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Rohirrim
11-20-2009, 11:53 AM
For all you football history buffs out there:

Football was so gruesome at the turn of the century that in 1905 President Roosevelt himself demanded the sport clean itself up. The notorious flying wedge was banned, but by ought-nine -- as they said back then -- it was still a brutal battle royal. The New York Times summed up the season's championship match as "an indescribable tangle of bodies, arms and legs."

That game, played on November 20 and arguably worthy of the "game of the century" label, pitted undefeated Yale and Harvard against each other. In then typical fashion, there were no touchdowns. In fact, when Yale won 8-0, it finished its whole season without letting up a score. The forward pass had been legalized in a limited fashion, but football remained mostly pounding scrimmage; few players wore helmets, and a close observer declared that as the Harvards and Yales pummeled each other, "It was the most magnificent sight ... Every lineman's face was dripping with blood."

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/frank_deford/11/18/harvard-yale/index.html?cnn=yes

Rohirrim
11-20-2009, 11:54 AM
You think the game is bad now? Check this out:

But the great game of a hundred years ago was overshadowed by greater carnage at other major universities. Three weeks before, when Harvard played at West Point, an Army lineman named Eugene Byrne was killed. Then two Saturdays later, against Georgetown, in the nation's capital, Archer Christian, the University of Virginia's star halfback, met his death. The Chicago Tribune reported twenty-six players were killed on the gridiron that year. How long would America allow its youth to perish for a silly game?

RhymesayersDU
11-20-2009, 12:08 PM
http://i29.photobucket.com/albums/c254/KenyonMartin/ShomerShabbos.png

Bronco LB52
11-20-2009, 12:09 PM
I wish the Gladiator aspect was still a part of the game:(

Maybe in another lifetime.

MrPeepers
11-20-2009, 12:14 PM
Coming soon to a TV near you.

The Running Man!

bronco militia
11-20-2009, 12:30 PM
kick ass!

ak1971
11-20-2009, 12:33 PM
You think the game is bad now? Check this out:

But the great game of a hundred years ago was overshadowed by greater carnage at other major universities. Three weeks before, when Harvard played at West Point, an Army lineman named Eugene Byrne was killed. Then two Saturdays later, against Georgetown, in the nation's capital, Archer Christian, the University of Virginia's star halfback, met his death. The Chicago Tribune reported twenty-six players were killed on the gridiron that year. How long would America allow its youth to perish for a silly game?

:thumbsup:

Rohirrim
11-20-2009, 12:35 PM
Can you imagine what would happen today if twenty six college players were killed playing football?

elsid13
11-20-2009, 01:11 PM
Can you imagine what would happen today if twenty six college players were killed playing football?

The same thing that happened back then, public outcry that lead to Congress investigating and forcing the then NCAA to make changes.

http://www.the-game.org/history-flyingwedge.htm

ludo21
11-20-2009, 01:18 PM
:thumbsup:

wtf?

WoodMan
11-20-2009, 03:12 PM
It would be OK with me if they brought back the clothes line and head slap, and pussification of the QB position was nixed, but the nintendo scoring and all the flavor-clowning would end and most fans wouldn't like that. You sure wouldn't see so much clown dancing and chest pounding if a defensive back or linebacker could still impend your next route with a clothes line. Wishful thinking on my part.

Pony Boy
11-20-2009, 03:20 PM
This says it all .....

25584

Rohirrim
11-20-2009, 04:30 PM
Weren't the original Packers, meat packers and the original Steelers, steel workers?

Arkie
11-20-2009, 05:09 PM
Should We Ban Football?

Hold on. This may come as a shock! Recent headlines suggest -- that playing professional football is dangerous. But how could it be otherwise? The game involves vicious, premeditated collisions between large and athletically talented men who have played the sport since they were in the peewee league. These warriors of the gridiron are our valiant heroes, and they will not be deterred by soap operas about dementia and shortened life spans. Until they can no longer move, they will "leave it all on the field."

Those who would make football safer for the participants will find few allies among those who still play the game. For them, a career in the National Football League is not a nightmare. It is their dream come true. Some play for the riches they are paid, others for the exultation of the experience. For all, it is the fulfillment of all their life's hopes, and no one is going to take that away from them now. Their union will protect their opportunity, not their health.

Yet there are others, like the fans, who are affected by the game who ultimately may have more to say about the future of the sport. As we wait patiently for Sunday, Monday, and - later in the season - the special Thursday night edition, we try to ignore the toll of the game on the men who are carried off the field on stretchers to the cheers of the crowd. Won't they be back at practice on Tuesday?

Congress recently held hearings about the dangers inherent in football. Although some were outraged by NFL Commissioner Goodell's oblivious and deflecting answers, they found no smoking gun that could catalyze Congressional action. Voting against professional football would be political suicide.

The evidence is mounting, however, about the debilitating effects of a football career. Soon the partisans of the game will no longer be able to deny the data. Men who play the game at the highest level lose, on average, three years of their life expectancy for every year they play in the NFL. The incidence of dementia in 50-year-old former footballers is five times that of non-football-playing men. Autopsies on those who died young show the effects of years of physical abuse. Studies now underway will confirm the toll.

Some deny the obvious, that the game of football played fully in accordance with its rules is extremely dangerous to the health and lives of those who play the game for our enjoyment. Tobacco company executives have taught us not to trust those who baldly claim no linkage between a high risk activity and physical and mental damage. The issue now is what we should do about it.

It is too easy to say that we should do nothing. Although they are careful about admitting it, NFL owners and officials know the golden goose is at risk, and they will fight a two-front war to battle bad publicity while searching for the equivalent of a safe cigarette. Those who tell us that football is as central to the American experience as apple pie and motherhood ignore the dramatic changes in our culture that seem to occur now with rapidity. Ban cigarette smoking in public places? Clean up toxic spills and polluted air? Require people to wear their seat belts? These "never-will-happen" things have happened and more are on the way.

The best we can do now is think about what kind of evidence would or should compel us to ban football the way we banned boxing in the Nineteenth Century because of its brutality. Would it be enough if we saw someone die on the field? Football kills silently long after the final gun sounds, and we seem not to be affected by mere quadriplegia. Maybe evidence about the impact of the game on our children who play the high school game might be compelling, but that too is unlikely. After all, success in high school football could result in a college football scholarship.

The ultimate turning point might come when we realize what the violence and brutality of football does to us, the fans and spectators of what has become our national passion each fall. Have we become the citizens of Rome attending the bouts at the Coliseum, watching the slaughter of the innocents? We turn away from dog fighting but we always seem "ready for some football - a Monday night party." What does that say about us? Are we desensitized to the carnage? Do we care?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/roger-i-abrams/should-we-ban-football_b_350842.html

RhymesayersDU
11-20-2009, 05:16 PM
Weren't the original Packers, meat packers and the original Steelers, steel workers?

Fudge packers, actually.



Heeeeyooooooooo!

Rohirrim
11-20-2009, 05:19 PM
Commercial fishing is the most dangerous job on Earth. Should we outlaw that? The most injurious sport to the human body is motocross. That's why you don't see many past the age of 25 doing it. How about ballet? Ballet destroys dancers' legs, backs and feet. In fact, all forms of professional dancing lead to broken, debilitated bodies in old age. Outlaw that? Coal mining? No good. Truck driving? Ask Spider. Can we legislate away death? Can we build a health care system that saves everybody all the time? Some people just need to STFU.

watermock
11-20-2009, 05:50 PM
Just curious Ro, what is your profession?

broncosteven
11-20-2009, 06:43 PM
Just curious Ro, what is your profession?

Modern Dancer,

He has worked under (literally) Arpino and for Tharp though the high point of his career arc was his solo revival of Copland's Rodeo at the Fort Wayne public library.

Also in the Movie Spinal Tap he did that Puppet show that got the top billing at that amusement park where the sign was: Puppet show and Spinal Tap.











Don't kill me Rohirrim, I am joking...

hookemhess
11-20-2009, 07:45 PM
Should We Ban Football?

Hold on. This may come as a shock! Recent headlines suggest -- that playing professional football is dangerous. But how could it be otherwise? The game involves vicious, premeditated collisions between large and athletically talented men who have played the sport since they were in the peewee league. These warriors of the gridiron are our valiant heroes, and they will not be deterred by soap operas about dementia and shortened life spans. Until they can no longer move, they will "leave it all on the field."

Those who would make football safer for the participants will find few allies among those who still play the game. For them, a career in the National Football League is not a nightmare. It is their dream come true. Some play for the riches they are paid, others for the exultation of the experience. For all, it is the fulfillment of all their life's hopes, and no one is going to take that away from them now. Their union will protect their opportunity, not their health.

Yet there are others, like the fans, who are affected by the game who ultimately may have more to say about the future of the sport. As we wait patiently for Sunday, Monday, and - later in the season - the special Thursday night edition, we try to ignore the toll of the game on the men who are carried off the field on stretchers to the cheers of the crowd. Won't they be back at practice on Tuesday?

Congress recently held hearings about the dangers inherent in football. Although some were outraged by NFL Commissioner Goodell's oblivious and deflecting answers, they found no smoking gun that could catalyze Congressional action. Voting against professional football would be political suicide.

The evidence is mounting, however, about the debilitating effects of a football career. Soon the partisans of the game will no longer be able to deny the data. Men who play the game at the highest level lose, on average, three years of their life expectancy for every year they play in the NFL. The incidence of dementia in 50-year-old former footballers is five times that of non-football-playing men. Autopsies on those who died young show the effects of years of physical abuse. Studies now underway will confirm the toll.

Some deny the obvious, that the game of football played fully in accordance with its rules is extremely dangerous to the health and lives of those who play the game for our enjoyment. Tobacco company executives have taught us not to trust those who baldly claim no linkage between a high risk activity and physical and mental damage. The issue now is what we should do about it.

It is too easy to say that we should do nothing. Although they are careful about admitting it, NFL owners and officials know the golden goose is at risk, and they will fight a two-front war to battle bad publicity while searching for the equivalent of a safe cigarette. Those who tell us that football is as central to the American experience as apple pie and motherhood ignore the dramatic changes in our culture that seem to occur now with rapidity. Ban cigarette smoking in public places? Clean up toxic spills and polluted air? Require people to wear their seat belts? These "never-will-happen" things have happened and more are on the way.

The best we can do now is think about what kind of evidence would or should compel us to ban football the way we banned boxing in the Nineteenth Century because of its brutality. Would it be enough if we saw someone die on the field? Football kills silently long after the final gun sounds, and we seem not to be affected by mere quadriplegia. Maybe evidence about the impact of the game on our children who play the high school game might be compelling, but that too is unlikely. After all, success in high school football could result in a college football scholarship.

The ultimate turning point might come when we realize what the violence and brutality of football does to us, the fans and spectators of what has become our national passion each fall. Have we become the citizens of Rome attending the bouts at the Coliseum, watching the slaughter of the innocents? We turn away from dog fighting but we always seem "ready for some football - a Monday night party." What does that say about us? Are we desensitized to the carnage? Do we care?

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/roger-i-abrams/should-we-ban-football_b_350842.html

Huffington Post... surprising.

broncocalijohn
11-20-2009, 09:16 PM
Weren't the original Packers, meat packers and the original Steelers, steel workers?

those are nicknames but if you think so Washington's team were a bunch of Indians. If you want the history of football from 100 year's ago, ask Old Dude. His recollection of his playing days is amazing. :thumbs:

Rohirrim
11-20-2009, 09:27 PM
Just curious Ro, what is your profession?

I write.

Rohirrim
11-20-2009, 09:28 PM
Modern Dancer,

He has worked under (literally) Arpino and for Tharp though the high point of his career arc was his solo revival of Copland's Rodeo at the Fort Wayne public library.

Also in the Movie Spinal Tap he did that Puppet show that got the top billing at that amusement park where the sign was: Puppet show and Spinal Tap.











Don't kill me Rohirrim, I am joking...

Interesting that you know all that stuff. I don't even know who all those people are. Sounds like somebody else might have repressed their dancing dream. ;)

ak1971
11-20-2009, 11:19 PM
I write.

on bathroom walls?

24champ
11-20-2009, 11:39 PM
on bathroom walls?


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BroncoMan4ever
11-21-2009, 01:22 AM
i understand the risks that are associated with playing in the NFL and the injuries that come from the game, but how many who don't play in the NFL, could honestly say they would NOT play pro football if the opportunity was given?

i know for a fact, at least 95% of fans would jump at the chance to play pro football for the money today's NFL players make, even if the pussified current rules were removed and it became like the NFL of the past.

Rausch 2.0
11-21-2009, 01:30 AM
If 1/2 the league isn't playing back up QB's it's not football.

Elway, Marino, Kelly, Montana, etc. played when you got KILLED trying to throw.

It's why they were heroic figures. It's why they're in the HOF.

Don't neuter defenses to try and simulate that talent...

BroncoMan4ever
11-21-2009, 01:35 AM
If 1/2 the league isn't playing back up QB's it's not football.

Elway, Marino, Kelly, Montana, etc. played when you got KILLED trying to throw.

It's why they were heroic figures. It's why they're in the HOF.

Don't neuter defenses to try and simulate that talent...

exactly. that is why i hate when people try to compare stats of today's QBs to the warriors of the past. all offensive stats of today's NFL players are inflated in comparison to the all time greats. by basically chopping the balls off of a defense in today's NFL, mediocre players are putting up stats that make them seem better than they really are.

watermock
11-21-2009, 03:36 AM
I remember Kapp, Lawson, Deacon Jones ect.

Barely.

Pony Boy
11-21-2009, 07:22 AM
exactly. that is why i hate when people try to compare stats of today's QBs to the warriors of the past. all offensive stats of today's NFL players are inflated in comparison to the all time greats. by basically chopping the balls off of a defense in today's NFL, mediocre players are putting up stats that make them seem better than they really are.

Good point, also remember QB's like Joe Namath were body slammed and stomped on after a sack and the wr's were mugged from the line of scrimmage all the way down the field.

Rohirrim
11-21-2009, 08:50 AM
on bathroom walls?

If it pays. :~ohyah!: