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Hotrod
05-14-2009, 03:20 PM
I would let my two year old watch me teabag their mother. It's not like they have any concept of what is going on.

and If they are so smart, why can't they stop ****ting their pants?

Is making tea for your wife really that violent or questionable of an action???

Sassy
05-14-2009, 03:38 PM
Again, if you understand the science of a toddler's mind, it's really not that hard to understand.

What happened in this thread was... someone objected to not having a say over what his 36 month old child watched, and somehow we got into people talking about post-feminist America.

Again, there are a lot of issues being mixed up, here. Basic child science and psychology is almost unanimous that a child under 3 shouldn't even watch TV, much less potentially confusing, violent images.

People are talking about what they did when they were 5, 7, 12, etc. Those are completely different ages.

The 1-3 year old brain is very fragile and development is absolutely crucial during that period. With so many better resources to help a toddler develop and learn, why choose something that was designed for 12+ year olds, and could potentially pose issues with regards to their ability to process/cope with this information?

The assumption that infants/toddlers are just stupid lumps that don't input any information is just not accurate.

Again, I agree that Ghostbusters is harmless for anyone past toddler-age, for the most part. (Though honestly, I don't recall EVERY scene.)
My point was just that having a 2 year old in the house, I see how my daughter reacts to things that I wouldn't even think about, and there's just a lot of mechanisms that aren't in place to help their little minds deal with some things we consider mundane.

Excellent post Popps...couldn't have said it better!
(I have a degree in child development ... btw and have over 20 years experience with infants, toddlers and preschoolers.)

Popps
05-14-2009, 03:38 PM
Popps, if that is his case why was the kid at somebody elses house if he is that moraly superior..

Well, it's not my kid. I don't know. I also don't think he claimed to be morally superior. Understanding children isn't about being moral. It's just about common sense.

He did not do his job as a parent then by protecting his 3 yr. old from the terrible cruel and dangerous world.
.

Again, you're starting to skew the argument, here No one said Ghostbusters made the world "cruel and dangerous." Not remotely.

He just said that he was surprised the other parents found a movie designed for adults appropriate for a 3 year old.

As for him not watching his child, I have no idea of the parameters of the situation and it's really not the issue. The issue, imo, is strictly one of the exact age of the child in question. Vast changes take place, mentally for children around those ages. Erring on the side of caution before the age of three is just prudent, common sense.

I'm not remotely saying friggin' Ghostbusters is evil. It's purely an age-thing, and as a parent... I get the concern.

Sassy
05-14-2009, 03:43 PM
Our brains learn the best between newborn and five.

Hotrod
05-14-2009, 03:44 PM
Excellent post Popps...couldn't have said it better!
(I have a degree in child development ... btw and have over 20 years experience with infants, toddlers and preschoolers.)

You should be a mod here :)

bronco610
05-14-2009, 04:08 PM
Our brains learn the best between newborn and five.

Then its the perfect time for Ghostbusters !!!!

bronco610
05-14-2009, 04:08 PM
You should be a mod here :)

ROFL! ROFL! ROFL!

bronco610
05-14-2009, 04:09 PM
Well, it's not my kid. I don't know. I also don't think he claimed to be morally superior. Understanding children isn't about being moral. It's just about common sense.



Again, you're starting to skew the argument, here No one said Ghostbusters made the world "cruel and dangerous." Not remotely.

He just said that he was surprised the other parents found a movie designed for adults appropriate for a 3 year old.

As for him not watching his child, I have no idea of the parameters of the situation and it's really not the issue. The issue, imo, is strictly one of the exact age of the child in question. Vast changes take place, mentally for children around those ages. Erring on the side of caution before the age of three is just prudent, common sense.

I'm not remotely saying friggin' Ghostbusters is evil. It's purely an age-thing, and as a parent... I get the concern.

Geeze Popps, lighten up already.:clown:

Popps
05-14-2009, 04:15 PM
Geeze Popps, lighten up already.:clown:

Dude, I loved Ghostbusters.

****. I that just reminded me a of great movie to add to the best comedies list...

BroncoBuff
05-14-2009, 04:29 PM
I agree with everything Popps says.



(In this thread.)

bronco610
05-14-2009, 04:31 PM
I agree with everything Popps says.



(In this thread.)

Yeah, but your one of those bleadin heart p***y's:wiggle:

Jason in LA
05-14-2009, 06:07 PM
I understand that some people, including myself, have used older children as examples. That's why I stated a few times that I saw Star Wars and other movies along the line of Ghostbusters when I was 3. My son saw Star Wars in the theater when he was 3 years old. Those movies had scary images and violence. I saw Popeye the movie around that age. That movie had a lot of violence and adult relationships. But those movies, including Ghostbusters, are perfectly fine for a 3 year old to see.

OABB
05-14-2009, 06:12 PM
The real movie to be concerned about is any of the High School Musical movies.

cutthemdown
05-14-2009, 06:15 PM
I understand that some people, including myself, have used older children as examples. That's why I stated a few times that I saw Star Wars and other movies along the line of Ghostbusters when I was 3. My son saw Star Wars in the theater when he was 3 years old. Those movies had scary images and violence. I saw Popeye the movie around that age. That movie had a lot of violence and adult relationships. But those movies, including Ghostbusters, are perfectly fine for a 3 year old to see.

First off every parent will have a different view on what is ok for a kid. You can't really project your values onto other people. Sharing your story is fine but your statement it's fine for a 3 yr old doesn't hold up because really you only know what is fine for your 3 yr old.

Why anyone would even take a 3 yr old to a movie is beyond me, that's not something I would do unless movie was for 3 yr olds. Screaming kids, crying kids, kids making noise just ruin it for the rest of the people.

How do you even remember seeing Star Wars when you were 3 anyways? You must have one hell of a childhood memory.

Moreno Knows Best
05-14-2009, 06:23 PM
I don't know if this has been posted, if not:

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/w91-GMc3j7I&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/w91-GMc3j7I&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Fantastic scene. And the "Dogs and cats, living together, mass hysteria!" line goes down as one of the best ever.

ksBRONCOfan
05-14-2009, 06:45 PM
I have three daughters (8, 6 and 2 1/2). They have all seen Ghostbusters, Blazing Saddles, Spaceballs and many others. They have seen a lot of various TV shows. They have watched countless hours of me playing Call of Duty, Gears of War and Grand Theft Auto. They are still smart well behaved kids. The two in school are in the gifted program at school and both started to read before starting school. My oldest skipped the 1st grade. The middle daughter is in kindergarten reading at a third grade level. The best part is they interact with other kids great. So many "advanced" kids are raised sheltered and do not know how to behave socially.

bronco610
05-14-2009, 06:48 PM
I have three daughters (8, 6 and 2 1/2). They have all seen Ghostbusters, Blazing Saddles, Spaceballs and many others. They have seen a lot of various TV shows. They have watched countless hours of me playing Call of Duty, Gears of War and Grand Theft Auto. They are still smart well behaved kids. The two in school are in the gifted program at school and both started to read before starting school. My oldest skipped the 1st grade. The middle daughter is in kindergarten reading at a third grade level. The best part is they interact with other kids great. So many "advanced" kids are raised sheltered and do not know how to behave socially.

You monster, Oh the Horror !!!!! :D

Sassy
05-14-2009, 06:50 PM
How video games affect toddlers and how to deal with it
Written for BabyCenter India


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Understanding your toddler

What do video games involve for my toddler?

What parents can do


Interactive video games designed and marketed for toddlers are the latest addition to the “get smarter” range of toys and games flooding the markets. These games may be small hand held devices or consoles that can be plugged on to a computer, laptop or television set.

They are often called “educational games” and use popular characters like Winnie the Pooh and Noddy to teach kids colours, shapes and numbers. Brightly coloured buttons, consoles and big characters are used to dub them as “child friendly” and they are often touted as better alternatives to watching television.

But are video games really that different from watching television? And will your two year old who may barely be able to hold a crayon, benefit from the latest in entertainment technology?



Understanding your toddler


Toddlers between the ages of one and four years are at their exploratory best, using all their senses to learn about the world they live in. Touching, tasting, feeling and smelling, your toddler satisfies his curiosity and learns more and more every day. Several studies recommend that infants below the age of two should, ideally, not be exposed to television since they hardly have any cognitive ability to make sense of the blur of shapes and colours they see on the screen.

Even for toddlers aged two to four, face-to-face interaction and speaking to them and encouraging them to talk is the best way to stimulate their imagination and creativity and screen time should be limited to half an hour to an hour a day. You may also like to read more on the effects of television on toddlers.

Spending too much time in front of the screen has been linked to problems relating to attention and focus at a later age. Your toddler is still learning to interact socially and is developing his reasoning skills; the passive monotony of images flashing on a screen doesn’t do much to improve them. The time spent reading a book to him or playing with his blocks goes a long way in sharpening his understanding of concepts and his memory. He starts to make connections between words, images, sounds and colours; when he sees a crow and says “ka ka” the smile on your face is an immediate affirmation of the connection he has made and anything you add to it (“the crow is black”) gets absorbed unconsciously.



What do video games involve for my toddler?


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Video games require some degree of hand eye coordination and fine motor skills which a three year old may not have. He will also not be able to read the menu options which may appear on the game screen. He will also have trouble connecting what his fingers do with what happens on screen.

In the long run, spending too much time in front of a screen has been found to have some relation to problems of impulsiveness, mood swings and hyperactivity. Physical problems like repetitive strain injury caused due to excessive time spent on the computer is a common problem today; many parents believe that video games played by children increase the risk of early onset of such injuries.



What parents can do


Proponents of video games however insist that there are quite a few benefits of starting early.They say that it makes them think and coordinate better and since the use of a computer has become an essential aspect of our lives it makes children familiar with the mouse and other functions at an early age. For parents who are faced with an inevitable demand for screen time, it seems to be a more interactive alternative than television.

But whatever claims are made about the benefits of video games for a three year old, most experts agree that children below two and a half do not benefit at all and should be kept away. For older toddlers if you do choose to introduce them to video games for their educational or entertaining content, the key points to remember are:

Moderation: No more than half an hour or an hour of screen time a day, including television. Excessive time spent in front of a television or computer screen may mean that your toddler is missing out on vital human interaction and face to face time with you, which is so essential to his overall development and creative stimulation. The time which he does spend can be broken up into five or ten minute sessions.

No violence: Any games for children should be free of violence and other adult content. Killing people or animals, high speed races with crashing cars and other such games serve no educational purpose and can only desensitize them to violence.

Clear and slow: Fast moving images and a loud soundtrack are best avoided.Stick to clear and slow moving images with a distinct audio relating to the image on the screen. This will also avoid over stimulation and help your toddler focus better on the task at hand.

Toddler friendly: Do not leave your toddler alone on the computer, sit with him and make it more interactive by explaining the menu commands and what the different keys do. Choose simple games and activities, and point out to the things he may see on screen.

Take care of loose wires which may be dangerous if they get in his way while playing. Adjust the height of the chair or table so that he doesn’t strain himself and make sure he has good back support. The screen should not be too close to him either. If required, click the mouse or keys for your toddler and ask him only to answer the questions or solve the puzzles in the game.

Created June 2008

bronco610
05-14-2009, 06:51 PM
First off every parent will have a different view on what is ok for a kid. You can't really project your values onto other people. Sharing your story is fine but your statement it's fine for a 3 yr old doesn't hold up because really you only know what is fine for your 3 yr old.

Why anyone would even take a 3 yr old to a movie is beyond me, that's not something I would do unless movie was for 3 yr olds. Screaming kids, crying kids, kids making noise just ruin it for the rest of the people.

How do you even remember seeing Star Wars when you were 3 anyways? You must have one hell of a childhood memory.

All points I agree with or made earlier.

Bravo Sir !!!

Sassy
05-14-2009, 06:55 PM
Television Violence: A Review of the Effects on Children of Different Ages
Summary of Recommendations

Report of the Department of
Canadian Heritage, Feb. 1995
Wendy L. Josephson, Ph.D.
Republished with permission the
Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada

Full document includes:

Executive Summary

Introduction

Infants (Children up to 18 Months):

Toddlers (Children 18 Months to 3 Years Old):

Early Childhood or Preschool Age (Children Ages 3 to 5):

Middle Childhood or Elementary School Age (Children Ages 6 to 11):

Adolescence (Children Ages 12 to 17):

Conclusion

Appendix I: Effects of Television Violence on Especially Vulnerable Groups

Appendix II: Responses to Common Criticisms of Research on the Relationship between Television Violence and Aggression

Appendix III: Research on the Effects of Violent Video Games

References

Children of different ages watch and understand television in different ways, depending on the length of their attention spans, the ways in which they process information, the amount of mental effort they invest, and their own life experiences. These variables must all be examined to gain an understanding of how television violence affects them.

Infants (children up to 18 months old) can pay attention to an operating television set for short periods of time, but the attention demands a great effort and infants are usually more interested in their own activities. Even when they do pay attention to the television, infants likely miss most of what adults consider to be program content. They experience it primarily as fragmented displays of light and sound, which they are only intermittently able to group into meaningful combinations such as recognizable human or animal characters.

No research has focused specifically on how violent content affects infants, but there is some evidence that infants can imitate behaviour from television when that behaviour is presented in a simple, uncluttered and instructional manner.

Children do not become full-fledged "viewers" until around the age of two-and-a-half. As toddlers, they begin to pay more attention to the television set when it is on, and they develop a limited ability to extract meaning from television content. They are likely to imitate what they see and hear on television.

The viewing patterns children establish as toddlers will influence their viewing habits throughout their lives. Since toddlers have a strong preference for cartoons and other programs that have characters who move fast, there is considerable likelihood that they will be exposed to large amounts of violence.

At the preschool age (three to five years old), children begin watching television with an "exploration" approach. They actively search for meaning in the content, but are still especially attracted to vivid production features, such as rapid character movement, rapid changes of scene, and intense or unexpected sights and sounds.

Because television violence is accompanied by vivid production features, preschoolers are predisposed to seek out and pay attention to violence—particularly cartoon violence. It is not the violence itself that makes the cartoons attractive to preschoolers, but the accompanying vivid production features. With this preference for cartoons, preschoolers are being exposed to a large number of violent acts in their viewing day. Moreover, they are unlikely to be able to put the violence in context, since they are likely to miss any subtlety conveyed mitigating information concerning motivation and consequences. Preschoolers behave more aggressively than usual in their play after watching any high-action exciting television content, but especially after watching violent television.

Elementary school age (ages six to eleven) is considered a critical period for understanding the effects of television on aggression. At this stage, children develop the attention span and cognitive ability to follow continuous plots, to make inferences about implicit content, and to recognize motivations and consequences to characters' actions. However, they are also investing increasingly less mental effort overall in their viewing, and it is mental effort that determines whether children will process television information deeply or merely react to it in an unfocused, superficial way.

By age eight, children are more likely to be sensitive to important moderating influences of television content, and will not become more aggressive themselves if the violence they see is portrayed as evil, as causing human suffering, or as resulting in punishment or disapproval. However, they are especially likely to show increased aggression from watching violent television if they believe the violence reflects real life, if they identify with a violent hero (as boys often do), or if they engage in aggressive fantasies.

At ages 6 to 11, elementary school children still watch cartoons but also begin watching more adult or family-oriented programming than they did when they were younger. They also develop a surprising taste for horror movies, perhaps deliberately scaring themselves in an attempt to overcome their own fears. However, to the extent that they are desensitizing themselves to fear and violence, they are also very likely becoming more tolerant of violence in the real world.

During adolescence (age 12 to 17), the middle school to high school years, children become capable of high levels of abstract thought and reasoning, although they rarely use these abilities when watching television, continuing to invest little mental effort. They watch less television than they did when they were younger, and watch less with their families. Their interests at this age tend to revolve around independence, sex and romance, and they develop a preference for music videos, horror movies, and (boys particularly) pornographic videos, which deal with these topics, although usually in negative ways.

Adolescents in middle school and high school are much more likely than younger children to doubt the reality of television content and much less likely to identify with television characters. The small percentage of those who continue to believe in the reality of television and to identify with its violent heroes are the ones likely to be more aggressive, especially if they continue to fantasize about aggressive-heroic themes.

Their superior abstract reasoning abilities and their tendency at this age to challenge conventional authority make adolescents particularly susceptible to imitating some kinds of television violence, crime and portrayals of suicide. However, these imitative acts affect only a small percentage of adolescents.

In a world in which violent television is pervasive and children are susceptible to its effects, parents are the best mediators of their children's viewing.

There are a number of ways parents can limit their children's exposure to violence. Restricting the amount and types of programs children watch is probably the most effective and common means of mediation for children of all ages. However, there are also strategies that are specifically appropriate for children at different ages.

Under normal conditions, parents probably do not need to worry too much about their infants being negatively influenced by television, although they might want to limit their exposure to violence or other portrayals it might be dangerous for an infant to imitate.

Limiting exposure to this kind of TV content is especially wise with toddlers, who are even more prone to imitating what they see on television. Another highly influential action parents can take for toddlers is to examine and regulate their own viewing behaviour, since toddlers are highly influenced by their parents' viewing habits.

Parental mediation to reduce a preschooler's aggression (as well as fears from what they see on television) can include viewing with the child, commenting on content, providing distraction or comfort if the child is frightened, and encouraging or discouraging behaviour they see preschoolers imitating from television.

While restricting viewing is an effective form of parental mediation for younger elementary school aged children, for older children it is more useful for parents to discuss, explain, and challenge television. By doing so, parents can help their children to interpret television material and overcome the effect televised violence has on their attitudes and behaviour. Another positive effect of these strategies is that children invest more mental effort in their watching, becoming more critical and analytical viewers.

Encouraging adolescents to express their opinions and to analyze and question television content is a parental strategy that has been found to reduce adolescents' fears and aggressiveness, as well as to improve their critical approach to the medium.

There is an unfortunate lack of non-violent educational and entertaining programming specifically geared to children. It would not be a difficult challenge to come up with non-violent programming, since it is not the violence itself that attracts viewers. The television industry would do well to create programming specifically aimed at child audiences, taking into account the various approaches to watching television and the interests of each age group.

Although toddlers do not understand a great deal of program content, creating educational programming using such features as animation, children's or women's voices on the sound track, and simplified movements and camera work will likely win them as loyal viewers. A habit of watching educational programs (as opposed to cartoons) will reduce their exposure to violent content and make it more likely that they will watch and benefit from educational television later on, as preschoolers.

For preschoolers, effective programming would include the use of vivid production features and "child-directed speech" (simple sentences spoken slowly, referring to objects that are actually being shown on the screen, and with repetition). These features will improve their attention and understanding and can be used to highlight important features of program content, such as critical plot events.

The elementary school-aged audience has been called the "almost forgotten group" when it comes to targeted programming. Such programming could easily avoid violence, since children at this age are still more attracted to variability and tempo than to violence. Although boys, particularly, seek out male heroes who tend to be violent, it is actually the hero's power (not the violence) that is the attraction. Strong, yet positive, counterstereotypical television characters could be created to fit the bill, since these have proven to equally attract their interest, as effectively as violent heroes.

Programming for adolescents should avoid promoting rape myths and portraying violent behaviour that promises fun, "kicks," or instant notoriety. It might lessen the number of horror and pornographic videos that adolescents watch if television programming were provided that addresses their particular needs and interests.

It is certainly true that television violence does not account for all the causes of children's aggression, and it is also true that some children are a great deal more likely to be affected by television violence than others, and that it is these children who are likely to be potentially more aggressive anyway. But the effect of television violence leads these "at-risk" children to be even more aggressive than they would otherwise be. And although the group especially at risk might be a minority of viewers, they are likely to be the majority of aggressors. This fact makes them, and the violent content of television, worthy of our attention.

cutthemdown
05-14-2009, 06:57 PM
I have three daughters (8, 6 and 2 1/2). They have all seen Ghostbusters, Blazing Saddles, Spaceballs and many others. They have seen a lot of various TV shows. They have watched countless hours of me playing Call of Duty, Gears of War and Grand Theft Auto. They are still smart well behaved kids. The two in school are in the gifted program at school and both started to read before starting school. My oldest skipped the 1st grade. The middle daughter is in kindergarten reading at a third grade level. The best part is they interact with other kids great. So many "advanced" kids are raised sheltered and do not know how to behave socially.

unedited blazing saddles? With all the N-bombs and god forbid, the fart scene.

Also know one is saying adult movies scar kids. Some people just feel it makes them grow up too fast or learn foul language.

ksBRONCOfan
05-14-2009, 07:00 PM
unedited blazing saddles? With all the N-bombs and god forbid, the fart scene.

Also know one is saying adult movies scar kids. Some people just feel it makes them grow up too fast or learn foul language.

In my honest opinion, school is the worst influence for my children. (but I would never home school). That's wear they pick up most bad habits. That's where I got mine. Half from school and the other half from my two older brothers!

cutthemdown
05-14-2009, 07:08 PM
All points I agree with or made earlier.

Bravo Sir !!!

Great minds........

bronco610
05-14-2009, 07:10 PM
[QUOTE=Sassy;2417210]Television Violence: A Review of the Effects on Children of Different Ages
Summary of Recommendations

Report of the Department of
Canadian Heritage, Feb. 1995
Wendy L. Josephson, Ph.D.
Republished with permission the
Minister of Public Works and Government Services Canada

It's from Canada, haven't you seen Southpark? They aren't a real Country like the U.S. so their scientist dont know what they are talking aboult. :kiss:

cutthemdown
05-14-2009, 07:23 PM
In my honest opinion, school is the worst influence for my children. (but I would never home school). That's wear they pick up most bad habits. That's where I got mine. Half from school and the other half from my two older brothers!

Some would say school is bad because half the parents let kids watch violent foul media in the form of music and TV.

mr007
05-14-2009, 07:31 PM
holy **** people are still seriously talking about this?! Off season blows!!!!

Inkana7
05-14-2009, 07:41 PM
http://iconsoffright.com/news/Ghostbusters.jpeg

cutthemdown
05-14-2009, 07:46 PM
**** **** people are still seriously talking about this?! *** season *****!!!!

I censor a little past the boards software. I took at any words which could be deemed offensive to someone somewhere of any nationality or religion..................Except Islam where it would look more like this......................

*** **** ***** *** **** ******* ****** **** *** * *** *******

Bronx33
05-14-2009, 08:43 PM
Our brains learn the best between newborn and five.


So raider fans are basically f**** from day one. ;D

rugbythug
05-14-2009, 09:03 PM
you can get the "morals" of Jesus without the barbarism attached to it that is the rest of the Bible. Its not like Jesus invented the Golden Rule

To suggest the Bible is the best collection of morals is incredibly naive
I am not suggesting this is what you do, but people like the starter of this thread act like they are getting superior morals than what society can come up with because it was written down in the Bronze age


I shouldnt say anymore I have already derailed this topic enough Ithink

Societies morals are sifting sand. What was Taboo today is fine tomorrow. If I stand in the same place and everyone else goes somewhere else who has really moved?

Jason in LA
05-15-2009, 07:02 AM
First off every parent will have a different view on what is ok for a kid. You can't really project your values onto other people. Sharing your story is fine but your statement it's fine for a 3 yr old doesn't hold up because really you only know what is fine for your 3 yr old.

Why anyone would even take a 3 yr old to a movie is beyond me, that's not something I would do unless movie was for 3 yr olds. Screaming kids, crying kids, kids making noise just ruin it for the rest of the people.

How do you even remember seeing Star Wars when you were 3 anyways? You must have one hell of a childhood memory.

I'd say it's generally acceptable to show a 3 year old Ghostbusters. That's why so many people are pretty much rolling their eyes at this one. Man, it's freakin' Ghostbusters.

The thread isn't about taking a 3 year old to the movies. And yes, I do remember seeing Star Wars at 3. I remember seeing Empire Strikes Back in the movie theater at 4. I saw Star Wars before I saw Empire Strikes Back, and I remember how excited I was when the Death Star blew up. My grandmother took my brothers and I.

Hotrod
05-15-2009, 07:27 AM
I think we can all agree that Jack was introduced to Ghostbusters at an early age.

http://newmedia.funnyjunk.com/pictures/sorry.jpg

Meck77
05-15-2009, 07:43 AM
I'm not that worried about the movie. What concerns me is people having kids that can't even provide the basic necessities for that child. I'm talking food, water, shelter and some love. "Oh but I've known you for 3 weeks! Let's have a kid. I'll find a job someday!"

rugbythug
05-15-2009, 07:48 AM
I'd say it's generally acceptable to show a 3 year old Ghostbusters. That's why so many people are pretty much rolling their eyes at this one. Man, it's freakin' Ghostbusters.

The thread isn't about taking a 3 year old to the movies. And yes, I do remember seeing Star Wars at 3. I remember seeing Empire Strikes Back in the movie theater at 4. I saw Star Wars before I saw Empire Strikes Back, and I remember how excited I was when the Death Star blew up. My grandmother took my brothers and I.

It is not People who actually have 3 year olds that find it generally acceptable.

And as to your watching star wars when you were 3.

Are you 28 years old?

And as to watching Empire Strikes back when 4.

The Star Wars franchise began as a film series. The original trilogy comprised Star Wars, released on May 25, 1977, The Empire Strikes Back, released on May 21, 1980, and Return of the Jedi, released on May 25, 1983

rugbythug
05-15-2009, 07:51 AM
I would not have a problem if he was 8. I don't think people on here have Kids much less toddlers. A 3 year old cant add 2+2. Yet people want them to differentiate fiction from reality.

Beantown Bronco
05-15-2009, 08:01 AM
It is not People who actually have 3 year olds that find it generally acceptable.

And as to your watching star wars when you were 3.

Are you 28 years old?

And as to watching Empire Strikes back when 4.

The Star Wars franchise began as a film series. The original trilogy comprised Star Wars, released on May 25, 1977, The Empire Strikes Back, released on May 21, 1980, and Return of the Jedi, released on May 25, 1983

Jason's math can work. He and I are both 32 and are only 2 months apart in age.

I clearly remember seeing Star Wars in the drive-in. Theaters and drive-ins back then weren't the same as they are today. They played older movies, not just new releases.

Star Wars in particular played for like 5 years after its original release. I saw double features of it with Empire when I was less than 5 years old, but older than 2.

Beantown Bronco
05-15-2009, 08:04 AM
I would not have a problem if he was 8. I don't think people on here have Kids much less toddlers. A 3 year old cant add 2+2. Yet people want them to differentiate fiction from reality.

For the record, I have a 3 year old boy and a 5 year old girl. They can both differentiate fiction from reality to a least some extent.

rugbythug
05-15-2009, 08:10 AM
For the record, I have a 3 year old boy and a 5 year old girl. They can both differentiate fiction from reality to a least some extent.

I know they can. But not to the extent that this is a no Brainer. I mean we are talking about kids that still believe in Santa Clause and the Tooth Fairy.

Beantown Bronco
05-15-2009, 08:12 AM
I know they can. But not to the extent that this is a no Brainer. I mean we are talking about kids that still believe in Santa Clause and the Tooth Fairy.

Funny you should say that. Mrs Bean actually still believed in Santa Claus in junior high. I'm not joking.

bronco610
05-15-2009, 08:20 AM
What? Santa isn't real?.......Son of a **tch!!!

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 08:38 AM
Trust me they know.

All I let my Kids watch is Discovery Channel. They probably see 4-6 hours of TV each Week. I Also let him watch sports like Basketball, Boxing, Football and UFC.

Wait you let your kids watch men beat the **** out of eachother but don't want them to see some lame 80's sex scene. I hope you don't let them watch Top Gun ever. They blow up Russians and Maverick and Charlie make out. Men also greese themselves up and play beach vollyball and howl.

Hotrod
05-15-2009, 08:45 AM
Wait you let your kids watch men beat the **** out of eachother but don't want them to see some lame 80's sex scene. I hope you don't let them watch Top Gun ever. They blow up Russians and Maverick and Charlie make out. Men also greese themselves up and play beach vollyball and howl.

I also believe there is a motercycle scene where the rider does not wear the proper safety equipment such as a helmet and leather pants.

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 08:48 AM
He also drives right under a jet and is way to close to the runway and the FAA can charge him with a crime. I believe he also makes an obscene gesture to the jet by shaking his fist at him. Back in the day a shaken fist meant bad bad things.

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 08:54 AM
What about Karate Kid. There is several make out scenes and Mr. Miyagi clearly utilizes black magic to heal Ralph Maccio

Taco John
05-15-2009, 08:54 AM
Funny you should say that. Mrs Bean actually still believed in Santa Claus in junior high. I'm not joking.

Your wife too!? Ha!

Grumps
05-15-2009, 08:54 AM
He also drives right under a jet and is way to close to the runway and the FAA can charge him with a crime. I believe he also makes an obscene gesture to the jet by shaking his fist at him. Back in the day a shaken fist meant bad bad things.

But he did it to some commies. There is a good message in that.

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 08:55 AM
But he did it to some commies. There is a good message in that.

Oh yes forgive me same thing with Iron Eagle and Red Dawn. Blow those commie red bastards to hell!

Grumps
05-15-2009, 08:56 AM
Oh yes forgive me same thing with Iron Eagle and Red Dawn. Blow those commie red bastards to hell!

Wolverines!

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 08:57 AM
Wolverines!

AVENGE ME! AVENGE MEEEEEEEEE!!!!!!!!!

SonOfLe-loLang
05-15-2009, 09:00 AM
Oh yes forgive me same thing with Iron Eagle and Red Dawn. Blow those commie red bastards to hell!

So I guess Rocky 4 is good too! Then again, Rocky does have crap grammar...so hmmm.

24champ
05-15-2009, 09:26 AM
Number five is alive!!!!


http://www.slashfilm.com/wp/wp-content/images/shortcircuit.jpg

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 09:29 AM
What about Goonies. I mean Pirate Skeletons, Giants with birth defects, crime families, a dead guy, making out, a penis breaking off a statue only to be glued upside down. The S Word, stealing a childs bike. A man pooping on the toilet, breaking out of jail, violence.

Jesus I loved that movie as a kid. Man I am ****ed.

Beantown Bronco
05-15-2009, 09:32 AM
Number five is alive!!!!



Disassemble! No!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

My kids love that movie. Not as much as the Saw movies, but I think that goes without saying.

Archer81
05-15-2009, 09:34 AM
What about Goonies. I mean Pirate Skeletons, Giants with birth defects, crime families, a dead guy, making out, a penis breaking off a statue only to be glued upside down. The S Word, stealing a childs bike. A man pooping on the toilet, breaking out of jail, violence.

Jesus I loved that movie as a kid. Man I am ****ed.


I dont remember a penis in Goonies.


:Broncos:

Beantown Bronco
05-15-2009, 09:36 AM
I dont remember a penis in Goonies.


:Broncos:

the mom's little statue that she kept in the living room (mini statue of david or something like that). they broke it while wrestling around in the beginning before the mom got home with the groceries.

kamakazi_kal
05-15-2009, 09:36 AM
What about Goonies. I mean Pirate Skeletons, Giants with birth defects, crime families, a dead guy, making out, a penis breaking off a statue only to be glued upside down. The S Word, stealing a childs bike. A man pooping on the toilet, breaking out of jail, violence.

Jesus I loved that movie as a kid. Man I am ****ed.

..... the truffle shuffle is kind of disturbing.

rugbythug
05-15-2009, 09:36 AM
Man this thread just keeps going.

He actually does not watch any non animated movies at home. That and discovery channel. He loves that show "River Monsters"

24champ
05-15-2009, 09:37 AM
BTW speaking of the Goonies, there was some evil speak when the guy was speaking spanish to the mexican lady that was going to work at the house.

Jason in LA
05-15-2009, 09:38 AM
It is not People who actually have 3 year olds that find it generally acceptable.

And as to your watching star wars when you were 3.

Are you 28 years old?

And as to watching Empire Strikes back when 4.

The Star Wars franchise began as a film series. The original trilogy comprised Star Wars, released on May 25, 1977, The Empire Strikes Back, released on May 21, 1980, and Return of the Jedi, released on May 25, 1983

It is acceptable by people with 3 year olds. A few people in this thread have kids and think that you're way overreacting, including myself.

This is kind of like the story of that high school kid who got suspended by his school for taking his girlfriend from a public school to her prom. It's just silly. Stop being such a prude.

And yes, I did see Star Wars at age 3, and Empire Strikes Back at 4. The math adds up. I'm not sure what your point is with that one. I took my son to see Star Wars Episode 1 when he was 3. He loved the movie, and he's a normal 13 year old now.

Archer81
05-15-2009, 09:39 AM
Yeah you would've caught that if there were....wouldn't you?


Yup. Josh Brolin was hot. Now he is a grizzled old guy who fights men with Dora the Explorer haircuts...


:Broncos:

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 09:40 AM
I dont remember a penis in Goonies.


:Broncos:

Its at the start of the movie, chunch breaks it and glues it back on the wrong way.

I forgot they have an illegal immigrant cleaning their house and mouth tells her about the drugs and where not to go.

Jesus I can't believe I haven't gone insane.

Hotrod
05-15-2009, 09:40 AM
Man this thread just keeps going.

He actually does not watch any non animated movies at home. That and discovery channel. He loves that show "River Monsters"

River monsters are you insane there is unethical treatment of animals in that heathen program.

:)

Archer81
05-15-2009, 09:41 AM
the mom's little statue that she kept in the living room (mini statue of david or something like that). they broke it while wrestling around in the beginning before the mom got home with the groceries.


Oh yeah. Thats right.


:Broncos:

24champ
05-15-2009, 09:47 AM
I didn't like Teen Wolf, and I wouldn't let my future kid watch it.

Here is why, everyone in real life would **** pamela over "boof".

Seriously...

Pamela
http://www.mrskin.com/data/star/00/35/76/biopic2_39490.jpg

or

Boof
http://i.cdn.turner.com/si/2008/images/12/19/boof-tale.jpg

Jason in LA
05-15-2009, 09:59 AM
I watched Porky's when I was about 10. That is the greatest movie for a young boy to see. Shower scene... AWESOME!!!!

Grumps
05-15-2009, 10:27 AM
I watched Porky's when I was about 10. That is the greatest movie for a young boy to see. Shower scene... AWESOME!!!!

When ballbreaker is in the Principle's office after that trying to convince him to do a lineup was hilarious.

Hotrod
05-15-2009, 10:36 AM
What is the appropriate age for Revenge of the Nerds. I mean there is a moral in that movie somewhere.

theAPAOps5
05-15-2009, 10:37 AM
When ballbreaker is in the Principle's office after that trying to convince him to do a lineup was hilarious.

That has to be one of the most underated greatest scenes of all time. that and when she was tugging it!

UberBroncoMan
05-15-2009, 12:25 PM
I don't want my kid to know words that I can't type on a message board. I also don't want him sexualized at a young age. Nothing good can come from it.

You better run your house like Soviet Russia/Red China and be ready to home school him too.

Boobs McGee
05-15-2009, 01:32 PM
..... the truffle shuffle is kind of disturbing.

So My mom moved up to Tillamook oregon. Went to visit and we went up to Astoria (where they filmed the goonies). Went to the actual goonies house and did the truffle shuffle!! Unfortunately, the stump was no longer there. BUT, I'll get the pics from my sis and try to post them

Evenrude
05-15-2009, 06:12 PM
I left my kids (aged 5, 8, & 10 at the time) with my inlaws. They thought it was ok to let them watch "Ghostship". I was furious...... Ghostbusters is much better than Ghostship.

Jason in LA
05-15-2009, 08:43 PM
What is the appropriate age for Revenge of the Nerds. I mean there is a moral in that movie somewhere.

I'd figure that I saw that movie around age 10. Man I loved cable TV.

tsiguy96
05-15-2009, 08:53 PM
have you all gone mad? no love for teen wolf?

cutthemdown
05-15-2009, 08:54 PM
I left my kids (aged 5, 8, & 10 at the time) with my inlaws. They thought it was ok to let them watch "Ghostship". I was furious...... Ghostbusters is much better than Ghostship.

Eeesh watching that many rugrats is enough to make me book passage on the ghostship.

Crushaholic
05-15-2009, 08:58 PM
I left my kids (aged 5, 8, & 10 at the time) with my inlaws. They thought it was ok to let them watch "Ghostship". I was furious...... Ghostbusters is much better than Ghostship.

That movie even has *gasp* a NEKKID WOMAN...Yikes!

Bob's your Information Minister
05-15-2009, 09:00 PM
they frowned on all R rated movies. I also felt guilty when I did see an R rated movie before I was a teenager (with a few exceptions).


God, the same **** went on when I was a kid. Mother****ing bull****.

Jason in LA
05-15-2009, 09:00 PM
This thread should go into the Ring of Fame. It doesn't even need a sticky because it just stays at the top. ;D

OABB
05-15-2009, 09:26 PM
I just, for the sake of it, played Ghostbusters for my newborn to show the op how ridiculous he is...


but low and behold, Junior has begun cutting himself and wiping his feces all over his crib in the shape of a giant marshmellow. I need some parental advice and quick!

GreatBronco16
05-15-2009, 09:51 PM
I just, for the sake of it, played Ghostbusters for my newborn to show the op how ridiculous he is...


but low and behold, Junior has begun cutting himself and wiping his feces all over his crib in the shape of a giant marshmellow. I need some parental advice and quick!

:spit:

SouthStndJunkie
05-15-2009, 09:54 PM
I watched Porky's when I was about 10. That is the greatest movie for a young boy to see. Shower scene... AWESOME!!!!

Porky's and Porky's II are kick ass.

Hit the pig whistle.

bronco610
05-15-2009, 10:18 PM
I just, for the sake of it, played Ghostbusters for my newborn to show the op how ridiculous he is...


but low and behold, Junior has begun cutting himself and wiping his feces all over his crib in the shape of a giant marshmellow. I need some parental advice and quick!

eeewwwww!!!!!!! :o :o :o :o :o

Popps
05-15-2009, 10:26 PM
We really are in the vast wasteland of the off-season.

bronco610
05-15-2009, 10:49 PM
We really are in the vast wasteland of the off-season.

You started it !!!! :wiggle:

Dukes
05-15-2009, 10:56 PM
We really are in the vast wasteland of the off-season.

Are you kidding? This is pure gold

Popps
05-15-2009, 11:29 PM
You started it !!!! :wiggle:

Huh?

Check again.

bronco610
05-16-2009, 12:35 AM
Huh?

Check again.

The off season, not the thread.

24champ
05-16-2009, 01:32 AM
We really are in the vast wasteland of the off-season.

This wouldn't be a problem if you McDaniels heathens didn't chase Jay Cutler away! :P

BroncoMan4ever
05-16-2009, 01:49 AM
Problem is we are becoming a bunch of ****ing p***Ys

Just like at my sons field day. Everyone gets a ribbon wtf.

In lowwer little league baseball the motto was "everyone plays" **** that **** if you suck at sports do something else.

We are teaching our kids that everyone is a winner. That is a bold faced ****ing lie. I dont want my son getting out of school expecting to be on a level playing surface with everyone else. You better be willing to work if you want to succeed.

Ugh ghostbusters **** me :nono:

i agree with that completely. i have actually coached kids little league baseball(T-Ball) and the league actually imposed this bull**** rule that score will not be kept so everyone is just having fun and winning and losing don't matter.

give me a break with that ****. in life there are winners and there are losers. why would you take that life lesson away from kids? in sports someone wins and someone loses, that is the way it is. no one wants to watch a bunch of bull**** about not keeping score, and everyone gets a trophy even if they suck. that is crap, winners get the prize, and if you want to hold a trophy, work to get better and win.

when i do have kids, i refuse to let this pussified world put into his head that everything is equal, and nobody loses, and that the world isn't a cold hard b****.

i am not saying i want him traumatised and afraid of the world, but i want him to know, that if you want anything in life, you need to work your ass off for it. no one is going to give you anything just for showing up, like so many people are doing now.

in high school i had dreams of pitching in the majors, and because of that, i worked my ass off, i worked my arm so much that i actually ended up tearing muscles in my shoulder. i did this because i wanted it, and i knew that if it was ever going to happen for me, i was going to have to work for it. kids aren't learning that now. they just think the world will give them all they want, because it is coddling them as children.

BroncoMan4ever
05-16-2009, 01:54 AM
I just, for the sake of it, played Ghostbusters for my newborn to show the op how ridiculous he is...


but low and behold, Junior has begun cutting himself and wiping his feces all over his crib in the shape of a giant marshmellow. I need some parental advice and quick!

call an exorcist. Ghostbusters has ruined your kid. he is possessed by the Stay Puft Marshmallow man.

theAPAOps5
05-16-2009, 07:16 AM
Hmmmm just drafted and the second post is some weird link. No way in hell I would click on that!

BroncosinDC
05-16-2009, 07:27 AM
Hmmmm just drafted and the second post is some weird link. No way in hell I would click on that!

This computer is already effed, I fear no virus. On that note it was not free porn, but soccer scores. That's a huge waste of bandwith better served for other things such as porn.

Meck77
05-16-2009, 07:29 AM
Originally Posted by Dortoh View Post
Problem is we are becoming a bunch of ****ing p***Ys

Just like at my sons field day. Everyone gets a ribbon wtf.

In lowwer little league baseball the motto was "everyone plays" **** that **** if you suck at sports do something else.

We are teaching our kids that everyone is a winner. That is a bold faced ****ing lie. I dont want my son getting out of school expecting to be on a level playing surface with everyone else. You better be willing to work if you want to succeed.

Ugh ghostbusters **** me








Dortoh I'm with you bud. Why teach our children they don't really need to compete in life yet the moment you hit the working world that is exactly what it's all about.

Our government is setting the worst possible example now. Can't succeed in business? No problem. Have a billion dollars. Having trouble paying your mortgage? No problem! Stop paying so the government can step in to help.

It's nothing short of insane IMO.

"Everyone gets a ribbon". That's funny **** dortoh! The last place kid should have gotten a kick in the ass from dad! Whap!

bronco610
05-16-2009, 09:14 AM
"Everyone gets a ribbon". That's funny **** dortoh! The last place kid should have gotten a kick in the ass from dad! Whap!


Or a computer and a chiefs jersey!!!

Popps
05-16-2009, 09:27 AM
Dortoh I'm with you bud. Why teach our children they don't really need to compete in life

I agree in principle, though I'm not sure the people engaging in trying to encourage kids through participation awards are trying to tell them "they don't need to compete." Winners still get cooler stuff.

My son (14 now) played a few sports a year. In some, he got nothing if they didn't win. Other times, there were participation trophies or team awards. I think the concept there is to positively reinforce the effort they gave, while recognizing that they still came up short as far as the actual competition.

I watch these kids after a loss. They KNOW they lost. They're not stupid. They don't think a participation recognition is the same as a winner's award.
They know damned well that it's a competition. The idea that they'll go out into the world and lay down because they were given recognition for efforts is a bit of a stretch. In fact, if you've taken any child development or worked with kids at all, it's widely accepted that positive reinforcement is much more effective than post-facto punishment.

To me, I don't see anything wrong with it. Basically, it serves as a souvenir for the kids. Maybe a kid wasn't lucky enough to be placed on a team with good soccer players, but he still had a gave a great effort.

The NFL does the same thing... it's called the Pro Bowl.

I think one of the many problems about discussing child development on a football forum is that most people (not you, Meck) want to make that one blanket statement that will sum everything up. Kids are highly complex and drastically different from age to age... even down to the month when you're talking about infants/toddlers. Making blanket statements is almost an impossibility.

For example, are we talking about 7 year olds or high school kids? My son is a freshman now, and he knows he's not getting any participation awards if he fails a test at school, or doesn't make the basketball team. He's an honors student involved in the media program and plays multiple sports and musical instruments. We couldn't ask any more from him.... and he wasn't ruined by being properly encouraged along the way.

bronco610
05-16-2009, 09:32 AM
Popps, I sure wish you would stop being so reasonable all the time. ;D

Popps
05-16-2009, 09:39 AM
Popps, I sure wish you would stop being so reasonable all the time. ;D

Oh, I have my unreasonable moments.

If my kid misbehaves, I force him to watch Wade Phillips-era Broncos games over and over until he realizes what he's done wrong.

"Dad... are they ever going to run for 100 yards? "

davidtkd
05-16-2009, 10:14 AM
I wonder what Foneco thinks about all of this.

bronco610
05-16-2009, 10:26 AM
Oh, I have my unreasonable moments.

If my kid misbehaves, I force him to watch Wade Phillips-era Broncos games over and over until he realizes what he's done wrong.

"Dad... are they ever going to run for 100 yards? "

:notworthy :notworthy Good one !!!!

SureShot
01-10-2010, 07:30 PM
Thread bump in honor of Rugbythug and his delicate sensibilities.

bowtown
01-10-2010, 07:32 PM
This thread makes me want to leave the mane.

azbroncfan
01-10-2010, 07:39 PM
Classic should be in ROF.

epicSocialism4tw
01-10-2010, 08:14 PM
3 years old is too young for Ghostbusters.

I wouldnt listen to a bunch of internet era dudes as to what is and what isnt appropriate for 3-year olds.

Honestly, I think that most people in this current 18-35 generation dont understand what values are and how or why they could ever be important.

You cant appeal to this crowd for affirmation of your values. They'd rather make fun of you than to admit that its better to take the high road. Theyre a bunch of pansies.

bowtown
01-10-2010, 08:17 PM
Soccer sucks.

epicSocialism4tw
01-10-2010, 08:26 PM
Soccer sucks.

Its certainly not as cool as a jet hitting a bong off of the roof of a lamborghini.

SureShot
01-10-2010, 08:27 PM
Its certainly not as cool as a jet hitting a bong off of the roof of a lamborghini.

Well...duh.

bowtown
01-10-2010, 08:31 PM
Total agreement.

Jason in LA
01-10-2010, 08:42 PM
This thread was awesome. So many jokes came out of it, and it crossed over into so many other threads. It was the best thread of last year's offseason.

Archer81
01-10-2010, 09:11 PM
Good thread. We learned so much.


:Broncos:

broncocalijohn
01-11-2010, 12:41 AM
3 years old is too young for Ghostbusters.

I wouldnt listen to a bunch of internet era dudes as to what is and what isnt appropriate for 3-year olds.

Honestly, I think that most people in this current 18-35 generation dont understand what values are and how or why they could ever be important.

You cant appeal to this crowd for affirmation of your values. They'd rather make fun of you than to admit that its better to take the high road. Theyre a bunch of pansies.

Says the guy who has pansies in his avatar.

OBF1
01-11-2010, 01:08 AM
I just read the first couple pages and I like it, Freekin classic, even though it is a year old :)

Beantown Bronco
01-11-2010, 04:49 AM
I came home from work the other day to find my 3 year old and 5 year old acting out the opening scene to one of the Saw movies. I never knew you could build torture devices with a Handy Manny playset.

It brought a tear to my eye.

Who says you never learn anything from tv?

Ratboy
01-11-2010, 04:52 AM
LOL, I busted out laughing when I seen this thread title.

missingnumber7
01-11-2010, 07:50 AM
3 years old is too young for Ghostbusters.

I wouldnt listen to a bunch of internet era dudes as to what is and what isnt appropriate for 3-year olds.

Honestly, I think that most people in this current 18-35 generation dont understand what values are and how or why they could ever be important.

You cant appeal to this crowd for affirmation of your values. They'd rather make fun of you than to admit that its better to take the high road. Theyre a bunch of pansies.

The movie was PG when it came out...by todays standards probably G.

epicSocialism4tw
01-11-2010, 08:36 AM
The movie was PG when it came out...by todays standards probably G.

Well, you cant depend on the rating system to determine what's good or right for your child. That's what it means to have standards. You think that certain things are important to restrict to prevent your child from learning behaviors that may not be advantageous for them.

Personally, Ghostbusters is still one of my favorite movies. One of my favorite scenes of all time is the Zuul at the party scene that culminates in the Vince Clothor scene with the noodle strainer on his head.

Dagmar
01-11-2010, 08:37 AM
Well, you cant depend on the rating system to determine what's good or right for your child. That's what it means to have standards. You think that certain things are important to restrict to prevent your child from learning behaviors that may not be advantageous for them.

How far up your ass did they put that stick?

Your kids are going to do very well on the playground. ROFL!

epicSocialism4tw
01-11-2010, 08:41 AM
How far up your ass did they put that stick?

Your kids are going to do very well on the playground.

Your interaction with kids probably amounts to nostalgia about your own childhood. Its obvious that you have no idea what youre talking about if you advocate watching questionable movies because it makes them "do well on the playground."

TailgateNut
01-11-2010, 08:44 AM
Your interaction with kids probably amounts to nostalgia about your own childhood. Its obvious that you have no idea what youre talking about if you advocate watching questionable movies because it makes them "do well on the playground."


:rofl:

missingnumber7
01-11-2010, 08:55 AM
Well, you cant depend on the rating system to determine what's good or right for your child. That's what it means to have standards. You think that certain things are important to restrict to prevent your child from learning behaviors that may not be advantageous for them.

Personally, Ghostbusters is still one of my favorite movies. One of my favorite scenes of all time is the Zuul at the party scene that culminates in the Vince Clothor scene with the noodle strainer on his head.

Thus PG stands for Parental Guidance Suggested. I've got three kids that I keep my eyes on...2 step kids that spend a weekend at their dads and can watch anything they want that are 14 and 9. And one that will be 2 on the 16th who would watch Veggietales non stop. And believe me I am very cautious on what my kids get to see, but the biggest thing is for the most part if I think it may be questionable, I'm going to watch it with them so I can either shut it off or walk out if its inappropriate, or fast forward. But in my mind that doesn't happen enough. When I sit in R rated movies and see kids that are way to young to be in there. But then again I was angry when the theatre wouldn't let me bring my 6 month old sleeping son with to a PG-13 movie.

Rohirrim
01-11-2010, 09:14 AM
When my oldest son was four he used to watch the video Pinocchio over and over again. Every time Monstro the Whale came on the screen he would run to the kitchen and then peek around the wall to watch it. I asked him, "Are you scared of Monstro?"

And he said, "Nope."

epicSocialism4tw
01-11-2010, 09:23 AM
When my oldest son was four he used to watch the video Pinocchio over and over again. Every time Monstro the Whale came on the screen he would run to the kitchen and then peek around the wall to watch it. I asked him, "Are you scared of Monstro?"

And he said, "Nope."

The first movie I saw in the theaters was Return of the Jedi. I was 4. The Rancor scared me so bad that I cowered in my seat and hid my eyes! :rofl:

Thats the only thing I remember from that day.

epicSocialism4tw
01-11-2010, 09:30 AM
Thus PG stands for Parental Guidance Suggested. I've got three kids that I keep my eyes on...2 step kids that spend a weekend at their dads and can watch anything they want that are 14 and 9. And one that will be 2 on the 16th who would watch Veggietales non stop. And believe me I am very cautious on what my kids get to see, but the biggest thing is for the most part if I think it may be questionable, I'm going to watch it with them so I can either shut it off or walk out if its inappropriate, or fast forward. But in my mind that doesn't happen enough. When I sit in R rated movies and see kids that are way to young to be in there. But then again I was angry when the theatre wouldn't let me bring my 6 month old sleeping son with to a PG-13 movie.


Alot of the people that I work with in the community have several kids at home (cousins, siblings, "adopted" kids of friends, etc.), a single parent and a grandma or friend, an absent father, or any other combination of non-traditional family members that live in the same place. These households are run with so few standards that it really works to the detriment of the children who live there. Kids tell me about watching "Chucky" and even porn! I have heard about Saw and "Chucky" from kids as old as 3. These same kids have grown up and later confided in me that they are afraid of the dark to the point that they will not sleep alone in the dark...as 16 year olds.

Granted these are extreme examples, but they get the idea across. Esposure to scary things or over-sexed themes can irreparably damage a large swath of a child's life.

Is it worth it to risk that? Heck no.

JJG
01-11-2010, 09:41 AM
I think my kids first watched this movie at ages 4 and 5. My oldest is one of the best football players on his team, and they both make A's and B's in school. So yeah, it makes a big impact alright. ;D
LOL
Not only is it ok to let kids watch GB, it actually makes them really good football players later on in life.....

I wish my parents let me watch it before I was 10, I'd be in the NFl right now for sure.

broncocalijohn
01-11-2010, 08:19 PM
The first movie I saw in the theaters was Return of the Jedi. I was 4. The Rancor scared me so bad that I cowered in my seat and hid my eyes! :rofl:

Thats the only thing I remember from that day.

so we can blame George Lucas for you becoming a pansy in 1983 or were you a soccer nut before that?

azbroncfan
01-11-2010, 08:25 PM
The first movie I saw in the theaters was Return of the Jedi. I was 4. The Rancor scared me so bad that I cowered in my seat and hid my eyes! :rofl:

Thats the only thing I remember from that day.

No surprise.

Dagmar
01-11-2010, 08:36 PM
So glad he quite the Mane!

Bronco Yoda
01-12-2010, 03:38 AM
So our youngest... nearly 2 now is chasing the cat with a meat cleaver down the hall.

Should we stop letting him go to sleep to the video chucky?

OABB
01-12-2010, 07:57 AM
I believe my avatar says it all. I was going to update it but with this bump I think I will keep it.

TerrElway
01-12-2010, 08:48 AM
Alot of the people that I work with in the community have several kids at home (cousins, siblings, "adopted" kids of friends, etc.), a single parent and a grandma or friend, an absent father, or any other combination of non-traditional family members that live in the same place. These households are run with so few standards that it really works to the detriment of the children who live there. Kids tell me about watching "Chucky" and even porn! I have heard about Saw and "Chucky" from kids as old as 3. These same kids have grown up and later confided in me that they are afraid of the dark to the point that they will not sleep alone in the dark...as 16 year olds.

Granted these are extreme examples, but they get the idea across. Esposure to scary things or over-sexed themes can irreparably damage a large swath of a child's life.

Is it worth it to risk that? Heck no.

I'm with you. I work with youth and the ones that have the most problems are the ones whose parents set no boundaries. Whether it is movies or curfew or whatever. The parents either aren't involved in their kids' lives or they are trying to be a cool friend rather than a guiding influence.

Teachers and resource officers that I associate see the same thing.

Sometimes the parent is not involved because they are a single parent working their fingers to the bone trying to keep food on the table. That is what it is, but most times it is because parents are too wrapped up in their own lives to give a rip about their kids or because they want to be a friend.

But sometimes parents underestimate how things effect kids. I learned about the effect of movies on kids the hard way. I loved the Lord of the Rings movies, thought they were pretty harmless - let my then 6 year old son watch them. He liked them but Gollum scared him to death and we dealt with a kid frightened at bedtime for a long time. I could have avoided that by being more judicious and letting him watch a movie I thought he would like when he was a little older. I've been far more careful with my younger kids and my son is now 11 and has friends whose parents let their kids watch R rated shows all the time. I don't let him. He can when he is older. Somehow he is well adjusted, one of the top players on his comp league basketball team and football team, a top student and in his schools student council. Even though I play the role of a parent and don't let him watch inappropriate movies.

baja
06-22-2010, 09:40 AM
This thread went 16 pages OMG!!!!

baja
06-22-2010, 09:43 AM
Thanks for the link Bean.

Of all the things you would like to protect your kids from I would think Ghost Busters would be low on the list.

Taco John
06-22-2010, 10:29 AM
For the record, there is no way in hell I would want my 3 year old watching Ghostbusters. He would not know how to assimilate that information and it would cause me more headache than it's worth.

baja
06-22-2010, 10:34 AM
I doubt Ghost Busters would have anywhere near the same meaning to a three year old as it does to his parents. They would not even see what you fear they will.

bowtown
06-22-2010, 10:35 AM
For the record, there is no way in hell I would want my 3 year old watching Ghostbusters. He would not know how to assimilate that information and it would cause me more headache than it's worth.

Unless you use it as a teachable moment. Ghosts are nothing to eff with and you should not try to catch them yourself or you'll get covered in slime. Also, if there's something wrong in the neighborhood, don't waste your time with 911, you call Ghostbusters. Finally, marshmallows are not always good. It's really never too early to start instilling that kind of stuff.

Popps
06-22-2010, 10:41 AM
I'm with you. I work with youth and the ones that have the most problems are the ones whose parents set no boundaries. Whether it is movies or curfew or whatever. The parents either aren't involved in their kids' lives or they are trying to be a cool friend rather than a guiding influence.

Teachers and resource officers that I associate see the same thing.

Sometimes the parent is not involved because they are a single parent working their fingers to the bone trying to keep food on the table. That is what it is, but most times it is because parents are too wrapped up in their own lives to give a rip about their kids or because they want to be a friend.

But sometimes parents underestimate how things effect kids. I learned about the effect of movies on kids the hard way. I loved the Lord of the Rings movies, thought they were pretty harmless - let my then 6 year old son watch them. He liked them but Gollum scared him to death and we dealt with a kid frightened at bedtime for a long time. I could have avoided that by being more judicious and letting him watch a movie I thought he would like when he was a little older. I've been far more careful with my younger kids and my son is now 11 and has friends whose parents let their kids watch R rated shows all the time. I don't let him. He can when he is older. Somehow he is well adjusted, one of the top players on his comp league basketball team and football team, a top student and in his schools student council. Even though I play the role of a parent and don't let him watch inappropriate movies.


Great post.

There's little or no possibility of damaging a child by NOT letting them watch a potentially questionable movie before they're ready.

bowtown
06-22-2010, 10:47 AM
Great post.

There's little or no possibility of damaging a child by NOT letting them watch a potentially questionable movie before they're ready.

My parents wouldn't let me watch Platoon when I was a kid. I still hate them for it, and will probably not take care of them when they get really old because of it.

Popps
06-22-2010, 10:52 AM
I doubt Ghost Busters would have anywhere near the same meaning to a three year old as it does to his parents. They would not even see what you fear they will.

You're wrong, Baja.

They see much MORE than we do. A 3 year old doesn't see special effects and purely comedic elements in violence. (Or psuedo-violence.) They see it for face value. Now, depending on the development stage of the child... those images can produce any number of responses, but often not good ones.

Example... my girl just turned 4. She used to love watching Toy Story. The new one came out... and now she's telling me that it's "scary." Now, I think she'll change her mind and want to see it at some point soon... but the point is, something changed in her outlook. It's impossible for me to know where she is, developmentally at every moment in her brain. So, I've just got to guess. I don't think Toy Story is too much... even for a 4 year old, but this is a good example of how it's impossible for us to know how they'll perceive imagery, and why erring on the conservative side is probably a wise move at such a delicate age.

Rohirrim
06-22-2010, 10:56 AM
In the first act of Bambi, Walt Disney killed off Bambi's mother. It's all relative.

baja
06-22-2010, 11:05 AM
You're wrong, Baja.

They see much MORE than we do. A 3 year old doesn't see special effects and purely comedic elements in violence. (Or psuedo-violence.) They see it for face value. Now, depending on the development stage of the child... those images can produce any number of responses, but often not good ones.

Example... my girl just turned 4. She used to love watching Toy Story. The new one came out... and now she's telling me that it's "scary." Now, I think she'll change her mind and want to see it at some point soon... but the point is, something changed in her outlook. It's impossible for me to know where she is, developmentally at every moment in her brain. So, I've just got to guess. I don't think Toy Story is too much... even for a 4 year old, but this is a good example of how it's impossible for us to know how they'll perceive imagery, and why erring on the conservative side is probably a wise move at such a delicate age.

I have long felt all that is wrong with us comes from input from our environment. We learn our emotional pain from our circle of influence, parents, other adults and in no small part other kids. We are methodically taught to be less than we are.

"Sins of the father shall be passed to the sons"

To avoid all the limiting and damaging input one would have to raise their child to experience only unconditional love.

We have collectively created the reality we live in and it is based mostly in fear not love.

baja
06-22-2010, 11:09 AM
As to Ghost Busters I don't think that is any worse than much of the input a child receives every day. I just don't think singling out GB is getting the point.

We infect our kids with the same dis ease we learned from our teachers.

Popps
06-22-2010, 11:10 AM
I have long felt all that is wrong with us comes from input from our environment. We learn our emotional pain from our circle of influence, parents, other adults and in no small part other kids. We are methodically taught to be less than we are.

"Sins of the father shall be passed to the sons"

To avoid all the limiting and damaging input one would have to raise their child to experience only unconditional love.

We have collectively created the reality we live in and it is based mostly in fear not love.

Think about TV and movies. It's a very recent invention relative to our evolution. I think we know very little about its effects.

baja
06-22-2010, 11:27 AM
Think about TV and movies. It's a very recent invention relative to our evolution. I think we know very little about its effects.

I know!

When almost every network show starts with a horrific murder and the rest of the show is spent solving the mystery you gotta wonder the impact.

This is (in part) why I believe we are on the thresh hold of a complete reboot of how we do life.

I believe we are about to experience a quantum leap in human consciousness

Rohirrim
06-22-2010, 11:29 AM
I know!

When almost every network show starts with a horrific murder and the rest of the show is spent solving the mystery you gotta wonder the impact.

This is why I believe we are on the thresh hold of a complete reboot of how we do life.

I believe we are about to experience a quantum leap in human consciousness

http://okjill.files.wordpress.com/2008/08/2001-ape-monolith.jpg

broncocalijohn
06-22-2010, 11:35 AM
My parents wouldn't let me watch Platoon when I was a kid. I still hate them for it, and will probably not take care of them when they get really old because of it.

I think best would be to play Platoon on a loop non-stop while they try to nap for the 3rd time in the day. Pay back!
Glad this got bumped so everyone understands the Ghostbuster reference posters throw around. If you didnt understand it then, you might now. Even baja didnt know about it and he has been here since Brian Griese.

sisterhellfyre
06-22-2010, 11:52 AM
In the first act of Bambi, Walt Disney killed off Bambi's mother. It's all relative.

Favorite movie: Bambi vs Godzilla.

Opening credits.
Bambi frolics thru the woods.
Giant lizard foot: *splat*
The end: roll credits.

cutthemdown
06-22-2010, 12:06 PM
I don't have a problem with rules that allows every kid to play. The only way a kid is going to get better is if he or she plays. But I do have a problem with rules that gives everybody equal play. The better kids get to play more. That's just how it is, and there is nothing wrong with that. If a kid wants more playing time, he better work for it. He better get better to help the team. On some level it is about getting all the kids out there to play, but at the same time, on some level it is about winning. The kid that works harder should be rewarded.

Plus it prepares the kids for high school sports. On that level if you suck you don't play.


It's the same way in music. The best kids get the first chair and most of the solos. Sure the lessor players get a chance to express themselves but not nearly as much as the better players do. Just how it is in anything.

What's worst then someone who stinks not getting a chance to get better, is someone really good not getting a chance to better.

bowtown
06-22-2010, 12:18 PM
It's the same way in music. The best kids get the first chair and most of the solos. Sure the lessor players get a chance to express themselves but not nearly as much as the better players do. Just how it is in anything.

What's worst then someone who stinks not getting a chance to get better, is someone really good not getting a chance to better.

Which is exactly why I am going to teach my kids that if they aren't good at something the first time they try it, they should never try it again. Only losers have to work at things.

Taco John
06-22-2010, 01:11 PM
In the first act of Bambi, Walt Disney killed off Bambi's mother. It's all relative.

My son didn't even register it. If I remember right, she jumps over a hill, you hear a shot, and that's the extent of it. The rest of the story is about furry critters.

Taco John
06-22-2010, 01:14 PM
As to Ghost Busters I don't think that is any worse than much of the input a child receives every day. I just don't think singling out GB is getting the point.



I'd say that you haven't spent much time with a 3 year old lately if this is what you believe. Have you watched anything on Playhouse Disney?

cutthemdown
06-22-2010, 01:15 PM
Which is exactly why I am going to teach my kids that if they aren't good at something the first time they try it, they should never try it again. Only losers have to work at things.

That wasn't my point at all. Is that really what you got from that?

Rohirrim
06-22-2010, 01:20 PM
My son didn't even register it. If I remember right, she jumps over a hill, you hear a shot, and that's the extent of it. The rest of the story is about furry critters.

When my son was four, he loved Pinocchio. But then, when the part with Monstro the Whale came, he would hide in the kitchen and peek around the corner at the TV. I asked him if Monstro scared him and he said, "No." Hilarious!

gunns
06-22-2010, 01:35 PM
In the first act of Bambi, Walt Disney killed off Bambi's mother. It's all relative.

And I am still traumatized by it. Really

underrated29
06-22-2010, 01:38 PM
When my son was four, he loved Pinocchio. But then, when the part with Monstro the Whale came, he would hide in the kitchen and peek around the corner at the TV. I asked him if Monstro scared him and he said, "No." Hilarious!

YES!!

Got to this thread a bit late. But really, Ghostbusters?

My son is 3- and I will NOT let him watch Pinnocchio- he loves it. Really though, there is a fox playing poker, a circus freak that kidnaps pinnochio, kids that drink beer and turn into donkeys and get taken away from their families and a giant whale that eats people....Oh and a magical fairy that may or may not be a meth head. No Way.

Ghostbusters is fine though. Do you let your kids watch spiderman, xman, spike....Those are fine and just as same. My son is fine. He still loves the wonder pets, backyardigans, MMCH, Manny, dora/diego---but there is nothing wrong with ghostbusters.

baja
06-22-2010, 01:38 PM
I'd say that you haven't spent much time with a 3 year old lately if this is what you believe. Have you watched anything on Playhouse Disney?

You would be right and no I have not.

Phantom
06-22-2010, 01:49 PM
My kids watch Football - great for the soul.
:thumbs:

I recommend keeping your 7 year olds away from WWE. I made that mistake, now the furniture is a wrestling ring and the pillows/cushions get the crap beat out of them daily. Good times.

baja
06-22-2010, 01:54 PM
And I am still traumatized by it. Really

Me too. Really!

Old Yeller left a mark too.

baja
06-22-2010, 01:58 PM
YES!!

Got to this thread a bit late. But really, Ghostbusters?

My son is 3- and I will NOT let him watch Pinnocchio- he loves it. Really though, there is a fox playing poker, a circus freak that kidnaps pinnochio, kids that drink beer and turn into donkeys and get taken away from their families and a giant whale that eats people....Oh and a magical fairy that may or may not be a meth head. No Way.

Ghostbusters is fine though. Do you let your kids watch spiderman, xman, spike....Those are fine and just as same. My son is fine. He still loves the wonder pets, backyardigans, MMCH, Manny, dora/diego---<b>but there is nothing wrong with ghostbusters.

That's what I thought, I mean the first five minutes of any episode of CSI has to be worse for a three year old than Ghost Busters.

broncosteven
06-22-2010, 02:24 PM
YES!!

Got to this thread a bit late. But really, Ghostbusters?

My son is 3- and I will NOT let him watch Pinnocchio- he loves it. Really though, there is a fox playing poker, a circus freak that kidnaps pinnochio, kids that drink beer and turn into donkeys and get taken away from their families and a giant whale that eats people....Oh and a magical fairy that may or may not be a meth head. No Way.

Ghostbusters is fine though. Do you let your kids watch spiderman, xman, spike....Those are fine and just as same. My son is fine. He still loves the wonder pets, backyardigans, MMCH, Manny, dora/diego---but there is nothing wrong with ghostbusters.

The Phone...The phone is ringing.


Josh would like the Wonder Pets due to it's focus on Team work.

Taco John
06-22-2010, 02:37 PM
That's what I thought, I mean the first five minutes of any episode of CSI has to be worse for a three year old than Ghost Busters.

Why would a three year old be up late enough to watch CSI? If your three year old kid is up as late as CSI, you're making parenting much harder on you and your kid than it needs to be. That kid probably is tired and grouchy a lot.

TheReverend
06-22-2010, 02:38 PM
The Phone...The phone is ringing.


Josh would like the Wonder Pets due to it's focus on Team work.

What's gonna work?

Teeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeamwork

Taco John
06-22-2010, 02:38 PM
When my son was four, he loved Pinocchio. But then, when the part with Monstro the Whale came, he would hide in the kitchen and peek around the corner at the TV. I asked him if Monstro scared him and he said, "No." Hilarious!



I can totally relate. Zachary is the same way. Only he'll admit that he's scared. "Daddy, this part is too scary."

baja
06-22-2010, 02:41 PM
Why would a three year old be up late enough to watch CSI?

I can find CSI or something similar any time of the day or night on Dish and since when do 3 years have regular sleeping hours.


Point is why single out GB there is tons of stuff that will leave an emotional mark on a three year old what is so special about Ghost Busters?

Taco John
06-22-2010, 02:45 PM
What's gonna work?

Teeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeamwork



I love it when I give a shout "What's gonna work," and I get that sweet innocent voice back from my son, "Teeeeeamwork!"

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijsHtY7aV7I&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijsHtY7aV7I&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

TheReverend
06-22-2010, 02:49 PM
I love it when I give a shout "What's gonna work," and I get that sweet innocent voice back from my son, "Teeeeeamwork!"

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijsHtY7aV7I&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijsHtY7aV7I&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

I want to stomp the life out of that yellow bird.

Taco John
06-22-2010, 02:56 PM
I can find CSI or something similar any time of the day or night on Dish and since when do 3 years have regular sleeping hours.


Point is why single out GB there is tons of stuff that will leave an emotional mark on a three year old what is so special about Ghost Busters?


I wouldn't single out Ghost Busters. There's plenty of stuff that I wouldn't want to expose my three year old to. I have a good friend, though, who doesn't see it like I do. We expose our kid to learning shows mostly - stuff that will enrich his mind and help him expand his vocabulary and abilities. My friend has his kid watching stuff like Transformers cartoons from the 80's - nothing too detrimental, but nothing enriching.

The difference betweent he two kids is striking. His kid, the older one by six months, can barely form words and has a sort of mush mouth when he talks. He talks in small sentances. Mine is very communicative, speaks in full sentances, and has a more quiet mind. (also, they don't give that kid a regular bed time, and so he sleeps until 11am every day. We put our kid to bed every night by 9pm on a schedule, and he wakes up no later than 8am every day ready to take on the day). Nothing wrong with his kid, I'm sure he's got the tools to be very bright, but he's just not being exposed to the same things that my kid is being exposed to, and it's showing in their development.

It wouldn't be the end of the world if my kid saw Ghostbusters, by any shot. It would just scare him, and I'd have a lot more on my hands than it would be worth. Of course, my kid will probably grow up to be more sensitive to violence and vulgarity than his kid. I don't know if that's a good thing or not for sure. But I'm ok with being conservative with his exposure to things and maximize the learning potential of what he is exposed to at this young and tender age.

Taco John
06-22-2010, 02:57 PM
I want to stomp the life out of that yellow bird.

This. Is. Sewious!

TheReverend
06-22-2010, 02:59 PM
This. Is. Sewious!

EXACTLY! And (maybe this has changed in the past few years since I've seen it) he's ALWAYS causing trouble for the rest of the group. Ling ling is the name, right? Ling ling needs to die for the good of the whole.

The rest of them should be chanting "What's going to work? Teamwork" as they lynch that stupid bird.

Requiem
06-22-2010, 03:00 PM
When I was three I was watchin' Pee Wee and stuff and that dude scared me. First nightmare I ever remember is dreams with Pee Wee hurting me.

BroncoLifer
06-22-2010, 03:03 PM
Old Yeller left a mark too.

I cried. Heavily.

Taco John
06-22-2010, 03:20 PM
My son loves Astro Boy. But there's this scene where the father freaks out on the robot boy "you're not my son" that causes my boy a bit of anguish. He always ends up on my lap with his arms around me during that scene.

baja
06-22-2010, 03:32 PM
Did anybody see the movie Precious?

I can't imagine the mind that can do those things to their own children or the mind that can watch on and let it happen.

The really amazing thing is a child can overcome this and have a good life filled with love.

Los Broncos
06-22-2010, 03:38 PM
When I was like 11 or 12 my mother took me to see "happy birthday to me", bid time horror movie for a kid.

My grandparents never forgave her for that.

Bronco Yoda
06-22-2010, 03:50 PM
I love it when I give a shout "What's gonna work," and I get that sweet innocent voice back from my son, "Teeeeeamwork!"

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijsHtY7aV7I&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/ijsHtY7aV7I&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

lol... my 2yr old does the same thing. Sings the whole thing and waits for me to say "and Ming Ming too".

and of course theres wubzy (sp?)

underrated29
06-22-2010, 04:03 PM
TJ- You put yours down at 9 and he sleeps til 8!?!?!


Holly balls! Thats 11 hours of sleep! Do you run him on a 5 mile marathon or what.


Mine goes to bed no later than 930 every night. Mostly between 9/930 and he ALWAYS gets up exactly at 6:47am. ALWAYS! He plays at daycare during the day with the 6 year olds, running around like crazy kids having fun, then when he comes home we swim for a few hours, eat, then play hockey or go for a walk or whatever to get him outside having fun and running around. At 8:30 we go in, do a puzzle or book and then turn on a recorded show of scooby doo or the other listed before and he is out like a light. But always always always gets up at 6:47.

I even made a CD full of classical, enya, sounds of nature and yoga type soft listening that quietly plays in the background while he sleeps. While I think it might help his development the chubby man just wont sleep past 7.


What is your secret?

baja
06-22-2010, 04:06 PM
Is there a noise that happens in his room or outside his room (sprinkler going on for instance) at that time?

Bronco Yoda
06-22-2010, 04:14 PM
I think tonight we'll have movie night.

Guess what's playing... "who ya going to call"

We'll see who's traumatized by it all.

Should I make up a survey for the after show discussion to see which kids were traumitized by what... or go straight to family counseling?

Rohirrim
06-22-2010, 04:30 PM
I remember sitting on the couch with my boys when they were little and watching Winnie the Pooh over and over again. I can do a very good Tigger impression ("The wonderful thing about Tiggers, ...) that they loved. It goes by too fast. Now, all three of them are taller than me. :pity:

baja
06-22-2010, 04:48 PM
I remember sitting on the couch with my boys when they were little and watching Winnie the Pooh over and over again. I can do a very good Tigger impression ("The wonderful thing about Tiggers, ...) that they loved. It goes by too fast. Now, all three of them are taller than me. :pity:

I know what you mean my daughter just sent her son on a class trip to Europe!

ksBRONCOfan
06-22-2010, 05:13 PM
What about Tremors? I watched that with my kids (9, 7 and 3) the other day.

gunns
06-22-2010, 05:21 PM
Me too. Really!

Old Yeller left a mark too.

Oh hell yes. I sobbed for hours after both.

baja
06-22-2010, 05:24 PM
Oh hell yes. I sobbed for hours after both.

When you say, "Let's get busy" what do you mean exactly?

briane
06-22-2010, 05:29 PM
How video games affect toddlers and how to deal with it
Written for BabyCenter India


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Understanding your toddler

What do video games involve for my toddler?

What parents can do


Interactive video games designed and marketed for toddlers are the latest addition to the “get smarter” range of toys and games flooding the markets. These games may be small hand held devices or consoles that can be plugged on to a computer, laptop or television set.

They are often called “educational games” and use popular characters like Winnie the Pooh and Noddy to teach kids colours, shapes and numbers. Brightly coloured buttons, consoles and big characters are used to dub them as “child friendly” and they are often touted as better alternatives to watching television.

But are video games really that different from watching television? And will your two year old who may barely be able to hold a crayon, benefit from the latest in entertainment technology?



Understanding your toddler


Toddlers between the ages of one and four years are at their exploratory best, using all their senses to learn about the world they live in. Touching, tasting, feeling and smelling, your toddler satisfies his curiosity and learns more and more every day. Several studies recommend that infants below the age of two should, ideally, not be exposed to television since they hardly have any cognitive ability to make sense of the blur of shapes and colours they see on the screen.

Even for toddlers aged two to four, face-to-face interaction and speaking to them and encouraging them to talk is the best way to stimulate their imagination and creativity and screen time should be limited to half an hour to an hour a day. You may also like to read more on the effects of television on toddlers.

Spending too much time in front of the screen has been linked to problems relating to attention and focus at a later age. Your toddler is still learning to interact socially and is developing his reasoning skills; the passive monotony of images flashing on a screen doesn’t do much to improve them. The time spent reading a book to him or playing with his blocks goes a long way in sharpening his understanding of concepts and his memory. He starts to make connections between words, images, sounds and colours; when he sees a crow and says “ka ka” the smile on your face is an immediate affirmation of the connection he has made and anything you add to it (“the crow is black”) gets absorbed unconsciously.



What do video games involve for my toddler?


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Video games require some degree of hand eye coordination and fine motor skills which a three year old may not have. He will also not be able to read the menu options which may appear on the game screen. He will also have trouble connecting what his fingers do with what happens on screen.

In the long run, spending too much time in front of a screen has been found to have some relation to problems of impulsiveness, mood swings and hyperactivity. Physical problems like repetitive strain injury caused due to excessive time spent on the computer is a common problem today; many parents believe that video games played by children increase the risk of early onset of such injuries.



What parents can do


Proponents of video games however insist that there are quite a few benefits of starting early.They say that it makes them think and coordinate better and since the use of a computer has become an essential aspect of our lives it makes children familiar with the mouse and other functions at an early age. For parents who are faced with an inevitable demand for screen time, it seems to be a more interactive alternative than television.

But whatever claims are made about the benefits of video games for a three year old, most experts agree that children below two and a half do not benefit at all and should be kept away. For older toddlers if you do choose to introduce them to video games for their educational or entertaining content, the key points to remember are:

Moderation: No more than half an hour or an hour of screen time a day, including television. Excessive time spent in front of a television or computer screen may mean that your toddler is missing out on vital human interaction and face to face time with you, which is so essential to his overall development and creative stimulation. The time which he does spend can be broken up into five or ten minute sessions.

No violence: Any games for children should be free of violence and other adult content. Killing people or animals, high speed races with crashing cars and other such games serve no educational purpose and can only desensitize them to violence.

Clear and slow: Fast moving images and a loud soundtrack are best avoided.Stick to clear and slow moving images with a distinct audio relating to the image on the screen. This will also avoid over stimulation and help your toddler focus better on the task at hand.

Toddler friendly: Do not leave your toddler alone on the computer, sit with him and make it more interactive by explaining the menu commands and what the different keys do. Choose simple games and activities, and point out to the things he may see on screen.

Take care of loose wires which may be dangerous if they get in his way while playing. Adjust the height of the chair or table so that he doesn’t strain himself and make sure he has good back support. The screen should not be too close to him either. If required, click the mouse or keys for your toddler and ask him only to answer the questions or solve the puzzles in the game.

Created June 2008

I didn't read any of that!

Vegas_Bronco
06-22-2010, 05:32 PM
Let your kids play this game = Results!

http://www.maniacworld.com/maze_game.htm

Vegas_Bronco
06-22-2010, 05:35 PM
What about Tremors? I watched that with my kids (9, 7 and 3) the other day.

Next level up in the scare meter is the movie Gremlins - I got some very unexpected results from that show.

ksBRONCOfan
06-22-2010, 05:37 PM
Next level up in the scare meter is the movie Gremlins - I got some very unexpected results from that show.

I remember watching Gremlins as a kid and it scaring the crap out of me.

gunns
06-22-2010, 05:38 PM
When you say, "Let's get busy" what do you mean exactly?

Depends on who I'm talking to.

baja
06-22-2010, 06:04 PM
Depends on who I'm talking to.

Oh











.








.







.




.




. Dare I ask? ;D

Vegas_Bronco
06-22-2010, 06:32 PM
I remember watching Gremlins as a kid and it scaring the crap out of me.

:thumbs: Results!

ksBRONCOfan
06-22-2010, 08:05 PM
:thumbs: Results!

:giggle:

The movie that absolutely scared me the most was Arachnophobia. Apparently I suffered from that condition myself as a kid.

http://uk.moviepilot.com/files/images/0210/1802/Arachnophobia_article.jpg

underrated29
06-22-2010, 08:24 PM
Is there a noise that happens in his room or outside his room (sprinkler going on for instance) at that time?

I do not think so....I will have to investigate further....Thing is he does this at his moms too. Not necessarily at 647 like at my house but 7ish for sure.

baja
06-22-2010, 08:28 PM
I do not think so....I will have to investigate further....Thing is he does this at his moms too. Not necessarily at 647 like at my house but 7ish for sure.

It would be likely that something is triggering his waking up at such an exact time. Are you under or near high power lines they sometimes increase the current to handle the daytime load and the increased EMFs could causing him to wake up.

Br0nc0Buster
06-22-2010, 08:35 PM
Gremlins scared me to when I first saw it
creepy looking critters

I felt odd when I found out a few years later it was a comedy...

Taco John
06-22-2010, 08:58 PM
What about Tremors? I watched that with my kids (9, 7 and 3) the other day.

With a 7 or 9 year old, I'd watch Tremors. Sitting alone with a 3 year old, I can't imagine what would possess me to make my life that difficult for no reason. I like it when my kid can sleep sound without crying in terror about monsters that don't exist but in his head and on the screen.

ksBRONCOfan
06-23-2010, 03:19 AM
With a 7 or 9 year old, I'd watch Tremors. Sitting alone with a 3 year old, I can't imagine what would possess me to make my life that difficult for no reason. I like it when my kid can sleep sound without crying in terror about monsters that don't exist but in his head and on the screen.

We had zero problems.

Archer81
06-23-2010, 07:05 AM
As a person without kids...I have to say it bugs the **** out of me when people have kids, go to public places and lets them run wild.

Why?

:Broncos:

bowtown
06-23-2010, 07:11 AM
Poltergeist messed me up for a couple of years as a kid. This scene especially:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/vdUkPu_rXo0&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/vdUkPu_rXo0&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

Archer81
06-23-2010, 07:17 AM
Poltergeist messed me up for a couple of years as a kid. This scene especially:

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/vdUkPu_rXo0&hl=en_US&fs=1&"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/vdUkPu_rXo0&hl=en_US&fs=1&" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>


Dude in the same summer I saw Poltergeist, It and Killer Clowns from Outerspace...ever since I hate clowns with the power of 10,000 suns. A grown man painted with a rubber nose is not funny, its cover for a pedobear.

:Broncos:

Grumps
06-23-2010, 07:46 AM
As a person without kids...I have to say it bugs the **** out of me when people have kids, go to public places and lets them run wild.

Why?

:Broncos:

Cause the parents don't realize they are the ones in control...or just don't care that their kids are annoying little *****.

baja
06-23-2010, 07:52 AM
As a person without kids...I have to say it bugs the **** out of me when people have kids, go to public places and lets them run wild.

Why?

:Broncos:

Movies in Mexico are mostly in English with Spanish sub titles so people bring their kids of all ages to any movie (R rated included). They have no reason to hear the diolouge because they are reading it. They talk loudly on cell phones while their kids do what ever the fuqk they want.

I got a blue ray player and have Apple TV so I watch my movies at home.

My pop corn has real butter too.;D

gunns
06-23-2010, 08:26 AM
As a person without kids...I have to say it bugs the **** out of me when people have kids, go to public places and lets them run wild.

Why?

:Broncos:

It totally disgusts me. It seems to be the norm. If you go to the store you play dodge the kid with your shopping cart. I don't believe parents don't know they are in control, I believe they don't care and think this is their time to be void of the kids while they irritate the hell out of the rest of us. They also seem to be daring the rest of us to say something to their kids.

I hit a kid with my shopping cart when he came darting around an aisle and ran into my cart. The looks from those parents was how dare you.....but the look back from me and the "why don't you get that kid under control" from me told them get that kid before this bitch does. Actually I'd like to knock the hell out of the parents, not the kids.

baja
06-23-2010, 08:35 AM
It totally disgusts me. It seems to be the norm. If you go to the store you play dodge the kid with your shopping cart. I don't believe parents don't know they are in control, I believe they don't care and think this is their time to be void of the kids while they irritate the hell out of the rest of us. They also seem to be daring the rest of us to say something to their kids.

I hit a kid with my shopping cart when he came darting around an aisle and ran into my cart. The looks from those parents was how dare you.....but the look back from me and the "why don't you get that kid under control" from me told them get that kid before this b**** does. Actually I'd like to knock the hell out of the parents, not the kids.

Referencing the "things I would like to see" thread, I'd like to see a little remote that you could click and give those run away kids instant diarrhea.

Wet clean up in aisle 6

Archer81
06-23-2010, 09:38 AM
It totally disgusts me. It seems to be the norm. If you go to the store you play dodge the kid with your shopping cart. I don't believe parents don't know they are in control, I believe they don't care and think this is their time to be void of the kids while they irritate the hell out of the rest of us. They also seem to be daring the rest of us to say something to their kids.

I hit a kid with my shopping cart when he came darting around an aisle and ran into my cart. The looks from those parents was how dare you.....but the look back from me and the "why don't you get that kid under control" from me told them get that kid before this b**** does. Actually I'd like to knock the hell out of the parents, not the kids.


I get that kids are kids, and some times they just can't help it. But racing down grocery aisles, climbing freezers at the grocery store or playing with the toys at walmart and leaving them where ever is too much. I had a kid at Walmart actually push me out of the way when I was looking at PS3 games. I told the kid's dad and he apologized to me, but just shrugged his shoulders and said, boys, what are you gonna do...Uhh...take that kid home and beat his ass...how about that?

:Broncos:

OABB
06-23-2010, 09:58 AM
Gunns is my soulmate I think.

BMF Bronco
06-23-2010, 09:58 AM
My daughter's favorite grown-up movie has been Kill-Bill Volume II since she was about 6

TheReverend
06-23-2010, 10:07 AM
As a person without kids...I have to say it bugs the **** out of me when people have kids, go to public places and lets them run wild.

Why?

:Broncos:

Because they need to get punched in the face.

Blueflame
06-23-2010, 08:16 PM
As a person without kids...I have to say it bugs the **** out of me when people have kids, go to public places and lets them run wild.

Why?

:Broncos:

My kids totally knew better than to even try to run wild in public. I was always quick to reward good behavior... but trust me on this, if one of them acted up in a store, every goodie in the cart went back on the shelf and we were leaving the store immediately (even if I didn't have everything we needed) and then when we got home, there would be a little "chat" and they'd end up either doing a chore they hated or losing a privilege for a timeframe that fit the bad behavior.

You only need to consistently do this a few times and one "look" shapes them right up....

gunns
06-23-2010, 08:33 PM
My kids totally knew better than to even try to run wild in public. I was always quick to reward good behavior... but trust me on this, if one of them acted up in a store, every goodie in the cart went back on the shelf and we were leaving the store immediately (even if I didn't have everything we needed) and then when we got home, there would be a little "chat" and they'd end up either doing a chore they hated or losing a privilege for a timeframe that fit the bad behavior.

You only need to consistently do this a few times and one "look" shapes them right up....

I did the exact same thing. I had 6 kids and they learned how to behave in public. My kids still talk about my "look". Sorry, your kids may be cute to you but not to everyone else nor should they be expected to be. I was rarely embarrassed by my kids in public. They also learned manners which is sorely lacking in kids today.

Archer81
06-23-2010, 08:52 PM
I did the exact same thing. I had 6 kids and they learned how to behave in public. My kids still talk about my "look". Sorry, your kids may be cute to you but not to everyone else nor should they be expected to be. I was rarely embarrassed by my kids in public. They also learned manners which is sorely lacking in kids today.


My dad had the look. We also learned over time that if we were at the store with him, he would say no to candy or toys. So eventually we stopped asking. When we got older and he would ask us if we wanted a soda or whatever, we'd automatically say no without thinking about it. Parental conditioning WORKS.

Then again...my parents knew who the boss was. That made things alot easier.

:Broncos:

baja
06-23-2010, 08:57 PM
My kids totally knew better than to even try to run wild in public. I was always quick to reward good behavior... but trust me on this, if one of them acted up in a store, every goodie in the cart went back on the shelf and we were leaving the store immediately (even if I didn't have everything we needed) and then when we got home, there would be a little "chat" and they'd end up either doing a chore they hated or losing a privilege for a timeframe that fit the bad behavior.

You only need to consistently do this a few times and one "look" shapes them right up....

Your children are lucky to have you as a mom Blue.

rugbythug
08-09-2010, 08:29 PM
My son now 4.5 could still not handle Ghost Busters. He gets all scared at just the start of Monsters Inc. He is fine with shark week but monsters get him.

Amazing how my mind white washes all the movies I watched as a Kid. I tried letting him watch Short Circuit but after countless GD's and then having them Jump aroung yelling **** **** ****. I had to turn it off.

Dr. Broncenstein
08-09-2010, 08:35 PM
This weekend I bribed my two year old son -- with the promise of candy -- to jump off a six foot cliff into the lake. Should I not have done that?

/True story, bro
//He managed to survive

Dagmar
08-09-2010, 08:44 PM
My son now 4.5 could still not handle Ghost Busters. He gets all scared at just the start of Monsters Inc. He is fine with shark week but monsters get him.

Amazing how my mind white washes all the movies I watched as a Kid. I tried letting him watch Short Circuit but after countless GD's and then having them Jump aroung yelling **** **** ****. I had to turn it off.

Wow. You better give him two sets of lunch money when he starts school.


Hilarious!

Dr. Broncenstein
08-09-2010, 08:46 PM
My son now 4.5 could still not handle Ghost Busters. He gets all scared at just the start of Monsters Inc. He is fine with shark week but monsters get him.

Amazing how my mind white washes all the movies I watched as a Kid. I tried letting him watch Short Circuit but after countless GD's and then having them Jump aroung yelling **** **** ****. I had to turn it off.

Sounds like desensitization therapy is in order.... starting with kicking dad in the fleshy place his balls used to reside.

listopencil
08-09-2010, 08:48 PM
To toughen my kids up I take them down to the bus station and have them watch me beat hobos to death. It's cool when the hobos have those cups of change, they get ice cream after.

Dr. Broncenstein
08-09-2010, 08:51 PM
To toughen my kids up I take them down to the bus station and have them watch me beat hobos to death. It's cool when the hobos have those cups of change, they get ice cream after.

I love the smell of family bonding in the morning.

epicSocialism4tw
08-09-2010, 08:56 PM
This weekend I bribed my two year old son -- with the promise of candy -- to jump off a six foot cliff into the lake. Should I not have done that?

/True story, bro
//He managed to survive

If youre a doctor you get to do those things. You can clean up the mess yourself afterward.

Lake Murray has a 6-foot cliff I used to fly off of when I was little. It was one of those little kind of off-the-road camping areas that the regulars and the locals know. Those places can be weird. You know...if you stake the spot out first, there are some understood lake rules that designate that the late comers shouldnt barge in on the staked territory (this is Oklahoma afterall...Land Run anyone?) especially if you have a large party of people with you. The last time I was there, my girlfriend AND I were invaded by this group of people that looked like they had been allowed out of the closets that they are usually padlocked in at the back of the shed a few hundred yards deeper into the woods than their delapidated trailer surrounded by appliances and only accessed by a dirt road that winds through several people's property.

This lady literally stared at my unit the entire time that they were there until it creeped me out enough for me to leave.

Lake people.

TheReverend
08-09-2010, 08:58 PM
If youre a doctor you get to do those things. You can clean up the mess yourself afterward.

Lake Murray has a 6-foot cliff I used to fly off of when I was little. It was one of those little kind of off-the-road camping areas that the regulars and the locals know. Those places can be weird. You know...if you stake the spot out first, there are some understood lake rules that designate that the late comers shouldnt barge in on the staked territory (this is Oklahoma afterall...Land Run anyone?) especially if you have a large party of people with you. The last time I was there, my girlfriend were invaded by this group of people that looked like they had been allowed out of the closets that they are usually padlocked in at the back of the shed a few hundred yards deeper into the woods than their delapidated trailer surrounded by appliances and only accessed by a dirt road that winds through several people's property.

This lady literally stared at my unit the entire time that they were there until it creeped me out enough for me to leave.

Lake people.

I just watched that video.

epicSocialism4tw
08-09-2010, 09:00 PM
I just watched that video.

Ha! I'll change that pronto.

Dr. Broncenstein
08-09-2010, 09:01 PM
If youre a doctor you get to do those things. You can clean up the mess yourself afterward.

Lake Murray has a 6-foot cliff I used to fly off of when I was little. It was one of those little kind of off-the-road camping areas that the regulars and the locals know. Those places can be weird. You know...if you stake the spot out first, there are some understood lake rules that designate that the late comers shouldnt barge in on the staked territory (this is Oklahoma afterall...Land Run anyone?) especially if you have a large party of people with you. The last time I was there, my girlfriend were invaded by this group of people that looked like they had been allowed out of the closets that they are usually padlocked in at the back of the shed a few hundred yards deeper into the woods than their delapidated trailer surrounded by appliances and only accessed by a dirt road that winds through several people's property.

This lady literally stared at my unit the entire time that they were there until it creeped me out enough for me to leave.

Lake people.

To be fair, I knew the jump was totally safe. My three year old daughter jumped off the same cliff before I could say a damn thing like "make sure to wait until I say it's okay to jump." She was the canary in the coalmine.

Dagmar
08-09-2010, 09:19 PM
http://www.tshirtsmoselikes.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/somethingstrangeinyourbeverage-300x251.gif

epicSocialism4tw
08-09-2010, 09:21 PM
To be fair, I knew the jump was totally safe. My three year old daughter jumped off the same cliff before I could say a damn thing like "make sure to wait until I say it's okay to jump." She was the canary in the coalmine.

Ha!

watermock
08-09-2010, 09:47 PM
I jumped off a 60 foot cliff off lake powell.

Alone.

DHallblows
08-09-2010, 09:49 PM
I jumped off a 60 foot cliff off lake powell.

Alone.

It's like you've been reading my diary...

epicSocialism4tw
08-09-2010, 10:00 PM
I jumped off a 60 foot cliff off lake powell.

Alone.

http://www.utahtripadvisor.com/image-files/lake-powell-cliff-jumping.jpg

sisterhellfyre
08-09-2010, 10:04 PM
I jumped off a 60 foot cliff off lake powell.

Alone.

So I'm guessing your mom could never use that line about "if everyone else was jumping off a cliff, would you do it too?"

(You too, DHb. ;-) )

Dagmar
08-09-2010, 10:16 PM
I jumped off a 60 foot cliff off lake powell.

Alone.

Did you hit your head? Hard??

epicSocialism4tw
08-09-2010, 10:18 PM
So I'm guessing your mom could never use that line about "if everyone else was jumping off a cliff, would you do it too?"

(You too, DHb. ;-) )

<object width="480" height="385"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/obKLdou0LH0&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/obKLdou0LH0&amp;hl=en_US&amp;fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="480" height="385"></embed></object>

Dedhed
08-10-2010, 05:26 AM
Trust me they know.

All I let my Kids watch is Discovery Channel. They probably see 4-6 hours of TV each Week. I Also let him watch sports like Basketball, Boxing, Football and UFC.

LOL! you're worried about Ghostbusters, and you let him watch UFC!Hilarious!

broncocalijohn
08-10-2010, 12:24 PM
My son now 4.5 could still not handle Ghost Busters. He gets all scared at just the start of Monsters Inc. He is fine with shark week but monsters get him.

Amazing how my mind white washes all the movies I watched as a Kid. I tried letting him watch Short Circuit but after countless GD's and then having them Jump aroung yelling **** **** ****. I had to turn it off.

Is this the story in the future of you hooking up with a chick, dumping your job, moving to Myrtle Beach and losing your gonads in the process? Sounds like your kid not only needs a Dad with his package attached but his own set too.

On a similar note, I made up a pirate joke that I told my kids. "Where do Pirates like to eat?" Answer: Arrrrrrrrrbyyyyys!

My kids loved it until my inlaws were taking my youngest (4 at the time) out to eat and pulled up to Arbys. Joey freaked out thinking pirates were going to get him. BUT, he laughs at Ghostbusters and Monsters, Inc.

How many times has this thread been bumped?

Mogulseeker
08-10-2010, 12:40 PM
I get that kids are kids, and some times they just can't help it. But racing down grocery aisles, climbing freezers at the grocery store or playing with the toys at walmart and leaving them where ever is too much. I had a kid at Walmart actually push me out of the way when I was looking at PS3 games. I told the kid's dad and he apologized to me, but just shrugged his shoulders and said, boys, what are you gonna do...Uhh...take that kid home and beat his ass...how about that?

:Broncos:

^Grumpy old man.

Boys will be boys.

Mogulseeker
08-10-2010, 12:42 PM
I watched Stephen King's IT when I was 4.

epicSocialism4tw
08-10-2010, 01:04 PM
I watched Stephen King's IT when I was 4.

I read It followed by The Stand when I was 11.

Mogulseeker
08-10-2010, 01:18 PM
I read It followed by The Stand when I was 11.

Well, a babysitter brought it over once when my parents were out.

epicSocialism4tw
08-10-2010, 01:21 PM
Well, a babysitter brought it over once when my parents were out.

The book was extremely creepy for an 11-year old. The movie was hokey and inadequate later on when I saw it. They managed to turn an interdimensional predator into a spider in a cave and a tangentially related clown.

Bronco Yoda
08-10-2010, 01:21 PM
As a person without kids...I have to say it bugs the **** out of me when people have kids, go to public places and lets them run wild.

Why?

:Broncos:


Because... it takes some of the wear and tear off your own house and listing to the wife lose her mind during the ensuing chaos.

My favorite thing to do is see what kind of rise I can get out of the lookie-loose... like "Zane, you better not pull that knife out! Not in the store. I'm not paying for anymore stitches & hospital bills for strangers"

Or. Liam don't hit your brother! He's family. Go hit a weird looking stranger or something. Now they know I'm kidding but the lookie-loos dont. :giggle:

Grumps
08-10-2010, 01:24 PM
^Grumpy old man.

Boys will be boys.

That's an excuse for people that are too lazy to raise their boys.

Mogulseeker
08-10-2010, 01:24 PM
The book was extremely creepy for an 11-year old. The movie was hokey and inadequate later on when I saw it. They managed to turn an interdimensional predator into a spider in a cave and a tangentially related clown.

Hence why I thought the movie was comical.

Except when my mom came it to check in on me that night, and, for some reason, she looked like a clown in that light.

Mogulseeker
08-10-2010, 01:26 PM
That's an excuse for people that are too lazy to raise their boys.

Hilarious! Coming from a guy with the screen name "Grumps"

Honestly I hope my kids get into a little trouble like that.

epicSocialism4tw
08-10-2010, 01:26 PM
Hence why I thought the movie was comical.

Except when my mom came it to check in on me that night, and, for some reason, she looked like a clown in that light.

"We all float down here, Georgie..."

rugbythug
08-12-2010, 06:51 PM
Sounds like desensitization therapy is in order.... starting with kicking dad in the fleshy place his balls used to reside.

So Cursing is a sign of Strength? Got it.

rugbythug
08-12-2010, 06:53 PM
This weekend I bribed my two year old son -- with the promise of candy -- to jump off a six foot cliff into the lake. Should I not have done that?

/True story, bro
//He managed to survive

He does not really have any issues with real Pain or real danger.

rugbythug
08-12-2010, 06:56 PM
Wow. You better give him two sets of lunch money when he starts school.


Hilarious!

That won't be his problem. He is a very physical kid, has tendency to hurt his peers at daycare, or at the park. Not intentionally just plays really rough.

Dedhed
08-12-2010, 06:58 PM
That won't be his problem. He is a very physical kid, has tendency to hurt his peers at daycare, or at the park. Not intentionally just plays really rough.

Yeah, I'm sure watching UFC has nothing to do with it.

rugbythug
08-12-2010, 06:58 PM
Is this the story in the future of you hooking up with a chick, dumping your job, moving to Myrtle Beach and losing your gonads in the process? Sounds like your kid not only needs a Dad with his package attached but his own set too.

On a similar note, I made up a pirate joke that I told my kids. "Where do Pirates like to eat?" Answer: Arrrrrrrrrbyyyyys!

My kids loved it until my inlaws were taking my youngest (4 at the time) out to eat and pulled up to Arbys. Joey freaked out thinking pirates were going to get him. BUT, he laughs at Ghostbusters and Monsters, Inc.

How many times has this thread been bumped?

Funny how people say things on the internet they would never say in real life.

rugbythug
08-12-2010, 07:00 PM
Yeah, I'm sure watching UFC has nothing to do with it.

I'm sure it does. Probably more football than UFC. He prefers football.

Dedhed
08-12-2010, 07:02 PM
Probably more football than UFC. He prefers football.Doubtful

OABB
08-12-2010, 07:03 PM
That won't be his problem. He is a very physical kid, has tendency to hurt his peers at daycare, or at the park. Not intentionally just plays really rough.

Duh... He watched ghostbusters.

rugbythug
08-12-2010, 07:04 PM
Doubtful

I'm Sure you would know better.

Dagmar
08-12-2010, 07:07 PM
Rugby Thug you come across as a conservative uninformed pussy idiot and yet you keep coming back to this thread.

HAT
01-11-2011, 08:59 AM
Happy birthday son....Here's your cake.

http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/4/2011/01/500x_gbust10.jpg

mikey555
01-11-2011, 10:39 AM
yeah girls in the US are only 70 times more likely to get an STD than their European counterparts
The US only has the highest teen pregnancy rates and abortion rates in the modernized world.

But you are right, Europe has it all wrong

I cant believe anyone would actually consider Ghostbusters something to be concerned about.
Its rated like PG, unless you want your kids to spend their entire life inside your house, they are going to see worse stuff than that pretty much everyday.

better not let your child watch Spongebob either, one time they said the word "crap"

Actually Spongebob once said "you wanked my doodle good Patrick!!" and thats when I turned it off.