PDA

View Full Version : NFL is NOT getting game film from premier College conferences!


Mediator12
10-26-2009, 11:59 AM
NFL's battle with video company may leave draft prospects in dark
By Don Banks, SI.com


The NFL's college advisory committee may find it next to impossible to render informed opinions on the readiness of juniors who are potential 2010 draft prospects because the league has been locked in a multi-million dollar standoff with a Boston-area company that produces and disseminates digitized content of NCAA games for eight major conferences, league sources told SI.com.

According to those sources, XOS Technologies, based in Billerica, Mass., requested the NFL pay a rights fee between $20 million and $30 million for a multi-year commitment to electronically receive the coaches' tape content for itself and its 32 teams. That content -- which shows the entire alignment of both the offense and defense on each play, shot from the end zone -- was formerly supplied free of charge in video tape form by schools as a mutually beneficial consideration between the NFL and NCAA. That's changed now.

Contacted by SI.com on Friday, XOS chief executive officer Randy Eccker said his company made the rights fee request to the NFL in August on behalf of the conferences it represents, and that XOS is no longer involved in the discussions between the league and the eight conference commissioners. NFL officials reached by SI.com declined comment.

XOS represents eight of college football's 11 major conferences -- a list that includes the SEC, Pac-10, Big 12, Mid-American, WAC and Sun Belt -- to produce the digitized coaches' tapes that are used for evaluation and scouting purposes. League sources say NFL officials continue to balk at paying anything for the game tapes. As a result, no NFL team's personnel and scouting departments have had access to any college action involving those conferences this season.

Rest of article here: http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/football/nfl/10/23/xos.nfl/index.html

Rohirrim
10-26-2009, 12:02 PM
Why don't the schools just sell them individually? Take out the middleman.

baja
10-26-2009, 12:03 PM
Wait till the Thais hear this they will provide copies for 3 dollars each to all the NFL teams. Course there may be the occasional fan standing up and blocking the camera from time to time. and the sound will suck.

DomCasual
10-26-2009, 12:05 PM
With the 9th pick of the 2010 NFL Draft, by way of the Chicago Bears, the Denver Broncos select - wow, this is amazing - another player from the Mountain West...

cutthemdown
10-26-2009, 12:07 PM
great job getting your graduates jobs colleges. They should be ashamed. They make tons of the players, at least let all the employers see the goods.

Mediator12
10-26-2009, 12:11 PM
The funny thing is XOS Also digitizes most of the NFL teams game film as well. Something that Banks completely forgets to mention in this article. The XOS software is really something excellent, and it does give the scouting and personnel depts cost savings from travel to review game film.

I think this will be really interesting as the end of the season draws near. Here are some things to look at:

1. The NFL and XOS had a great relationship until XOS spearheaded this latest drive for digital content. What happens with the NFL's Film that EVERYONE wants access to going forward? The NFL owns their content, but all that college tape is owned by the individual schools or their athletic conferences?

2. Digital content is almost impossible to make copyproof. That is the major reason why the NFL and colleges have not released their game film to anyone yet. Take a look at the major piracy of digital content with music, film, etc. This is the major stumbling block to getting NFL game film and college scouting film to date. It is too easy to steal and distribute. Once its out there, its gone.

3. This could be major contention in the upcoming CBA talks. This is another hidden expense that the NFLPA refuses to acknowledge and could possibly take the other side in that the NFL is keeping a revenue stream under wraps from the players.

That is just what I can think of right now. I bet there are a bunch of other things I am missing....

Bronx33
10-26-2009, 12:16 PM
The NFL is strict with it's films/broadcasts for the sake of money now they know what's it's like to deal with themselves. :P

baja
10-26-2009, 12:21 PM
The funny thing is XOS Also digitizes most of the NFL teams game film as well. Something that Banks completely forgets to mention in this article. The XOS software is really something excellent, and it does give the scouting and personnel depts cost savings from travel to review game film.

I think this will be really interesting as the end of the season draws near. Here are some things to look at:

1. The NFL and XOS had a great relationship until XOS spearheaded this latest drive for digital content. What happens with the NFL's Film that EVERYONE wants access to going forward? The NFL owns their content, but all that college tape is owned by the individual schools or their athletic conferences?

2. Digital content is almost impossible to make copyproof. That is the major reason why the NFL and colleges have not released their game film to anyone yet. Take a look at the major piracy of digital content with music, film, etc. This is the major stumbling block to getting NFL game film and college scouting film to date. It is too easy to steal and distribute. Once its out there, its gone.

3. This could be major contention in the upcoming CBA talks. This is another hidden expense that the NFLPA refuses to acknowledge and could possibly take the other side in that the NFL is keeping a revenue stream under wraps from the players.

That is just what I can think of right now. I bet there are a bunch of other things I am missing....

Maybe we can outsource this football playing to India.

DenverBound
10-26-2009, 12:25 PM
great job getting your graduates jobs colleges. They should be ashamed. They make tons of the players, at least let all the employers see the goods.

I agree with this. It is only hurting the kids really. They work their asses off and then don't even get a chance to be seen. It's sad. Money really is the root of all evil.


LMFAO @ Baja!!!!! That has to be the funniest post I've read here. Good stuff.

Mediator12
10-26-2009, 02:24 PM
I know this would have been much better suited to the bye week, but this is a big deal for the NFL and for College. What else is being missed here?

Kaylore
10-26-2009, 02:39 PM
Guys, there is a difference between broadcast and game film. This is not a "copy of the game." This is a compilation of footage shot from the field and each endzone so the entire spread of each play can be seen. Each one is broken down and digitally marked for quick access, many times based on down, distance and situations. This allows coaches to quickly look at each player in all his plays and see how he performs in very specific situations. That's invaluable for talent evaluation.

It can take hours for anyone to comb through an entire game, let alone a season, to try and see how a guy does, and then convert it into a digital medium labeled and sorted. Now compound that by considering that is all work for ONE PLAYER and you have hundreds of players and hundreds of schools to comb through.

This is a big deal.

tsiguy96
10-26-2009, 02:43 PM
more costs taht will get passed on to people and will price real fans out of going to the games. getting pathetic.

GoBroncos DownUnder
10-26-2009, 02:55 PM
[SIZE="3"]
According to those sources, XOS Technologies, based in Billerica, Mass., requested the NFL pay [B]a rights fee between $20 million and $30 million for a multi-year commitment to electronically receive the coaches' tape content for itself and its 32 teams.

So, ah, let me get this straight ... balking at a $20-30mil fee, ... which is equivalent to HALF or a THIRD of JaMammoth Russell's contract with oakland (six-year, $61 million).

ARE THEY FOR REAL? PAY THE DAMN THING!!!

Mr. Elway
10-26-2009, 03:03 PM
Very interesting. It seems that XOS has essentially cornered this market and is pressing the NFL to pay. My initial thought is: Good for them, I would do the same thing too. If you have invested in and developed something of value, then you have every right to make money from it. If you don't want to pay the money, the answer of course is to do it yourself or pay someone besides XOS.

But I wonder if XOS is only leveraging the technology, or if they have acquired the actual rights to the film from the colleges? If it's the former, then XOS is definitely standing on strong ethical grounds IMO, since they are saying "pay for our technology or find someone else to digitize your film." If it's the latter, and XOS has acquired some sort of rights ownership prior to this move, then that is a different matter altogether: In that case they have much more leverage and are perhaps acting a little out of school ethically.

TexanBob
10-26-2009, 05:36 PM
Now they (the NFL) know what's it's like to deal with themselves. :P

Exactly. They are so used to acting like the 800-pound gorilla with other businesses, I wonder what it feels like for them to get their own anuses stretched?

_Oro_
10-26-2009, 05:59 PM
Maybe some of the 10,000$ they fined Ocho Cinco for wearing a black chin strap could go to the 30 mil.

ludo21
10-26-2009, 10:08 PM
wow, I hope all this gets resolved or the dynamics of the draft and late round prospects will change and be even harder to evaluate

Durango
10-26-2009, 11:16 PM
and what, exactly, do the scouts do? I can understand the need for reviewable footage.

It just seems to me that if teams won't be getting the footage, then assign scouts to film games where players of interest might be involved.

McDaniels doesn't believe in mass evaluations anyway. He selects a dirty dozen or something and drafts 'em come hell or high water.

Taco John
10-26-2009, 11:51 PM
Guys, there is a difference between broadcast and game film. This is not a "copy of the game." This is a compilation of footage shot from the field and each endzone so the entire spread of each play can be seen. Each one is broken down and digitally marked for quick access, many times based on down, distance and situations. This allows coaches to quickly look at each player in all his plays and see how he performs in very specific situations. That's invaluable for talent evaluation.

It can take hours for anyone to comb through an entire game, let alone a season, to try and see how a guy does, and then convert it into a digital medium labeled and sorted. Now compound that by considering that is all work for ONE PLAYER and you have hundreds of players and hundreds of schools to comb through.

This is a big deal.


I can't understand why the NFL shouldn't think they should have to pay for this stuff. It's a ton of work going into this stuff.

Kaylore
10-26-2009, 11:54 PM
I can't understand why the NFL shouldn't think they should have to pay for this stuff. It's a ton of work going into this stuff.

Exactly. The man hours to hire guys to comb through this crap and pick out what you want is beyond any team budget. And that's to say nothing about the technology to convert and sort everything. The flip side is once you've done it, it's done and you can just sell copies to each team. Of course there's only so many.

I would like to see how the system is set up now. It's a weird situation because it takes a lot of work and they are essentials tools in a multimillion dollar industry, but the number of buyers is incredibly small.

ØrangeÇrush
10-27-2009, 12:06 AM
Good for them, its nice to see the NFL get fudged by someone else...maybe the upstart leauge should by the rights to it so they can gouge the nfl for revenue...

Mediator12
10-27-2009, 12:55 PM
I can't understand why the NFL shouldn't think they should have to pay for this stuff. It's a ton of work going into this stuff.

There are several reasons, well explained in the article.

1. The NFL has always had access to the film, whether digital or not to evaluate college players. It is a mutually beneficial deal that helps keep players in school and allows the NFL to scout the players for the draft. In the past, the Teams video departments have made the cutups of the players from tape. In essence, they absorbed the cost of manufacturing the players film.

2. What XOS has done, is sold the technology to the college teams that the NFL has by telling the colleges they can get revenue out of the content to pay for the cost of the system. Basically, colleges who are struggling with their budgets buy a really expensive hardware and software upgrade based on the sales tactic of creating revenue streams from the content made from said system. Conversely, their are several NFL teams that use the competing system for their digitalization of game film. XOS was trying to leverage those teams into switching as well.

3. This is really some shortsighted business by XOS. The NFL, and its individual teams, are also one of the biggest clients they have. Someone sold a bill of goods to the colleges at the expense of pissing off another client. And Now, XOS is simply trying to get out of the way and let the colleges and NFL duke it out.

4. The ramifications to both college and the NFL are pretty serious. One, the business relationship they have mutually enjoyed will now be tenous. Two, Game tape is still the number one scouting tool to assess talent for most teams. Three, it will establish the nature of digital distribution for both College and the NFL.

Plus, I think that is just the tip of the iceberg....

oubronco
10-27-2009, 01:24 PM
**** the NFL they make too much money I say make em pay

Garcia Bronco
10-27-2009, 01:37 PM
I think if the colleges are charging for the film then they need to pay the players.

missingnumber7
10-27-2009, 02:01 PM
I think if the colleges are charging for the film then they need to pay the players.

Quoted for Truth...One of these former athletes who happens to be a lawyer needs to take it to the NCAA.

missingnumber7
10-27-2009, 02:02 PM
Maybe some of the 10,000$ they fined Ocho Cinco for wearing a black chin strap could go to the 30 mil.

he just does stuff like that so his charitable donations get made public out side of cinci.