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baja
04-15-2009, 10:47 PM
What is your favorite method of brewing

baja
04-15-2009, 10:50 PM
I like Pete's French Roast whole beans that I grind and use a French press for brewing. No sugar with a splash of half & Half.

Sassy
04-15-2009, 10:53 PM
I've thought about buying a french press...are they easy to use? I also like 1/2 and 1/2 no sugar.

SouthStndJunkie
04-15-2009, 10:54 PM
I really like:

OrangeRising
04-15-2009, 10:56 PM
I love the intensity of coffee from a French Press, especially this Caribou brand I buy, but it can be too much work early in a work day, so I just brew from a Mr. Coffee Brewmaster most days.

French Press does make the most of the coffee oils though.

Sassy
04-15-2009, 10:56 PM
Isn't that stuff about 35 dollars a lb???

baja
04-15-2009, 10:59 PM
I've thought about buying a french press...are they easy to use? I also like 1/2 and 1/2 no sugar.

Easy as pouring hot water. ;D

baja
04-15-2009, 11:01 PM
I really like:

What would you compare it to? Is it a full flavored coffee like French roast?

OrangeRising
04-15-2009, 11:01 PM
Sassy - "Isn't that stuff about 35 dollars a lb"


No, no. I order it on-line at about $11 a lb, and much less expensive when on special (which is often).

More often than not, I mix the Caribou with Folgers or Maxwell House to add some smoothness to the brew.

My God, store-shelf coffees have gotten bad recently, even as prices go up.

Sassy
04-15-2009, 11:02 PM
Folgers and Maxwell house...UGH!

24champ
04-15-2009, 11:03 PM
I get my coffee beans from Cuba and prepare it expresso style.

It's like crack, gets you really jacked up.

SouthStndJunkie
04-15-2009, 11:03 PM
What would you compare it to? Is it a full flavored coffee like French roast?

Heck, I am not a coffee expert, I just like how it tastes.

Here is a summary I found:

Jamaican Blue Mountain Coffee or Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee is a classification of coffee grown in the Blue Mountains of Jamaica. The best lots of Blue Mountain coffee are noted for their mild flavor and lack of bitterness. Over the last several decades, this coffee has developed a reputation that has made it one of the most expensive and sought-after coffees in the world. In addition to its use for brewed coffee, the beans are the flavor base of Tia Maria coffee liqueur.

and

The Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee is considered to be the world's finest and rarest coffee variant. Words cannot describe the taste of this premier coffee blend.

A 100% Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee has this distinctively rich taste and aroma. Compared to other coffee variants, this has a milder flavor which is less bitter yet a little sweet, giving it that smooth, clean taste.

Because of the high quality expected of this coffee variant, the island country of Jamaica built the Jamaican Coffee Industry Board to maintain the world-class quality of every coffee bean produced in the island.

The tedious and time-consuming labor of coffee growers in planting, harvesting and processing the Blue Mountain coffee is truly amazing.

The Jamaican Blue Mountain coffee is indeed a world-class variant that coffee enthusiasts around the world can sip and enjoy - up to the last drop.

SonOfLe-loLang
04-15-2009, 11:03 PM
I like Coffee Bean out here in LA. I use french press though too cuz its real easy

Sassy
04-15-2009, 11:05 PM
http://www.bluemountaincoffee.com/OrderCoffee.cfm

16 oz Roasted Whole Beans

(Starting at $38.00 delivered in Continental US) Grade I, export quality Blue Mountain Coffee flat beans are roasted in small batches to ensure freshness upon delivery. Jamaica reserves its best Grade I green coffee beans for export and ships them in wooden barrels. The coffee beans are certified by the Coffee Industry Board as 100% Jamaica Blue Mountain®. We launch their unique characteristics when we roast the coffee.

OrangeRising
04-15-2009, 11:06 PM
Sassy - "Folgers and Maxwell house...UGH!"


I couldn't agree more, but if you add some premium blend to the mix, you can improve it considerably.

I tried purchasing some Starbucks beans, and Millstone and a variety of so-called in-store premium beans, but none even approached the taste of Caribou.

8 O'Clock is excellent in bean form for the French Press as well. It's the only in-store coffee I can stand on it's own. It's quite good.

SouthStndJunkie
04-15-2009, 11:07 PM
Isn't that stuff about 35 dollars a lb???

You talking about the Jamaica Blue Mountain Coffee?

I always bring a bunch back when I go there....it is a lot cheaper to buy it there.

They also give you a bunch of it in the villa I stay in, so I take that with me as well.

Sassy
04-15-2009, 11:11 PM
A Brief History of Coffee
There are numerous myths and legends dating to ancient times that attempt to explain the discovery of the coffee plant. While historians may never agree on where coffee was first cultivated or who first discovered it, it is believed that the coffee plant first appeared in the regions of Yemen (South Arabia) and the Abyssinian region of Kaffa (Ethiopia). It appears that the various cultures in these regions used the coffee plant in different ways, including crushing the bean and mixing it with animal fat as a food, using the bean to make a beverage, and for medicinal purposes.

By the eleventh century, coffee drinking had become an important part of the Muslim culture. The Koran's prohibition on alcoholic beverages gave coffee a special place in Muslim religious rituals. By the sixteenth century, coffee had been introduced to the European ports of Venice and Marseilles and was known as "Arabian Wine."

While records indicate that coffee was available to American Colonists as early as 1668, it was not until after the British Crown Stamp Act of 1765 that coffee became America's beverage of choice. That Act led to the Boston Tea Party and a tea boycott that ultimately resulted in the Continental Congress declaring coffee to be the national beverage in 1774. Today, the United States imports over $4 billion in coffee annually! Internationally, coffee is now the second largest traded commodity after oil. Over 20 million people worldwide are employed in this industry.1



Bean Varieties

While there are more than 50 species of coffee, two species, Coffea arabica and Coffea robusta are most prevalent. Coffea arabica is a coffee plant species that generates beans used in gourmet blends. The finest arabicas are derived from elevations above 4,000 feet, but are more often grown with great success above 2,000 feet. Even though 75 percent of world coffee production uses arabica beans, only ten percent qualify as "specialty coffee." Dunn Bros Coffee roasts only high-quality Arabica beans.

Robusta is a large, hearty plant that generates a lower grade bean. (Only 5 percent of robusta beans are regarded as excellent.) Robusta beans contain nearly twice the amount of caffeine as arabica beans. These beans are primarily used to make water soluble (instant) coffees and inexpensive blended coffees. Robusta plants are less particular about climate, altitude and terrain than arabica, and they are more resistant to diseases, making them easier to grow and maintain.

Coffee Plants
The coffee bean itself is actually the seed of a fruit tree. The coffee tree initially produces white blossoms that last for only three days. Six to nine months later, a green berry appears. As the berry ripens, it eventually turns to a yellow and then red color. Inside each ripe, red cherry are two coffee beans (seeds) that are round or oval in shape, each with one flat side—the exception to this is the "peaberry," which occurs about ten percent of the time and produces a single bean. Each plant produces about 3,000 cherries annually (about one pound of coffee). A new coffee plant takes approximately five years to produce its first crop.

Coffee plants are grown in about 70 countries throughout the world and are found between 25 degrees north to 30 degrees south of the equator. The optimum conditions for growing coffee plants are: high elevations (2,000 to 5,000 feet), volcanic soil, moderate rainfall, temperatures between 60 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit, and a balance of sunshine and shade.



Harvesting and Processing Beans

Picking
Harvesting high quality arabica coffee is a very labor-intensive process because cherries on the same plant may ripen at different times. Beans must be handpicked in a process known as "selective picking," meaning pickers harvest only the ripe cherries. Pickers may have to harvest the same tree up to eight times in a single season to ensure that the cherries are picked at the height of ripeness. An experienced picker can harvest about 200 pounds of cherries daily (40 pounds of roasted coffee). Often, all the cherries of the lesser quality robusta, and some Brazilian coffee plants, are picked at the same time. This results in unripe and overripe cherries being picked along with the ripe cherries.

Pulping
Once the cherries have been picked, the green beans are separated from the outside layers of the cherry. This process is called pulping and needs to be performed as quickly as possible after the cherries have been picked to avoid spoilage. Either the "dry" method or the "washed" or "wet" method is used to process the cherries.



Milling

Wet Method
The "wet" method is primarily used with higher quality arabicas. It is a more expensive process as it is more complex and requires a great deal of water. In this classic method, first the outer layer is gently removed by a "pulping" machine. The next step, called fermentation, is a process of allowing natural bacteria to dissolve away any fruit that may remain on the bean. There are a few types of fermentation:

Wet fermentation: The beans are soaked in water for many hours to aid in the growth of the natural bacteria
Dry fermentation: No water is added to the beans, rather they are allowed to ferment in their own juices.
Aquapulping: A mechanical process used in arid climates which uses much less water and eliminates the need for fermentation.


Following fermentation or aquapulping, the beans are dried on large concrete patios or elevated drying beds. Depending on the weather, the drying can take up to several days. During the drying process, the beans are constantly raked or hand stirred to ensure even drying and to prevent any build up of microorganisms. In some countries, like Africa, defective beans are sorted out by hand at or near the end of the drying process.

Dry Method
The "dry" method (sometimes referred to as naturals or unwashed) involves picking the beans from the plant and simply allowing them to dry in the sun naturally on large drying patios. This method of drying can take up to three weeks. Once fully dried, millstones or machines are used to remove the husk. The "dry" method is most commonly used in regions that lack an adequate water supply.

Pulped Naturals
Most commonly found in Brazil and certain parts of Indonesia, this method is similar to the "wet" method. The main difference occurs after the removal of the outer skin, where the second layer of sticky fruit is allowed to dry on the bean. Once dried, the fruit and the parchment underneath are removed at the dry mill.

Dry Milling
It is at the dry mill that the beans are prepared for shipping. The first step in the dry mill is to remove a final layer of parchment from the green coffee. The parchment has been protecting and allowing the bean to recover or "rest" and is now mechanically removed so that the beans can be sorted and graded. In most dry mills, huge machines are used to remove debris like twigs and stones. Then the beans are sorted by density and size.

Color Sorting
The final step in the milling process is the sorting of beans by color. Although color sorting is the final step in this long process of milling, it may also be the most time consuming because in most countries sorting is being done by hand. More developed countries have begun using machines that optically scan each bean for color but these machines are very expensive and not yet practical in most coffee producing regions.



Cupping and Grading

Grading is the critical final step in the lengthy process of getting great coffee from farm to market. In addition to grading the beans on size, the number of defective beans in a given sample, the altitude at which it was grown, the growing region it comes from, and the processing method used, the cupping score will be the criteria that is most important in determining the final price a roaster is willing to pay for a specialty grade bean.

Coffee is graded on a scale of 1 to 100. In order to be considered a specialty grade coffee, the coffee must score at least a 70. The coffees purchased by Dunn Bros Coffee generally score between 85 and 93. The fact is, it is really difficult for most coffee drinkers to tell the difference between a coffee that scores between 85-93. On the other hand, a regular drinker of Dunn Bros coffee could probably tell the difference between a coffee scoring 70 and a coffee scoring 85.

So what is a "cupper" looking for when tasting different coffees? Here's the main things the cupper is zeroing in on:
Aroma — This is exactly what it means. How does the coffee smell? More often than not, the smell and taste go together. If the smell is "off," the taste will probably be too. These aromas will vary based on growing region. As an example, African coffees tend to have floral notes while Central Americans are often vanilla-nut or chocolate.
Acidity — Best described as the physical sensation on the tongue. This is typically described as a taste of sweet and/or slightly sour. Acidity is also called brightness. A pleasant tartness is sometimes described as sweet citrus fruit.
Body — Most easily described as "mouth feel." Does the coffee feel heavy or thin in your mouth? Although the degree of heaviness will vary between different growing regions, all specialty grade coffees should have good body and not be overly thin.
Finish or Aftertaste — This is the perceived flavor left in the back of the mouth after swallowing . The aftertaste in a quality coffee should be well-developed. As an example, a good African coffee will typically have a berry or fruit aftertaste.

SouthStndJunkie
04-15-2009, 11:14 PM
There is nothing better than staying almost all night on the beach sampling Jamaica's best know crop....and then waking up and drinking their kick ass coffee with some breakfast.

Sassy
04-15-2009, 11:15 PM
Coffee FAQ
What is the recommended brewing process?
Once you've got great coffee beans, there's still one more step. Correct brewing will unlock all of our coffee's rich flavor and deep aroma.

If you grind your own beans, grind just before brewing.
Grind your coffee in small batches.
Measure 2T of coffee per 6oz. of water. This makes a deep, flavorful cup of coffee. (If you prefer a lighter cup, simply add a little hot water to the finished brew.)
Always use fresh water.
If you use a French press coffee maker, bring the water to just short of a boil (195-205 degrees).
Keep brew time to 4-5 minutes.
How should my coffee be ground?
Different brewing systems require different grinds to get the best results. Your barista can advise you on the proper grind for your coffeemaker. Here are a few guidelines:

If possible, only grind as much coffee as you intend to use right away.
Choosing the proper grind setting is an art in itself. In general, the faster brewing systems benefit from a finer grind, and slower systems require a more coarse grind.
How much coffee do I need?
Coffee Weight Total Brewed Ounces # of 8oz cups # of 12oz cups # of 10 cup pots
.25 lb 80 oz 10 6.5 1
.5 lb 160 oz 20 13 2
1 lb 240 oz (almost 2 gals) 30 20 4+
1.25 lb 320 oz (2.5 gals) 40 27 5+
2 lb 480 oz 60 40 8+
2.5 lb 640 oz (5 gals) 80 53 10+




How should I store my fine coffee?
When it comes to freshness, there's no substitute for, well, freshness. We encourage our guests to buy just a week's worth of coffee at a time. Store your coffee at room temperature in the same bags you bring your coffee home in. Avoid refrigerator or freezer storage.

What is the buzz on decaf?
It's important to know that caffeine has little to do with the taste of coffee. Most of the flavor is determined by the quality of the bean, the roasting process and how the coffee is brewed. The FDA-approved decaffeination methods we use remove 97 to 99 percent of the caffeine. We kick the caffeine out and keep the flavor in so you can enjoy great tasting coffee any time of day.

cutthemdown
04-15-2009, 11:16 PM
Kopi Luwak. From beans that have passed through the digestive system of a palm civet. Nothing else even comes close.

Sassy
04-15-2009, 11:21 PM
Full City Roast
A Full City Roast brings the beans to a medium roast level by industry standards, but it is Dunn Bros Coffee's lightest roast. It accentuates a coffee's natural characteristics (acidity, fruit, spice and floral quality) without masking them. We consider a Full City to be an optimal roast level—a balanced taste experience that allows the bean's natural flavors to shine in each cup.
Vienna Roast
Slightly darker than a Full City Roast, a Vienna Roast falls somewhere in the middle ground between a dark roast and a light roast. But it's not necessarily a medium roast. Rather, the Vienna adds a slight accentuating touch of smoky dark roast and, because of it's more caramelized sugars, slightly sweetens the bean's natural flavors. We use the Vienna Roast to bring out a little more character in selected coffees.
French Roast
Our darkest roast. Marked by a lingering smoky finish and dark chocolate richness. French Roasted beans are roasted a little longer and a little hotter than all the rest. This gives the beans a smoky, chocolaty flavor. While a French Roast does narrow a bean's natural flavor spectrum, it produces a smooth, bold coffee with reduced acidity levels.

Just in case you were wondering, caffeine content actually remains relatively stable throughout the roast process. Though "technically" in very dark roasts there may be higher than usual organic losses associated with the high degree of roast temperature. This may cause minimal losses of caffeine content. So while it's often assumed darker roasts have more caffeine, in fact the opposite is actually true (though the difference is, frankly, marginal).

SouthStndJunkie
04-15-2009, 11:26 PM
I also enjoy the coffee and chicory served Au Lait at the Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans with some fresh beignets.

baja
04-15-2009, 11:36 PM
I also enjoy the coffee and chicory served Au Lait at the Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans with some fresh beignets.

The best coffee I have ever had was at a small family owned hotel in Rio

http://riointernationalhotel.com/default.aspx.

And the buffet style breakfast was heaven.

BroncoBuff
04-15-2009, 11:59 PM
I've thought about buying a french press...are they easy to use? I also like 1/2 and 1/2 no sugar.

I saw a Discovery Channel show about coffee, and the experts say French press is the best way to make coffee, starting with coarse ground.

My favorite drip coffee is called "Kitamu," it's from Ethiopia. Starbucks used to sell Ethiopian Kitamu, or "African Kitamu," but they stopped about a year ago. I think it's from a "conflict zone," so they won't buy it now. Now I just buy Sumatra or House Blend.


Favorite latte? Viente triple-shot no-foam latte ... with 5 Sweet'n'Lows.

meangene
04-16-2009, 03:33 AM
I have always preferred kona coffee. I occasionally mix it up with a french roast for something different. I prefer to grind my own beans and the flavor from a french press is so much better than a regular coffee maker. Add in a touch of all-natural half and half and good to go!

Traveler
04-16-2009, 03:49 AM
Colombian Cafe Sello Rojo-ground really fine.

SleepingTiger
04-16-2009, 04:40 AM
I also enjoy the coffee and chicory served Au Lait at the Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans with some fresh beignets.

since im Vietnamese, i got several cans of Cade Du Monde at the house.


http://aldeahome.com/images/cafe.jpg

worm
04-16-2009, 06:34 AM
I also enjoy the coffee and chicory served Au Lait at the Cafe Du Monde in New Orleans with some fresh beignets.

I have grown to really like chicory in coffee.

I live on the same street as Cafe Du Monde and make it there a few times a week when in town. Between 2am and 7am it is a cool, sometimes even magical, place. Even during the insanely busy prime hours it can be a fun place to people watch.


At home I use CDM chicory brand as my bread and butter coffee.

baja
04-16-2009, 06:43 AM
A lot of restaurants here serve chicory in their coffee I don;t care for it that much.

worm
04-16-2009, 06:52 AM
A lot of restaurants here serve chicory in their coffee I don;t care for it that much.

You need a good pallet to appreciate it. :)

baja
04-16-2009, 07:13 AM
I could get one of these???




http://www.made-in-china.com/image/2f0j00eCKTYMtFbQuwM/WPC-Pallet.jpg

KS Bronco
04-16-2009, 07:13 AM
for the price, cant beat eight o'clock coffee. just a few bucks for the pound, and you can buy it at target.

HorseHead
04-16-2009, 07:17 AM
Here in Vermont we're fortunate to have Green Mountain Coffee Roasters,
they're very good. Bought one of those Keurig's not too long ago, it allows to check out coffee from all over, here are some of my favorites:

1) Green Mountain "Dark Magic"- rocket fuel...

2) Caribou- "Daybreak"...very smooth

3) "Coffee People" (out of Portland Oregon)-"Donut Shop" very smooth and sweet...

4) Dunkin' Donuts-regular blend- I know the Coffee elitists refer to this as "brown water"..but i'm a homer, and this is much loved in New England...

Los Broncos
04-16-2009, 07:22 AM
Ice blended coffee for me.

DenverBrit
04-16-2009, 07:29 AM
Lavazza, for the rich taste. ;D


http://www.baciocafechicago.com/lavazza.jpg

http://www.baciocafechicago.com/Lavazza2.jpg

footstepsfrom#27
04-16-2009, 07:33 AM
The one I'm drinking now...caffeine is caffeine.

ak1971
04-16-2009, 07:33 AM
I order exclusively from here www.rowstercoffee.com (http://www.rowstercoffee.com)

Little shop out of Grand Rapids, Michigan. It kicks ass.

Where's Plummer???
04-16-2009, 07:35 AM
just a simple cup of Folger's extra black coffee... IMO coffe tastes like crap when it's cold and when it has sugar and cream in it... when you mix all three of em thats a train wreck in your mouth IMO :peace: http://www.viewpoints.com/images/review/2007/297/15/1193258592-91197_full.jpg

worm
04-16-2009, 07:39 AM
I could get one of these???


Doh!

palate....palette.....pallet....

very confusing before my chicory and coffee.

TheElusiveKyleOrton
04-16-2009, 07:41 AM
ABC: Always Buy Colorado.

Peaberry Coffee's Mocha Java Blend is a really smooth, even blend. Great palate. Excellent finish. At $11 a pound, and brewed right here in Denver, it's a great, great coffee.

It's been my favorite since I was a barista at Peaberry when I got out of college.

I also like the Tully's breakfast blend, but the roast isn't as fresh, and that comes through.

I have a coffeemaker (Cuisinart) that grinds the beans and makes the coffee all together, which is def. the way to go.

TheElusiveKyleOrton
04-16-2009, 07:42 AM
Lavazza, for the rich taste. ;D


http://www.baciocafechicago.com/lavazza.jpg

http://www.baciocafechicago.com/Lavazza2.jpg

Lavazza is terrific. Only place I know that serves it is a little bakery close to my house. Buffalo Doughboy on the corner of Lincoln and Dakota, in West Wash Park. Great pastries too.

OrangeRising
04-16-2009, 07:52 AM
ABC: Always Buy Colorado.

Peaberry Coffee's Mocha Java Blend is a really smooth, even blend. Great palate. Excellent finish. At $11 a pound, and brewed right here in Denver, it's a great, great coffee.

It's been my favorite since I was a barista at Peaberry when I got out of college.



I recently ordered some 'Rockies Blend' from Peaberrys through family who still lives in Colorado and it is outstanding. My younger sister insists Peaberrys is the best coffee you can buy.

Rohirrim
04-16-2009, 07:54 AM
Starbucks. Sumatra. Whole Bean. Grind it myself. French press. Milk and sugar. Every morning. 10 oz.

alkemical
04-16-2009, 07:57 AM
I like Pete's French Roast whole beans that I grind and use a French press for brewing. No sugar with a splash of half & Half.

I use any whole bean i can find - i'm not always picky - but a french press is the way to go.

SouthStndJunkie
04-16-2009, 08:02 AM
since im Vietnamese, i got several cans of Cade Du Monde at the house.


http://aldeahome.com/images/cafe.jpg

Just curious....what does being Vietnamese have to do with having a lot of Cafe Du Monde?

worm
04-16-2009, 08:17 AM
Just curious....what does being Vietnamese have to do with having a lot of Cafe Du Monde?

I am guessing due to the French connection.

baja
04-16-2009, 08:24 AM
Do we call them freedom presses now???

SleepingTiger
04-16-2009, 08:26 AM
Just curious....what does being Vietnamese have to do with having a lot of Cafe Du Monde?

i guess its a inside joke. if you go to any Vietnamese resturant, they serve Cafe Du Monde. You go to any Vietnamese house, they will have several cans. Go to any Vietnamese supermarket, they only carry Cafe Du Monde

Pony Boy
04-16-2009, 08:45 AM
"Old School" I use and old coffee pot that percolates the coffee, it takes longer to brew a pot but you can make any coffee taste 10 X better.

USMCBladerunner
04-16-2009, 08:49 AM
Peet's Major Dickason Blend is a nice coffee.

baja
04-16-2009, 09:10 AM
Peet's Major Dickason Blend is a nice coffee.

They have a few blends is that their most popular, I forget.

TheElusiveKyleOrton
04-16-2009, 09:14 AM
"Old School" I use and old coffee pot that percolates the coffee, it takes longer to brew a pot but you can make any coffee taste 10 X better.

There's nothin' quite like a Perc.

I do like a french press as well, and use mine regularly on weekends, but during the week, it doesn't get much better (or more convenient) than the Cuisinart. Thought you have to clean everything after each use.

baja
04-16-2009, 09:21 AM
I've had some damn good cowboy coffee. Who knows what that is? ;D

Sassy
04-16-2009, 09:21 AM
I have a Krups cappuccino / espresso /coffee combo.l
I really want to invest in a new one...but the ones that I want are about a grand! LOL!

baja
04-16-2009, 09:23 AM
I saw one at Cosco for about 200

Sassy
04-16-2009, 09:32 AM
Yeah. I know I can get them for cheaper...but I saw a
really awesome one at a specialty kitchen store and about
died when I looked at the price tag.

maher_tyler
04-16-2009, 09:59 AM
Not really picky about coffee...but the coffee at the IHop here is pretty good. I gotta try some of these brands you guys speak of though. I'm not sure what all the talk about french press is though?? I use an every day coffee pot.

baja
04-16-2009, 10:02 AM
French coffee press




http://www.copperthoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/300px-french_press.jpg

USMCBladerunner
04-16-2009, 10:03 AM
They have a few blends is that their most popular, I forget.

I'm not sure if it's their most popular, but it's the one I can find the easiest, so it probably is.

In general, for those coffee snobs out there. Peet's is pretty damn good coffee.

baja
04-16-2009, 10:04 AM
I'm not sure if it's their most popular, but it's the one I can find the easiest, so it probably is.

In general, for those coffee snobs out there. Peet's is pretty damn good coffee.

It's the one I use and I like it a lot. I do want to try some of the ones that guys posted here too.

BroncoBuff
04-16-2009, 10:09 AM
I have always preferred kona coffee. I occasionally mix it up with a french roast for something different. I prefer to grind my own beans and the flavor from a french press is so much better than a regular coffee maker.

I was on the Big Island in 2004, and had 100% Kona coffee ... it was heavenly. "100%" as opposed to Kona blends, which is all I see here. Maybe 10% real Kona. I dunno where to get 100% Kona ???


Kopi Luwak. From beans that have passed through the digestive system of a palm civet. Nothing else even comes close.
I've heard about that stuff for years ... but where do you get it?

I live in the coffee capital of the world, and I have no idea where to get this stuff ...

Peets, Starbucks, Seattle's Best, Caffe d'Arte, none of these has Kopi Luwak ???

BroncoBuff
04-16-2009, 10:12 AM
French coffee press
http://www.copperthoughts.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/01/300px-french_press.jpg

Cool ... :thumbs: Like I mentioned, there's a Discovery Channel "Coffee" show (I think Modern Marvels), and the experts interveiwed there who drink coffee for a living, say French press is the #1 prep method ... but you must start with coarse ground, or so they say.

Sassy
04-16-2009, 10:14 AM
http://www.koacoffee.com/coffeestore.html

http://www.koacoffee.com/images/tripack2.jpg

Try this for Kona.

MagicHef
04-16-2009, 10:15 AM
I was on the Big Island in 2004, and had 100% Kona coffee ... it was heavenly. "100%" as opposed to Kona blends, which is all I see here. Maybe 10% real Kona. I dunno where to get 100% Kona ???

100% Kona in a french press is definitely the best I've ever had. I had it on the Big Island, too, and I don't know where to get it on the mainland.

DenverBrit
04-16-2009, 10:57 AM
Lavazza is terrific. Only place I know that serves it is a little bakery close to my house. Buffalo Doughboy on the corner of Lincoln and Dakota, in West Wash Park. Great pastries too.

You can buy Lavazza at whole foods.....$7.99.

Used with a french press....or this little gem:http://www.amazon.com/AeroPress-Coffee-and-Espresso-Maker/dp/B000GXZ2GS/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1239904385&sr=8-2

A fantastic espresso 'machine' (press) for $25. Small, portable and unbelievably good.........the best coffee maker you've never heard of. :thumbs:

Rohirrim
04-16-2009, 11:01 AM
Not really picky about coffee...but the coffee at the IHop here is pretty good. I gotta try some of these brands you guys speak of though. I'm not sure what all the talk about french press is though?? I use an every day coffee pot.

If you think IHOP coffee is good, you really need to do some exploring. That's like saying Coors Light is good beer. ;D

BABronco
04-16-2009, 11:03 AM
I love Hungarian coffee. A buddy gave me some about a week ago (aswell as some german coffee). I have yet to find anything better than Hungarian coffee. The worst is American coffee.

baja
04-16-2009, 11:03 AM
If you think IHOP coffee is good, you really need to do some exploring. That's like saying Coors Light is good beer. ;D

And you can see the plant from your window so you should know.

BroncoBuff
04-16-2009, 11:05 AM
If you think IHOP coffee is good, you really need to do some exploring. That's like saying Coors Light is good beer. ;D

LOL .... and when you hear "pure Arabica beans," just laugh. There's only two kinds of beans, and any coffee worth a plugged nickel is 100% Arabica bens. Robusto beans are cheaper, but are only used maybe as a 10% or at most 50/50 blend. I think the #1 restaurant supplier for coffee - Farmer Brothers - uses some Robusto in their cheaper blends, for like IHOP and Norm's restaurants.

TheDave
04-16-2009, 11:10 AM
http://www.foodservicedirect.com/productimages/SankaInsS.jpg

SouthStndJunkie
04-16-2009, 11:18 AM
i guess its a inside joke. if you go to any Vietnamese resturant, they serve Cafe Du Monde. You go to any Vietnamese house, they will have several cans. Go to any Vietnamese supermarket, they only carry Cafe Du Monde

That is interesting....thanks.

baja
04-16-2009, 11:21 AM
<b>Yerba Mate the new coffee</b>


http://www.ecojoes.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/01/einstein-yerba-mate.jpg

http://www.physics.ucsd.edu/%7Edzocco/other/mateypava.jpg

DenverBrit
04-16-2009, 11:30 AM
If you think IHOP coffee is good, you really need to do some exploring. That's like saying Coors Light is good beer. ;D

Depends how it's served. ;D

SonOfLe-loLang
04-16-2009, 11:40 AM
Lavazza is terrific. Only place I know that serves it is a little bakery close to my house. Buffalo Doughboy on the corner of Lincoln and Dakota, in West Wash Park. Great pastries too.

Chain italian restaurants serve Lavazza (like Macaroni Grill). For some reason, Lavazza became a joke with a friend of mine, now we often steal the lavazza cup when served.

SonOfLe-loLang
04-16-2009, 11:40 AM
Cool ... :thumbs: Like I mentioned, there's a Discovery Channel "Coffee" show (I think Modern Marvels), and the experts interveiwed there who drink coffee for a living, say French press is the #1 prep method ... but you must start with coarse ground, or so they say.

the fine grinds will get through the press

Where's Plummer???
04-16-2009, 11:46 AM
this is how you do it!http://farm1.static.flickr.com/33/38355516_afdcbc886b.jpg?v=0

and then you throw in some plummer highlight reels

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y78/ChadFinn/full-3.jpg

DeuceOfClub
04-16-2009, 11:53 AM
I like my coffee like i like my women.

Black and hot?

No, ground up and in the freezer.

Pony Boy
04-16-2009, 02:26 PM
this is how you do it!http://farm1.static.flickr.com/33/38355516_afdcbc886b.jpg?v=0

and then you throw in some plummer highlight reels

http://i3.photobucket.com/albums/y78/ChadFinn/full-3.jpg

I'm really starting to think this Jake!

Where's Plummer???
04-16-2009, 02:31 PM
I'm really starting to think this Jake!

i do it now becuz it pisses ppl off. it started off w/ a resume then ppl started talkin ****, then ppl stareted callin some casino royal guy, then ppl were dicks even after i dropped it... so now i know how i can push ppls buttos :nutkick _i_O_i_ besides mocking my commander in charge behind his back gets boring...

bowtown
04-16-2009, 02:51 PM
http://blog.danshamptons.com/entertainment/wp-content/uploads/2009/03/chock2.jpg

Everything else is a big waste of time... and probably Communist.

Rock Chalk
04-16-2009, 03:37 PM
Kona and nothing else.

Liquid Courage
04-16-2009, 03:42 PM
anything from Stumptown Coffee or, at least, Peet's. and I prefer either from a coffee press or the traditional Ethiopian method from a Jebana . . . my snobbery ends with coffee and beer, though, life is too short to drink crap coffee and canoe beer!

NYBronco
04-19-2009, 04:41 AM
http://i208.photobucket.com/albums/bb150/NYBronco/0418091559.jpg

Our espresso machine.

baja
04-19-2009, 04:55 AM
"Your expresso machine"

Wow that looks expensive is that why you have a menu on your wall.

Bronx33
04-19-2009, 12:03 PM
You know a person can spend alot of money daily just making a cup of coffee but i just like old school coffee nothing fancy but i do add a bit of vanilla creamer to my folgers.

Bronx33
04-19-2009, 12:04 PM
"Your expresso machine"

Wow that looks expensive is that why you have a menu on your wall.

To pay for the expresso machine duhhhhh.

BroncoBuff
04-19-2009, 12:05 PM
"Your expresso machine"

Wow that looks expensive is that why you have a menu on your wall.

It is an odd decorative choice for a home.

Bronx33
04-19-2009, 12:08 PM
"Old School" I use and old coffee pot that percolates the coffee, it takes longer to brew a pot but you can make any coffee taste 10 X better.


I have of of those for camping.

baja
04-19-2009, 12:17 PM
It is an odd decorative choice for a home.

More like he snapped a pic at his local coffee shop.

BroncoBuff
04-19-2009, 12:20 PM
More like he snapped a pic at his local coffee shop.

Maybe "his local coffee shop" in the sense he owns/works for a local coffee shop.

I'll bet that's what he meant.

NYB ... you own a Starbucks knockoff shop there in NY?

Sassy
04-19-2009, 12:51 PM
Maybe "his local coffee shop" in the sense he owns/works for a local coffee shop.

I'll bet that's what he meant.

NYB ... you own a Starbucks knockoff shop there in NY?

Who would do a Starbucks Knockoff...Starbucks sucks ;D

Majik
04-19-2009, 01:03 PM
http://cdn1.sbnation.com/entry_photo_images/6211/121898_brewers_dodgers_baseball_large.jpg
Todd Coffey: 9.2 IP 0.00 ERA 1 save

Whats not to love about that.

Swedish Extrovert
04-19-2009, 01:35 PM
I was on the Big Island in 2004, and had 100% Kona coffee ... it was heavenly. "100%" as opposed to Kona blends, which is all I see here. Maybe 10% real Kona. I dunno where to get 100% Kona ???



I've heard about that stuff for years ... but where do you get it?

I live in the coffee capital of the world, and I have no idea where to get this stuff ...

Peets, Starbucks, Seattle's Best, Caffe d'Arte, none of these has Kopi Luwak ???

I agree. I haven't had Kona since I was in Hawaii. I remembered it was SO good.

NYBronco
04-19-2009, 03:37 PM
Maybe "his local coffee shop" in the sense he owns/works for a local coffee shop.

I'll bet that's what he meant.

NYB ... you own a Starbucks knockoff shop there in NY?

Starbucks... ROTFLOL

My wife and I just opened a coffee shop and the machine we have in the pic is a used machine (approximately 5 years old). It's like new and we got it for half the price. We are proud of it and the espresso is fantastic.

We are trying to take advantage of the down economy and pick up marked down equipment. We hope to be on the leading edge of the economies return.

Starbucks... so much overhype and short changed espresso in your $7 cup.

DenverBrit
04-19-2009, 03:40 PM
I agree. I haven't had Kona since I was in Hawaii. I remembered it was SO good.

You'll find it online.......lot's of places.