia).
* Diagnose a heart attack.
* Evaluate certain abnormalities of your heart, such as an enlarged heart.

How Should I Prepare for an EKG?

To prepare for an EKG:

* Avoid oily or greasy skin creams and lotions the day of the test. They interfere with the electrode-skin contact.
* Avoid full-length hosiery, because electrodes need to be placed directly on the legs.
* Wear a shirt that can be easily removed to place the leads on the chest.

What Happens During an EKG

During an EKG, a technician will attach 10 electrodes with adhesive pads to the skin of your chest, arms, and legs. Men may have chest hair shaved to allow a better connection. You will lie flat while the computer creates a picture, on graph paper, of the electrical impulses traveling through your heart. This is called a "resting" EKG. This same test may also be used to monitor your heart during exercise.

It takes about 10 minutes to attach the electrodes and complete the test, but the actual recording takes only a few seconds.

Your EKG patterns will be kept on file for later comparison with future EKG recordings.

If you have questions, be sure to ask your doctor.

In addition to the standard EKG, your doctor may recommend other specialized EKG tests, including a holter monitor or a signal-averaged electrocardiogram.
What Is a Holter Monitor?

A holter monitor is a portable EKG that monitors the electrical activity of a freely moving person's heart generally for one to two days, 24-hours a day. It is most often used when the doctor suspects an abnormal heart rhythm or ischemia (not enough blood flow to the heart muscle).

It is a painless test; electrodes from the monitor are taped to the skin. Once the monitor is in place, you can go home and perform all of your normal activities (except showering). You will be asked to keep a diary of your activities and any symptoms you experience and when they occur.
What Is an Event Monitor?

If your symptoms are infrequent your doctor may suggest an event monitor. This is a device that, when you push a button, will record and store the heart's electrical activity for a few minutes. Each time you develop symptoms you should try to get a reading on the monitor. They are used for weeks to months, typically one month. This information can later by transmitted by telephone to the doctor for interpretation.
What Is a Signal-Averaged Electrocardiogram?

This is a painless test used to assess whether a person is at high risk of developing a potentially fatal heart arrhythmia. It is performed in a similar manner to the EKG, but uses sophisticated technology to look for heart arrhythmias.



WebMD Medical Reference
Reviewed by Robert J Bryg, MD on March 07, 2009

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/electrocardiogram-specialized-ekgs

I'm not going to make this an fight over a man dying. I wouldn't even begin to imagine the odds of the teams doing a ECG at physicals (if they do) and having this missed by two teams this year. I'm sure he had one at the beginning of the year and then again by the Bears to finalize the trade. No matter the reason genetics, drugs, or freak accident it's a tragic turn of events.

The Moops
01-17-2010, 08:53 PM
Truly tragic . . . speechless right now.

broncocalijohn
01-17-2010, 11:35 PM
How low is your blood pressure?

Extremely low blood pressure and low heart rate could be a symptom of a problem.

You should talk to your doctor.

Glad you said "his" doctor and not yours.

Bronco LB52
01-18-2010, 12:58 AM
"He was a great example of how you could progress through hard work," Dabo Swinney said. "He played eight-man football in high school, then became a top-five pick. How many people have done that? I was an offensive assistant coach during his career, and we all took notice of his considerable skills."

Broncos_OTM
01-18-2010, 06:33 AM
Heart attack + his age + offseason = we all know what.

That really really sucks.
We need that jump to conclusions board...

Dont you feel like a Ahole.

BroncoBuff
01-18-2010, 06:39 AM
We need that jump to conclusions board...

Dont you feel like a Ahole.

Seemed likely to me, and I'm sure most people thought that was possible when they first heard.

It seems like an enlarged heart - that kind of structural problem - would more likely present during stressful periods like in training camp or at practice ???

kappys
01-18-2010, 11:55 AM
I don't think a ECG test for players would break the NFL. It won't pick up all problems but it more then likely would have saved Gaines life.

While an ECG might have been abnormal it is not that sensitive or specific for structural heart disease

Chris
01-18-2010, 11:56 AM
I thought any time you lifted weights to get bigger you were in effect enlargening your heart?

kappys
01-18-2010, 12:04 PM
I thought any time you lifted weights to get bigger you were in effect enlargening your heart?

In effect all athletes have somewhat larger hearts then the unexercised folks.

in Idiopathic hypertrophic subaortic stenosis it is asymettric enlargement in a particular portion of the heart that it the concern as it leads to an increased potential for malignant arrythmia.

PRBronco
01-18-2010, 12:09 PM
The only way to know definitively is a echocardiogram. Dude, if they tested for everything that could kill their players, NFL teams might go bankrupt.

Fact of the matter is, unless something else was wrong, a 26 years old should not have an enlarged heart.

I know the NHL has started doing some kind of heart test on players at their draft combine, but I'm not sure which of the two that are mentioned in this thread it is. I remember 2 or so years ago a player had to end his career because he showed up for the combine and they found out he had that sneaky condition that killed that 49ers guard a few years ago. (Is that what they figure killed Adams?)

Mogulseeker
01-18-2010, 12:58 PM
I called it a ECG and not a cardiac ECHO for a reason. ECG would cost much less and still should give you the result. (opinion/guess about the cost)

Heart Disease, Electrocardiogram, and Specialized EKGs

An electrocardiogram (also called EKG or ECG) is a test that records the electrical activity of your heart through small electrode patches attached to the skin of your chest, arms, and legs. An EKG may be part of a routine physical exam or it may be used as a test for heart disease. An EKG can be used to further investigate symptoms related to heart problems.

EKGs are quick, safe, painless, and inexpensive tests that are routinely performed if a heart condition is suspected.

Your doctor uses the EKG to:

* Assess your heart rhythm.
* Diagnose poor blood flow to the heart muscle (ischemia).
* Diagnose a heart attack.
* Evaluate certain abnormalities of your heart, such as an enlarged heart.

How Should I Prepare for an EKG?

To prepare for an EKG:

* Avoid oily or greasy skin creams and lotions the day of the test. They interfere with the electrode-skin contact.
* Avoid full-length hosiery, because electrodes need to be placed directly on the legs.
* Wear a shirt that can be easily removed to place the leads on the chest.

What Happens During an EKG

During an EKG, a technician will attach 10 electrodes with adhesive pads to the skin of your chest, arms, and legs. Men may have chest hair shaved to allow a better connection. You will lie flat while the computer creates a picture, on graph paper, of the electrical impulses traveling through your heart. This is called a "resting" EKG. This same test may also be used to monitor your heart during exercise.

It takes about 10 minutes to attach the electrodes and complete the test, but the actual recording takes only a few seconds.

Your EKG patterns will be kept on file for later comparison with future EKG recordings.

If you have questions, be sure to ask your doctor.

In addition to the standard EKG, your doctor may recommend other specialized EKG tests, including a holter monitor or a signal-averaged electrocardiogram.
What Is a Holter Monitor?

A holter monitor is a portable EKG that monitors the electrical activity of a freely moving person's heart generally for one to two days, 24-hours a day. It is most often used when the doctor suspects an abnormal heart rhythm or ischemia (not enough blood flow to the heart muscle).

It is a painless test; electrodes from the monitor are taped to the skin. Once the monitor is in place, you can go home and perform all of your normal activities (except showering). You will be asked to keep a diary of your activities and any symptoms you experience and when they occur.
What Is an Event Monitor?

If your symptoms are infrequent your doctor may suggest an event monitor. This is a device that, when you push a button, will record and store the heart's electrical activity for a few minutes. Each time you develop symptoms you should try to get a reading on the monitor. They are used for weeks to months, typically one month. This information can later by transmitted by telephone to the doctor for interpretation.
What Is a Signal-Averaged Electrocardiogram?

This is a painless test used to assess whether a person is at high risk of developing a potentially fatal heart arrhythmia. It is performed in a similar manner to the EKG, but uses sophisticated technology to look for heart arrhythmias.



WebMD Medical Reference
Reviewed by Robert J Bryg, MD on March 07, 2009

http://www.webmd.com/heart-disease/guide/electrocardiogram-specialized-ekgs

I'm not going to make this an fight over a man dying. I wouldn't even begin to imagine the odds of the teams doing a ECG at physicals (if they do) and having this missed by two teams this year. I'm sure he had one at the beginning of the year and then again by the Bears to finalize the trade. No matter the reason genetics, drugs, or freak accident it's a tragic turn of events.

An ECG/EKG measures the electrical impulses in your heart. I've had two of them in the last two months. When the doctor thought I had an enlarged heart off of an EKG, he ran a chest x-ray and ultrasound and it was still inconclusive until a cardiologist analyzed an echocardiogram.

An echo shows an image of the heart. An EKG is the preliminary test that says something might be wrong, and if any flags are raised then a slew of other tests are done.

You don't want to imagine the odds? Well, I got them for you right here - according to Georgetown medical school, over 1/4 of positive readings on an EKG are false leading to billions in unnecessary tests. Further still, nearly 10% of heart conditions go undetected on an EKG - http://explore.georgetown.edu/news/?ID=15536

“We estimate that if 20 percent of EKGs are false, the follow-up tests will cost about $683 million, and that doesn’t account for the stress that a patient feels, the time off from work they have to take, and the possible complications that result from the follow-up test.”

This leads me to believe that,
a. Adams passed the the EKG test even though there was something wrong
b. Adams was fine when he had his physical, but was taking steroids
c. Adams was fine when he had his physical, but was taking stimulants (ephedra, cocaine)

An EKG is part of a routine physical in older men (at least it is at Lutheran and Kaiser in Denver), so I'm sure they do it on the younger men in the NFL, too.

Edit - FURTHERMORE, here is a little tidbit: every time you go to radiology for a test - MRI, cat scan, X-ray, etc., you're exposed to a little radiation. This damages your thyroid. Your thyroid hormones monitor your blood pressure, and hypo/hyperthyroidism raises blood pressure - putting the heart at risk.

It's well know that football players are already at risk for elevated blood pressure - http://www.cnn.com/2009/HEALTH/05/28/football.players.blood.pressure/index.html

They're large men. Large men have higher blood pressure. It explains WHY a lot of them die.

DBroncos4life
01-18-2010, 01:17 PM
An ECG/EKG measures the electrical impulses in your heart. I've had two of them in the last two months. When the doctor thought I had an enlarged heart off of an EKG, he ran a chest x-ray and ultrasound and it was still inconclusive until a cardiologist analyzed an echocardiogram.

An echo shows an image of the heart. An EKG is the preliminary test that says something might be wrong, and if any flags are raised then a slew of other tests are done.

You don't want to imagine the odds? Well, I got them for you right here - according to Georgetown medical school, over 1/4 of positive readings on an EKG are false leading to billions in unnecessary tests. Further still, nearly 10% of heart conditions go undetected on an EKG - http://explore.georgetown.edu/news/?ID=15536

This leads me to believe that,
a. Adams passed the the EKG test even though there was something wrong
b. Adams was fine when he had his physical, but was taking steroids
c. Adams was fine when he had his physical, but was taking stimulants (ephedra, cocaine)

An EKG is part of a routine physical in older men (at least it is at Lutheran and Kaiser in Denver), so I'm sure they do it on the younger men in the NFL, too.
So a doctor who ran a ECG on you thought you had a enlarged heart and ordered more test on you right? So you fell into the 20% that are false? At what point do you put a value on life? Would you have rather the doctor say well there is something odd about your results but because there is a 20 to 30 % chance this is false I'm going to pass you off as healthy and not order more expensive test that if I'm wrong would have saved your life? A 80% success rate at finding something wrong before a person dies seems like a risk worth taking no matter the cost.
If only 10% of EKG/ECGs don't detect any heart problems should lead you to believe that he hadn't had one preformed on him recently. 90% success rate at finding something wrong is very good. Either he had one done and he fell into the 10% that doesn't pick anything up or the Dr's missed it. I'm leaning towards he hasn't had one done in awhile.

Mogulseeker
01-18-2010, 01:25 PM
So a doctor who ran a ECG on you thought you had a enlarged heart and ordered more test on you right? So you fell into the 20% that are false? At what point do you put a value on life? Would you have rather the doctor say well there is something odd about your results but because there is a 20 to 30 % chance this is false I'm going to pass you off as healthy and not order more expensive test that if I'm wrong would have saved your life? A 80% success rate at finding something wrong before a person dies seems like a risk worth taking no matter the cost.
If only 10% of EKG/ECGs don't detect any heart problems should lead you to believe that he hadn't had one preformed on him recently. 90% success rate at finding something wrong is very good. Either he had one done and he fell into the 10% that doesn't pick anything up or the Dr's missed it. I'm leaning towards he hasn't had one done in awhile.

I've realize through experience (and the Mayoclinic website) that the younger you are, the more likely it is to be a false result. They don't even do them on teenagers because they are so inaccurate.

I mean... I'd hate to get thyroid cancer from a nuclear stress test just to find out my heart was fine...

DBroncos4life
01-18-2010, 01:26 PM
That CNN article is talking about 300 pound plus guys. Here is another article about 300 pound plus lineman as well.

http://www.dentalplans.com/articles/15040/many-ex-nfl-linemen-at-risk-for-heart-disease.html

Gaines on the other hand was 6'5" 258. Like I said with all these players being found with heart problems after they played leads me to think that the NFL turns a blind eye to the problem during there playing days.

DBroncos4life
01-18-2010, 01:28 PM
I've realize through experience (and the Mayoclinic website) that the younger you are, the more likely it is to be a false result. They don't even do them on teenagers because they are so inaccurate.

I mean... I'd hate to get thyroid cancer from a nuclear stress test just to find out my heart was fine...

Oh my, so what are the odds of getting thyroid cancer from the test they run? I would guess they would be high by the way you make it sound? So are they in the 50 to 60% chance of getting it?

Mogulseeker
01-18-2010, 01:41 PM
You're just not being realistic. Say, a young person with a congenital heart defect will dies in 6 months without a heart replacement. The replacement costs $1million. Insurance wont cover it. The family makes $50,000 a year. Looks like there is a price on the life of the child - it's $1 million.

DBroncos4life
01-18-2010, 01:57 PM
You're just not being realistic. Say, a young person with a congenital heart defect will dies in 6 months without a heart replacement. The replacement costs $1million. Insurance wont cover it. The family makes $50,000 a year. Looks like there is a price on the life of the child - it's $1 million.

You don't have kids do you?