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Dempsey Dog
04-26-2009, 10:56 AM
Take this for what it is worth as SN is sometimes way off on things.

2 points here stand out to me.

A Smith is their highest rated CB and 11th overall player. The only drawback is his height.
Quinn was a real reach. They had him rated as the 15 best TE and said he may have not even been drafted.


Knowshon Moreno
RB, Georgia

Overall grade: 8.4
Position rank: 2
Blocking: 1
Durability: 1
Hands/routes: 1
Inside running: 2
Outside running: 5
NFL comparison:
Shaun Alexander, free agent


KNOWSHON MORENO MEASURABLES
Height: 5-10 Weight: 217
40-yard dash: 4.51 10-yard dash: 1.53
20-yard shuttle: 4.27 60-yard shuttle: 11.63
Broad jump: 9-7 225-lb. bench: 25
3-cone drill: 6.84 Vertical jump: 35
Wonderlic: 20-yard dash: 2.69

War Room analysis
POST-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

(No. 12 overall, Broncos) Mike Shanahan would never have taken a running back this high. While this is a bit of a surprise, it makes sense. After Denver traded its franchise quarterback, the Broncos now have an RB who can support new QB Kyle Orton. Moreno doesn't have blazing speed, but he runs hard and shows the elusiveness and intangibles to be an excellent starting RB.

PRE-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

Inside running: Is at his best running between the tackles. Has great vision and run instincts. Is able to find holes and has the quick cutting ability to get through them fast. Is an aggressive runner who runs through arm tackles, gets his shoulders down to deliver a blow to the tackler and consistently gains yards after contact. Is an excellent runner in traffic. Does a good job of getting both hands wrapped around the ball in traffic, enabling him to avoid fumbles. Grade: 8.5

Outside running: Does an excellent job of following blockers on outside runs. Can break defensive backs' and linebackers' tackles outside on the edge. Lacks the explosive burst and elite speed to get the corner on his own; needs blockers. Grade: 7.0

Blocking: Doesn't have a lot of experience as a lead blocker on running plays. Displays strength, competitiveness and toughness while pass blocking. Picks up the correct man and stops him on the line. Grade: 6.5

Hands/routes: Does a good job of reaching out and plucking the ball away from his body. Is solid on wheel routes and screen passes. Can make tacklers miss running out in space. Keeps his feet moving to gain yards after contact and breaks tackles well. Struggles to make long breakaway runs. Grade: 7.5

Durability: Is strong and well built. Plays through pain. Looks to be able to hold up over an NFL season. Grade: 8.0

Bottom line: Moreno is one of the most physical running back prospects our scouts have evaluated in recent years, and he has the talent to be a solid NFL starter. Despite his lack of elite speed and burst, he is faster than expected and outruns defenders who have angles on him. What's truly impressive is his ability to move well in tight quarters, a trait that separates the good NFL backs from the elite ones. That skill will make Moreno a first-round pick.

Robert Ayers
DE, Tennessee

Overall grade: 7.3
Position rank: 3
Initial quickness: 12
Pass rush: 2
Pursuit/tackling: 2
Run/pass recognition: 1
Versus the run: 1
NFL comparison:
Adalius Thomas, Patriots


ROBERT AYERS MEASURABLES
Height: 6-3 Weight: 272
40-yard dash: 4.78 10-yard dash: 1.63
20-yard shuttle: 4.46 60-yard shuttle:
Broad jump: 8-6 225-lb. bench: 18
3-cone drill: 7.07 Vertical jump: 29
Wonderlic: 20-yard dash: 2.81

War Room analysis
POST-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

(No. 18 overall, Broncos) Ayers came on strong after an impressive performance at the Senior Bowl. Denver needed to get bigger and stronger for its 3-4 defense, and Ayers is an excellent fit. He plays with a high motor and has the strength to hold the point of attack, as well as the speed and hands to rush the passer.

PRE-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

Against the run: Consistently takes on the blocker with solid leverage. Gets his hands on the blocker quickly. Shows the ability to blow up the play before it gets started. Is able to accelerate down the line of scrimmage and tackle the ballcarrier. Grade: 8.5

Pass rush: Does not have the explosive burst off the ball to threaten the corner as a speed rusher. Fails to rush the quarterback aggressively every time. Doesn't have a variety of pass rush moves. Grade: 6.5

Initial quickness: Gets moving quickly at the snap. Shows explosiveness closing in on the ballcarrier. Can make the hard hits and tackles. Grade: 7.0

Run/pass recognition: Shows great instincts, which help him play quicker and faster than expected. Is able to read the screen fast and can break up or intercept the pass. Does not get fooled by trick plays. Consistently maintains backside contain responsibility. Grade: 8.0

Pursuit/tackling: Does a good job making tackles in pursuit. Accelerates to full speed. Able to consistently get his man to the ground. Grade: 7.5

Bottom line: Ayers showed his worth this year when he won several battles against Alabama's Andre Smith, one of the draft's top offensive tackle prospects. He has all the characteristics to be productive against the run and pass. While Ayers isn't likely to be drafted as high as he's rated here (even after his strong week at the Senior Bowl), in time he'll prove to be an impressive NFL starter at either defensive end or outside linebacker.


Alphonso Smith
CB, Wake Forest

Overall grade: 8.2
Position rank: 1
Ball skills: 1
Closing speed: 5
Coverage/skills: 1
Run support: 12
Run/pass recognition: 1
NFL comparison:
Antoine Winfield, Vikings


ALPHONSO SMITH MEASURABLES
Height: 5-9 Weight: 193
40-yard dash: 4.47 10-yard dash: 1.53
20-yard shuttle: 4.38 60-yard shuttle:
Broad jump: 10-5 225-lb. bench: 13
3-cone drill: 7.09 Vertical jump: 34
Wonderlic: 20-yard dash: 2.60

War Room analysis
POST-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

(No. 37 overall, Broncos) Denver trades up to get who we believe is the best cornerback in this draft. If Smith were two inches taller, he would have been considered a top-10 pick. He has the speed, fluidity in his hips, instincts and ball skills to make an instant impact in a position of dire need for the Broncos.

PRE-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

Coverage skills: Consistently makes plays on the ball to break up or intercept passes. Reads the quarterback well in zone coverage, which enables him to plant, drive and close fast on passes in front of him. Does a good job going through receivers to break up the pass. Rarely gets called for the penalty. Is excellent in tight man coverage; stays on the receiver's hip all over the field and rarely allows separation. Shows the versatility to cover a slot receiver. Grade: 8.5

Run/pass recognition: Shows excellent instincts and awareness to help him avoid misreads and mistakes. Is able to maintain his cushion when playing off the receiver and then drive and close on passes in a flash. Reads routes well. Shows the ability to get in front of the receiver to cut him off and shield him from the ball. Does not get fooled by play-action fakes and consistently stays in proper coverage position. Grade: 8.5

Closing speed: Has the explosive closing burst to consistently make plays on the ball. Shows the playing speed to stay with receivers on deep routes. Grade: 8.5

Ball skills: Consistently makes plays to break up passes despite often being much shorter than the receiver he is covering. Is aggressive going up against the receiver. Has the ability to cut in front of the receiver and make the interception. Has outstanding hands for the interception, even on high passes. Grade: 8.5

Run support: Seems to enjoy hitting and tackling. Avoids blockers well and usually gets the ballcarrier to the ground. At times, tries to go for big hit and ends up grabbing at the ballcarrier's feet to try and recover. Grade: 7.5

Bottom line: At first glance, Smith doesn't seem tall enough to be an NFL cornerback. But with more film evaluation, it becomes clear he has enough positive traits to overcome his height and be an elite NFL cornerback. He has the top athleticism, competitiveness and ball skills few cornerbacks have, and he is a big-play threat as a return man. Expect him to contribute early in his career and develop into a good starter.

Darcel McBath
S, Texas Tech

Overall grade: 7.5
Position rank: 2
Ball skills: 5
Closing speed: 4
Coverage/skills: 7
Run support: 6
Run/pass recognition: 3
NFL comparison:
Adrian Wilson, Cardinals


DARCEL MCBATH MEASURABLES
Height: 6-0 Weight: 200
40-yard dash: 4.53 10-yard dash: 1.57
20-yard shuttle: 4.18 60-yard shuttle:
Broad jump: 10-0 225-lb. bench: 17
3-cone drill: 6.84 Vertical jump: 38
Wonderlic: 20-yard dash: 2.64

War Room analysis
POST-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

(No. 48 overall, Broncos) McBath has the great toughness and coverage skills to be a solid all-around safety and help Denver revamp its secondary.

PRE-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

Coverage skills: Has the top-level footwork, athleticism and speed to cover any tight end well in man coverage. Reads the quarterback fast in deep coverage and consistently reacts quickly. Plants, drives and closes fast on passes in front of him and gets there in time to either make a play on the ball or to hit the receiver right after ball arrives to break up the pass. Flashes the ability to cut in front of the receiver to make the very tough interception. Grade: 7.5

Run/pass recognition: Is instinctive; consistently reads and reacts quickly and correctly to the play. Does not get sucked up by play-action or jump on pump fakes. Is able to consistently break and close quickly on passes. Does not aggressively fly up the field in run support, tends to take a more cautious approach. Grade: 7.5

Closing speed: Has an elite explosive burst to the receiver to make plays on the ball and break up passes or deliver the hard blow. Has the speed to stay with any tight end and many receivers on deep routes. Grade: 8.0

Ball skills: Breaks up passes consistently well. Aggressively goes for the breakup without committing a penalty. Has excellent hands for the interception. Shows the ability to make the tough interception on off-target passes. Grade: 7.5

Run support: Does not dominate against the run at the level he is capable of. Often seems content to wait for the ballcarrier to get to him. Is a good open-field tackler. Has the strength to stand up ballcarriers and make the tackle right at the point of contact. Is overaggressive going for the tackle at times, will dive and end up missing tackles he should make. Grade: 6.5

Bottom line: McBath arguably is the best all-around athlete among the safety prospects, the total package NFL coaches covet. One concern is a thin-looking lower body, especially because of how physical the game has become in the last decade. McBath won't likely be drafted as highly as we have him rated, but a combination of solid athleticism, toughness and coverage skills projects him to be a productive NFL starter in any NFL defensive scheme.

Richard Quinn
TE, North Carolina

Overall grade: 5.0
Position rank: 12
Blocking: 4
Hands: 9
Patterns: 15
Release: 15
Run after catch: 10

RICHARD QUINN MEASURABLES
Height: 6-3 Weight: 264
40-yard dash: 4.88 10-yard dash: 1.63
20-yard shuttle: 4.63 60-yard shuttle: 12.62
Broad jump: 9-11 225-lb. bench: 24
3-cone drill: 7.50 Vertical jump: 32
Wonderlic: 20-yard dash: 2.84

War Room analysis
POST-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

(No. 64 overall, Broncos) Quinn is a well-built tight end who will be used primarily as a run blocker. Quinn's receiving skills are largely unknown, and he's a huge reach in this spot, so Denver must really have liked his blocking ability.

PRE-DRAFT ANALYSIS:

Strengths: Is a big, well-built tight end. Run blocks with good knee bend and technique, locking up targets and eliminating them from plays. Pins defensive ends inside side blocks to spring ballcarriers on outside runs. Shows quicker footwork than expected. Once off the line, accelerates to full speed quickly and shows good speed in routes. Shows hands to pluck balls away from body. Twists and adjusts to catch off-target throws.

Weaknesses: Is not a quick-twitch athlete. Has not been used much as a receiver in college; must work on route running and hand usage to fight off contact in routes. Must run with better balance to make routes sharper. Lacks explosiveness off snap and into routes. Lacks elite speed to gain separation deep. Lacks burst out of cuts to create space from defenders, which will be a bigger issue against NFL defenders.

Bottom line: No doubt, Quinn looks the part of an NFL tight end, with the size and strength to be a strong in-line run blocker. Although he is not the explosive receiver teams are always on the lookout for at that position, he has the tools to be a solid possession receiver. Quinn probably won't be drafted as high as we have him rated -- if at all -- but he is talented enough to eventually start for a team that values blocking over receiving at the position.

David Bruton
S (http://warroom.sportingnews.com/nfl/draft/2009/rankings/s/), Notre Dame (javascript:ow('/nfl/draft/2009/colleges/notredame.html','_blank','scrollbars=yes,width=545 ,height=350')) War Room analysis
Strengths: Has nice size. Plays aggressively, and shows good speed. Is solid against the run, flying upfield to attack the line. Sheds blockers well and takes good angles to the ball. Chases down plays from behind. Is physical in pass coverage.
Weaknesses: Must continue improving his coverage technique. Is slow to diagnose pass plays. Struggles against quicker receivers. Gets beaten by double moves because of aggressiveness. Must improve lower-body strength to take on blockers. Is stiff in the hips and upper body, which limits his ability to change directions quickly and to adjust in coverage. Cannot cover tight ends or slot receivers in man coverage. Struggles to break down and tackle well out in space.
Bottom line: Bruton was a two-year starter in college and was named a team captain this season. His combination of size and straight line speed will intrigue many NFL teams, but the reality is he lacks the agility, flexibility, explosiveness and top speed to start at the next level. However, he should be able to stick as a backup safety and special teams player.

Dagmar
04-26-2009, 11:01 AM
Remember people, this is the same publication that had us taking Brandon Pettigrew at 12.

Dempsey Dog
04-26-2009, 11:04 AM
Remember people, this is the same publication that had us taking Brandon Pettigrew at 12.

That is why I said take it for what is worth. Nevertheless, I did not think we would draft a TE at all, but we did and we gave up a lot to do so. I know SN is off base at times, but I got to give them credit on this. Perhaps they had a decent idea that we were after a TE, just not Pettigrew.

Gcver2ver3
04-26-2009, 11:06 AM
That is why I said take it for what is worth.

i hear you bro, and as much as i want to hear positive info on what McD is doing...

SportingNews had us taking TE & OT in the 1st round...

any site that far removed from what's really going on, carries no merit with me...

McDman
04-26-2009, 11:07 AM
Mayock just praised our draft, just not the way we went about doing it.

Dempsey Dog
04-26-2009, 11:14 AM
i hear you bro, and as much as i want to hear positive info on what McD is doing...

SportingNews had us taking TE & OT in the 1st round...

any site that far removed from what's really going on, carries no merit with me...

I think you and I are on the same page on this. I thought they were crazy to project that, but I do look over their draft reports, and other resources, for information.

Drek
04-26-2009, 11:22 AM
i hear you bro, and as much as i want to hear positive info on what McD is doing...

SportingNews had us taking TE & OT in the 1st round...

any site that far removed from what's really going on, carries no merit with me...

Evaluating team needs and evaluating draft talent are two different things though.

I'm not saying SN is on the money here or anything, but a lot of these publications don't care to get to know actual team needs and just do their mocks based on where the BPAs should be landing at each spot.

Darcel McBath = Adrian Wilson though? Wilson is three inches taller, 30 pounds heavier, and plays almost like an extra LB in run support. I don't see how he and McBath are anything alike.

Gcver2ver3
04-26-2009, 11:30 AM
I think you and I are on the same page on this. I thought they were crazy to project that, but I do look over their draft reports, and other resources, for information.

fair enough...

thanks for the articles...

Gcver2ver3
04-26-2009, 11:31 AM
Evaluating team needs and evaluating draft talent are two different things though.

I'm not saying SN is on the money here or anything, but a lot of these publications don't care to get to know actual team needs and just do their mocks based on where the BPAs should be landing at each spot.

Darcel McBath = Adrian Wilson though? Wilson is three inches taller, 30 pounds heavier, and plays almost like an extra LB in run support. I don't see how he and McBath are anything alike.

Adrian Wilson?...yea that's scary...

barryr
04-26-2009, 11:36 AM
"(No. 37 overall, Broncos) Denver trades up to get who we believe is the best cornerback in this draft. If Smith were two inches taller, he would have been considered a top-10 pick. He has the speed, fluidity in his hips, instincts and ball skills to make an instant impact in a position of dire need for the Broncos."

It's pretty obvious this is pretty accurate. The Broncos don't make that move to get what they consider just a good CB. Time will tell if he's as good as they think, but if you really like a player and think he's the best at a position, you don't just wait and hope to get him if you can make a deal. The Pats make such moves and that has worked quite well for them, so odds are McDaniels is trying that same thinking. And only bozos would find fault with it.