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footstepsfrom#27
06-29-2009, 05:24 AM
To your kids? Check out the study below...

Mine seem to enjoy telling me I'm NOT cool...however we actually share most of the SAME opinions on this stuff and in fact I think I'm actually "cooler" on some issues on their cool meter... :~ohyah!: so I think it's mostly their schtick to be cooler by ACTING like they think they are...if that make sense... ;) ... because on MOST of the stuff in this study we share the same views in common. Of course some things they're not even aware of yet...13 year olds aren't into politics for example while my two 19 year olds are both Obama nuts :thumbs: I'd say other than two of my girls being into ultra lame teeny bopper music...the other three like the good stuff...R&B at least...that we are ALMOST equally cool. My wife thinks she's actually cooler than all of us...she probably is ;D So I THINK the generation gap in my house is pretty small....but I've been wrong before. :)

So how about you? How big a "cool" gap are you working with?

Poll coming...please be at least 35 to respond.

http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20090629/ap_on_re_us/us_generation_gap

Study finds widening generation gap in US

Associated Press Writer Mon Jun 29, 3:50 am ET

WASHINGTON From cell phones and texting to religion and manners, younger and older Americans see the world differently, creating the largest generation gap since the tumultuous years of the 1960s and the culture clashes over Vietnam, civil rights and women's liberation.

A new study released Monday by the Pew Research Center found Americans of different ages increasingly at odds over a range of social and technological issues. It also highlights a widening age divide after last November's election, when 18- to 29-year-olds voted for Democrat Barack Obama by a 2-to-1 ratio.

Almost eight in 10 people believe there is a major difference in the point of view of younger people and older people today, according to the independent public opinion research group. That is the highest spread since 1969, when about 74 percent reported major differences in an era of generational conflicts over the Vietnam War and civil and women's rights. In contrast, just 60 percent in 1979 saw a generation gap.

Asked to identify where older and younger people differ most, 47 percent said social values and morality. People age 18 to 29 were more likely to report disagreements over lifestyle, views on family, relationships and dating, while older people cited differences in a sense of entitlement. Those in the middle-age groups also often pointed to a difference in manners.

Religion is a far bigger part of the lives of older adults. About two-thirds of people 65 and older said religion is very important to them, compared with just over half of those 30 to 49 and 44 percent of people 18 to 29.

In addition, among adults 65 and older, one-third said religion has grown more important to them over the course of their lives, while 4 percent said it has become less important and 60 percent said it has stayed the same.

"Around the notion of morality and work ethic, the differences in point of view are pretty much felt across the board," said Paul Taylor, director of the Pew Social and Demographic Trends Project. He cited a greater tolerance among younger people on cultural issues such as gay marriage and interracial relationships.

Still, he noted that the generation gap in 2009 seems to be more tepid in nature than it was in the 1960s, when younger people built a defiant counterculture in opposing the Vietnam War and demanding equal rights for women and minorities.

"Today, it's more of a general outlook, a different point of view, a general set of moral values," Taylor said.

Among the study's other findings:

_Getting old isn't as bad as people believe in terms of health, but isn't as good when it comes to lifestyle. While more than half of those under 65 think they will experience memory loss when they are older, only one-quarter of people 65 and older say they do so. Older people reported fewer instances than expected of problems such as serious illness, not being able to drive, being less sexually active or depressed.

On the other hand, older adults end up having less leisure time than expected. While 87 percent of those under 65 think they will have more time for hobbies and other interests in older age, only 65 percent of older people report having it. Life at 65 and older also fell below expectations when it came to time with family, travel, having more financial security and less stress.

_Hispanics are more likely to report problems in old age. About 35 percent of Hispanics 65 and older say they have a serious illness, compared with 20 percent of whites and 22 percent of blacks in the same age group. More older Hispanics reported being depressed, lonely or a burden to others than did whites and blacks. They also were less likely to do volunteer work or be involved in their communities.

_Younger people are more likely to embrace technology. About 75 percent of adults 18 to 30 went online daily, compared with 40 percent of those 65 to 74 and about 16 percent for people 75 and older. The age gap widened over cell phones and text messaging. About 6 percent of those 65 and older used a cell phone for most or all of their calls; 11 percent sent or received text messages. That's compared with 64 percent of adults under 30 for cell phone use and 87 percent for texting.

_Americans differ on when old age begins. On average, they say 68. People under age 30 believe it begins at 60, while those 65 and older push the threshold to 74. Of all those surveyed, most said they wanted to live to 89.

Pew interviewed 2,969 adults by cell phone or landline from Feb. 23 to March 23. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 2.6 percentage points. In cases where older persons were too ill or incapacitated, their adult children were interviewed. Pew also used surveys conducted by Gallup, CBS and The New York Times to identify trends since 1969.

___

On the Net:

Pew Social and Demographic Trends: http://pewsocialtrends.org/

BroncoInSkinland
06-29-2009, 05:35 AM
I went with we agree on most things, but the whole king of cool thing doesn't fit. My stepdaughter is a geek and knows I am a geek too. Then again, geek IS the new cool in a lot of ways, so it works out.

watermock
06-29-2009, 09:40 AM
Mak'em tell ya how cool ya are before you toss a 20 to 'em. A Big Ben make ya super cool.

gyldenlove
06-29-2009, 10:00 AM
I have no kids and therefore is super cool. I freeze nitrogen compared to most people.

bronco militia
06-29-2009, 10:19 AM
my kids think i'm the ultimate dork until their friends remind them how cool I'am.

my kids hate that ;D

Gcver2ver3
06-29-2009, 10:31 AM
Poll coming...please be at least 35 to respond.



crap, i'm 34...i just missed the cut...

please bump in september...

Atlas
06-29-2009, 11:56 AM
My Daughter thinks I'm the ****!! but, whenever she acts up we have a cage out back that we can put her in for a couple of days until she has a better attitude.

http://speardog.webs.com/SouthDakota272.jpg

Crushaholic
06-29-2009, 12:54 PM
I don't have any kids, but I'm super cool as far as my niece and nephew are concerned. They are both under 3...:clown:

c_lazy_r
06-29-2009, 03:20 PM
I'm super cool until the kids hit about 14. Then I'm an idiot.

cutthemdown
06-29-2009, 03:45 PM
Actually being cool for kids is IMO just doing your own thing and having high self esteem. Doesn't matter if you are into music, theater, sports, whatever. A high self esteem kid doesn't get caught up in as many trends, bully people, allow people to bully him and is usually doing lots of activities.

footstepsfrom#27
06-30-2009, 01:56 AM
Actually being cool for kids is IMO just doing your own thing and having high self esteem. Doesn't matter if you are into music, theater, sports, whatever. A high self esteem kid doesn't get caught up in as many trends, bully people, allow people to bully him and is usually doing lots of activities.
Do you actually have your OWN kids? Because that's what this article was about...the relationship you have with YOUR kids...not just kids in general, and not about "self esteem". Kids DO get caught up into trends...that's what this whole article is about...whether they have self esteem or not. Part of growing up is learning to distinguish yourself and your choices from others and their choices but expecting a 14 year old to grasp the adult-like developmental stages of psyco-social development and magically become imune from peers opinions is ridiculous.

The point of this article (did you read it?) was that a generation gap exists today that is wider than it used to be based on differences of opinion on a wide range oif issues like politics, fashion, religion, morals, technology, social justice, etc...

broncosteven
06-30-2009, 02:18 AM
My kids are still young enough that they have not figured out we are Human yet.

I found out my parents weren't perfect when I was around 10-12. I didn't get much guidance on day to day matters.

I started early with my daughter, she has been through a few phases but has grown out of them. Just being there and letting them know they can come to you helps.

We talk about her day and who she plays with, what they do, what kind of bad things happened and how to deal with it every night at Dinner.

We also turned off the TV. It is not to be on unless we all are watching something together in the evening during the week, we let her watch Saturday and Sunday morning but that is it.

No more tween shows on Disney. THat had been the bigest help.

BroncoInSkinland
06-30-2009, 04:05 AM
The point of this article (did you read it?) was that a generation gap exists today that is wider than it used to be based on differences of opinion on a wide range oif issues like politics, fashion, religion, morals, technology, social justice, etc...

Figured I would go a step further, and evaluate where my stepdaughter and I were closest, and where we were furthest away. On a scale from 1 to 10 with 10 being absolutely lock step on every facet and 1 being as widely opposing as possible I would say politics 9, social justice 8, religion 8 technology 6 (I am far cooler here and she would be the first to tell you so, I am her IT department), morals 5 (she has the concept, but has trouble executing when it comes to personal sacrifice, she will get it as she gets older), fashion 4 (she is cooler here, mostly because I just can't find the energy to care about it).

I think a large part of any differences we do have is purely age related. She will probably "grow into" a lot of the things I currently believe, and that I know I have "grown out" of a few of the limited differences of opinion that we do have. To me this is no different than the generational gap that has existed for a long time in our country. As technology advances though, I can see the elderly having problems keeping up. I would say as technology has progressed my parents and I have grown further apart as they become less able to adapt to new methods of gathering information and communicating. I think any increased generational gap will occur between parents and adult children, and that that trend will probably continue. For now my stepdaughter and I are very close ideologically, when I get towards 60 and she is around 40 that might change.

Atlas
06-30-2009, 11:51 AM
Do you actually have your OWN kids? Because that's what this article was about...the relationship you have with YOUR kids...not just kids in general, and not about "self esteem". Kids DO get caught up into trends...that's what this whole article is about...whether they have self esteem or not. Part of growing up is learning to distinguish yourself and your choices from others and their choices but expecting a 14 year old to grasp the adult-like developmental stages of psyco-social development and magically become imune from peers opinions is ridiculous.

The point of this article (did you read it?) was that a generation gap exists today that is wider than it used to be based on differences of opinion on a wide range oif issues like politics, fashion, religion, morals, technology, social justice, etc...


For the most part kids are going to be who they are going to be by the time they enter first grade. Kindergarten is such an important time. If they respond well like going to school, like the teachers and love learning then they will repeat this trend throughout school. BUT in order to get to this point the parents must start very early in installing values, respect, and an apetite for learning. Reading to your kids is so important.

My daughter wants to be a Doctor, Teacher, Vet and President. She is not yet sure which order though.

Sure kids are going to **** up, but it's what they do after they **** up that can make or break their life. If they they have the coping tools to deal with pressures, and situations than they will likely make the right decisions.

cutthemdown
06-30-2009, 12:08 PM
Do you actually have your OWN kids? Because that's what this article was about...the relationship you have with YOUR kids...not just kids in general, and not about "self esteem". Kids DO get caught up into trends...that's what this whole article is about...whether they have self esteem or not. Part of growing up is learning to distinguish yourself and your choices from others and their choices but expecting a 14 year old to grasp the adult-like developmental stages of psyco-social development and magically become imune from peers opinions is ridiculous.

The point of this article (did you read it?) was that a generation gap exists today that is wider than it used to be based on differences of opinion on a wide range oif issues like politics, fashion, religion, morals, technology, social justice, etc...

I don't have kids but I do teach kids music, have several nephews and a niece all in that 8-16 range. I don't see much difference in them then when I was 16 to tell you the truth.

I don't think kids are that much further from how adults think then they have ever been. There is always a generation gap and I fail to see the points of the article that it is different now then in the 80's when I grew up.

As far as kids being unable to become immune from peers opinions I also disagree. Sure no matter what kids will go through angst, but no worst then it used to be. They key is still to teach them that it's not as important as they think to follow the trends or peer pressure.

My nephews totally get and are really well developed young men. Both on the golf team, one plays music, my niece plays music.

My youngest nephew was teased often when he first started in the band, almost all music kids get some of that. Because though he was raised so solidly, had tons of support that built his self-esteem, he didn't worry about that and overcame that pressure. I've seen other kids quit band over it over the yrs because they cant handle other kids making fun of them.

I totally disagree with your opinions that high self esteem and awareness can not avert many of the problems you are talking about.

Also just because some article says the generation gap is so much different doesn't make it so. Kid's seem the same to me and I work with them all the time. I have to HS I go to to help the directors with the sax sections.

When I do that I see the same kids I saw when I went to school. Theres ones that remind me of me, my friends, the kids I didn't like, the brains, the jocks, the jockers, its not much different.

I will say that kids are more talented then ever IMO. I think American Idol etc has really gotten kids into music and singing.

broncosteven
06-30-2009, 12:35 PM
For the most part kids are going to be who they are going to be by the time they enter first grade. Kindergarten is such an important time. If they respond well like going to school, like the teachers and love learning then they will repeat this trend throughout school. BUT in order to get to this point the parents must start very early in installing values, respect, and an apetite for learning. Reading to your kids is so important.

My daughter wants to be a Doctor, Teacher, Vet and President. She is not yet sure which order though.

Sure kids are going to **** up, but it's what they do after they **** up that can make or break their life. If they they have the coping tools to deal with pressures, and situations than they will likely make the right decisions.

You are so right about the reading!

My daughter just finished Kindergarten, I had surgery in december and we couldn't spend a lot of time with her. Her report card started showing 2's instead of 1's in a 4 - 1 system, one highest.

Once I was getting up and around we diverted her TV time to home work and reading with out telling her we were taking it away. We promoted play time with her 18 month old Brother and PC learning games.

The last quarter she had all 1's and was the only kid in her class with perfect attendance. She got all these prizes and was mentioned 1st before they dismissed the class. She gained a ton of self esteem and has been great so far this summer.

I have been going to the library for DVD's, and even books, they offered a summer reading program so I signed us up.

2 days ago I caught her playing teacher with her babys and stuffed things and she was reading books to them. She sat there for over 30 minutes reading books aloud to them. It was priceless.

We do a family movie night when we are home alone on weekends and monitor her TV time. That and promoting reading has really helped her and reduced her fits.

footstepsfrom#27
06-30-2009, 02:01 PM
I don't have kids...
Thanks for playing...BTW I didn't say self esteem was not important to overcoming problems. The point of this article is for parents to evaluate how they relate to their own kids...not how music teachers think kids have or have not changed.

cutthemdown
06-30-2009, 04:24 PM
Thanks for playing...BTW I didn't say self esteem was not important to overcoming problems. The point of this article is for parents to evaluate how they relate to their own kids...not how music teachers think kids have or have not changed.

They talked about a wide range of things, what article did you read. They talked about religion and differences in ages, it wasn't only meant for people with kids.

That's fine though go ahead and think you know it all because you spermed a kid out.

cutthemdown
06-30-2009, 04:25 PM
I practically raised an old G/F kid so I have some experience being the adult figure for a kid. It always cracks me up when people with kids think that just having them proves anything. What a joke you always are footsteps.

By the way plenty of people with kids I'm sure agree with my post. It was all logical stuff.

cutthemdown
06-30-2009, 04:26 PM
You are so right about the reading!

My daughter just finished Kindergarten, I had surgery in december and we couldn't spend a lot of time with her. Her report card started showing 2's instead of 1's in a 4 - 1 system, one highest.

Once I was getting up and around we diverted her TV time to home work and reading with out telling her we were taking it away. We promoted play time with her 18 month old Brother and PC learning games.

The last quarter she had all 1's and was the only kid in her class with perfect attendance. She got all these prizes and was mentioned 1st before they dismissed the class. She gained a ton of self esteem and has been great so far this summer.

I have been going to the library for DVD's, and even books, they offered a summer reading program so I signed us up.

2 days ago I caught her playing teacher with her babys and stuffed things and she was reading books to them. She sat there for over 30 minutes reading books aloud to them. It was priceless.

We do a family movie night when we are home alone on weekends and monitor her TV time. That and promoting reading has really helped her and reduced her fits.

Reading important no matter what. It's proven that even just reading magazines keeps the brain sharper. Even if you don't have kids to read to everyone should read at least one night a week.

My dad got me into reading so I would have to say you are totally correct. Reading to kids really important because it shows them how fun it can be. In the end people who read just smarter.

footstepsfrom#27
06-30-2009, 04:46 PM
They talked about a wide range of things, what article did you read. They talked about religion and differences in ages, it wasn't only meant for people with kids.

That's fine though go ahead and think you know it all because you spermed a kid out.
"Spermed a kid out"...lol...fine...my ability to think I know it all has little to do with that one..."sperming a kid out" generally makes you realize how much you have left to learn, and raising 5 magnifies that just a bit. I'm just bagging on you because the poll I posted asked about how people relate to their own kids and whether you know this or not...people who HAVE kids know a bit more about this than those who don't. In any case..."generation gap" is what this is about, but none-the-less you missunderstood several things I said earlier, including the bit about self esteem and kids feeling their peers opinions are important...you apparently took it as comment denying the innapropriate aspects of negative peer pressure were mitigated by self esteem, but I wasn't referring to anything negative, just that kids have a need for acceptance among their own age group...because they do. It doesn't take "knowing it all" to know that much.

oubronco
06-30-2009, 04:47 PM
How Cool are You?

I'm the coolest mofo I know

footstepsfrom#27
06-30-2009, 04:48 PM
I practically raised an old G/F kid so I have some experience being the adult figure for a kid. It always cracks me up when people with kids think that just having them proves anything. What a joke you always are footsteps.

By the way plenty of people with kids I'm sure agree with my post. It was all logical stuff.
I missed the part where I suggested having kids "proves" something...so I guess the joke's on you.

gunns
06-30-2009, 05:11 PM
The point of this article (did you read it?) was that a generation gap exists today that is wider than it used to be based on differences of opinion on a wide range oif issues like politics, fashion, religion, morals, technology, social justice, etc...

I can see that being a sizable gap. Things have really changed from even when I was young (shut up, I'm not THAT old). I really don't think kids want to agree with the older generation, it's always been their way of having individuality and it's why generations become so different.

None of my children still live at home. But one or two of them are over every day. I talk to all each week. They think I'm cool ;D or they like my cooking.

Atlas
06-30-2009, 08:20 PM
You are so right about the reading!

My daughter just finished Kindergarten, I had surgery in december and we couldn't spend a lot of time with her. Her report card started showing 2's instead of 1's in a 4 - 1 system, one highest.

Once I was getting up and around we diverted her TV time to home work and reading with out telling her we were taking it away. We promoted play time with her 18 month old Brother and PC learning games.

The last quarter she had all 1's and was the only kid in her class with perfect attendance. She got all these prizes and was mentioned 1st before they dismissed the class. She gained a ton of self esteem and has been great so far this summer.

I have been going to the library for DVD's, and even books, they offered a summer reading program so I signed us up.

2 days ago I caught her playing teacher with her babys and stuffed things and she was reading books to them. She sat there for over 30 minutes reading books aloud to them. It was priceless.

We do a family movie night when we are home alone on weekends and monitor her TV time. That and promoting reading has really helped her and reduced her fits.


That is great. My daughter was beaming when she got her library card!!! I don't have one(on purpose) so when we go she has to checkout everything even my stuff. Makes her feel awesome that she has a library card and her old man doesn't.

Atlas
06-30-2009, 08:24 PM
"Spermed a kid out"...lol...fine...my ability to think I know it all has little to do with that one..."sperming a kid out" generally makes you realize how much you have left to learn, and raising 5 magnifies that just a bit. I'm just bagging on you because the poll I posted asked about how people relate to their own kids and whether you know this or not...people who HAVE kids know a bit more about this than those who don't. In any case..."generation gap" is what this is about, but none-the-less you missunderstood several things I said earlier, including the bit about self esteem and kids feeling their peers opinions are important...you apparently took it as comment denying the innapropriate aspects of negative peer pressure were mitigated by self esteem, but I wasn't referring to anything negative, just that kids have a need for acceptance among their own age group...because they do. It doesn't take "knowing it all" to know that much.


What are you talking about? I have seen lots of people with lots of kids and they are ****ty parents. I think everything cutdown has said has pretty much proven he could be a great dad....... If he wasn't gay ;)....Just kidding of course.

Archer81
06-30-2009, 08:53 PM
Polls like this are kind of silly. These same 18-29 year olds (i'm in this group) eventually get older. Tend to learn and change how we view things. Things I knew and believed at 7 or 17 are not the same as what I know and believe at 27. Thats the point. Alot of those 60 and up people in the poll were the kids from the 60s who saw a huge generational gap between themselves and their parents are the ones now who view things in a different light. Same thing will happen to my age group too.

:Broncos:

Bronco Yoda
06-30-2009, 08:55 PM
My kids are still too young to realize the full extent of my overall coolness....