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Mogulseeker
04-07-2009, 10:26 AM
I dug this up from the NY Times... pretty good read:

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9D00E6D9143AF935A25753C1A9629C8B 63&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all#


COLLEGE FOOTBALL;
Purdue's Orton, the Thinking Man's Quarterback
October 16, 2004

Orton dodging a Penn State linebacker in Purdue's 20-13 victory last Saturday. (Photo by Carolyn Kaster/Associated Press)

A nightly ritual at the Orton household in Altoona, Iowa, prepared Purdue quarterback Kyle Orton for both of his potential professions.

The Orton family faithfully watched Dan Rather deliver the ''CBS Evening News'' and talked about politics and current events at dinner. Byron Orton, Kyle's father, has worked in state government since 1975 and is now Iowa's labor commissioner.

Growing up, Kyle Orton learned about the importance of a strong work ethic and the fundamentals of liberal politics.

Both lessons resonate today in this election year's Heisman Trophy campaign, and perhaps in the future, when his football career ends. Orton plans to return eventually to Iowa and run for Congress.

''It's definitely something that I want to do when I get older,'' Orton said. ''I think I'd be good at it for the sole fact that I wouldn't be a career politician.''

Orton is expected to be a first-round pick in April's N.F.L. draft. He leads the nation with 18 touchdown passes, and Purdue's No. 5 ranking in the Associated Press poll is its highest since 1979. The publicity and name recognition Orton gains from a National Football League career could help him make the transition into the political arena.

As quickly as Orton can whisk through his pass reads on the field, he can rattle off the names of political figures who have used their sports fame to help their off-the-field careers.

First and foremost for Orton is Tom Osborne, the former coach at Nebraska. Orton's uncle Greg Orton played at Nebraska under Osborne, which is why Kyle Orton grew up a die-hard Cornhuskers fan. Kyle Orton watched Osborne leave the sideline and become a Nebraska congressman in 2000.

Orton also noted that the former New Jersey Senator Bill Bradley and two former Oklahoma congressmen, J.C. Watts and Steve Largent, used their clout from playing sports to help them win office.

''They've made their money and they want to help people,'' Orton said. ''That's what makes them good politicians.''

Orton said that his beliefs and work ethic came from his father, who he said showed through work like enforcing child labor laws and minimum wage requirements that everyone deserves a voice.

''The biggest influence he had on my beliefs is that there are people working hard every single day that don't necessarily make a lot of money doing it,'' Orton said. ''There should be more people working for them.''

Orton is a history major with a grade point average near 3.0, and he recently finished reading Bill Clinton's 1,000-plus-page autobiography, ''My Life.'' Not for a class, just for fun.

This summer, Orton approached the Purdue associate history professor Michael A. Morrison about taking an independent study course on postwar liberalism. Orton got to shape the coursework, which involved reading all or parts of 15 books about Franklin D. Roosevelt, Lyndon B. Johnson and John F. Kennedy.

The independent study left a strong impression on Morrison, who praised Orton's papers.

Morrison could also see Byron Orton's influence in Kyle Orton's writing about the Great Depression.

''He was responsive to the plight of these people,'' Morrison said. ''He had empathy with the misery that many of them were suffering. Although the paper was quite good on policy, it had a real good feel for people.''

True to Orton's modest nature, Morrison never knew about his political aspirations until reading about them in a newspaper article this fall. Orton's unassuming manner makes him popular with his teammates and coaches. Orton claims to be nothing more than a country boy who chews tobacco, fishes for bass and drives a beat-up red pickup truck.

His teammates tease him that he is the worst-dressed Purdue player. Orton just shrugs, saying that his boots and untucked shirts are part of who he is.

Purdue Coach Joe Tiller calls Orton ''my kind of guy,'' and has developed a deep relationship off the field with him. Tiller's father worked as an inspector at a factory in Toledo, Ohio, logging eight-hour shifts on his feet with his slide rule tucked in his shirt pocket.

Tiller said that his father developed ulcers late in his career because of the pressure to approve products and got the ''proverbial silver watch'' upon his retirement.

''Maybe that's one of the reasons that Kyle and I get along so well,'' Tiller said. ''My dad was a blue-collar guy, a working guy. We grew up in similar types of backgrounds, similar types of philosophies.''

Tiller and Orton often talk presidential politics, and things can get animated because Tiller supports President Bush and Orton supports Senator John Kerry. After Tiller saw a speech on C-Span recently about immigration, he got a copy of it and lent it to Orton to watch.

''He's like a friend, I guess,'' Tiller said. ''You talk about something that hits home and you move on.''

Tiller jokes with Orton all the time that he will never make it in politics. ''He's too honest,'' Tiller said. ''He's an honest person and the definition of politics is playing the system and playing the game.''

Orton said that he and Tiller clicked instantly during recruiting. He liked the coach's honest style and felt at home in West Lafayette, a gritty town dotted with billowing smokestacks. Both Orton's career and his relationship with Tiller blossomed after he was benched in his sophomore year.

Orton's big arm and high school reputation were a perfect fit for Purdue's pass-oriented spread offense. Still, Orton struggled to mature. Relying too much on his natural ability, he did not study much film his freshman year. His sophomore year, he sustained a concussion and his play was inconsistent, prompting Tiller to sit him for four starts.

That forced Orton to develop a blue-collar edge and not to let anyone outwork him. Over time, Orton developed into a meticulous student of game film, and he puts in about three hours studying it every day.

Orton watches so intently that he notices where linebackers look on plays they blitz and analyzes a team's down and distance, personnel and tendencies. Mastery of those nuances allows him to call audibles on about 40 percent of the plays.

''If you're not ready to have the ability to audible, there's no way you can be on the football field,'' Orton said. ''I learned that if I didn't watch enough film I'd be getting hit in the mouth.''

Orton -- 6 feet 4 and 226 pounds -- is now the one delivering the blows, and he can go a long way toward winning the Heisman with impressive performances in the next two weeks. Purdue is host to No. 10 Wisconsin on Saturday and No. 14 Michigan the following weekend.

These are heady times at Purdue, as a victory this week would improve the Boilermakers to 6-0 for the first time since 1943. Orton would be the Boilermakers' first Heisman winner, and he certainly has the credentials: Purdue ranks No. 4 nationally in scoring average (41.8) and second in passing offense (351.2 yards a game). Orton, though, isn't particularly concerned about the numbers or the trophy. He is worried about victories.

One of the reasons he would love to be a finalist for the Heisman is the chance to visit New York for the first time to see some of the locations from his favorite show, ''Seinfeld.'' Orton is a devoted fan -- his girlfriend bought him an autographed picture of the Soup Nazi and he has a T-shirt that his roommate got him from Tom's Restaurant. He even named his dog Elaine after the Julia Louis-Dreyfus character.

To earn his trip to New York, Orton is letting his play on the field do the lobbying. He will save his stumping for votes for later in his career.


What happened to Orton, as this article says an "expected first round pick", that would make him drop to the fourth?

lex
04-07-2009, 10:27 AM
Wow. Good find.

PRBronco
04-07-2009, 10:33 AM
Hey a thinking man at QB, I like it. Jake had one of those qualities, Jay had none :(

Hulamau
04-07-2009, 10:34 AM
Good stuff, I like this guy!

SonOfLe-loLang
04-07-2009, 10:34 AM
A seinfeld fan and a Democrat! I love this guy

Mogulseeker
04-07-2009, 10:41 AM
No so much concrened with his politics, even though I would agree. It's more about the fact that Orton is a real guys guy. Even being into politics -service - and whatnot wether it's conservative OR liberal. I just thought I'd put that out there before any conservatives come out and slam him simply for his ties to Labor Unions and Democratic politicians.

This is more about his football ability and his cerebellum.

I adored Cutler, but getting rid of him is like burning off a wart - it hurts, but it had to be done. I think the Broncos will be better in the long run, and Orton has REALLY grown on me the last couple weeks. The talent gap is obvious, but having a guy this tenacious and coachable, and McD as a coach, Orton just might be a Cutler replacement, not a Cutler compromise.

Oh, and the picks were nice, too.

Dukes
04-07-2009, 10:50 AM
Orton's unassuming manner makes him popular with his teammates and coaches. Orton claims to be nothing more than a country boy who chews tobacco, fishes for bass and drives a beat-up red pickup truck.

Looks like he'll get along with Hillis very well. :~ohyah!:

Doggcow
04-07-2009, 10:59 AM
a 3.0 student? Is Purdue prestigious at all? Because I make a 3.0 without trying at all.

Mogulseeker
04-07-2009, 11:01 AM
I was thinking the same thing. I had a 3.73 in undergraduate school... at Southern New Hampshire University...

Purdue is pretty prestigious... then again, so is Vanderbilt.

Pony Boy
04-07-2009, 11:04 AM
"Growing up, Kyle Orton learned about the importance of a strong work ethic and the fundamentals of liberal politics. "

Wow talk about your oxymoron!

Doggcow
04-07-2009, 11:05 AM
I was thinking the same thing. I had a 3.73 in undergraduate school... at Southern New Hampshire University...

Purdue is pretty prestigious... then again, so is Vanderbilt.

Purdue is like a Stanford/Vandy? Not a Princeton/Oxford, right?

baja
04-07-2009, 11:07 AM
Is there a possibility that the cerebral Orton is a better fit to McD's system that the physically more gifted Cutler?

Mogulseeker
04-07-2009, 11:14 AM
Purdue is like a Stanford/Vandy? Not a Princeton/Oxford, right?

Well... I'd consider Stanford better than Princeton, IMO. Judging by the professors that come out... I mean, Princeton has Paul Krugman... Harvard, Yale, Columbia, MIT, Berkeley, and Stanford (throw Princeton in there too, I guess) are the cream of the crop, IMO.

But yeah, I'd put Purdue up there with Vany, Georgetown and Duke

Is there a possibility that the cerebral Orton is a better fit to McD's system that the physically more gifted Cutler?

I'd say so

Beantown Bronco
04-07-2009, 11:21 AM
a 3.0 student? Is Purdue prestigious at all? Because I make a 3.0 without trying at all.

Grade inflation. Undergraduate GPAs have all but become a joke.

Hulamau
04-07-2009, 11:21 AM
I was thinking the same thing. I had a 3.73 in undergraduate school... at Southern New Hampshire University...

Purdue is pretty prestigious... then again, so is Vanderbilt.

We weren't studying game film three hours a day either.

Hulamau
04-07-2009, 11:23 AM
Is there a possibility that the cerebral Orton is a better fit to McD's system that the physically more gifted Cutler?

I think that is a distinct possiblity if not likelihood, specially in the red zone where you have to make good decisions on the line in this cerebral offense.

SonOfLe-loLang
04-07-2009, 11:26 AM
Well... I'd consider Stanford better than Princeton, IMO. Judging by the professors that come out... I mean, Princeton has Paul Krugman... Harvard, Yale, Columbia, MIT, Berkeley, and Stanford (throw Princeton in there too, I guess) are the cream of the crop, IMO.

But yeah, I'd put Purdue up there with Vany, Georgetown and Duke



I'd say so

Yeah, Nobel Prize Winner Paul Krugman...the guy who predicted the asian financial crisis as well as our current one. What a hack! Please.

And Vanderbilt wishes it was Stanford.

Beantown Bronco
04-07-2009, 11:31 AM
The funny part is.....if you actually attend any of the "prestigious" schools listed on this page, your chances of actually being taught by a top professor before your junior or senior year is pretty much zero. Hope you like classes taught by the graduate students and research assistants.

Borks147
04-07-2009, 02:20 PM
The funny part is.....if you actually attend any of the "prestigious" schools listed on this page, your chances of actually being taught by a top professor before your junior or senior year is pretty much zero. Hope you like classes taught by the graduate students and research assistants.

false, maybe if you go to Harvard where they crap on undergrads, but any of the smaller ivy schools put an emphasis on their undergrads. I never was taught be a graduate student and had seminars starting my first term.

but I digress....I agree with many of you guys, I really am falling for Orton. Echoing the original post, does anyone know why he fell to the fourth, since it said he was a projected 1st round pick? Was it an injury or sucky senior play?

Beantown Bronco
04-07-2009, 02:26 PM
false, maybe if you go to Harvard where they crap on undergrads, but any of the smaller ivy schools put an emphasis on their undergrads. I never was taught be a graduate student and had seminars starting my first term.

Read my post again. I specified the "prestigious schools listed on this page".

Harvard, Yale, Columbia, MIT, Berkeley, Princeton and Stanford, etc.

Where did anyone say anything about small ivy schools?

SouthStndJunkie
04-07-2009, 02:33 PM
Old NY Times Atricle: Purdue's Orton, the Drinking Man's Quarterback

WolfpackGuy
04-07-2009, 02:50 PM
Purdue's a damn good school.
Quite a few of the early astronauts went there.

bronco militia
04-07-2009, 03:00 PM
the last 'thinking man's QB' in Denver:

gyldenlove
04-07-2009, 03:06 PM
Kyle was a relative unknown prepster, but saw the college recruits clamor for his attention after he starred at the Nike Camp (Champaign, Ill.) and Elite 11 Quarterback Camp (Cal.)... He was rated the second-best quarterback in the nation coming out of Southeast Polk (Altoona, Ia.) High School by Super Prep, where he also lettered in basketball, track and tennis. Orton threw for 1,366 yards with twelve touchdowns and five interceptions on 95 of 192 passes (49.5%) as a senior and hit on 208 of 450 attempts (46.2%) for 3,176 yards, 24 touchdowns and 18 interceptions during his three-year career...Lettered as a true freshman at Purdue, starting three of the seven games he appeared in. Kyle completed 107 of 216 passes (49.5%) for 1,105 yards with four touchdowns and seven interceptions.
He gained national attention that year when he connected on 38 of 74 passes for 419 yards with two touchdowns vs. Washington State in Sun Bowl. The 74 attempts are the second-most in school history (Drew Brees had 83 at Wisconsin in 1998) and the most in NCAA bowl game history. He also set a bowl record with 83 offensive plays (previous marks were 63 passing attempts by Trent Dilfer of Fresno State vs. Colorado in the 1993 Aloha Bowl and 74 total plays by Tony Kimbrough of Western Michigan vs. Fresno State in the 1988 California Bowl)...Started nine games for the Boilermakers in 2002, connecting on 192 of 317 passes (60.6%) for 2,257 yards, 13 touchdowns and nine interceptions...In 2003, Orton was named the "Most Fearless Quarterback in the Big Ten Conference" by The Sporting News and was tabbed the "Most Accurate Passer, Strongest Arm and Coolest in the Clutch" in the Big Ten by Lindy's magazine. Kyle was named to the Davey O'Brien Award watch list (nation's outstanding quarterback) as he completed 251 of 414 passes (60.6%) for 2,885 yards with 15 touchdowns and just seven interceptions (interception percentage of 1.69 set a school record).
He tied a school bowl record with two rushing touchdowns vs. Georgia in the Capital One Bowl, despite suffering a dislocated left thumb, sprained toe and cracked rib in that game, prompting head coach Joe Tiller to say it was "one of the two truly courageous performances I've seen in all my years of coaching." ...The 2004 season began with Orton being the favorite to win the Heisman Trophy. He threw for 1,367 yards, 17 touchdowns and no interceptions through the team's first four games before turnovers and injuries would see his senior campaign experience a big roadblock. A hip injury saw Kyle get benched vs. Northwestern and then sit out the next contest vs. Iowa. He returned in the fourth quarter of the Ohio State game, then set a school record the following week when he totaled 503 yards in the Indiana contest. Orton finished the year completing 236 of 389 passes (60.7%) for 3,090 yards, 31 touchdowns and only five interceptions.
Closed out his career third on the school's all-time record lists with 786 completions in 1,336 pass attempts (58.8%) for 9,337 yards and 63 touchdowns, topped only by Drew Brees (1,026 of 1,678 passing for 11,792 yards and 90 touchdowns, 1997-2000) and Mark Herrmann (772 of 1,309 passing for 9,946 yards and 71 touchdowns, 1977-80)...Only Brees (12,692) gained more yards in total offense that Kyle's 9,653 in Purdue annals...His 9,337 passing yards rank fourth in Big Ten Conference history (behind Brees, Herrmann and Iowa's Chuck Long -- 10,461 yards, 1981-85)...Only 2.01% of his passes (28) were intercepted during his time at Purdue...He has seven 300-yard passing games (including one 500-yard game and two 400-yard games) to rank fourth in school history.
<TABLE borderColor=#d90000 cellSpacing=0 cellPadding=0 width="100%" align=center border=0><TBODY><TR><TD width="100%" background=images/mcfback.jpg height=20> ANALYSIS</B></TD></TR></TBODY></TABLE>

Kyle is a four-year starter who is an intelligent and instinctive signal caller...He is a quiet, respected leader, but might need to get more vocal in order to command presence in the huddle at the next level...Has decent upper body strength, but despite adding ten pounds to his frame prior to 2004, he still lacks thickness and muscle definition in his lower body frame...Good athlete with a medium to long stride and adequate foot speed...Operates mostly out of the shotgun and while he shows a smooth, long release, he lacks quickness when dropping back from center in a conventional offense...Shows very good accuracy in the short to intermediate passing game, but he has a bit of a long windup and the ball fails to come off his hands quickly when having to throw long...Better throwing from the pocket, as his passes seem to lack velocity and accuracy when he is forced to throw on the move.
Has no trouble reading defenses, but will tend to force the ball into coverage instead of taking what's there...Stays on his primary receiver too long...Has displayed the arm strength to fire tight spirals in the intermediate area...If anyone ever questions his toughness, they only have to go back and watch the 2003 Capitol One Bowl contest vs. Georgia, where he completed 20 of 34 passes for 230 yards and a touchdown while tying a school bowl record with two rushing touchdowns despite suffering a dislocated left thumb, sprained toe and cracked rib in that game. That prompted head coach Joe Tiller to say it was "one of the two truly courageous performances I've seen in all my years of coaching."...Has a snappy three-quarter-arm delivery and can pass with good velocity when not forced to throw off-balance...Tries to use his arm strength to get out of trouble, but fails to compensate for his feet not being set to throw.
Has a very good understanding of the game, competes with tremendous effort and never complains...Effective on timing routes and crossing patterns, putting enough zip on the ball to allow the receivers to catch the pigskin in stride...Does a good job of picking up the blitz, but it may be too good, as he will get impatient waiting for his targets to get open and will run at the first sign of pressure...When he fails to get off his first read quickly, he will make poor decisions and force the ball into traffic...Not a threat to run and does not need to be accounted for in this area....Struggles getting back from center to his set point was evident during practices at the 2005 East-West Game, where he had a series of fumbles and poor center exchanges throughout the scrimmages.
His hip injury stalled what was first thought to be a Heisman Trophy season during the first half of the 2004 season and further medical evaluation of that injury might be needed...Not a blue chip prospect, but gets the most out of his blue collar ability to provide good depth on a pro roster.

Orton was ranked as the 5th best QB in the 2005 draft by nfldraftscout.

gyldenlove
04-07-2009, 03:10 PM
Athletic Ability 1.5
He is an adequate athlete who has good balance, but just adequate quickness, agility and playing speed. He runs with a normal stride and shows just enough agility to adjust in the pocket and throw on the move, but is better when standing in the pocket. He does not have the sustained speed to run long distances, nor the acceleration to elude when rolling out of the pocket. He operates mostly out of the shotgun to compensate for a lack of foot speed.

Football Sense 1.2
He learns well and doesn't need reps. His classroom work indicates that he has a good ability to learn (3.0 gpa) and retain plays. The coaches claim he is very dedicated to the game plan. He makes good adjustment calls on the field most of the time and has the instincts to sense pressure well. He will have no problems grasping the mental aspect of the game at the next level.

Character 1.3
He has a good workman-like personality and is a solid student with no off-field issues. He comes from a supportive two-parent home and showed in 2004 that he is starting to develop decent leadership qualities. He has a good attitude, working well in a team-first atmosphere, despite being somewhat limited athletically in the system. He is the type of leader who will go after teammates when they are not performing up to task, but is a likeable guy with a quiet personality.

Competitiveness 1.3
He is a good competitor who plays tough and hasadequate playing strength. He is not really a vocal leader, but players listen when he talks in the huddle. He has displayed good mental toughness. As evidence, one only has to look at his performance vs. Georgia in the 2004 Capital One Bowl, as he played with a cracked rib, sprained toe and dislocated left thumb, but still ran for two scores and threw for another. He competes well under tough situations and gives consistent effort and dedication on every play, but you’d wish he’d get more vocal (has adequate field presence)..

Work Habits 1.3
He works hard on and off the field and is a dedicated player who is a team-first type. He does a good job in the weight room and takes well to hard coaching, spending the extra time in the film room preparing for his next opponent.





Athletic Report 1.51


Set Up 1.6
He often operates out of the shotgun and had just adequate set quickness dropping back from center. He has adequate agility to reach his throwing point, but showed in 2004 that he might not be capable of throwing on the run (see 2004 Penn State and Wisconsin games). When he dropping back from center, he sometimes gets a little off-balance trying to position his body to set and throw. He looks slower than his timed speed setting up in the pocket, but displays good mechanics to make the throws.

Reading Defenses 1.5
He generally makes good decisions, but when forced to step up in the pocket, he will sometimes throw into coverage and force the ball. He can get rattled by pressure and while he showed better patience early in 2004, he reverted to forcing the ball later that year, perhaps to compensate for a lack of mobility due to his hip injury. He just looks too uncomfortable when flushed out of the pocket and needs protection in order to feel safe getting into rhythm.

Release 1.5
He is right-handed passer with a long throwing motion on a ¾ delivery. Despite the longer motion he has decent release quickness, showing the ability to get rid of the ball and made good decisions on his throws. He did a good job in the first half of 2004 in working through his progression to find secondary receivers. He is better when he carries the ball chest high, so he can set and deliver. He looked uncomfortable adjusting his release and delivery under pressure after he was injured in 2004, as it appeared that he just took too long to unleash the ball.

Arm Strength 1.4
He has adequate arm strength, but can put some velocity on the ball. Earlier in his career, he was a little inconsistent to get the ball deep, as his passes would fall off a lot because he was throwing the ball too low at times. But, he made some mechanical refinements in his release, maintaining power behind his throws, but still had problems throwing off-balance. The coaches say that he had the most powerful arm in the Big Ten, but while he can make most of the throws, he failed to display the arm strength to consistently air it out on deep routes. He shows good ability to throw with good velocity and still provide a catchable ball with good touch in the short to intermediate area, but his long ball will flutter.

Accuracy 1.4
He throws with good accuracy on the short and intermediate tosses, but was inconsistent and generally off with his placement on the deep ball. He shows adequate timing and touch, but tends to struggle a bit with the hitch pass and short dump-off when on the move (better when staying in the pocket), putting a lot of zip with touch going over the middle. He simply lacks the arm strength to get the ball deep consistently.

Touch 1.4
He shows good timing on crossing patterns and does a decent job of recognizing the action underneath. He has adequate ability to slide and adjust in the pocket. At times, he tends to take off and run too early rather than step up in the pocket. He will sometimes get too locked on his primary target and needs to do a better job of locating his secondary receivers.

Poise 1.5
He could be a little impatient with the blitz and force the ball under pressure. When he is flushed out of the pocket, he will make some poor judgement calls and throw into coverage (see 2004 Penn State and Michigan games). He needs to develop a better “testosterone level,” as he is prone to break out of the pocket when he senses the pressure. He has the vision to scan the field and anticipates the blitz, but is more apt to run with the ball than step up in the pocket and take a hit.

Leadership 1.6
He will take charge and get after teammates, when needed. He is not a vocal type, but will command respect in the huddle. He still needs to develop an air of cockiness, as it sometimes looks as if he is uncertain of his leadership ability.

Pocket Movement 1.5
He is more of a pocket passer and does a marginal job of sliding or stepping up in the pocket to avoid the rush. He has adequate lateral agility, but fails to keep his feet on the move. The hip injury effected his balance and agility the second half of 2004. He will try to avoid defenders, but does lose a little velocity throwing on the move, especially when going to his left.

Scrambling Ability 1.7
He had just adequate mobility and escape quickness from the pocket. He shows adequate ability to roll out to both his right and left (best going to his right). He gets a little inconsistent to get his body in good position to make the throw when on the move, but has the arm strength to compensate. He is not a threat with his feet to be accounted for there.

USMCBladerunner
04-07-2009, 03:36 PM
Read my post again. I specified the "prestigious schools listed on this page".

Harvard, Yale, Columbia, MIT, Berkeley, Princeton and Stanford, etc.

Where did anyone say anything about small ivy schools?

Now you got me confused...four of the schools you listed are Ivy League schools, and each of them are relatively small.

USMCBladerunner
04-07-2009, 03:42 PM
Purdue is a good state school. One of the better state schools in the country, particularly in science and engineering. I don't know about it's History program, but it is History, so how hard can it be.

Ivy's, Stanford, Rice, Cal tech, MIT, and the like > Berkeley, Northwestern, Vanderbilt, a few others > UVA, Michigan, Purdue, a number of others > whoever > Nebraska

FireFly
04-07-2009, 04:34 PM
I like Orton, I think he could have some success, I just don't quite understand why there seems to be so much more excitement about him over Simms?

Borks147
04-07-2009, 06:45 PM
Read my post again. I specified the "prestigious schools listed on this page".

Harvard, Yale, Columbia, MIT, Berkeley, Princeton and Stanford, etc.

Where did anyone say anything about small ivy schools?

again I disagree, particularly with lumping Princeton into that bunch since they have a ridiculous focus on their undergrads. but yes, some of those other schools sh*t on their undergrads

El Minion
04-07-2009, 07:18 PM
Purdue is a good state school. One of the better state schools in the country, particularly in science and engineering. I don't know about it's History program, but it is History, so how hard can it be.

Ivy's, Stanford, Rice, Cal tech, MIT, and the like > Berkeley, Northwestern, Vanderbilt, a few others > UVA, Michigan, Purdue, a number of others > whoever > Nebraska

Rice? :kiddingme

Berkeley is a top 5 university worldwide. In fact the majority of the UC's are ranked at or near the top world wide.

Gotta represent for Cali ;D

SonOfLe-loLang
04-07-2009, 07:20 PM
Rice? :kiddingme

Berkeley is a top 5 university worldwide. In fact the majority of the UC's are ranked at or near the top world wide.

Gotta represent for Cali ;D

Rice is a great school. Berkeley is very good (its like Cornell of the west i guess), but its not "top 5)

Borks147
04-07-2009, 07:30 PM
Rice is a great school. Berkeley is very good (its like Cornell of the west i guess), but its not "top 5)

Cornell of the west LOL. don't do that to Berkeley man

El Minion
04-07-2009, 07:36 PM
Rice is a great school. Berkeley is very good (its like Cornell of the west i guess), but its not "top 5)

Rice may be great value school but it is not in the league with Berkeley or even Cornell:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Academic_Ranking_of_World_Universities

http://www.timeshighereducation.co.uk/hybrid.asp?typeCode=243&pubCode=1&navcode=137

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Top_100_Global_Universities

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Webometrics_Ranking_of_World_Universities

Mogulseeker
04-08-2009, 06:41 AM
Berkeley is a top five school. For undergrad, it's probably better than most Ivys. It's the highest ranked public school in the country.

Just to end the college debate: look up USNWR's list for top schools. I didn't apply to any Ivys because of the fact that undergrads don't really play I to the mix as opposed to other schools. I went to SNHU because it was the nearest school to my base, and it was the school to be covered by my TA. However, soley for the fact that I want the undergrad experience, I'm going for a double-major so a better school can confer my degree... Probably either Bowdoin College or St. Olaf College. IMO, the best undergrad schools are the well-endowed schools who only confer bachelors, ie Amherst, Wellesley, Pomona, Occidental, Bowdoin, Wesleyan, St. Olaf, Oberlin, Colorado College, Carleton, Bates... then the best graduate schools are the Ivys (Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Penn, Columbia) and top non-Ivys like Stanford, Chicago, and Georgetown ....... then other top schools - ie , Northwestern, Washington U, Vanderbilt, the public Ivys (UNC Chapel Hill, UM Ann Arbor, UT Austin, CU Boulder), and private schools (Boston College, University of Denver)........ then large state schools (Ohio, Florida, Florida state)....... then small state schools (Colorado State, or my alma matter - for now - Southern New Hampshire)....... then run-of-the mill colleges like Ft. Lewis, Metro State College of Denver, or Mesa State ....... then Community Colleges like Red Rocks or Denver CC ........ then technical schools like Devriy ...... then degree mills like the University of Phoenix .......... then welfare job corps schools at which point, we're talking regressive education (actually getting dumber) ....... then taking advice from mentally challenged hobos,) ....... finally, at the bottom of the list: evangelical colleges (Liberty University, Bob Jones University)

Certain schools have their specialties. For example, Johns Hopkins' medical program pretty much owns everybody elses... or Georgetown's political science program... or the University of Denver's international relations program.


Back to Orton. From the reasearch I've done, this guy was supposed to be the greatest thing since sliced bread heading into senior year after breaking all of Drew Brees's records in basically the same system at Purdue. He had more yards and wins than Brees. An easy first rounder, and then he was injured. I think if anything, it demonstartes his potential... I don't think he's had a major injury in the pros.

SonOfLe-loLang
04-08-2009, 09:26 AM
Berkeley is a top five school. For undergrad, it's probably better than most Ivys. It's the highest ranked public school in the country.

Just to end the college debate: look up USNWR's list for top schools. I didn't apply to any Ivys because of the fact that undergrads don't really play I to the mix as opposed to other schools. I went to SNHU because it was the nearest school to my base, and it was the school to be covered by my TA. However, soley for the fact that I want the undergrad experience, I'm going for a double-major so a better school can confer my degree... Probably either Bowdoin College or St. Olaf College. IMO, the best undergrad schools are the well-endowed schools who only confer bachelors, ie Amherst, Wellesley, Pomona, Occidental, Bowdoin, Wesleyan, St. Olaf, Oberlin, Colorado College, Carleton, Bates... then the best graduate schools are the Ivys (Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Penn, Columbia) and top non-Ivys like Stanford, Chicago, and Georgetown ....... then other top schools - ie , Northwestern, Washington U, Vanderbilt, the public Ivys (UNC Chapel Hill, UM Ann Arbor, UT Austin, CU Boulder), and private schools (Boston College, University of Denver)........ then large state schools (Ohio, Florida, Florida state)....... then small state schools (Colorado State, or my alma matter - for now - Southern New Hampshire)....... then run-of-the mill colleges like Ft. Lewis, Metro State College of Denver, or Mesa State ....... then Community Colleges like Red Rocks or Denver CC ........ then technical schools like Devriy ...... then degree mills like the University of Phoenix .......... then welfare job corps schools at which point, we're talking regressive education (actually getting dumber) ....... then taking advice from mentally challenged hobos,) ....... finally, at the bottom of the list: evangelical colleges (Liberty University, Bob Jones University)

Certain schools have their specialties. For example, Johns Hopkins' medical program pretty much owns everybody elses... or Georgetown's political science program... or the University of Denver's international relations program.


Back to Orton. From the reasearch I've done, this guy was supposed to be the greatest thing since sliced bread heading into senior year after breaking all of Drew Brees's records in basically the same system at Purdue. He had more yards and wins than Brees. An easy first rounder, and then he was injured. I think if anything, it demonstartes his potential... I don't think he's had a major injury in the pros.

US News and Report rankings are BS. (Actually, ranking schools in general is pretty dumb come to think of it.) But, for example, my college refused to give USNR any info about grades and what not, so they'd always bury us, where as Princeton Review had us ranked with ivy's for academics.

I think you'll realize once yuore out of school, that unless you work in the financial sector, lots of times people dont give a **** where you went. And once you'vebeen in the workforce for 5 years, they really dont

lex
04-08-2009, 09:33 AM
Berkeley is a top five school. For undergrad, it's probably better than most Ivys. It's the highest ranked public school in the country.

Just to end the college debate: look up USNWR's list for top schools. I didn't apply to any Ivys because of the fact that undergrads don't really play I to the mix as opposed to other schools. I went to SNHU because it was the nearest school to my base, and it was the school to be covered by my TA. However, soley for the fact that I want the undergrad experience, I'm going for a double-major so a better school can confer my degree... Probably either Bowdoin College or St. Olaf College. IMO, the best undergrad schools are the well-endowed schools who only confer bachelors, ie Amherst, Wellesley, Pomona, Occidental, Bowdoin, Wesleyan, St. Olaf, Oberlin, Colorado College, Carleton, Bates... then the best graduate schools are the Ivys (Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Brown, Cornell, Dartmouth, Penn, Columbia) and top non-Ivys like Stanford, Chicago, and Georgetown ....... then other top schools - ie , Northwestern, Washington U, Vanderbilt, the public Ivys (UNC Chapel Hill, UM Ann Arbor, UT Austin, CU Boulder), and private schools (Boston College, University of Denver)........ then large state schools (Ohio, Florida, Florida state)....... then small state schools (Colorado State, or my alma matter - for now - Southern New Hampshire)....... then run-of-the mill colleges like Ft. Lewis, Metro State College of Denver, or Mesa State ....... then Community Colleges like Red Rocks or Denver CC ........ then technical schools like Devriy ...... then degree mills like the University of Phoenix .......... then welfare job corps schools at which point, we're talking regressive education (actually getting dumber) ....... then taking advice from mentally challenged hobos,) ....... finally, at the bottom of the list: evangelical colleges (Liberty University, Bob Jones University)

Certain schools have their specialties. For example, Johns Hopkins' medical program pretty much owns everybody elses... or Georgetown's political science program... or the University of Denver's international relations program.


Back to Orton. From the reasearch I've done, this guy was supposed to be the greatest thing since sliced bread heading into senior year after breaking all of Drew Brees's records in basically the same system at Purdue. He had more yards and wins than Brees. An easy first rounder, and then he was injured. I think if anything, it demonstartes his potential... I don't think he's had a major injury in the pros.

FYI, locally, little distinction is made between Northwestern and the Univ. of Chicago. Both are held in the same regard once you throw out biases. They're both on the same tier.

BTW, I would resist relying too heavily on one source for rankings. Its fairly arbitrary. Its not in that good schools are usually ranked high but arbitrary criteria sometimes creates discrepancies that dont exist.

Mogulseeker
04-09-2009, 01:39 PM
Collges are colleges.

On a side note, I hear Kyle Orton is a thinking man's Quarterback. It was in the NY Times a while back.

baja
04-09-2009, 02:03 PM
"Think with your dipstick" LOL @ the Sports Center add for motor oil.

Mogulseeker
04-09-2009, 02:10 PM
Looks like he'll get along with Hillis very well. :~ohyah!:

You might be a redneck if...

...you play in the Denver Broncos backfield.

blake0052
04-09-2009, 03:32 PM
I was thinking the same thing. I had a 3.73 in undergraduate school... at Southern New Hampshire University...

Purdue is pretty prestigious... then again, so is Vanderbilt.

Did you also play DI Football while attaining a 3.73? Prolly not.

Mogulseeker
10-23-2009, 12:45 AM
Sheeeeeet... why not?

It might be fun to revisit this article.