PDA

View Full Version : Everest


ZONA
05-16-2009, 02:00 AM
Just finished watching up the series on my HD TV and was it ever awesome. I grew up in Colorado Springs and I hiked up to the top of Pikes Peak 5 times (without oxygen........lol) and I could not believe how tired your body feels hiking that last 2 hours or so. You get headaches, and it seems you need to rest every 10 steps or so. And that's to go 14K feet.

Now think about going twice as high, to 29K feet. OMG, I don't know how the people do it, and especially those ones who have done it both without oxygen and the few who have done it in the dead of winter.

Watching that show, seeing how those top sherpas, not only climb that mountain every year, but help get people up and down that could not do it on their own, amazes me. And it's not like they hike up and down. On this show, you saw them go up to the top and lay all the new line for the group, come back down, help everybody up, and help everybody down. They are amazing people.

Anyway, if you like mountains, I highly recommend you to watch this series. I think it was on Discovery.

Take a peek at this pic below. The top of Pikes Peak would not even be in this picture. It is still several thousands of feet below where the glacier run is, 3000 feet below base camp at Everest. Wow, that is insane.

http://www.nikegames.net/zona/Misc/Broncos/everest.jpg

ZONA
05-16-2009, 01:21 PM
Wow, I thought for sure there would be somebody who would have said something. A post about a cool mountain on a forum where probably a good base of the forum population probably lives in the mountains.

That's okay, probably alot of people here who are city dwellers who probably never even hiked a single peak in Colorado. That's the new generation for ya. A guy can live right next to a majestic peak growing up and never give a care in the world to hike it. Just wants to get home from work, eat his cupcakes and drink his 6 pack and watch American Idol.

I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top. Seriously, if you live in Colorado, are in good to decent shape (which probably wipes out half of this forum......hahaha) and you haven't hiked a 14,000 peak yet, WTF are you waiting on? Go do it. You'll be amazed once you've done it what a cool feeling it is.

Los Broncos
05-16-2009, 01:26 PM
I love that show, has anyone seen "The man who skied everest"

Flex Gunmetal
05-16-2009, 01:33 PM
Nice, I'll check it out.
I read Into Thin Air every couple years and the scale of such an expedition amazes me. To think sherpas have been doing it without oxygen for generations is incredible.

SureShot
05-16-2009, 01:41 PM
Wow, I thought for sure there would be somebody who would have said something. A post about a cool mountain on a forum where probably a good base of the forum population probably lives in the mountains.

That's okay, probably alot of people here who are city dwellers who probably never even hiked a single peak in Colorado. That's the new generation for ya. A guy can live right next to a majestic peak growing up and never give a care in the world to hike it. Just wants to get home from work, eat his cupcakes and drink his 6 pack and watch American Idol.

I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top. Seriously, if you live in Colorado, are in good to decent shape (which probably wipes out half of this forum......hahaha) and you haven't hiked a 14,000 peak yet, WTF are you waiting on? Go do it. You'll be amazed once you've done it what a cool feeling it is.

Climbing mountains is boring. Its much more fun to jump off of them

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/_F9RJSPnf8A&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/_F9RJSPnf8A&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

ZONA
05-16-2009, 02:00 PM
I've seen plenty of Everest documentaries before but this was amazing. It was like a 5 part series of something and with each guy on the team having a mic and several having video, you hear and see stuff as never before shown. You really get to see first hand how people just fall apart up near the top. They think they are making wise decisions and you can see how they are really not. It's brutal up there. The team walks past a man dying on the way back just a few hours after some of them summit. They try to give him oxygen to revive him but the man doesn't respond. They can't possibly get him down because they are running low on oxygen themselves, and are spent physically. Yet they show great remorse and emotion knowing they are leaving a man to die on top. They all have walked past dead bodies (currently 120 bodies or so are still on the peak and many still visible as hikers walk on by (and they show them, pretty gruesome) but coming across a man still alive but not being able to help him is another. Pretty much anybody who attempts Everest knows that once you get above 26K feet, if you can't at least get up on your own 2 feet, you're a dead man. Sherpas can only do so much at that height. Alot of placed are only wide enough for them to put one foot in front of the other. Yet the media had a field day with them saying why couldn't you rescue that man. All they would have to do is watch this series and you get a real up close first hand view of what it's like up there. Almost every member of the team, when they finally got back to base camp, had at least something amputated. They spent some 12 hours in -40 degrees. What shocked me most was the amount of people that were on the route to the summit and those log jams of novice climbers cost lives because everything is so calculated out, how much oxygen you can take, how many hours you can stay at any given altitude, how long you can stand still waiting for idiot climbers to get going while you're not moving and frost bite sets in, etc. I was hooked. I tivo'd them all and planned to watch them over a weeks period but I was so hooked I had to watch them all back to back in one night.

footstepsfrom#27
05-16-2009, 02:05 PM
Nothing beats this guy: http://www.accessmylibrary.com/coms2/summary_0286-5942928_ITM

maher_tyler
05-16-2009, 02:36 PM
I've hiked to the top of a peak in the Black Hills..but it was only a little over 5k feet lol. When i went out to visit a good friend end of June of last year in NE Nevada..we went up into a mountain range just outside the town he lives in called the Ruby Mountains and climbed up to a old glacier lake...it was pretty cool, have no idea how high we were..prolly around 10k feel..there was still a lot of snow on the ground up there. It was pretty bad ass and well worth it...if i needed water i just filled up with the water dripping off the rocks...some of the best water i've ever drank!!

broncosteven
05-16-2009, 02:36 PM
I've seen plenty of Everest documentaries before but this was amazing. It was like a 5 part series of something and with each guy on the team having a mic and several having video, you hear and see stuff as never before shown. You really get to see first hand how people just fall apart up near the top. They think they are making wise decisions and you can see how they are really not. It's brutal up there. The team walks past a man dying on the way back just a few hours after some of them summit. They try to give him oxygen to revive him but the man doesn't respond. They can't possibly get him down because they are running low on oxygen themselves, and are spent physically. Yet they show great remorse and emotion knowing they are leaving a man to die on top. They all have walked past dead bodies (currently 120 bodies or so are still on the peak and many still visible as hikers walk on by (and they show them, pretty gruesome) but coming across a man still alive but not being able to help him is another. Pretty much anybody who attempts Everest knows that once you get above 26K feet, if you can't at least get up on your own 2 feet, you're a dead man. Sherpas can only do so much at that height. Alot of placed are only wide enough for them to put one foot in front of the other. Yet the media had a field day with them saying why couldn't you rescue that man. All they would have to do is watch this series and you get a real up close first hand view of what it's like up there. Almost every member of the team, when they finally got back to base camp, had at least something amputated. They spent some 12 hours in -40 degrees. What shocked me most was the amount of people that were on the route to the summit and those log jams of novice climbers cost lives because everything is so calculated out, how much oxygen you can take, how many hours you can stay at any given altitude, how long you can stand still waiting for idiot climbers to get going while you're not moving and frost bite sets in, etc. I was hooked. I tivo'd them all and planned to watch them over a weeks period but I was so hooked I had to watch them all back to back in one night.

I cannot imagine climbing or hiking past dead bodies that have been stranded up there for almost a 100 years now.

Did you see the couple Nova's on PBS about the group that got stuck in a storm and lost a bunch of climbers? Or the one where Hillary? and his sherpa were recently found coming down the summit?

They were great documentaries. I guess if people love doing it great but I won't be hiking to any poles or climbing any mountians over 10k.

Oh and I am a suburbanite from Chi-town. I try to go hiking in the fall when we are in town for games. It is amazing how many Denver area locals do not hike or ski! Maybe you have to be closer into the foothills? You see a lot of hikers and bikers and climbers though when you are up there.

Broncojef
05-16-2009, 02:54 PM
That whole series was just awesome, the things some of these guys do and risk is incredible. I have a very good friend who climbed Everest and still walks with a slight limp because of the exposure/frostbite to his feet. BTW my boss is climbing all the 14Kers in the Rocky's.

BroncoLifer
05-16-2009, 03:24 PM
http://www.nikegames.net/zona/Misc/Broncos/everest.jpg

That's the "easy" route. The Northern route from Tibet is even more difficult / deadly, largely because it is less steep and therefore the climbers spend more time in the Death Zone.

Los Broncos
05-16-2009, 03:28 PM
And doesn't Everest get a little higher each year?

9mmbhp
05-16-2009, 04:02 PM
I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top.

Capital
Crestone Peak
Crestone Needle
Humbolt
Harvard
Yale
Sneffles
Longs

:wave:

PS Some might find this interesting: Ski the 14ers Project (http://www.skithe14ers.com)

Broncojef
05-16-2009, 04:12 PM
Capital
Crestone Peak
Crestone Needle
Humbolt
Harvard
Yale
Sneffles
Longs

:wave:

PS Some might find this interesting: Ski the 14ers Project (http://www.skithe14ers.com)

I've done longs to the top, went backside past the keyhole and the one grave on the mountain during a winter climb.

Arkie
05-16-2009, 04:27 PM
I've seen plenty of Everest documentaries before but this was amazing. It was like a 5 part series of something and with each guy on the team having a mic and several having video, you hear and see stuff as never before shown. You really get to see first hand how people just fall apart up near the top. They think they are making wise decisions and you can see how they are really not. It's brutal up there. The team walks past a man dying on the way back just a few hours after some of them summit. They try to give him oxygen to revive him but the man doesn't respond. They can't possibly get him down because they are running low on oxygen themselves, and are spent physically. Yet they show great remorse and emotion knowing they are leaving a man to die on top. They all have walked past dead bodies (currently 120 bodies or so are still on the peak and many still visible as hikers walk on by (and they show them, pretty gruesome) but coming across a man still alive but not being able to help him is another. Pretty much anybody who attempts Everest knows that once you get above 26K feet, if you can't at least get up on your own 2 feet, you're a dead man. Sherpas can only do so much at that height. Alot of placed are only wide enough for them to put one foot in front of the other. Yet the media had a field day with them saying why couldn't you rescue that man. All they would have to do is watch this series and you get a real up close first hand view of what it's like up there. Almost every member of the team, when they finally got back to base camp, had at least something amputated. They spent some 12 hours in -40 degrees. What shocked me most was the amount of people that were on the route to the summit and those log jams of novice climbers cost lives because everything is so calculated out, how much oxygen you can take, how many hours you can stay at any given altitude, how long you can stand still waiting for idiot climbers to get going while you're not moving and frost bite sets in, etc. I was hooked. I tivo'd them all and planned to watch them over a weeks period but I was so hooked I had to watch them all back to back in one night.


The man left to die on the main trail was David Sharp (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Sharp), and they passed him by on the ascent and descent.


Sir Edmund Hillary was highly critical of the decision not to try to rescue Sharp, saying that leaving other climbers to die is unacceptable, and the desire to get to the summit has become all-important. He also said, "I think the whole attitude towards climbing Mount Everest has become rather horrifying. The people just want to get to the top. It was wrong if there was a man suffering altitude problems and was huddled under a rock, just to lift your hat, say good morning and pass on by". He also told the New Zealand Herald that he was horrified by the callous attitude of today’s climbers. "They don’t give a damn for anybody else who may be in distress and it doesn’t impress me at all that they leave someone lying under a rock to die" and that, "I think that their priority was to get to the top and the welfare of one of the... of a member of an expedition was very secondary." [3] Hillary also called Mark Inglis "crazy" [5].

In the documentary "Dying For Everest" (broadcast on SKY 20.04.09), Mark Inglis now states: "From my memory, I used the radio. I got a reply to move on and there is nothing that I can do to help. Now I'm not sure whether it was from Russell or from someone else, or whether you know..it's just Hypoxia and it's... it's in your mind." Russell received many radio messages (many of which were heard by others) that night and a full log was kept. There is no record of any call from Mark Inglis. The group continued to the summit, passing David Sharp, without offering any assistance. David was in a grave condition. On their decent, passing back through the cave several hours later, the group found David near death. Sir Edmund Hillary described Mark Inglis attitude as "pathetic".

Jason7730
05-16-2009, 06:00 PM
I also grew up in the springs and climbed Pikes Peak when I was younger. When we got to the top I ran around all excited...................and then I passed out.:rofl: You have to take it easy at altitude.

TDmvp
05-16-2009, 06:08 PM
Climbing mountains is stupid ... The loss of life and in some places the money spent trying to save these fools ...

Seen stories of them having to rescue the same people over and over on the tax payers dollar ... I say if you are stupid enough to go someplace that requires a rescue you either pay back the money it cost or we need to start leaving these idiots ...


Cool tv show tho ... I root for the mountain to win ...

Malcontent
05-16-2009, 06:20 PM
Hey AZ...is it available to buy on DVD or BR yet??

summerdenver
05-16-2009, 07:02 PM
I used to hike regulalrly when I lived in colorado - I hiked about 20 of the 14ers and my room-mate climbed all 54. Unfortuantely, I don't hike much these days though.

I have not seen this documentary - Is this same as the one that covered the Jon Krauker's 'Into Thin Air'?

btw, If you like climbing you must read 'Touching the Void' book, The film was good but the book was really incredible.

slyinky
05-16-2009, 07:14 PM
Wow, I thought for sure there would be somebody who would have said something. A post about a cool mountain on a forum where probably a good base of the forum population probably lives in the mountains.

That's okay, probably alot of people here who are city dwellers who probably never even hiked a single peak in Colorado. That's the new generation for ya. A guy can live right next to a majestic peak growing up and never give a care in the world to hike it. Just wants to get home from work, eat his cupcakes and drink his 6 pack and watch American Idol.

I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top. Seriously, if you live in Colorado, are in good to decent shape (which probably wipes out half of this forum......hahaha) and you haven't hiked a 14,000 peak yet, WTF are you waiting on? Go do it. You'll be amazed once you've done it what a cool feeling it is.

Wow, condescending much? Besides, WTF do you care? I head to the hills to get away from people. The fewer people, the better.

BroncoLifer
05-16-2009, 09:10 PM
I would be amazed if more then 5 people on this forum have hiked any of the 14,000 foot peaks in Colorado all the way to the top.

My List (more or less in order of doing them):
Grays
Torreys
Quandry (now 3x)
Elbert
Longs
Sherman
Democrat (2x)
Lincoln (2x)
Bross (2x)
Oxford
Belford
Huron
Redcloud
Sunshine
Handies
San Luis
Bierstdat
Evans
Massive (on the 3rd try)
La Plata
Yale
Harvard
Antero

Started but turned back on:
Missouri
Uncompaghre

:wave:

That makes 5 of us so far. Any more?

Meck77
05-16-2009, 09:23 PM
Took this today. Great thread btw....

I even got out of the car to hike it once. ;D

http://img33.imageshack.us/img33/8853/dsc9598.jpg (http://img33.imageshack.us/my.php?image=dsc9598.jpg)

Cito Pelon
05-16-2009, 09:28 PM
I cannot imagine climbing or hiking past dead bodies that have been stranded up there for almost a 100 years now.

Did you see the couple Nova's on PBS about the group that got stuck in a storm and lost a bunch of climbers? Or the one where Hillary? and his sherpa were recently found coming down the summit?

They were great documentaries. I guess if people love doing it great but I won't be hiking to any poles or climbing any mountians over 10k.

Oh and I am a suburbanite from Chi-town. I try to go hiking in the fall when we are in town for games. It is amazing how many Denver area locals do not hike or ski! Maybe you have to be closer into the foothills? You see a lot of hikers and bikers and climbers though when you are up there.

The Nova one was very intense. Very intense drama in a documentary format. The one where they stumbled on SIr Edmund Hillary's remains was a good one. Dude climbed Everest in 1921 I believe with pretty primitive equipment. The phrase 'only mad dogs and Englishmen' certainly applies there.

Myself, I've never done a 14'r. I always stop at the highest lake to fish. Once or twice a year I'll take a break from fishing and go a little higher to the Divide, but that doesn't mean a 14'r.

It's getting to be about that time to get up into the high country. And don't talk to me about It is amazing how many Denver area locals do not [go into the high country]. Dude, there's so many gotdang people up there nowadays the high country has lost a lot of its luster.

Where 20 years ago there was 5 people and two vehicles, there's now 100 people and 40 vehicles.

Ah, I long for the good old days. Prosperity and progress is a two-edged sword.

Dutch
05-16-2009, 09:38 PM
Worked for MountainSmith, The Boulder Mountaineer, and had my guiding cert back in the early to mid Eighties. Bagged 35 of the 14ers. Also had a chance to do Denali. The whole scene surrounding Everest sickens me. Give me K2 any day of the week for technical difficulty and mountaineering accomplishment. I'll have to check out the series, heard it was great. "Void " is a great read. For a very different Himalaya experience try "One Cup of Tea". In 1993, mountain-climber Greg Mortenson nearly lost his life trying to climb one of the world’s highest mountains, K2 in northern Pakistan. Reeling from his failed attempt, Mortenson stumbled into the village of Korphe in Pakistan’s Karakoram Himalaya region. There he saw children huddled in the cold wind, scratching out lessons with sticks in the hard ground. He was inspired and impetuously made a promise to the village’s leader, Haji Ali: I will build you a school. That promise took him to rock bottom and back again as he despaired while living in his car to save money for the school until a generous benefactor set him on his way. His remarkable odyssesy reflects the astounding humanitarian reach that one person can generate. By building schools for poor Pakistani and Afghan Muslim youth, Greg Mortenson promotes peace by fighting illiteracy. As a former Mountaineer and Combat Vet Marine, I am humbled by what this guy has done.

Malcontent
05-16-2009, 09:51 PM
Az...youre soooo likeable...

Broncojef
05-16-2009, 09:54 PM
The fewer people, the better.

Dude you rock!!! As I get older thats my exact motto, get away from as many people as possible.

Cito Pelon
05-17-2009, 12:38 AM
Climbing mountains is stupid ... The loss of life and in some places the money spent trying to save these fools ...

Seen stories of them having to rescue the same people over and over on the tax payers dollar ... I say if you are stupid enough to go someplace that requires a rescue you either pay back the money it cost or we need to start leaving these idiots ...


Cool tv show tho ... I root for the mountain to win ...

I agree that it it costs the taxpayers a lot of money. The locals enjoy the living daylights out of rescuing people though. I was up near Gray's Peak one time exploring a potential fishing spot (ruined by mine tailings runoff, BTW, a common problem in many Colorado locales), and it was like the county fair day.

ZONA
05-17-2009, 01:24 AM
The problem with doing rescues on Everest is that there are only so many places where a rescue can be done. Once you get past camp 4 heading to the summit, you cannot depend on a rescue. Helicopters can't fly that high to get you and of all the people who might be heading for the summit that day, maybe only a handful are capable of helping. And some of the people in Russel's crew did try to give the man oxygen. I don't think it's so much a mentality that people want to summit so badly they can't help, they just realize just how near impossible it is to help somebody back down in the condition Sharp was in. He was unconscious. It's not like somebody can just throw you on their back and hike down with you. Not at that height. Russell even said over the mic that he agreed with his guys giving the guy a bit of oxygen to see if he would awake and become alert and be able to get on his feet. He was not able to do that. That guy still had to save some of his own oxygen to get himself down safely. You don't know what could happen. What if he sprained his ankle just a few hundred meters past that area and now had to move even slower as he headed back down to camp 4? He would need all the oxygen he could spare. There are just so many things that can go wrong, you can't just forfeit your life to try and save somebody. These guys, like Russel have been doing this for a long long time and they know the success rate of a rescue that high. It's not good. And he (Russel) has a responsibility to his own team (climbers and sherpas) to ensure their safety first. How would it look if he said for them to try and get that guy down and then the both died up there, which is probably what would have happened. How would that look for him? Bad. And where were the team members of Sharp? Even they did not try to save him. That right there probably tells you it was a dangerous task and probably was going to cost the lives of anybody who tried to save him. From what I took from this series, once you get past camp 4, if you can't at least get to your feet, you're probably not going to be rescued. It's too much to try and just haul dead weight down those difficult areas at that altitude. Guys can barely put one foot in front of the other themselves at that altitude and no doubt are probably extremely cold and fatigued as it is, and they should be expected to CARRY somebody down? OMG, people need to get real. They did what they could, try to revive somebody for a few minutes and help if the person can stand and have some sense of helping themselves to at least some small degree. That's the game though and they all play it. Everybody is well aware of the risks of dying when they go up and they realize there are quite a plethora of bad and unexpected things that can happen up there. At least Russel is smart enough to form several small teams where they take turns trying to summit over several days. When they ran into that Chinese team with some 15 climbers in one group, I was shocked. Many of them didn't even seem like they knew how to climb all that well. That's just too many men in one group.

Arkie
05-17-2009, 09:29 AM
One of the guys says he radioed the expedition leader on the ascent, but the leader denied it. The leader said he didn't know about it until on their way back down. That was just one person thats talked about it. Nobody wants to be responsible. The fact remains that 42 climbers went by David, most of them went by twice. He was still clamped to the trail rope, so each climber had to unclamp their thingy to navigate around the dying man. Many experts think he could have been saved. They're were several capable teams that could've mounted a rescue effort from the various camps on this very busy part of the season. (It was the busiest time of Everests history) It would have cost about $20,000 to rescue David, and he may not have lived, but guys in worse shape (left for dead) have been rescued and fully recovered. If only David had ascended Mount Everest 10 days later, when Dan Mazur would have passed by, he might have lived.

Mogulseeker
05-17-2009, 10:04 AM
Hiking Everest is on my to-do list before I die.

broncosteven
05-17-2009, 10:46 AM
Hiking Everest is on my to-do list before I die.

I would like to go to Low Earth orbit or Moon before I die. It is safer and faster than everest plus you get your Astronaut wings.

Mogulseeker
05-17-2009, 11:20 AM
I would like to go to Low Earth orbit or Moon before I die. It is safer and faster than everest plus you get your Astronaut wings.

Yeah, but then you have to go through OCS... which includes an 8-year commitment at NASA...

Being an Astronaut is more of a career desiccation... not just something you can do.

Everest, however, I can do without an engineering degree and mandatory haircuts and drug and alcohol tests. Granted, there's years of training involved... but if you're training for a marathon, too, combined with military PT... plus a couple years of 14er experience, and another year or two of preparation... I'd say it's possible.

ZONA
05-17-2009, 11:23 AM
One of the guys says he radioed the expedition leader on the ascent, but the leader denied it. The leader said he didn't know about it until on their way back down. That was just one person thats talked about it. Nobody wants to be responsible. The fact remains that 42 climbers went by David, most of them went by twice. He was still clamped to the trail rope, so each climber had to unclamp their thingy to navigate around the dying man. Many experts think he could have been saved. They're were several capable teams that could've mounted a rescue effort from the various camps on this very busy part of the season. (It was the busiest time of Everests history) It would have cost about $20,000 to rescue David, and he may not have lived, but guys in worse shape (left for dead) have been rescued and fully recovered. If only David had ascended Mount Everest 10 days later, when Dan Mazur would have passed by, he might have lived.


So where the hell was David's team then? I highly doubt the 2 guys that Russel sent up first saw this man on their ascent. They left camp 4 at 1AM and were some of the first ones to summit that day. Do you really think anyone of those 18 idiot Chinese climbers was going to be able to save him? It took that group 4 hours just to do the latter. I highly doubt Dan Mazur would have been able to rescue David either. What, Dan would just tie him to his back like an extra back pack and then hike down that way? Or maybe Dan would have tied a rope to the guys leg and tried to drag him down? Dude, you're making me laugh. You tell me one time where a man was past camp 4 and was rescued when he could not get on his own 2 damn feet.


And again, where they hell was David's team? Everybody crying bloody murder about everybody else going right past the guy but yet nobody in his own team cared enough to try and save him. That's BS. Let's see if there's any radio dialog between David and his team leader. Let's find out what was happening there shall we? Why was he left behind by his own team?

ZONA
05-17-2009, 11:49 AM
OK

Hmmmm........it appears that David had no team support past base camp nor did he have sherpas, no did he have oxygen, nor did he have a radio. So he went solo, having none of those items. Okay, that's real smart if you ask me. Anything happens to you up there and you have no radio, no guide, no sherpa, no nothing. David's own mother says it was nobody's fault but his own.

And where's all the talk about the 3 men who died the following week who also used the same company David did? Looks to me like Asian Trekking is probably not the best representative for your bid to reach the summit and get back down alive.

Sharp was a former mathematics teacher who possibly reached the summit of Mount Everest on his third attempt. He obtained his climbing permit through Asian Trekking, paying $6,200 for logistical support up to the advance base camp. He made no provisions for Sherpa or guide support for his summit bid. He also carried no radio with which to contact Asian Trekking, primarily because Asian Trekking lacked the capacity to effect any rescue operation. The following week three other climbers from Asian Trekking also died during summit attempts, Vitor Negrete, Igor Plyushkin, and Thomas Weber.




It appears that David may have made the summit the day before and stayed much too long on the summit and made his attempt to come down during the night (one of the coldest nights of the year). Inglis did see him on the way up, tried to help but could not get Sharp on his feet.

And that man that was rescued the year before, or whenever, that was dragged down by 11 sherpas, I highly doubt he had made the summit the day before and came down at night time, probably no oxygen. And nobody knows for sure if 11 sherpas were around this time, just to stop doing what they were doing and make an attempt to save him.

Everest guide Jamie McGuinness reported that on reaching David Sharp on the descent some nine hours later, "...Dawa from Arun Treks also gave oxygen to David and tried to help him move, repeatedly, for perhaps an hour. But he could not get David to stand alone or even stand resting on his shoulders, and crying, Dawa had to leave him too. Even with two Sherpas it was not going to be possible to get David down the tricky sections below..."

so it does look like several people tried to help David but none could really get him on his feet. There were not 11 sherpas around to help so blaming climbers for his death is pathetic. Sir Edmund can go stick an ice pick up his ass.

broncosteven
05-17-2009, 04:23 PM
Yeah, but then you have to go through OCS... which includes an 8-year commitment at NASA...

Being an Astronaut is more of a career desiccation... not just something you can do.

Everest, however, I can do without an engineering degree and mandatory haircuts and drug and alcohol tests. Granted, there's years of training involved... but if you're training for a marathon, too, combined with military PT... plus a couple years of 14er experience, and another year or two of preparation... I'd say it's possible.

UM you are wrong sir!

If you have the money, in a couple of years it will be easier to go into low earth orbit than climb Everest.

http://www.virgingalactic.com/htmlsite/index.php?language=english

Virgin Galactic is the world's first spaceline. Giving you the groundbreaking opportunity to become one of the first ever non-professional astronauts. Virgin Galactic will own and operate its privately built spaceships, modelled on the remarkable, history-making SpaceShipOne.


Virgin's vast experience in aviation, adventure, luxury travel and cutting-edge design combined with the unique technology developed by Burt Rutan will ensure an unforgettable experience unlike any other available to mankind.


With safety at the forefront, our unique spacecraft is being designed at Rutan's base in Mojave, California alongside a concerted research and development programme.


"The deal with Mojave Aerospace Ventures is just the start of what we believe will be a new era in the history of mankind, one day making the affordable exploration of space by human beings a real possibility." Richard Branson.


It is these spaceships that will allow affordable sub-orbital space tourism for the first time in the history of the universe.

Mogulseeker
05-17-2009, 08:02 PM
My life goals are to Run the Boston Marathon and Climb Everest...

I'm too poor to go into orbit.

Broncojef
05-17-2009, 08:32 PM
My life goals are to Run the Boston Marathon and Climb Everest...

I'm too poor to go into orbit.

You probably don't want to see the bill most of these guys foot to climb Everest then. My buddy spent over $30K in the ninties to climb Everest. Many people now look for sponsorship and other means to make the trip and the climb. My buddy even spent a week prior in a local monastery getting right spiritually before making the climb and will never divulge to the rest of his friends what mountain he is doing ahead of time so as not to brag to the mountain. You think sports guys have rituals you should meet some of these "serious" climbers.

Mogulseeker
05-17-2009, 08:48 PM
You probably don't want to see the bill most of these guys foot to climb Everest then. My buddy spent over $30K in the ninties to climb Everest. Many people now look for sponsorship and other means to make the trip and the climb. My buddy even spent a week prior in a local monastery getting right spiritually before making the climb and will never divulge to the rest of his friends what mountain he is doing ahead of time so as not to brag to the mountain. You think sports guys have rituals you should meet some of these "serious" climbers.

For real.

I really hope that when I attempt it, it will be a spiritual experience. I have my heart set on it, and I'm pushing 24, so I need to get going... once I hit my thirties it will be an impossibility.

slyinky
05-17-2009, 11:11 PM
Left to Die on Everest
No one came to David Sharp's aid on Everest. What happened?
July 23, 2006

http://climb.mountainzone.com/2006/david_sharp/index.html

ZONA
05-18-2009, 12:29 AM
Left to Die on Everest
No one came to David Sharp's aid on Everest. What happened?
July 23, 2006

http://climb.mountainzone.com/2006/david_sharp/index.html

Yup, it pretty much states what I said before. That man (Hall) who was rescued by some 13 sherpas a few years prior, was able to at least get to his own feet and to some degree could support his own weight...........and it still was difficult getting him down with 13 Sherpas. Imagine trying to get down a body of dead weight of a man who can't even stand, a man who is basically as close to death as you can get without being dead.

Of course I don't wish death on any of these guys but if you're going to hike Mt. Everest alone, with no radio, then you're a fool inviting death to sit down at your dinner table. As Brice said, none of my guys would have been in that situation. I keep account of them all and when somebody of my team is in trouble, we know about it right away, there is no guess work at all.

It's a shame Sharpe had to die, but then again, people die on Everest all the time. More people will die on Everest next year and the year after. Maybe in about 5 years when this story has died down, the media once again will blow up over another Everest death down the road.

slyinky
05-18-2009, 02:19 AM
Here's an interesting documentary that involves dilemmas similar to that of the David Sharp situation.

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/HQJQapyHAQg&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/HQJQapyHAQg&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/clvehmQz6ro&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/clvehmQz6ro&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/x8sj4zhyhlc&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/x8sj4zhyhlc&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ibBi6_2NrEI&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ibBi6_2NrEI&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/bivOZDjBobg&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/bivOZDjBobg&hl=en&fs=1&rel=0" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

ZONA
05-18-2009, 10:42 PM
Here's an interesting documentary that involves dilemmas similar to that of the David Sharp situation.


Thanks, that was quite interesting. It seems these "situations" have been going on since hikers have been climbing and no doubt will continue to go on. Hiking is dangerous. Hiking over 26K feet to where the body starts to completely shut down is insane, to me. Your body has several systems that shut down at that altitude, one of which is your digestive system. Your body cannot burn fuel from food sources, it literally starts to feed on itself for energy. There is no doubt that adds to the exhaustion levels of the climbers.

What I find interesting is a few things. Every person who finds themselves above the death zone knows the odds of them being rescued is not good. That might have something to do with trying to help other climbers at that altitude. Do you risk your own self to save somebody else? That one guy in Part 3 stated it best. You can judge to no end, but until you are in that situation, you would never know how you yourself would act. Okay, so you have a very small handful of people who believe otherwise but they are indeed the minority. And of those few people in this video, none of them ever did face that situation. You had one guy who was a victim and never had to come to terms with trying to help somebody else. He was lucky, and may ever know just how lucky. The other guy, simply cut a dead man down, but never came across somebody on their death bed and could not get to their own feet. Some will say, as did one guy on this series, that it's no different then trying to help somebody that is dying on the street. That's a bunch of BS. You have the means to help, and there are a great number of resources in which you can help. Call 911 and there could be help in minutes. That is not the case up there. And sorry, call me morbid or whatever, but if I have the right amount of training to realize that somebody is hours from death near the summit of Everest, I'm not gonna waste my resources to lay with them so they don't die alone. I'm not gonna put that kind risk on my own life or for anybody else on my team. You never know what could happen up there. You could get high altitude sickness at anytime and that would further slow you down. Wasting hours laying next to a virtual dead person, who truth be told, probably doesn't even realize you are there, is insane to me, not a display of humanity.

Rashomon
05-19-2009, 10:29 AM
The one where they stumbled on SIr Edmund Hillary's remains was a good one. Dude climbed Everest in 1921 I believe with pretty primitive equipment. The phrase 'only mad dogs and Englishmen' certainly applies there.

I believe you are talking about George Mallory, not Edmund Hillary. Hillary is the first known person to reach the summit, but there is a good chance Mallory reached it, but died in the descent. Mallory is the one who famously replied why he wanted to climb Mt. Everest: "Because it's there".

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/George_Mallory

Mountain Bronco
05-19-2009, 10:44 AM
Democrate
Lincoln
Sunshine
Longs
Wilson
Mt. Wilson
El Diente
Sneffels is on the hit list this year. I have attempted twice, but been thwarted by weather both times.

However, those are all easier than a lot of the high 13,000 foot peaks around Colorado, just like Everest is easier than K2 even though it is higher.

Mogulseeker
05-19-2009, 10:54 AM
Democrate
Lincoln
Sunshine
Longs
Wilson
Mt. Wilson
El Diente
Sneffels is on the hit list this year. I have attempted twice, but been thwarted by weather both times.

However, those are all easier than a lot of the high 13,000 foot peaks around Colorado, just like Everest is easier than K2 even though it is higher.

I was looking at K2... evidently it is the most dangerous mountain in the world to climb.

BroncoLifer
05-19-2009, 12:12 PM
Democrate

However, those are all easier than a lot of the high 13,000 foot peaks around Colorado, just like Everest is easier than K2 even though it is higher.

I've read that Dallas Peak (a 13er) is the hardest climb in the state.

ZONA
05-19-2009, 12:17 PM
Sweet........looks like the series EVEREST BEYOND THE LIMIT is not really over yet. Now they are showing the hike from 2007. Some of the same guys are back, such as biker man and asthma boy. Just saw Russell's sherpas ascend to the summit laying down new rope, and they made it all the way down to base camp in one day. Amazing guys.

ZONA
05-19-2009, 12:18 PM
I was lookg at K2... evidently it is the most dangerous mountain in the worl to climb.

I believe so. For every 1 successful summit, there are 4 deaths. Those are some lousy odds man.