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HILife
06-18-2009, 09:46 AM
So, I just got back from the Community College were I signed up for the Motorcycle Rider Course. It's one day of classroom training and 2 days on a bike. If I pass I can go to the DMV and get my motorcycle license.

Been wanting a motorcycle for years, but was always afraid to fall off and didn't want to spend all the money on motorcycle and gear. I figured it's about time to go ahead and get things started, so here I am.

What I want to know is, who out there rides and what do you ride (pics welcomed)? Also do you have any advice for a beginner?

EDIT: If you have bike recommandations I'm 6'2" and prefer a Sporty looking Bike for now.

Thanks
hilife

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 09:50 AM
Hell yes I ride, and there is really only one Bike to have (all others are posers)-buy a Harley! If you don't you will always want one-

If I were in your shoes I'd get a Sportster-easy to learn on, low center of gravity, easy to control, Belt Drive, and reasonably priced-best of all, it will keep it's value better than anything out there-

http://i41.tinypic.com/2ztbzft.jpg

SoDak Bronco
06-18-2009, 09:58 AM
"Wear a helmet"-- mom

SoDak Bronco
06-18-2009, 09:59 AM
http://loadinform.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/2007-kawasaki-ninja-zx-10-r.jpg

Here is what Kelen Winslow recommends

Dukes
06-18-2009, 10:01 AM
http://loadinform.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/2007-kawasaki-ninja-zx-10-r.jpg

Here is what Kelen Winslow recommends

What about Rothlesburger?

broncofan2438
06-18-2009, 10:06 AM
KTM Supermoto

HILife
06-18-2009, 10:12 AM
Hell yes I ride, and there is really only one Bike to have (all others are posers)-buy a Harley! If you don't you will always want one-

If I were in your shoes I'd get a Sportster-easy to learn on, low center of gravity, easy to control, Belt Drive, and reasonably priced-best of all, it will keep it's value better than anything out there-

http://i41.tinypic.com/2ztbzft.jpg

I really want a sport bike and Harley, from what I can tell, only makes crusiers. I would ride for a while before I got a crusier.

HILife
06-18-2009, 10:16 AM
http://loadinform.com/wp-content/uploads/2007/12/2007-kawasaki-ninja-zx-10-r.jpg

Here is what Kelen Winslow recommends

LOL I prefer not to fall off the bike. So you won't mind if I ignore his recommandation.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 10:21 AM
So, I just got back from the Community College were I signed up for the Motorcycle Rider Course. It's one day of classroom training and 2 days on a bike. If I pass I can go to the DMV and get my motorcycle license.

Been wanting a motorcycle for years, but was always afraid to fall off and didn't want to spend all the money on motorcycle and gear. I figured it's about time to go ahead and get things started, so here I am.

What I want to know is, who out there rides and what do you ride (pics welcomed)? Also do you have any advice for a beginner?

Thanks
hilife

Stay out of blind spots. Keep it in a lower gear on the freeway so you can accelerate out of trouble as well as braking to get out of trouble. Don't skimp on a helmet, get the best. Keep your tires with plenty of tread. Carry spare fuses, especially the main fuse. Carry a spare tire valve and a valve tool.

Start out with a lower CC bike for a year to get used to riding, buy it used from a dealer, their reputation depends on selling decent bikes, say a 450-500. They're cheap and it's hard to f up buying a bike. If it's clean, has good tires, doesn't leak, chain's in good shape, all the lights work, both brakes work, it's probably a good bike.

Go through the low gears slowly on the test ride up to the redline, listen for bad sounds, vibration. The test ride is the only time I recommend going without a helmet, and that's only for the low gears. If there's no bad sounds or vibrations in the low gears up to redline, just go through the rest of the gears cursorily. You'll want to take it up to 55 mph at least to check for vibrations.

Downshift through every gear also, and stress it downshifting from high RPM's.

Don't get too excited and jump on a 600 crotch rocket right away. Learn the ropes first, and there's a hell of a lot of ropes to learn. One year on a smaller bike in the school of hard knocks and you'll be doing it right.

Pony Boy
06-18-2009, 10:28 AM
I really want a sport bike and Harley, from what I can tell, only makes crusiers. I would ride for a while before I got a crusier.

You are correct when you said you want a bike, a sport bike is just that a bike not to be confused with a real motorcycle. Harley Davidson makes a real motorcycle for real men not a bike for boys. Riding a sport bike is a completely different experience from riding a Harley. Not saying riding a sport bike is not fun, I'm sure it is but don't call it a motorcycle. I ride a 2003 Scramin Eagle road king.
"Just be careful I see a lot of newbies splattered on the road, The one good thing about sport bike riders is they usually wear leather protection and a full face helmet.

HILife
06-18-2009, 10:44 AM
Stay out of blind spots. Keep it in a lower gear on the freeway so you can accelerate out of trouble as well as braking to get out of trouble. Don't skimp on a helmet, get the best. Keep your tires with plenty of tread. Carry spare fuses, especially the main fuse. Carry a spare tire valve and a valve tool.

Start out with a lower CC bike for a year to get used to riding, buy it used from a dealer, their reputation depends on selling decent bikes, say a 450-500. They're cheap and it's hard to f up buying a bike. If it's clean, has good tires, doesn't leak, chain's in good shape, all the lights work, both brakes work, it's probably a good bike.

Go through the low gears slowly on the test ride up to the redline, listen for bad sounds, vibration. The test ride is the only time I recommend going without a helmet, and that's only for the low gears. If there's no bad sounds or vibrations in the low gears up to redline, just go through the rest of the gears cursorily. You'll want to take it up to 55 mph at least to check for vibrations.

Downshift through every gear also, and stress it downshifting from high RPM's.

Don't get too excited and jump on a 600 crotch rocket right away. Learn the ropes first, and there's a hell of a lot of ropes to learn. One year on a smaller bike in the school of hard knocks and you'll be doing it right.

Good advice. I will keep it in mind. Wouldn't anything less then 750 be to small for me. I 6'2" and I tried to sit on a 600 crotch rocket and it was very crampt

HILife
06-18-2009, 10:46 AM
You are correct when you said you want a bike, a sport bike is just that a bike not to be confused with a real motorcycle. Harley Davidson makes a real motorcycle for real men not a bike for boys. Riding a sport bike is a completely different experience from riding a Harley. Not saying riding a sport bike is not fun, I'm sure it is but don't call it a motorcycle. I ride a 2003 Scramin Eagle road king.
"Just be careful I see a lot of newbies splattered on the road, The one good thing about sport bike riders is they usually wear leather protection and a full face helmet.

Wouldn't mind a Harley one day, two people at my work ride one.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 10:58 AM
I really want a sport bike and Harley, from what I can tell, only makes crusiers. I would ride for a while before I got a crusier.

Don't start out with a sport bike/crotch rocket. Get into them slowly. Even if you only ride your first slow bike for a few months, you learn the basics you're gonna need to ride fast and safe. You learn a lot those first few months, make your inevitable mistakes on a slower bike. That's good advice, life.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 11:08 AM
Good advice. I will keep it in mind. Wouldn't anything less then 750 be to small for me. I 6'2" and I tried to sit on a 600 crotch rocket and it was very crampt

No. You can find what's called a commuter bike just to get your feet wet so to speak that won't leave you cramped. IMO, it's important to make your inevitable mistakes as a first time rider in traffic on a slower bike. A 750 is too big to start out with. It's not a matter of how tall you are, it's a matter of experience. You're gonna be surprised how many ways you can get into trouble on two wheels. It's better to get into your inevitable trouble at slower speeds when you're first learning.

If you want this to be a lifelong enjoyment of riding, I say start out slowly. It's not like your first bike is gonna be the one you ride all your life.

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 11:08 AM
I really want a sport bike and Harley, from what I can tell, only makes crusiers. I would ride for a while before I got a crusier.

Harley makes Sportbikes! (by the way, the one in my Avatar is my Bike)-

http://i40.tinypic.com/2e5p2mr.jpg

HILife
06-18-2009, 11:11 AM
Harley makes Sportbikes! (by the way, the one in my Avatar is my Bike)-

http://i40.tinypic.com/2e5p2mr.jpg

That's a sexy bike.

HILife
06-18-2009, 11:13 AM
No. You can find what's called a commuter bike just to get your feet wet so to speak that won't leave you cramped. IMO, it's important to make your inevitable mistakes as a first time rider in traffic on a slower bike. A 750 is too big to start out with. It's not a matter of how tall you are, it's a matter of experience. You're gonna be surprised how many ways you can get into trouble on two wheels. It's better to get into your inevitable trouble at slower speeds when you're first learning.

If you want this to be a lifelong enjoyment of riding, I say start out slowly. It's not like your first bike is gonna be the one you ride all your life.

words of wisdom. Thanks.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 11:22 AM
I'm a BMW guy myself, lately.

I started out on Honda's, a 450 twin to start, then a '77 CB750, then the Big Daddy 1979 Honda CBX.

After the CBX I had the '82 BMW R65S. What a bike. I liked it so much I bought a '75 BMW R90. I love those BMX boxers. Superb handlers, just flat superb.

24429

24430

mr007
06-18-2009, 11:24 AM
Harley Davidson makes a real motorcycle for real men not a bike for boys.

I guess I ride a bike for boys.....

<img src="http://i30.photobucket.com/albums/c329/mike_sd_619/IMG_0136.jpg" />

As far as what bike you should start with.... I started with an R6 but I had experience riding dirt bikes. You need to be very careful with crotch rockets, they are much faster and much more dangerous than "real motorcycles." If you haven't ridden before I would suggest something like a YZF450 to get your feet wet for about 6 months before jumping up to the faster bikes.

My 2 cents.

worm
06-18-2009, 11:34 AM
You are correct when you said you want a bike, a sport bike is just that a bike not to be confused with a real motorcycle. Harley Davidson makes a real motorcycle for real men not a bike for boys. Riding a sport bike is a completely different experience from riding a Harley. Not saying riding a sport bike is not fun, I'm sure it is but don't call it a motorcycle. I ride a 2003 Scramin Eagle road king.


Harley riders actually ride? ;D I see the majority of them with all their 'cute' orange and black logoed gear sitting at a bar. Or broken down somewhere. Most Harley riders also don't seem to want to wear a full face helmet, regardless of what safety stats tell them, because it isn't cool and doesn't fit into the 'scene'. Makes no sense to me.

Hilife. Find the type of riding you like to do...and don't let anybody tell you this is better than that. ALL riding is awesome. Sport. Cruising. Whatever. Even on a Harley.

Start off slow. Master the basics. Then get out of the city!

My vote goes to Dual Sporting as my favorite type of riding. Riding to places that few get to see....then fishing\hiking\camping is heaven to me.

Leaving on Wed for Northern Glacier NP. Weapon of choice this time is the old girl. The bike that started dual sport as a type of riding. It is my backup DS bike now but is like an old shoe. Bike has gotten me back every time from truly off the grid locations in Canada and the PNW.

broncofan2438
06-18-2009, 11:37 AM
http://www.travelizmo.com/archives/ktm-690-smc-supermoto-dirt-bike-2008.jpg

Rohirrim
06-18-2009, 11:41 AM
Don't forget to fill out the organ donor card. ;D

HILife
06-18-2009, 11:48 AM
Don't forget to fill out the organ donor card. ;D

LOL LOL see, that is the stuff that scared me away from bikes for so long.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 12:02 PM
Harley riders actually ride? ;D I see the majority of them with all their 'cute' orange and black logoed gear sitting at a bar. Or broken down somewhere. Most Harley riders also don't seem to want to wear a full face helmet, regardless of what safety stats tell them, because it isn't cool and doesn't fit into the 'scene'. Makes no sense to me.

Hilife. Find the type of riding you like to do...and don't let anybody tell you this is better than that. ALL riding is awesome. Sport. Cruising. Whatever. Even on a Harley.

Start off slow. Master the basics. Then get out of the city!

My vote goes to Dual Sporting as my favorite type of riding. Riding to places that few get to see....then fishing\hiking\camping is heaven to me.

Leaving on Wed for Northern Glacier NP. Weapon of choice this time is the old girl. The bike that started dual sport as a type of riding. It is my backup DS bike now but is like an old shoe. Bike has gotten me back every time from truly off the grid locations in Canada and the PNW.

I thought BMW started the dual stuff.

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 12:11 PM
LOL LOL see, that is the stuff that scared me away from bikes for so long.

If you ride safe and smart you'll be ok. Riding smart is a big deal. Stay out of blind spots, if you see somebody turning left into your lane flash your brights and weave a little bit. Cars turning left into your lane and they just never saw you is one of the rider's banes. And wear the best fullface helmet.

HILife
06-18-2009, 12:17 PM
If you ride safe and smart you'll be ok. Riding smart is a big deal. Stay out of blind spots, if you see somebody turning left into your lane flash your brights and weave a little bit. Cars turning left into your lane and they just never saw you is one of the rider's banes. And wear the best fullface helmet.

Sounds like I will be driving in the far right lane and not next to anyone.

worm
06-18-2009, 12:19 PM
I thought BMW started the dual stuff.

Nope. Honda. The Transalp and the Africa Twin (never sold in the US) started it all. Won Dakar multiple times back in the early 90s.

BMW has refined it with the 'Long Way Around' phenomenon et al. Also the fact that there is a BMW dealer everywhere around the globe doesn't hurt.

I have a GS800 as my primary DS now. Love it. Truly a bike to take you anywhere. My Alp is now regulated to <1000mile trips. Awesome bike. Honda reliability + V-twin power....but it is now a classic and deserves to be babied more.

Will post some pics of her in Glacier when I get back.

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 12:24 PM
And don't forget, Leather is your friend (in the Summer the new Mesh Jackets), and don't forget Boots.

hilife,

I think you've done the right thing taking a Rider's Course, I do wish that they would make all Street Riders ride a Dirt Bike for a Year before they were given a License-you learn so much about riding on a Dirt Bike (balance, weighting, how to crash and not hurt yourself (most of the time), etc.).

I started out racing Dirt Bikes (and Trials Bikes), then Drag raced a 750 Kawasaki 2 Stroke and a 1000cc Kawasaki-I've owned a bunch of Metric Bikes (as well as Harleys). I also became concerned about riding on the street, and actually quit for about 10 Years, then I bought the Bike of my dreams, and it has added a lot of color to my life-I really like riding, adn I was amazed at how much I had missed it.

Understanding how to use the Brakes, how to properly weight the Bike and throttle control to me are the most important-practice, practice, practice. You will see things on a Bike that you miss while riding in a car.

gyldenlove
06-18-2009, 12:24 PM
Avoid a powerful bike for your first one, get a nice 450cc or something similar, definitely a tourer or street bike, don't go for anything sporty. You need to build up your reflexes, once you have more natural and faster bike reflexes you can get a big one.

The one you want down the line is the Ducati monster.

Pony Boy
06-18-2009, 12:25 PM
Harley riders actually ride? ;D I see the majority of them with all their 'cute' orange and black logoed gear sitting at a bar. Or broken down somewhere.


I logged a 6,000 mile trip on my 2003 Harley Road King last summer and a 2,000 this spring and that's not including Sturgis. My advice would be to buy what you are going to ride, not a starter bike. I have had friends buy Sportsters and then have a hard time selling and trading up. It's what ever "floats your boat" if zipping around on a sport bike and speed is what turns you on, go for it and if lay back cruzing and hearing your pipes talk to you turns you on get a Harley or metric cruzer or chopper. Just get out there and ride, nothing better for the soul.

USMCBladerunner
06-18-2009, 12:27 PM
Harley's are about status, not motorcycle riding. They are heavy, unreliable, expensive, built with 1970's engine technology and handle like a refridgerator on skates. But they have a patented "potato" sounding muffler that makes you feel like a real american, so if that's your thing...

At 6'2, you are going to have some trouble finding a true sport bike that won't be too cramped. As a new rider, you do NOT want to be cramped and uncomfortable. Any sport bike regardless of displacement is going to be a bit cramped, but how relaxed rider geometry is depends on the brand more than the engine size. Honda is probably the most comfy, Ducati the least.

I wouldn't recommend a sport bike of any size for a new rider. I'd recommend a dual sport or standard to begin with (think SV-650 or Versys or VStrom 650). But most folks ride for an image, and like you said, you want a sport bike. The only appropriate starter sport bike is the Kawi Ninja 250, but that will be small for you as well.

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 12:28 PM
I logged a 6,000 mile trip on my 2003 Harley Road King last summer and a 2,000 this spring and that's not including Sturgis. My advice would be to buy what you are going to ride, not a starter bike. I have had friends buy Sportsters and then have a hard time selling and trading up. It's what ever "floats your boat" if zipping around on a sport bike and speed is what turns you on, go for it and if lay back cruzing and hearing your pipes talk to you turns you on get a Harley or metric cruzer or chopper. Just get out there and ride, nothing better for the soul.

Pony Boy,

Really nice Bike (love the paint), but on the Sportster thing don't forget that Harley has a Program where you can trade in a one Year old Sportser and get 100% value towards a Big Twin-

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 12:32 PM
Harley's are about status, not motorcycle riding. They are heavy, unreliable, expensive, built with 1970's engine technology and handle like a refridgerator on skates. But they have a patented "potato" sounding muffler that makes you feel like a real american, so if that's your thing...

You really don't know much about newer Harleys do you? There are plenty of Harleys out there with 150,000+ miles that have never been touched-if you want high tech, look at the VRod-you are calling that 70's technology? Or, the Buell-

HILife
06-18-2009, 12:44 PM
Harley's are about status, not motorcycle riding. They are heavy, unreliable, expensive, built with 1970's engine technology and handle like a refridgerator on skates. But they have a patented "potato" sounding muffler that makes you feel like a real american, so if that's your thing...

At 6'2, you are going to have some trouble finding a true sport bike that won't be too cramped. As a new rider, you do NOT want to be cramped and uncomfortable. Any sport bike regardless of displacement is going to be a bit cramped, but how relaxed rider geometry is depends on the brand more than the engine size. Honda is probably the most comfy, Ducati the least.

I wouldn't recommend a sport bike of any size for a new rider. I'd recommend a dual sport or standard to begin with (think SV-650 or Versys or VStrom 650). But most folks ride for an image, and like you said, you want a sport bike. The only appropriate starter sport bike is the Kawi Ninja 250, but that will be small for you as well.

I don't really want a sports bike for the speed, but more for the look. I have no intention of getting a 1000cc and up kind of bike. I just want a bike that looks sporty, but has a comfortable riding position and enough room so my knees aren't touching my chest.

worm
06-18-2009, 12:47 PM
Here is one of my Tacos. In my opinion, one of the best trail bikes in the 70s. She stays close to Priest Lake but still rips.

No better way to spend a day than putting some sweet smelling two stroke oil in her and ripping around the Lake.

I have a serious addiction to classic bikes.

mr007
06-18-2009, 12:48 PM
I don't really want a sports bike for the speed, but more for the look. I have no intention of getting a 1000cc and up kind of bike. I just want a bike that looks sporty, but has a comfortable riding position and enough room so my knees aren't touching my chest.

If you haven't ridden motorcycles, dirt bikes, etc previously I would not recommend getting any sports bike. Start with a dual-sport (someone earlier mentioned a SV-650, great idea).

You can get one of these cheap, ride it for about 6 months, sell it and then move on to a sports bike.

If you have a good amount of dirt bike riding experience, I wouldn't say an R6, CBR600RR, or Ninja is a horrible idea... you just gotta be careful.

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 12:49 PM
Here is one of my Tacos. In my opinion, one of the best trail bikes in the 70s. She stays close to Priest Lake but still rips.

No better way to spend a day than putting some sweet smelling two stroke oil in her and ripping around the Lake.

I have a serious addiction to classic bikes.


Hey,

Is that a Serpa T 350? I bought a new one in 1980-they were ahead of their time-and, is that a Pursang in the background?

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 12:56 PM
Sounds like I will be driving in the far right lane and not next to anyone.

That's the objective.

You have to find the holes in traffic. And you damn sure better watch out for oncoming traffic on a two way street. If you see somebody oncoming ready to make a left turn in front of you better be sure to weave some and flick your brights. You can't relax on two wheels.

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 12:57 PM
I have one of these for sale if anybody's looking-


http://i167.photobucket.com/albums/u157/a80mill/r62005.jpg

worm
06-18-2009, 12:57 PM
Hey,

Is that a Serpa T 350? I bought a new one in 1980-they were ahead of their time-and, is that a Pursang in the background?

It is an Alpina. More for trail than trial.

The Serpa T 350 was THE trials bike back then. Changed everything. You mentioning trials is what made me post my Taco.

You are correct on the Pursang in the back. Still dialing her in. Would love to get a Sherpa and Astro.

Love the old Bultacos!!

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 01:00 PM
It is an Alpina. More for trail than trial.

The Serpa T 350 was THE trials bike back then. Changed everything. You mentioning trials is what made me post my Taco.

You are correct on the Pursang in the back. Still dialing her in. Would love to get a Sherpa and Astro.

Love the old Bultacos!!


I have a close friend who was the TT Champ for the state of Colorado, and he did it on an Astro-Bultaco's are great Bikes!

I competed with Bultaco's, Montesa's and Gas Gas-

chadta
06-18-2009, 01:10 PM
KTM Supermoto

wont be the most comfortable bike for long rides, BUT supermotos are glorified dirt bikes, and crash VERY VERY WELL, so if you drop it you pick itt up and keep riding, and trust me you will drop it.


Good advice. I will keep it in mind. Wouldn't anything less then 750 be to small for me. I 6'2" and I tried to sit on a 600 crotch rocket and it was very crampt

dimensionally the sport bikes are pretty much the same between the 600 and the 1000, or at least they were in 04, my r6 was 3/4 of an inch lower then the R1. im 6'4 btw

honestly , if you want a good small starter sport bike, the honda 125 is where its at, its small, light, cheap,

http://www.honda.ca/go/en/index.html

i dunno if you can get them in the states but $3500 for a new bike 3 year warranty, and gear to get you started

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 01:11 PM
And don't forget, Leather is your friend (in the Summer the new Mesh Jackets), and don't forget Boots.

hilife,

I think you've done the right thing taking a Rider's Course, I do wish that they would make all Street Riders ride a Dirt Bike for a Year before they were given a License-you learn so much about riding on a Dirt Bike (balance, weighting, how to crash and not hurt yourself (most of the time), etc.).

I started out racing Dirt Bikes (and Trials Bikes), then Drag raced a 750 Kawasaki 2 Stroke and a 1000cc Kawasaki-I've owned a bunch of Metric Bikes (as well as Harleys). I also became concerned about riding on the street, and actually quit for about 10 Years, then I bought the Bike of my dreams, and it has added a lot of color to my life-I really like riding, adn I was amazed at how much I had missed it.

Understanding how to use the Brakes, how to properly weight the Bike and throttle control to me are the most important-practice, practice, practice. You will see things on a Bike that you miss while riding in a car.

Yah, the object is to get used to dealing with a handclutch, toe shift, toe and hand brake before you go out there on the street trying to be a badass.

Pony Boy
06-18-2009, 01:16 PM
Harley's are about status, not motorcycle riding. They are heavy, unreliable, expensive, built with 1970's engine technology and handle like a refridgerator on skates. But they have a patented "potato" sounding muffler that makes you feel like a real american, so if that's your thing...

If I have to explain it, you wouldn't understand, For me and the old fats I ride with, we could give a big rats ass about status. Go out and straddle a Harley Screamin Eagle and tell me it's 1970's technology. There are guys that talk and guys that go out a ride. Status my ass !!

Cito Pelon
06-18-2009, 01:21 PM
Here is one of my Tacos. In my opinion, one of the best trail bikes in the 70s. She stays close to Priest Lake but still rips.

No better way to spend a day than putting some sweet smelling two stroke oil in her and ripping around the Lake.

I have a serious addiction to classic bikes.

Bultaco. Czech bike?

Pony Boy
06-18-2009, 01:25 PM
Here is one of my Tacos. In my opinion, one of the best trail bikes in the 70s. She stays close to Priest Lake but still rips.

No better way to spend a day than putting some sweet smelling two stroke oil in her and ripping around the Lake.

I have a serious addiction to classic bikes.

Thats a sweet bike, I had a 1975 Honda Elisinore 250, I loved that bike. Then got married and had the first kid in 1977. I sold it and put a down payment on a Pontiac station wagon.

chadta
06-18-2009, 01:28 PM
Harley's are about status, not motorcycle riding. They are heavy, unreliable, expensive, built with 1970's engine technology and handle like a refridgerator on skates.

i bet you said the same thing about toyota in the 70's

news flash this isnt the 70s anymore incase you havent noticed.

why is it people will pay the extra for toyota quality but scof at paying a bit more for north american made quality.

worm
06-18-2009, 01:43 PM
Bultaco. Czech bike?

Spanish.

worm
06-18-2009, 01:46 PM
Thats a sweet bike, I had a 1975 Honda Elisinore 250, I loved that bike. Then got married and had the first kid in 1977. I sold it and put a down payment on a Pontiac station wagon.

'75 Elsinore 250. What an awesome bike! Bet you can just visualize the way she smelled even today. It is almost impossible to get rid of that two stroke smell from your brain.

Your Harley might sound better.....but that Elsie I bet smelled better.

HILife
06-18-2009, 01:52 PM
If you haven't ridden motorcycles, dirt bikes, etc previously I would not recommend getting any sports bike. Start with a dual-sport (someone earlier mentioned a SV-650, great idea).

You can get one of these cheap, ride it for about 6 months, sell it and then move on to a sports bike.

If you have a good amount of dirt bike riding experience, I wouldn't say an R6, CBR600RR, or Ninja is a horrible idea... you just gotta be careful.

SV-650? Looks good to me. I'll have to keep it in mind when I start looking for a bike.

http://news.micronexhaust.com/upload/SV-650%20slip-on1sm.jpg

worm
06-18-2009, 01:59 PM
This is my bike I use the most when I am camping locally in the Cascade or Selkirk Mountains. I also use this when I am kayaking. I trailer it down to the take out and then drive back to the drop in on solo trips.

Carries a ton of gear. Awesome low end torque. She will climb over any amount of snow, mud, dirt. Highway legal (though I keep her under 70). The fat tire is hilarious and teaches you to ride differently than a traditional dirt bike.

Sometimes it isn't about the cc's. This bike might be down on the cool factor but it is a 10 on the fun scale. The #1 bike that I put a friend on that doesn't ride that often.

SureShot
06-18-2009, 02:04 PM
This is what I'm getting once Dortoh closes on his $2million house.

http://media.moterus.es/photos/3570/gs.jpg

Pony Boy
06-18-2009, 02:10 PM
'75 Elsinore 250. What an awesome bike! Bet you can just visualize the way she smelled even today. It is almost impossible to get rid of that two stroke smell from your brain.

Your Harley might sound better.....but that Elsie I bet smelled better.

I lived in Boulder Co at the time and my Elsinore was a poor mans version of a 4 wheel drive. You could ride anywhere back then no restrictions. The Elsinore was Hondas first serious 2-stroke bike. A four stroke just couldn't cut it at high altitude. The Bultaco's was the bike of choice for the serious rider back then. I rode with a guy that had a Hodaka Wombat and I coudln't keep up with that crazy bastard, he carried a pocket full of spark plugs and a pack down fly rod across the handle bars. You are right about the smell, Robert Duvall said it best" nothing like the smell of napalm in the morning". The same goes for 2-stroke smell.

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 02:45 PM
I lived in Boulder Co at the time and my Elsinore was a poor mans version of a 4 wheel drive. You could ride anywhere back then no restrictions. The Elsinore was Hondas first serious 2-stroke bike. A four stroke just couldn't cut it at high altitude. The Bultaco's was the bike of choice for the serious rider back then. I rode with a guy that had a Hodaka Wombat and I coudln't keep up with that crazy bastard, he carried a pocket full of spark plugs and a pack down fly rod across the handle bars. You are right about the smell, Robert Duvall said it best" nothing like the smell of napalm in the morning". The same goes for 2-stroke smell.



+1:thumbsup:


I spent a ton of time in Left Hand Canyon-

HILife
06-18-2009, 02:53 PM
This is my bike I use the most when I am camping locally in the Cascade or Selkirk Mountains. I also use this when I am kayaking. I trailer it down to the take out and then drive back to the drop in on solo trips.

Carries a ton of gear. Awesome low end torque. She will climb over any amount of snow, mud, dirt. Highway legal (though I keep her under 70). The fat tire is hilarious and teaches you to ride differently than a traditional dirt bike.

Sometimes it isn't about the cc's. This bike might be down on the cool factor but it is a 10 on the fun scale. The #1 bike that I put a friend on that doesn't ride that often.

All this talk about dirt bikes and DS are getting me turned on to them. The idea of off roading through the dirt, hills and mountains sounds like fun.

USMCBladerunner
06-18-2009, 02:59 PM
You really don't know much about newer Harleys do you? There are plenty of Harleys out there with 150,000+ miles that have never been touched-if you want high tech, look at the VRod-you are calling that 70's technology? Or, the Buell-

I'm surprised at how few counterpunches my post got. I know plenty about newer Harleys. I was being deliberately(and overly) antagonistic, but I truly do feel that they are overpriced, underpowered, lacking in reliability (however improved from their pathetic past performance), and generally lacking in inspiration or engineering vision. Even the V-Rod uses engine technology that was only cutting edge in the late 1980s. That isn't to say that they are as bad as they were, they have reinvented themselves in a remarkable way, but they still aren't even close to the rest of the world in terms of performance and engineering. I think Buell has a lot of good ideas, the under carriage muffler is a great idea, but overall they have a worse reliability problem than Harley, and, given that they are "sport" bikes, their lack of power is even more aggregious than that of their cruiser brethren. I think they are kind of cool, and they are definitely unique, but from a total motorcycle ownership perspective, they suck big balls.

USMCBladerunner
06-18-2009, 03:08 PM
If I have to explain it, you wouldn't understand, For me and the old fats I ride with, we could give a big rats ass about status. Go out and straddle a Harley Screamin Eagle and tell me it's 1970's technology. There are guys that talk and guys that go out a ride. Status my ass !!

Lol...I get it...you don't have to explain it...you think you aren't about status as you display pictures of your $30,000 (at least) motorcycle...one that is more than likely inferior to a Gold Wing in almost every emperical metric...except "understanding" I'm sure...

Don't get me wrong, I think your bike is sweet. Hell, it is sweet, regardless of what I think about it. But I don't see how you get around the cost/performance/value issue without acknowledging that it is either about status or "buy American at any cost." If I had money to burn, I'd own a Harley, but I wouldn't kid myself that it made sense to in any way other than emotional fulfillment.

Pony Boy
06-18-2009, 03:10 PM
+1:thumbsup:


I spent a ton of time in Left Hand Canyon-

In the early 70's you could ride a bike up left hand canyon above the town of Ward to St Vrain Creek and up the creek all the way to the divide. You could also ride back into Left Hand reservoir and all around the lake. I haven't been up there in a while but I heard you can't even fart up there now without the tree huggers getting upset. I think it's all blocked off except for foot traffic only. There was no population living up there back then.

USMCBladerunner
06-18-2009, 03:14 PM
I don't really want a sports bike for the speed, but more for the look. I have no intention of getting a 1000cc and up kind of bike. I just want a bike that looks sporty, but has a comfortable riding position and enough room so my knees aren't touching my chest.

I get you, but my point was that all true sport bikes are going to be about the same size, regardless of displacement.

Look into the SV-650 or FZ-600 and see how those hit ya. The SV-650S adds a front 1/2 fairing and clip-ons to make it even a little more sporting. I prefer the handlebarred standard version myself.

Pony Boy
06-18-2009, 03:32 PM
Lol...I get it...you don't have to explain it...you think you aren't about status as you display pictures of your $30,000 (at least) motorcycle...one that is more than likely inferior to a Gold Wing in almost every emperical metric...except "understanding" I'm sure...

Like I said I would try to explain but you will never understand. I ride a Harley and have for over 40 years. I drive a Ford F-250 truck and I always prefered my women a little on the plump side. In other words it's "different strokes for different folks". I wouldn't ride a Honda Gold Wing if you gave it to me for free and by the way I think they run about 25 to 30K.

bronclvr
06-18-2009, 03:36 PM
I get it

No, unfortunately, you don't-and you won't until you own one-

I've owned every kind of Bike, and they all have their place, but nothing has ever moved me like....well, never mind-

HILife
06-18-2009, 03:49 PM
I get you, but my point was that all true sport bikes are going to be about the same size, regardless of displacement.

Look into the SV-650 or FZ-600 and see how those hit ya. The SV-650S adds a front 1/2 fairing and clip-ons to make it even a little more sporting. I prefer the handlebarred standard version myself.

I posted a pic of the SV-650 one page back. It actually looks nice. Also someone meantioned the Honda cbr 125. I'd consider it. interms of size from what I understand I can just get any bike and adjust a few things on it to make it more comfortable, say raise the seat up.

http://www.moto-station.com/ttesimages/motodivers/nouveautes2007/Honda_CBR125R_2007_rouge_stgz

Bronx33
06-18-2009, 04:19 PM
Just buy a $1000 or cheaper streetbike 650cc or smaller off of craigslist until you learn how to ride ( sell it) then buy something fancy, if you go buying something to powerfull now ( you will end up being a hood ornament)

USMCBladerunner
06-18-2009, 05:23 PM
No, unfortunately, you don't-and you won't until you own one-

I've owned every kind of Bike, and they all have their place, but nothing has ever moved me like....well, never mind-

I suppose you are right that I don't get it, but I've ridden Harleys, and I haven't been impressed at all...they look the business, a few of their models are freaking gorgeous, but they ride like ****...there is no other way around it, if you actually enjoy riding a motorcycle vice a moving sofa, then a Harley is nothing less than a >$20,000 piece of epic fail.

chadta
06-18-2009, 07:50 PM
ive got it, just the thing to get you onto 2 wheels

http://i173.photobucket.com/albums/w48/chadta12/Bike/1122334455.jpg


ps dont tell my buddy i posted this, he thinks i destroyed this picture

TennBronco
06-18-2009, 08:02 PM
If you get a sport bike, I definitely recommend finding your local road course. A lot can be learned there and a much safer place to divulge in fun.

My bikes are:
Ducati 999 for the street.
http://img208.imageshack.us/img208/2503/dsc2771.jpg
GSXR600 for the track.
http://img524.imageshack.us/img524/9118/img5499c.jpg

Broncos_OTM
06-18-2009, 10:13 PM
I have a Triumph 1969 bobber chopped out. for street

and a 2006 KTM 525cc for off road.

Are you doing your course at front range?

Best advice i can give you is dont buy one. Not unless you want to shorten your life span. And to buy a cheap bike before you graduate to the costly bikes. that way if you wreck it wont set you out to much.

Broncos_OTM
06-18-2009, 10:26 PM
Also all those morons that keep on running off at the mouth about harley this and harley that. i hate those people. i can understand understand not wanting to look like a retard but. There is a ton of Quality bikes out there. you just either a have to have alot of money to get a custom or figure out how to be a engineer lol

The Old Nortons BSA's and Triumph make perfect choppers.

NASurfer
06-19-2009, 12:14 AM
I suppose you are right that I don't get it, but I've ridden Harleys, and I haven't been impressed at all...they look the business, a few of their models are freaking gorgeous, but they ride like ****...there is no other way around it, if you actually enjoy riding a motorcycle vice a moving sofa, then a Harley is nothing less than a >$20,000 piece of epic fail.
I've ridden both and my opinion is similar to yours.

I try not to bash what others like but I do think much of the Harley fanbase really is just fascinated with the image. They aren't superior bikes in regards to performance.

That being said, they don't leak oil like they used to (quality is actually pretty good nowadays), and their performance is enough for plenty of riders. Different strokes for different folks.

CSU Husker
06-19-2009, 01:03 AM
Ride what you like, there is no need to rag on others for what they enjoy.

HILife
06-19-2009, 05:55 AM
I have a Triumph 1969 bobber chopped out. for street

and a 2006 KTM 525cc for off road.

Are you doing your course at front range?

Best advice i can give you is dont buy one. Not unless you want to shorten your life span. And to buy a cheap bike before you graduate to the costly bikes. that way if you wreck it wont set you out to much.

? what's that?

CSU Husker
06-19-2009, 06:08 AM
? what's that?

Front Range Community College, I think

TailgateNut
06-19-2009, 07:44 AM
Here's my toy.


Good to see you taking the safety course. Way to many out there who are clueless. It's usually either a dumnbass who thinks he should be going 0-60 in 4 seconds or a car/truck driver who isn't paying attention and runs the MC off the road which kills newby (and experienced) riders.

I had to lay one of my bikes down back in the early 90's. I didn't get back on until about 1yr ago.

TailgateNut
06-19-2009, 07:48 AM
If you ride safe and smart you'll be ok. Riding smart is a big deal. Stay out of blind spots, if you see somebody turning left into your lane flash your brights and weave a little bit. Cars turning left into your lane and they just never saw you is one of the rider's banes. And wear the best fullface helmet.


...if you see someone turning into your lane, pull out the glock and put a few holes in their driver side door.LOL

LOUD PIPES and PAYING ATTENTION saves lives.

Cito Pelon
06-19-2009, 11:25 AM
This is what I'm getting once Dortoh closes on his $2million house.

http://media.moterus.es/photos/3570/gs.jpg

A water-cooled, fuel-injected, BMW boxer twin, right?

I love the boxer twin engine. The handling is superb. And, you can put a huge gas tank on a boxer because the boxer has the low center of gravity to balance it out. That's one of the things I liked about my BMW boxers, I didn't have to stop for fuel at 200 miles, I could go 350 miles before refueling. Not to mention shaft drive which quiets the ride down some. There's plenty of nice bikes out there, but the BMW boxers is what clicked best with me.

SureShot
06-19-2009, 11:31 AM
A water-cooled, fuel-injected, BMW boxer twin, right?

I love the boxer twin engine. The handling is superb. And, you can put a huge gas tank on a boxer because the boxer has the low center of gravity to balance it out. That's one of the things I liked about my BMW boxers, I didn't have to stop for fuel at 200 miles, I could go 350 miles before refueling. Not to mention shaft drive which quiets the ride down some. There's plenty of nice bikes out there, but the BMW boxers is what clicked best with me.


I don't have a bike but if I were to get one it would be the R1200 GS. I have to have a bike that will go over Cottonwood pass so I can deliver beatings to Apa at the Fairplay truckstop.

Cito Pelon
06-19-2009, 11:38 AM
I'm surprised at how few counterpunches my post got. I know plenty about newer Harleys. I was being deliberately(and overly) antagonistic, but I truly do feel that they are overpriced, underpowered, lacking in reliability (however improved from their pathetic past performance), and generally lacking in inspiration or engineering vision. Even the V-Rod uses engine technology that was only cutting edge in the late 1980s. That isn't to say that they are as bad as they were, they have reinvented themselves in a remarkable way, but they still aren't even close to the rest of the world in terms of performance and engineering. I think Buell has a lot of good ideas, the under carriage muffler is a great idea, but overall they have a worse reliability problem than Harley, and, given that they are "sport" bikes, their lack of power is even more aggregious than that of their cruiser brethren. I think they are kind of cool, and they are definitely unique, but from a total motorcycle ownership perspective, they suck big balls.

Harley is a culture thing. That's pretty much the whole appeal. Their bikes can't hold a candle to the best bikes on the market.

It's interesting that Ducati is a V-twin and is the top superbike, but Harley is a V-twin and is the lowest on the totem pole. Harley has their niche, and performance is not a priority in the Harley buyers.

worm
06-19-2009, 12:00 PM
One of the road bikes.

Taking the TL for a spin on the Coeur d 'Alene River a few weeks ago. Just up from the Snake Pit.

bronclvr
06-19-2009, 12:03 PM
Harley is a culture thing. That's pretty much the whole appeal. Their bikes can't hold a candle to the best bikes on the market.

Harley is a V-twin and is the lowest on the totem pole. Harley has their niche, and performance is not a priority in the Harley buyers.

Cito, for the most part you are totally correct on this-almost every Bike that I have owned was faster, handled better, and stopped better no disagreement there-I have 30 Years worth of almost every kind of Motorcycle Racing under my belt, I do understand.

For me, at this stage of my life, it's about how it makes me feel-I'm done blasting around, defying physics and my Health Insurance-I want to enjoy the ride and not die any younger than I am. I cannot control my right wrist on a SportBike, and that is why I have an R6 for sale.

Now, what we haven't discussed here is Women-when I was single, I had no problem picking up Women on a Harley (even moreso than usual). Harleys are absolute chick magnets, bar none, unless you want to pick up women at a SuperBike race. NO Bike gets more attention.

On top of that, have I mentioned that my Wife likes my Harley? Let me restate that-she absolutely LOVES my Harley-why? Because I can take her for a ride an she can have an Or.....did I mention that she likes my Harley? She will ask when we are taking our next ride, and afterwards I get the "benefits" ;) .There is a reason why they call them a Milwaukee Vibrator-Hilarious!

As for them being at the lowest on the totem pole-who's opinion is that? Can you prove that they are? By what measure-Cycle World? Motorcyclist? No, I didn't think so-I think Pony boy said it best: "if I have to explain it to ya, you wouldn't understand"

bronclvr
06-19-2009, 12:05 PM
One of the road bikes.

Taking the TL for a spin on the Coeur d 'Alene River a few weeks ago. Just up from the Snake Pit.

worm,

Nice looking Bike-is that an AfterMarket Exhaust on it? Any mods?

Cito Pelon
06-19-2009, 12:08 PM
I don't have a bike but if I were to get one it would be the R1200 GS. I have to have a bike that will go over Cottonwood pass so I can deliver beatings to Apa at the Fairplay truckstop.

Go for it. I wouldn't mind having a R1200GS. Looks like a superb machine. I started out with Hondas, but the BMW R65 I had was probably the best all-around machine I ever owned. A 1965 Mercedes 220S I had rivaled the BMW R65 for best machine. My attitude is buy a lot of cars and bikes, always looking to top the last one.

TheElusiveKyleOrton
06-19-2009, 12:08 PM
Kruger Kustoms - Because Stock Bikes Suck
www.krugerkustoms.com

My girlfriend's brother in law and his brother run that company. Building me a bike from the bones of a '96 Softail. Should have it by the end of the summer. Can't freakin' wait.

worm
06-19-2009, 12:13 PM
worm,

Nice looking Bike-is that an AfterMarket Exhaust on it? Any mods?

Good eye broncolvr. Yoshi Exhaust. No other mods.

Only mods I really do are to my adventure bikes, the GS800, the Alp and the two mighty TW200s. Most of the mods are more outfiting for fishing\camping\off-road stuff than performance related.

OCBronco
06-19-2009, 12:25 PM
I'm riding an 05 SV-650 (see below), and I absolutely love it. It has enough power for commuting around SoCal, and is able to get me out of trouble on the freeways when needed. It's also very well behaved in corners, and very flickable. The only problem is that the standard SV is being replaced with a bike called the Gladius, which I guess is supposed to be a "detuned" SV.


As for starting out, here's my two cents. I started off two years ago on an 04 ninja 250, after I took the MSF course. At the time, I appreciated that the bike didn't have enough power to kill me, especially since I hadn't ridden before. If I had the experience of riding dirt bikes for awhile, I might have started bigger. The only problems with starting off with a 250, IMHO, are: 1) the super squishy front forks, and 2) the fact that it has hardly any low-end torque. Combine the two, and it can be very challenging for experienced riders, let alone newbies.

One thing I did, and I would recommend if you're just starting out, is I spent several months practicing in a parking lot before I hit the streets. Some of the time at first was just practicing what I had learned at MSF. Once I felt comfortable with that, I picked up some books and started practicing what I was learning in the books. A really good one is Nick Ienatsch's Sport Riding Techniques (here: http://www.amazon.com/Sport-Riding-Techniques-Develop-Confidence/dp/1893618072/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1245435547&sr=8-1)

By the way, you all haven't lived until you've woven through LA freeway traffic on a motorcycle. :D

ant1999e
06-19-2009, 12:32 PM
Don't forget to fill out the organ donor card. ;D

My job is safety for the Air Force. We have these motorcycle safety classes every week and hand the donor cards out for the students to put in their helmet. Motorcycles are fun but scary.

Cito Pelon
06-19-2009, 12:34 PM
Cito, for the most part you are totally correct on this-almost every Bike that I have owned was faster, handled better, and stopped better no disagreement there-I have 30 Years worth of almost every kind of Motorcycle Racing under my belt, I do understand.

For me, at this stage of my life, it's about how it makes me feel-I'm done blasting around, defying physics and my Health Insurance-I want to enjoy the ride and not die any younger than I am. I cannot control my right wrist on a SportBike, and that is why I have an R6 for sale.

Now, what we haven't discussed here is Women-when I was single, I had no problem picking up Women on a Harley (even moreso than usual). Harleys are absolute chick magnets, bar none, unless you want to pick up women at a SuperBike race. NO Bike gets more attention.

On top of that, have I mentioned that my Wife likes my Harley? Let me restate that-she absolutely LOVES my Harley-why? Because I can take her for a ride an she can have an Or.....did I mention that she likes my Harley? She will ask when we are taking our next ride, and afterwards I get the "benefits" ;) .There is a reason why they call them a Milwaukee Vibrator-Hilarious!

As for them being at the lowest on the totem pole-who's opinion is that? Can you prove that they are? By what measure-Cycle World? Motorcyclist? No, I didn't think so-I think Pony boy said it best: "if I have to explain it to ya, you wouldn't understand"

There's no doubt about vibrations and chicks. :thumbsup:

Vibrations and chicks aside, I like fine machinery for its own merits. And Harley is not known as fine machinery. If you're gonna get into a race of any kind, Harley is gonna be sucking hind tit.

HILife
06-19-2009, 12:51 PM
Front Range Community College, I think

oh ok. Then no. I don't live in Denver

HILife
06-19-2009, 12:53 PM
Here's my toy.


Good to see you taking the safety course. Way to many out there who are clueless. It's usually either a dumnbass who thinks he should be going 0-60 in 4 seconds or a car/truck driver who isn't paying attention and runs the MC off the road which kills newby (and experienced) riders.

I had to lay one of my bikes down back in the early 90's. I didn't get back on until about 1yr ago.

I've had that happen a few times and I was driving a car.

Bronx33
06-19-2009, 12:58 PM
Hopefully your first bike is a learner bike don't get caught up in style or power ( it will kill you ) when you have zero experience, start slow and smart you will be amazed how defensive you have to ride to avoid being ran over. Be smart brother i have been riding since the age of 7 and i have ridin most everything and i have learned over confidence and lack of learned skills f**** you up everytime. (And you don't always get a second chance) may as well increase your odds.

bronclvr
06-19-2009, 01:12 PM
There's no doubt about vibrations and chicks. :thumbsup:

Vibrations and chicks aside, I like fine machinery for its own merits. And Harley is not known as fine machinery. If you're gonna get into a race of any kind, Harley is gonna be sucking hind tit.


I don't race on the Street, and, "not known as fine machinery" is purely an opinion, not fact-:thumbs:

TailgateNut
06-19-2009, 01:40 PM
I logged a 6,000 mile trip on my 2003 Harley Road King last summer and a 2,000 this spring and that's not including Sturgis. My advice would be to buy what you are going to ride, not a starter bike. I have had friends buy Sportsters and then have a hard time selling and trading up. It's what ever "floats your boat" if zipping around on a sport bike and speed is what turns you on, go for it and if lay back cruzing and hearing your pipes talk to you turns you on get a Harley or metric cruzer or chopper. Just get out there and ride, nothing better for the soul.

Nice ride, and great comments. I picked up my bike for "a song" (Cash Talks). The guy who owned it got a scare while riding in the hills and would'nt touch it anymore after getting home. I waited as he dropped the price each month until I pounced.
I picked it up for less than half price with only 700 miles on the odometer. Now I'm looking into trading up to a 2000cc Vulcan. I just love the fuel injection, water cooled engine and the way this beast handles. I can go on runs with guys who don't have fuel injection and when driving in the mountains it make a giant difference. You can go from 5000 t0o 12000ft without any loss of power and performance. I'll Dog a Hog and the ride is just as comfy.;)

mr007
06-19-2009, 05:28 PM
My advice would be to buy what you are going to ride, not a starter bike. I have had friends buy Sportsters and then have a hard time selling and trading up. It's what ever "floats your boat" if zipping around on a sport bike and speed is what turns you on, go for it..

This is about the worst piece of advice you could possibly get. Do not take advice on sports bikes from someone who rides cruisers.

HILife
06-20-2009, 01:05 PM
Thanks everyone for all the info. I'll make sure to keep it all in mind. My Safety class is on July 3, 4, 5 so wish me luck.

Bronx33
06-20-2009, 01:19 PM
Quote:
Originally Posted by Pony Boy
My advice would be to buy what you are going to ride, not a starter bike. I have had friends buy Sportsters and then have a hard time selling and trading up. It's what ever "floats your boat" if zipping around on a sport bike and speed is what turns you on, go for it..


Aweful advice ( just aweful) so by your reasoning a little kid learning should start riding a full race YZ 80? Hilarious!

NASurfer
06-20-2009, 01:37 PM
If you get something too small you'll outgrow it fast and may have a hard time getting rid of it.

If you get something too big, you'll get yourself killed.

Obviously the second one is worst then the first but you don't want to go too extreme with a small bike.

(to original poster) Pay attention to how you feel during your course with the bike you have. I believe everything is a cruiser type 500cc and smaller. After you take the course try out any bikes that your friends may have. Just try to get a decent feel before you plunk down any hard earned cash. :thumbsup:

Bronx33
06-20-2009, 01:41 PM
If you get something too small you'll outgrow it fast and may have a hard time getting rid of it.If you get something too big, you'll get yourself killed.

Obviously the second one is worst then the first but you don't want to go too extreme with a small bike.

(to original poster) Pay attention to how you feel during your course with the bike you have. I believe everything is a cruiser type 500cc and smaller. After you take the course try out any bikes that your friends may have. Just try to get a decent feel before you plunk down any hard earned cash. :thumbsup:

Not on craigs list..

want2bAbronco2
06-20-2009, 01:56 PM
I use to race Motorcross/Supercross 80cc, 125cc, and 250cc. When I got a street bike I went with a Ninja 750 (im 6'4" 210) you are 6'2" but have no exp. so I would buy a used 600cc for 3-4k and ride for a summer then upgrade to a 750. The big 1000cc are sick and the hyabusa 1300 is just insane.

Tip on riding, look out everywhere and treat everyone else as if they dont know how to drive/are stupid. If you are looking at everyone you will be fine. Everytime I almost got hit was because someone pulled infront of me/didnt stop at a stop sign etc... just watch out. Oh, and ALWAYS were a helm and protective gear, just stupid not too.

HILife
06-20-2009, 06:07 PM
Not on craigs list..

Craigslist is where I've been looking for a bike. Mostly just see what's out there and how much it would cost. Looks like the prices are much better on there then at a dealer.

Bronx33
06-20-2009, 06:29 PM
Craigslist is where I've been looking for a bike. Mostly just see what's out there and how much it would cost. Looks like the prices are much better on there then at a dealer.


Let me know where you live at and i can give you a hand ( iam a craigs list seasoned veteran) i can also point you towards great learner bike or if you are looking for something inpeticular, the trick is looking early an often and be ready to move when you find something ( it will be gone fast)

HILife
06-20-2009, 06:56 PM
I use to race Motorcross/Supercross 80cc, 125cc, and 250cc. When I got a street bike I went with a Ninja 750 (im 6'4" 210) you are 6'2" but have no exp. so I would buy a used 600cc for 3-4k and ride for a summer then upgrade to a 750. The big 1000cc are sick and the hyabusa 1300 is just insane.

Tip on riding, look out everywhere and treat everyone else as if they dont know how to drive/are stupid. If you are looking at everyone you will be fine. Everytime I almost got hit was because someone pulled infront of me/didnt stop at a stop sign etc... just watch out. Oh, and ALWAYS were a helm and protective gear, just stupid not too.

There is someone at my work that rides the 1300 Haybusa. I haven't found out who that person is, but I'm looking for them. I NEVER plan on riding without gear. Motorcycles are dangeres enough.

chadta
06-20-2009, 07:55 PM
busas are great, if ya wanna go really fast in a straight line.

i had more fun on my R6 then i did my R1 tho, it was just more fun to ride, ay really had to ring its neck to get it to go, but i liked driving around at 12,000 rpm

TennBronco
06-21-2009, 08:52 AM
Quote:



Aweful advice ( just aweful) so by your reasoning a little kid learning should start riding a full race YZ 80? Hilarious!

I kind of understand what he's saying. Sure, starting small in engine size or hp category and working your way up is the safest bet. But how many of you riders took that advice? It's not very practical and, honestly, doesn't happen that often. No matter what bike you buy, whether it's small, large, sport or cruiser, the two most important things are getting lots of training and using that ever important god given matter between your ears.

seanpgk
06-21-2009, 09:38 AM
Nope. Honda. The Transalp and the Africa Twin (never sold in the US) started it all. Won Dakar multiple times back in the early 90s.

BMW has refined it with the 'Long Way Around' phenomenon et al. Also the fact that there is a BMW dealer everywhere around the globe doesn't hurt.

I have a GS800 as my primary DS now. Love it. Truly a bike to take you anywhere. My Alp is now regulated to <1000mile trips. Awesome bike. Honda reliability + V-twin power....but it is now a classic and deserves to be babied more.

Will post some pics of her in Glacier when I get back.

I'm a BMW guy, own a '96 R850R. I probably won't ever sell it, just buy something else. The Dakar bike rally goes a further back than the early 90s...

Yamaha won it in '79 and '80, BMW won 4 out of 5 years from '81-'85 with Honda winning in '82. Honda won '86-'89, with Yamaha dominating most of the '90s.

worm
06-21-2009, 10:23 AM
I'm a BMW guy, own a '96 R850R. I probably won't ever sell it, just buy something else. The Dakar bike rally goes a further back than the early 90s...

Yamaha won it in '79 and '80, BMW won 4 out of 5 years from '81-'85 with Honda winning in '82. Honda won '86-'89, with Yamaha dominating most of the '90s.

Nice bike. Love the boxer twins. I almost never sell. I just add. I love riding and I love collecting.

I didn't mean to imply that Honda won the first Dakar (I have been obsessed with riding in that race for a long, long time).

I was saying that with the Africa Twin and Alp, Honda was at the forefront of coming out with 50\50 bikes that birthed dual sport riding as a genre.

I guess they could have done it without their Dakar success but Honda was a master at cross-breeding all their technology advances in various types of riding and taking it a new direction. 30 years later, dual sport riding is currently the fastest growing motorcycle segment.

Soichiro Honda was a true genius and visionary. In many, many ways. It is remarkable to hear the reverence still paid to him today on the Isle of Man from riders and non-riders alike.

All riding is awesome. Sport, cruising, whatever. Different tools for different situations. However, when you can mix riding with adventure, RTW, off-road, exploring, fishing, camping etc. That is heaven to me.

seanpgk
06-21-2009, 11:03 AM
I agree 100%, if I wasn't riding BMW it would be Honda or Harley. My next bike will probably be the 800 GS or the R1200 GS. The damn thing is I don't have enough $ to get either right now!

DenverFanMan6
06-21-2009, 11:09 AM
i have 2 1971 superglides and i love them but if your looking for something cheap to start out on i would go with a buell it's the best of both world it's harley and a sports bike and they are pretty cheap if you look around

Cito Pelon
07-04-2009, 07:45 PM
Just buy a $1000 or cheaper streetbike 650cc or smaller off of craigslist until you learn how to ride ( sell it) then buy something fancy, if you go buying something to powerfull now ( you will end up being a hood ornament)

That's some good advice, life. Heed.

Dutch
07-05-2009, 02:01 AM
Hilife,
Normally I don't get into these discussions as folks in the Moto gig tend to be so brand/style loyal, they also tend to not see the drawbacks of their own marque/style (remember that they most likely did not start riding on what they are currently enamored with). Disclaimer: I've owned over thirty bikes of every type/marque over the last 30 years: dirt, sport, dual sport, cruiser, and touring. I've been paid to race by three different manufacturers, paid to do long term testing by two (currently), and am a card carrying MSF instructor and AMA pro racer (both dirt and road racing). Whatever. For a starter bike you want a couple of things. User friendly first. The comment about "getting what you want, screw what everyone tells you" is...well, stupid. You are going to be dealing with an entirely new way of interacting with the vehicular world. Reduce the number of issues you have to handle as there are going to be enough of them as it is. Secondly Underpowered is as dangerous as overpowered in the real world. Remember that the gas is your friend. When it comes to getting out of trouble, you have a significantly reduced ability to control a bike while on the brakes....no different than a cage (car), but magnified even more so when you only have two wheels (it won't turn when on the brakes...it wants to stand up and run strait). At 6'2" (my height) you are going to want something that will fit that frame. The SV-650 is where I point anyone starting out that is 6'+. The great thing about the SV is that it won't be too small from a positional standpoint or underpowered as it is a twin (great torque), plus you can buy a used one and ride it for a year..then sell it for about the same money as you paid for it (personally I would keep it and turn it into a track bike...nowhere will you learn as much about your riding or your bike as the track). Schools are the bomb. I still take them as often as I can (and I teach at a couple). You will never stop learning, plus they will usually give you discounts on your insurance. Think about what you want to do with the activity and please don't get caught up in the "my Marque is the only Marque" BS. If it works for what you want, it is all good......you are riding and at the end of the day, that is all that matters. Purchase great gear. Not good...Great. Period. If you have a $10 head, buy a $10 helmet. Leathers are the preferred way to stay clean (let the cow take the hit, it is already dead and that is a mighty big and angry belt sander running under you). Quality helmet, jacket, boots, and gloves are the required basics-no exceptions. Not cheap to get into, but they will last you a long time if you get good kit up front. As for bikes, it will never end. They are all valid and fun. You will figure out what works for you. Welcome to the club, sincerely. There is nothing out there quite like it. You can tap into a vibe that is attainable from many other activities, but none of which is nearly as convenient to access. You can go out to the garage and hop on the bike, ride for thirty minutes around your own neighborhood, and come home with perma-grin and a clean headspace. It narrows the focus (remember that they are ALL trying to kill you) and clears the head like nothing else I know. PM me if you would like to chat about this offline, I'd be glad to help out. Think Iíve got a pretty good feel for where you want to goÖ..:thumbs:, again welcome...you won't regret it.

TDmvp
07-05-2009, 03:24 AM
http://www.buell.com/en_us/

nuff said ...

XB9SX
http://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/street/xb9sx/gallery/regular/wallpaper_XB9SX_6.jpg
1125CR
http://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/street/1125cr/gallery/regular/wallpaper_1125CR_14.jpg


Firebolt
http://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/sportbike/xb12r/gallery/regular/wallpaper_XB12R_6.jpghttp://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/sportbike/xb12r/gallery/regular/wallpaper_XB12R_7.jpg

Bronx33
07-05-2009, 08:35 AM
It's time to go shopping hilife!!

Cito Pelon
07-05-2009, 09:38 AM
Hilife,
Normally I don't get into these discussions as folks in the Moto gig tend to be so brand/style loyal, they also tend to not see the drawbacks of their own marque/style (remember that they most likely did not start riding on what they are currently enamored with). Disclaimer: I've owned over thirty bikes of every type/marque over the last 30 years: dirt, sport, dual sport, cruiser, and touring. I've been paid to race by three different manufacturers, paid to do long term testing by two (currently), and am a card carrying MSF instructor and AMA pro racer (both dirt and road racing). Whatever. For a starter bike you want a couple of things. User friendly first. The comment about "getting what you want, screw what everyone tells you" is...well, stupid. You are going to be dealing with an entirely new way of interacting with the vehicular world. Reduce the number of issues you have to handle as there are going to be enough of them as it is. Secondly Underpowered is as dangerous as overpowered in the real world. Remember that the gas is your friend. When it comes to getting out of trouble, you have a significantly reduced ability to control a bike while on the brakes....no different than a cage (car), but magnified even more so when you only have two wheels (it won't turn when on the brakes...it wants to stand up and run strait). At 6'2" (my height) you are going to want something that will fit that frame. The SV-650 is where I point anyone starting out that is 6'+. The great thing about the SV is that it won't be too small from a positional standpoint or underpowered as it is a twin (great torque), plus you can buy a used one and ride it for a year..then sell it for about the same money as you paid for it (personally I would keep it and turn it into a track bike...nowhere will you learn as much about your riding or your bike as the track). Schools are the bomb. I still take them as often as I can (and I teach at a couple). You will never stop learning, plus they will usually give you discounts on your insurance. Think about what you want to do with the activity and please don't get caught up in the "my Marque is the only Marque" BS. If it works for what you want, it is all good......you are riding and at the end of the day, that is all that matters. Purchase great gear. Not good...Great. Period. If you have a $10 head, buy a $10 helmet. Leathers are the preferred way to stay clean (let the cow take the hit, it is already dead and that is a mighty big and angry belt sander running under you). Quality helmet, jacket, boots, and gloves are the required basics-no exceptions. Not cheap to get into, but they will last you a long time if you get good kit up front. As for bikes, it will never end. They are all valid and fun. You will figure out what works for you. Welcome to the club, sincerely. There is nothing out there quite like it. You can tap into a vibe that is attainable from many other activities, but none of which is nearly as convenient to access. You can go out to the garage and hop on the bike, ride for thirty minutes around your own neighborhood, and come home with perma-grin and a clean headspace. It narrows the focus (remember that they are ALL trying to kill you) and clears the head like nothing else I know. PM me if you would like to chat about this offline, I'd be glad to help out. Think Iíve got a pretty good feel for where you want to goÖ..:thumbs:, again welcome...you won't regret it.

I don't know if having too much power for a starter bike is a good idea. I started out with a Honda CM450 twin many years ago and I'm glad I did. Top speed was about 75 mph and that was a good way to learn the ropes for a year. It wasn't cool, but it was a good way to learn about the trouble one can get into and how to wrench a bike, the maintenance needed and so forth.

Absolutely get good gear, don't skimp and a lot of people do after dropping all that money on a bike. You have to budget for the gear also. And top notch tires. Bikes are a blast, dangerous, but a blast.

What you said about accelerating out of trouble is true. When in traffic I always keep it in a lower gear so I have the option of accelerating or braking. And stay out of cars blind spots, when I'm passing a car I accelerate through the blind spot as fast as I can. I also watch the car drivers head and hands to see if he's planning on making a lane change.

Cito Pelon
07-05-2009, 09:38 AM
It's time to go shopping hilife!!

C'mon hilife, give us a update.

Bronx33
07-05-2009, 09:44 AM
I don't know if having too much power for a starter bike is a good idea. I started out with a Honda CM450 twin many years ago and I'm glad I did. Top speed was about 75 mph and that was a good way to learn the ropes for a year. It wasn't cool, but it was a good way to learn about the trouble one can get into and how to wrench a bike, the maintenance needed and so forth.

Absolutely get good gear, don't skimp and a lot of people do after dropping all that money on a bike. You have to budget for the gear also. And top notch tires. Bikes are a blast, dangerous, but a blast.

What you said about accelerating out of trouble is true. When in traffic I always keep it in a lower gear so I have the option of accelerating or braking. And stay out of cars blind spots, when I'm passing a car I accelerate through the blind spot as fast as I can. I also watch the car drivers head and hands to see if he's planning on making a lane change.


Me too and if they have aphone glued to theirs heads i really watch em....

Cito Pelon
07-05-2009, 09:48 AM
http://www.buell.com/en_us/

nuff said ...

XB9SX
http://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/street/xb9sx/gallery/regular/wallpaper_XB9SX_6.jpg
1125CR
http://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/street/1125cr/gallery/regular/wallpaper_1125CR_14.jpg


Firebolt
http://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/sportbike/xb12r/gallery/regular/wallpaper_XB12R_6.jpghttp://www.buell.com/_media/images/bikes/sportbike/xb12r/gallery/regular/wallpaper_XB12R_7.jpg

I wouldn't mind having one of them, but I'm not all that big on sport bikes/crotch rockets. They can be very fatiguing when riding for long periods. Leaning over the tank with your arms stretched out like that gets to me in the neck and shoulders.

Cito Pelon
07-05-2009, 10:00 AM
Nice bike. Love the boxer twins. I almost never sell. I just add. I love riding and I love collecting.

I didn't mean to imply that Honda won the first Dakar (I have been obsessed with riding in that race for a long, long time).

I was saying that with the Africa Twin and Alp, Honda was at the forefront of coming out with 50\50 bikes that birthed dual sport riding as a genre.

I guess they could have done it without their Dakar success but Honda was a master at cross-breeding all their technology advances in various types of riding and taking it a new direction. 30 years later, dual sport riding is currently the fastest growing motorcycle segment.

Soichiro Honda was a true genius and visionary. In many, many ways. It is remarkable to hear the reverence still paid to him today on the Isle of Man from riders and non-riders alike.

All riding is awesome. Sport, cruising, whatever. Different tools for different situations. However, when you can mix riding with adventure, RTW, off-road, exploring, fishing, camping etc. That is heaven to me.

Me too. I liked my Hondas, but the two BMW boxers I owned were my favorites. The R65S was a sweet bike. I used to take that thing off road quite a bit when we lived in Alpine, CA. Just a quick jaunt up I-8 to the Pine Valley Wilderness area, cut off on the old hwy 60 to Descanso, over the pass through Guatay into Pine Valley, then on the dirt road up to Laguna Mt Rd and back south to I-8 again and west to Alpine. Or just continuing north and east to the Anza-Borrego and ripping down that road south at 110 mph, a quick stop at the Mormon Trail monument, then west on I-8 ripping uphill through Devils Canyon at 100 mph back to Alpine. Good times.