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Bronco Rob
08-09-2009, 02:54 PM
Class of 09 had its shining moments


In this edition of the NFList, we take a look at the greatest games for each member of the Pro Football Hall of Fame Class of 2009. In the case of one inductee, we highlight one great season.

WR Bob Hayes

Greatest game: Nov. 13, 1966, at Washington, as a member of the Dallas Cowboys.

Synopsis: The Redskins had no answers for Hayes, who racked up a team-record 246 receiving yards in a 31-30 victory. Hayes and QB Don Meredith connected on a 95-yard TD pass, which still ranks as the longest scoring reception in club history. On the season, Hayes hauled in 64 passes for 1,232 yards and 13 TDs (all career bests), earned Pro Bowl and All-Pro honors for the second time in his career and helped lead the Cowboys to their first-ever Eastern Conference title.



OG Randall McDaniel

Greatest season: 1998, as a member of the Minnesota Vikings.

Synopsis: In this case, we settled on a season, not a single game, after several people who worked closely with McDaniel in Minnesota insisted that his consistent excellence was his hallmark. Even McDaniel couldn't isolate a best single-game performance, noting that the game he most vividly remembered was his pro debut in 1988 with Minnesota. But thoughts of an all-time best game had never crossed his mind, he said.

"I don't think I ever played a greatest game," he said. "My thing was that I was always trying to get better and play that perfect game."

In the '98 regular season, the Vikings were dominant, losing just one game and scoring a league-record 556 points, and McDaniel played to his normal high standard. The Vikings racked up 5.4 yards per carry when they ran to McDaniel's side of the line, and he allowed just 1 sacks. The late Joel Buchsbaum rated McDaniel the NFL's top guard at season's end. "He is still quicker than two cats and tremendously strong for his size," Buchsbaum wrote.

When told PFW had picked '98 as his best season, McDaniel said he understood our reasoning, considering Minnesota's potent offense, which is best-remembered for its explosive passing game. However, he noted that "as linemen, we didn't think we were running (the ball) enough."



DE Bruce Smith

Greatest game: Dec. 9, 1990, at Indianapolis, as a member of the Buffalo Bills.

Synopsis: Smith's tour de force at the Hoosier Dome in the midst of a season that would garner him NFL Defensive Player of the Year honors for the first time perhaps best highlights how dominant he could be. Smith sacked Colts QB Jeff George four times in the first 20 minutes of play as the Bills rolled to a 31-7 victory. "He's one of the best in the league, and you really can't stop him," George said afterward. The sacks were Smith's last of the season. He would finish with 19, setting a club record and falling one behind Chiefs OLB Derrick Thomas.



OLB Derrick Thomas

Greatest game: Nov. 11, 1990, vs. Seattle, as a member of the Kansas City Chiefs.

Synopsis: On Armistice Day, Thomas, the son of an Air Force pilot who went missing after his plane was shot down over Vietnam, had the game of his life. Wearing a scarf given to him by an Air Force captain as a headband and inspired by a pregame flyover of four Air Force fighter jets, Thomas sacked Seahawks QB Dave Krieg an NFL-record seven times. However, the Seahawks stayed close, thanks to an outstanding effort from Krieg, who shook off Thomas' attempt at an eighth sack on the game's final play and hit WR Paul Skansi for the game-winning TD. "That last sack I didn't get is the one I'm going to remember," Thomas said.



Bills owner Ralph Wilson

Greatest game: 1965 AFL championship.

Synopsis: One of the AFL's founding fathers, Wilson won his first title as owner in 1964, when the host Bills knocked off the Chargers in the AFL championship game. The following season, the Chargers looked for revenge. The Chargers routed the Bills at Buffalo in October and then tied Buffalo in the rematch in San Diego. The third and final game was for the AFL title the day after Christmas, and the Chargers would be the hosts. However, the Bills again proved the AFL's best, blanking San Diego 23-0. Buffalo rolled with two second-quarter TDs and shut down the Chargers' potent offense.



DB Rod Woodson

Greatest game: Sept. 6, 1992, vs. Houston, as a member of the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Synopsis: In Bill Cowher's first game as the Steelers' head coach, Woodson, just two weeks removed from partially tearing a calf muscle, was at his disruptive best. Woodson notched nine tackles and intercepted a pair of passes as the Steelers, 12-point underdogs, scored a 29-24 upset of the Oilers at the Astrodome. Woodson's second interception set up the Steelers' game-winning touchdown. Woodson, who captured NFL Defensive Player of the Year honors the next season and was named to the NFL's 75th anniversary team, was truly a force to be reckoned with in his prime.





http://www.profootballweekly.com/2009/08/08/class-of-09-had-its-shining-moments




;)

tsiguy96
08-09-2009, 03:17 PM
randy gradishar: as good or better than all of them.

lex
08-09-2009, 03:24 PM
randy gradishar: as good or better than all of them.


I dont know. This was a pretty strong HOF class for defense. But either way, Gradishar should still be in. Harry Carson is a guy you can definitely point to and say WTF though.

Pick Six
08-09-2009, 04:38 PM
I dont know. This was a pretty strong HOF class for defense. But either way, Gradishar should still be in. Harry Carson is a guy you can definitely point to and say WTF though.

Yep. I'm guessing that if Harry Carson wasn't a New York Giant, he wouldn't even be a consideration...

TheReverend
08-09-2009, 05:52 PM
randy gradishar: as good or better than all of them.

Didn't you say you just started watching like 5 years ago?

lex
08-09-2009, 05:58 PM
Yep. I'm guessing that if Harry Carson wasn't a New York Giant, he wouldn't even be a consideration...

Agreed. But just to be clear, Im not really into saying Player X shouldnt be in the HOF. But its fair to benchmark off of player X and say because Player Y was better than Player X, Player Y should also be in.

Bronx33
08-09-2009, 06:00 PM
randy gradishar: as good or better than all of them.


They didn't start giving out any type of bronco respect until the 90s and it was rather limited.

tsiguy96
08-09-2009, 06:04 PM
Didn't you say you just started watching like 5 years ago?

so because im relatively new (to you old ****s) to watching bronco football means i dont know anything about the teams from before? just because i didnt personally see them play doesnt mean i dont know anything about them fool.

TheReverend
08-09-2009, 06:14 PM
so because im relatively new (to you old ****s) to watching bronco football means i dont know anything about the teams from before? just because i didnt personally see them play doesnt mean i dont know anything about them fool.

You're an idiot.

No, it doesn't mean you don't know "anything about them".

It certainly does mean you shouldn't be saying one player you've never seen play is better than another player you've never seen play.

tsiguy96
08-09-2009, 06:51 PM
You're an idiot.

No, it doesn't mean you don't know "anything about them".

It certainly does mean you shouldn't be saying one player you've never seen play is better than another player you've never seen play.

ok, the guy with over 2000 career tackles is better then the guy with less than 400 career receptions. good enough?

gunns
08-09-2009, 06:56 PM
I dont know. This was a pretty strong HOF class for defense. But either way, Gradishar should still be in. Harry Carson is a guy you can definitely point to and say WTF though.

And Franco Harris.

I did love watching Bruce Smith and Rod Woodson. Aside, Gradishar should be in there. HOF reminds me of the BCS.

lex
08-09-2009, 07:01 PM
And Franco Harris.

I did love watching Bruce Smith and Rod Woodson. Aside, Gradishar should be in there. HOF reminds me of the BCS.

I agree absolutely and completely that Gradishar should be in. I just happen to think highly of a lot of the defensive players making it in this particular HOF class.

A better example is Lynn Swann. Franco Harris was at least a 10,000 yard rusher in his day. If you look at Lynn Swanns stats, theyre not very good even for the era he played in. The guy basically made it in because the voters love Steelers and because of 4 catches he made in SBs.

Having said that, Lynn Swann is iconic and images of his SB highlights have left a meaningful imprint on many. But when you let someone like that in who doesnt have the heft statistically, you open yourself to arguments that can be made for several other guys.

broncosteven
08-09-2009, 07:06 PM
And Franco Harris.

I did love watching Bruce Smith and Rod Woodson. Aside, Gradishar should be in there. HOF reminds me of the BCS.

And Bob Griese...

broncosteven
08-09-2009, 07:11 PM
Didn't you say you just started watching like 5 years ago?

I knew he is only 22 but I thought the way he took over the board, since the Broncos HC took over, he at least witnessed the Bronco SB runs, even if he was only 12ish at the time.

TheReverend
08-09-2009, 07:16 PM
ok, the guy with over 2000 career tackles is better then the guy with less than 400 career receptions. good enough?

Strong change from your original statement:

randy gradishar: as good or better than all of them.

Secondly, as much as I think Gradishar belongs, you're also ignoring MANY things in your last statement, one main thing is the legitimacy brought to the NFL by having an Olympian playing in the NFL. You're also ignoring how the league back then was a running league and passing was an after-thought. Hayes had a roughly 20 ypc average and was instrumental in CHANGING THE GAME... much like Jim Brown after him.

TheReverend
08-09-2009, 07:17 PM
I knew he is only 22 but I thought the way he took over the board, since the Broncos HC took over, he at least witnessed the Bronco SB runs, even if he was only 12ish at the time.

I think he said he started watching within the past few years... which means no TD, maybe even no Sharpe, and certainly no Elway

tsiguy96
08-09-2009, 07:23 PM
Strong change from your original statement:



Secondly, as much as I think Gradishar belongs, you're also ignoring MANY things in your last statement, one main thing is the legitimacy brought to the NFL by having an Olympian playing in the NFL. You're also ignoring how the league back then was a running league and passing was an after-thought. Hayes had a roughly 20 ypc average and was instrumental in CHANGING THE GAME... much like Jim Brown after him.

ok, gradishar is not better than all of them, i was being dramatic, big ****ing deal. so hayes gets HOF because he was a converted olympian and caught 400 passes in the NFL? the 60s if i recall correctly, the AFL was a passing league. he had a high YPC obviously because he took a lot of TDs to the house, but he is no where near HOF quality receiver. people say you need longevity and greatness to be a HOF player, he only played 10 years and only caught 400 passes (40 passes a year, = just under 3 catches per game for the era). he was a cowboy, so of course hes considered more important than teams like the broncos.

TheReverend
08-09-2009, 07:26 PM
ok, gradishar is not better than all of them, i was being dramatic, big ****ing deal.

k

tsiguy96
08-09-2009, 07:29 PM
k

would you say hes not equally good as anyone on that list, and better than others on there?

gunns
08-09-2009, 07:55 PM
I agree absolutely and completely that Gradishar should be in. I just happen to think highly of a lot of the defensive players making it in this particular HOF class.

A better example is Lynn Swann. Franco Harris was at least a 10,000 yard rusher in his day. If you look at Lynn Swanns stats, theyre not very good even for the era he played in. The guy basically made it in because the voters love Steelers and because of 4 catches he made in SBs.

Having said that, Lynn Swann is iconic and images of his SB highlights have left a meaningful imprint on many. But when you let someone like that in who doesnt have the heft statistically, you open yourself to arguments that can be made for several other guys.

Agreed. Swann is a better example. I think I just get ruffled feathers whenever it's mentioned that Bradshaw or anyone on those offenses won 4 SB's. To me, it was all their defense.

TheReverend
08-09-2009, 08:02 PM
would you say hes not equally good as anyone on that list, and better than others on there?

I'd say there's DOZENS of people he deserves to be in the HoF over that are in... but I'd be hard pressed to be decisive that he should be in OVER anyone in this group.

OrangeRising
08-09-2009, 10:05 PM
Strong change from your original statement:



Secondly, as much as I think Gradishar belongs, you're also ignoring MANY things in your last statement, one main thing is the legitimacy brought to the NFL by having an Olympian playing in the NFL. You're also ignoring how the league back then was a running league and passing was an after-thought. Hayes had a roughly 20 ypc average and was instrumental in CHANGING THE GAME... much like Jim Brown after him.

I don't mean to be nit-picky, but wasn't Jim Brown playing some years before Bob Hayes. You are right though, Brown and Hayes unquestionably changed the game at their positions.

TheReverend
08-09-2009, 10:07 PM
I don't mean to be nit-picky, but wasn't Jim Brown playing some years before Bob Hayes. You are right though, Brown and Hayes unquestionably changed the game at their positions.

You're absolutely right, sorry.

tsiguy96
08-09-2009, 10:15 PM
jim brown also rushed for 12,000+ yards and was the NFL record holder in rushing yards. far, far more prestigious then 400 career receptions. averaged over 100 yards per game for his career, come on, what did bob hayes do again?

BroncoMan4ever
08-09-2009, 11:38 PM
i hate the Chiefs and everything about the franchise, but i still have to give respect to Thomas

azbroncfan
08-09-2009, 11:42 PM
It's amazing the sacks that Smith got playing DE in a 3-4 for a lot of it. Woodson was a great player too and one of the best DB's ever. He was a straight playmaker.