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Dagmar
03-10-2009, 08:51 PM
Another Vision of the Universe

In 1609, Galileo improved the newly invented telescope, turned it toward the heavens, and revolutionized our view of the universe. In celebration of the 400th anniversary of this milestone, 2009 has been designated as the International Year of Astronomy.

Today, NASA's Great Observatories are continuing Galileo's legacy with stunning images and breakthrough science from the Hubble Space Telescope, the Spitzer Space Telescope, and the Chandra X-ray Observatory.

While Galileo observed the sky using visible light seen by the human eye, technology now allows us to observe in many wavelengths, including Spitzer's infrared view and Chandra's view in X-rays. Each wavelength region shows different aspects of celestial objects and often reveals new objects that could not otherwise be studied.

This image of spiral galaxy Messier 101 is the visible light view from the Hubble Space Telescope.

Composite images allow astronomers to see how features seen in one wavelength match up with those seen in another wavelength. It's like seeing with a camera, night vision goggles, and X-ray vision all at once.

In the four centuries since Galileo, astronomy has changed dramatically. Yet our curiosity and quest for knowledge remain the same. So, too, does our wonder at the splendor of the universe.

http://i40.tinypic.com/mcrk9d.jpg

Moon, Mercury, Jupiter, Mars
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0902/20090223mmjm900px_MikeSalway.jpg
Explanation: When the Moon rose in predawn skies on February 23rd, it sported a sunlit crescent. It also offered early morning risers a tantalizing view of earthshine, the dark portion of the lunar disk illuminated by sunlight reflected from the Earth. Of course, on that morning a remarkable conjunction with three wandering planets added an impressive touch to the celestial scene. Recorded just before sunrise, this serene skyview looks east toward a glowing horizon across Tuggerah Lake on the Central Coast of New South Wales, Australia. Along with the waning crescent Moon, the picture captures (top to bottom) bright Mercury, Jupiter, and Mars.


http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0901/PIA07997_spiritmars_c800.jpg
Explanation: This month, the Mars Exploration Rovers are celebrating their 5th anniversary of operations on the surface of the Red Planet. The serene sunset view, part of their extensive legacy of images from the martian surface, was recorded by the Spirit rover on May 19, 2005. Colors in the image have been slightly exaggerated but would likely be apparent to a human explorer's eye. Of course, fine martian dust particles suspended in the thin atmosphere lend the sky a reddish color, but the dust also scatters blue light in the forward direction, creating a bluish sky glow near the setting Sun. The Sun is setting behind the Gusev crater rim wall some 80 kilometers (50 miles) in the distance. Because Mars is farther away, the Sun is less bright and only about two thirds the size seen from planet Earth


Planetary Nebula NGC 2818
http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0901/ngc2818_hheritage_800.jpg
Explanation: NGC 2818 is a beautiful planetary nebula, the gaseous shroud of a dying sun-like star. It could well offer a glimpse of the future that awaits our own Sun after spending another 5 billion years or so steadily using up hydrogen at its core, and then finally helium, as fuel for nuclear fusion.

Curiously, NGC 2818 seems to lie within a sparse open star cluster, NGC 2818A, that is some 10,000 light-years distant toward the southern constellation Pyxis (Compass). Since open star clusters disperse after only a few hundred million years, this one must be exceptionally old to have one of its member stars evolve to the planetary nebula stage.

At the distance of the star cluster, planetary nebula NGC 2818 would be about 4 light-years across. The Hubble image is a composite of exposures through narrow-band filters, presenting emission from nitrogen, hydrogen, and oxygen atoms in the nebula as red, green, and blue hues.


The Milky Way Over Mauna Kea
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0901/maunakea_pacholka.jpg
Explanation: Have you ever seen the band of our Milky Way Galaxy? In a clear sky from a dark location at the right time, a faint band of light becomes visible across the sky. Soon after your eyes become dark adapted, you might spot the band for the first time. It may then become obvious. Then spectacular. One reason for a growing astonishment might be the realization that this fuzzy swath contains billions of stars and is the disk of our very own spiral galaxy. Since we are inside this disk, the band appears to encircle the Earth. Visible in the above image, high above in the night sky, the band of the Milky Way Galaxy arcs. The bright spot just below the band is the planet Jupiter. In the foreground lies the moonlit caldera of the volcano Haleakala, located on the island of Maui in Hawaii, USA. A close look near the horizon will reveal light clouds and the dark but enormous Mauna Kea volcano on the Big Island of Hawaii. If you have never seen the Milky Way band or recognized the planet Jupiter, this year may be your chance. Because 2009 is the International Year of Astronomy, an opportunity to look through a window that peers deep into the universe may be coming to a location near you.

More Milky Way
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0809/falsekiva_pacholka.jpg
Explanation: Is there any place in the world you could see a sight like this? Yes! This digital mosaic shows the night sky as seen from False Kiva in Canyonlands National Park, eastern Utah, USA. Diving into the Earth far in the distance is part of the central band of our Milky Way Galaxy. Much closer, the planet Jupiter is visible as the bright point just to band's left. Closer still are the park's picturesque buttes and mesas lit by a crescent moon. In the foreground is the cave housing a stone circle of unknown origin named False Kiva. The cave itself was briefly lit by flashlight during the exposure. Astrophotographer Wally Pacholka reports that getting to the cave was no easy trek. Also, mountain lions were a concern while waiting alone in the dark to record the mosaic.


Simeis 147: Supernova Remnant
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0901/s147metsavainioNBMedium_c800.jpg
Explanation: It's easy to get lost following the intricate filaments in this detailed image of faint supernova remnant Simeis 147. Also cataloged as Sh2-240 and seen towards the constellation Taurus, it covers nearly 3 degrees (6 full moons) on the sky. That corresponds to a width of 150 light-years at the stellar debris cloud's estimated distance of 3,000 light-years. The remarkable narrow-band composite image in the Hubble color palette includes emission from hydrogen, sulfur, and oxygen atoms tracing regions of shocked, glowing gas. This supernova remnant has an estimated age of about 40,000 years - meaning light from the massive stellar explosion first reached Earth 40,000 years ago. But this expanding remnant is not the only aftermath. The cosmic catastrophe also left behind a spinning neutron star or pulsar, all that remains of the original star's core.

Meck77
03-10-2009, 08:58 PM
Good stuff rusty!

It's a worm moon tonight!

• Full Worm - March Moon As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

worm
03-10-2009, 09:05 PM
Good stuff rusty!

It's a worm moon tonight!

Full Worm - March Moon As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

Woohoo!! Time to drink.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:05 PM
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0902/eagle_kp09.jpg

Explanation: From afar, the whole thing looks like an Eagle. A closer look at the Eagle Nebula, however, shows the bright region is actually a window into the center of a larger dark shell of dust. Through this window, a brightly-lit workshop appears where a whole open cluster of stars is being formed. In this cavity tall pillars and round globules of dark dust and cold molecular gas remain where stars are still forming. Already visible are several young bright blue stars whose light and winds are burning away and pushing back the remaining filaments and walls of gas and dust. The Eagle emission nebula, tagged M16, lies about 6500 light years away, spans about 20 light-years, and is visible with binoculars toward the constellation of the Serpent (Serpens). This picture combines three specific emitted colors and was taken with the 0.9-meter telescope on Kitt Peak, Arizona, USA.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:06 PM
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/earthgrazer_ansmet_big.jpg

Explanation: What is that streaking across the sky? A bright earthgrazing meteor. In 1972, an unusually bright meteor from space was witnessed bouncing off Earth's atmosphere, much like a skipping stone can bounce off of a calm lake. The impressive event lasted several seconds, was visible in daylight, and reportedly visible all the way from Utah, USA to Alberta, Canada. Pictured above, the fireball was photographed streaking above Teton mountains behind Jackson Lake, Wyoming, USA. The Great Daylight Fireball of 1972 was possibly the size of a small truck, and would likely have created an impressive airburst were it to have struck Earth more directly. Earthgrazing meteors are rare but are more commonly seen when the radiant of a meteor shower is just rising or setting. At that time, meteors closer to the Earth than earthgrazers would more usually strike the Earth near the horizon, while meteors further than earthgrazers would miss the Earth entirely.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:07 PM
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/helix_eso.jpg

Explanation: Will our Sun look like this one day? The Helix Nebula is one of brightest and closest examples of a planetary nebula, a gas cloud created at the end of the life of a Sun-like star. The outer gasses of the star expelled into space appear from our vantage point as if we are looking down a helix. The remnant central stellar core, destined to become a white dwarf star, glows in light so energetic it causes the previously expelled gas to fluoresce. The Helix Nebula, given a technical designation of NGC 7293, lies about 700 light-years away towards the constellation of Aquarius and spans about 2.5 light-years. The above picture was taken by the Wide Field Imager on the 2.2-meter Telescope at the European Southern Observatory's La Silla Observatory. A close-up of the inner edge of the Helix Nebula shows complex gas knots of unknown origin.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:09 PM
Good stuff rusty!

It's a worm moon tonight!

Full Worm - March Moon As the temperature begins to warm and the ground begins to thaw, earthworm casts appear, heralding the return of the robins. The more northern tribes knew this Moon as the Full Crow Moon, when the cawing of crows signaled the end of winter; or the Full Crust Moon, because the snow cover becomes crusted from thawing by day and freezing at night. The Full Sap Moon, marking the time of tapping maple trees, is another variation. To the settlers, it was also known as the Lenten Moon, and was considered to be the last full Moon of winter.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/crescentmoonvenus_sullivan.jpg
Explanation: Last Friday (Feb 27th), the Moon and Venus shared the early evening sky in a beautiful conjunction. Separated by only about 2 degrees, they also were both in a crescent phase. Just like our Moon, Venus can appear as a full disk or a thin crescent. Frequently the brightest object in the post-sunset or pre-sunrise sky, Venus is so small that it usually requires binoculars or a small telescope to clearly see its phase. This telescopic image of Friday's conjunction shows off the similar crescent phases, with the tiny crescent Venus at the upper right.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:11 PM
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/europa_galileo.jpg

Explanation: Although the phase of this moon might appear familiar, the moon itself might not. In fact, this gibbous phase shows part of Jupiter's moon Europa. The robot spacecraft Galileo captured this image mosaic during its mission orbiting Jupiter from 1995 - 2003. Visible are plains of bright ice, cracks that run to the horizon, and dark patches that likely contain both ice and dirt. Raised terrain is particularly apparent near the terminator, where it casts shadows. Europa is nearly the same size as Earth's Moon, but much smoother, showing few highlands or large impact craters. Evidence and images from the Galileo spacecraft, indicated that liquid oceans might exist below the icy surface. To test speculation that these seas hold life, ESA and NASA have together started preliminary development of the Europa Jupiter System Mission , a spacecraft proposed to better study Europa. If the surface ice is thin enough, a future mission might drop hydrobots to burrow into the oceans and search for life.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:13 PM
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/horseheadorion_martin.jpg

Explanation: Adrift 1,500 light-years away in one of the night sky's most recognizable constellations, the glowing Orion Nebula and the dark Horsehead Nebula are contrasting cosmic vistas. They appear in opposite corners of this stunning mosaic taken with a digital camera attached to a small telescope. The magnificent emission region, the Orion Nebula (aka M42), lies at the upper right of the picture. Immediately to its left is a prominent bluish reflection nebula sometimes called the Running Man. The Horsehead nebula appears as a dark cloud, a small silhouette notched against the long red glow at the lower left. Alnitak is the easternmost star in Orion's belt and is seen as the brightest star to the left of the Horsehead. Below Alnitak is the Flame Nebula, with clouds of bright emission and dramatic dark dust lanes. Pervasive tendrils of glowing hydrogen gas are easily traced throughout the region in this deep field image of the same region.

ohiobronco2
03-10-2009, 09:14 PM
Awesome pics Rusty.

watermock
03-10-2009, 09:34 PM
Hey!

My epic universe thread went down like a lead balloon but I tried. :thanku:

Keep in mind, the Paladeans are from Orion, the Reptillians from Zeta Reticuli.

mhgaffney
03-10-2009, 09:46 PM
Now if we could just get NASA to level with us about what they found on the back side of the moon...

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:54 PM
Now if we could just get NASA to level with us about what they found on the back side of the moon...

mock. They found mock.

mhgaffney
03-10-2009, 09:56 PM
The cracks in Europa probably happen because of the gravitational stersses from Jupiter.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 09:58 PM
http://www.ukimagehost.com/uploads/2daed9235d.gif

Bronco Bob
03-10-2009, 10:13 PM
,

BABronco
03-10-2009, 10:15 PM
http://www.ukimagehost.com/uploads/2daed9235d.gif

that is just insane to think about.

Bronco Bob
03-10-2009, 10:16 PM
.

Dagmar
03-10-2009, 10:19 PM
Could you make those images a bit bigger? My parents almost can't make them out from Scotland...

Kid A
03-10-2009, 10:50 PM
that is just insane to think about.

The only thing almost as incredible to think about is the amount of distance between the planets/solar systems/galaxies.

To quote Bill Bryson, all the material in our solar system "fills less than a trillionth of the available space...with Earth reduced to the size of a pea, Jupiter would be over a thousand feet away and Pluto would be a mile and a half distant....on the same scale, Proxima Centauri, our nearest star, would be almost ten thousand miles away."

Suffice to say, we won't be leaving the neighborhood anytime soon.

watermock
03-10-2009, 11:01 PM
UFO's shift dimension.

Dagmar
03-31-2009, 09:27 PM
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/ngc2074a_hst.jpg

Explanation: To some it may look to some like a big space monster, but it is more big than monster. To others it may look like a grazing seahorse, but the dark object toward the image right is actually an inanimate pillar of smoky dust about 20 light years long. The curiously-shaped dust structure occurs in our neighboring Large Magellanic Cloud, in a star forming region very near the expansive Tarantula Nebula. The energetic nebula is creating a star cluster named NGC 2074, whose center is visible just off the top of the image in the direction of the neck of the seahorse. The above representative color image was taken last year by the Hubble Space Telescope's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2 in honor of Hubble's 100,000th trip around the Earth. As young stars in the cluster form, their light and winds will slowly erode the dust pillars away over the next million years.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/Almahata-Sitta15_c900.jpg


Explanation: Small asteroid 2008 TC3 fell to Earth at dawn on October 7, 2008, tracking through the skies over the Nubian Desert in northern Sudan. That event was remarkable because it was the first time an asteroid was detected in space before crashing into planet Earth's atmosphere. It was generally assumed the asteroid itself had completely disintegrated to dust. But, based on satellite and ground observations of the atmospheric impact event, Dr. Mauwia Shaddad of the University of Khartoum, aided by Dr. Peter Jenniskens of the SETI Institute and NASA Ames Research Center, led an expedition of students and staff to the area, combing the desert for surviving fragments. On December 6, 2008, two hours after their search began, the first meteorite was found. The team ultimately collected some 280 small meteorites, now called Almahata Sitta, with a total mass of about 5 kilograms -- the first material recovered from a known asteroid. In stark contrast to the lighter-colored stones, the black fragment in the picture is Almahata Sitta meteorite number 15. About 4 centimeters in diameter, it is seen as it came to rest on the desert floor.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/sn94d_highz.jpg


Explanation: Eleven years ago results were first presented indicating that most of the energy in our universe is not in stars or galaxies but is tied to space itself. In the language of cosmologists, a large cosmological constant is directly implied by new distant supernovae observations. Suggestions of a cosmological constant (lambda) were not new -- they have existed since the advent of modern relativistic cosmology. Such claims were not usually popular with astronomers, though, because lambda is so unlike known universe components, because lambda's value appeared limited by other observations, and because less- strange cosmologies without lambda had previously done well in explaining the data. What is noteworthy here is the seemingly direct and reliable method of the observations and the good reputations of the scientists conducting the investigations. Over the past eleven years, independent teams of astronomers have continued to accumulate data that appears to confirm the existence of dark energy and the unsettling result of a presently accelerating universe. The above picture of a supernova that occurred in 1994 on the outskirts of a spiral galaxy was taken by one of these collaborations.

http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0903/tarantula2_hst.jpg

Explanation: In the heart of monstrous Tarantula Nebula lies huge bubbles of energetic gas, long filaments of dark dust, and unusually massive stars. In the center of this heart, is a knot of stars so dense that it was once thought to be a single star. This star cluster, labeled as R136 or NGC 2070, is visible just above the center of the above image and home to a great number of hot young stars. The energetic light from these stars continually ionizes nebula gas, while their energetic particle wind blows bubbles and defines intricate filaments. The above representative-color picture of this great LMC nebula details its tumultuous center. The Tarantula Nebula, also known as the 30 Doradus nebula, is one of the largest star-formation regions known, and has been creating unusually strong episodes of star formation every few million years.

gyldenlove
03-31-2009, 10:12 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Hubble_ultra_deep_field_high_rez_edit1.jpg/600px-Hubble_ultra_deep_field_high_rez_edit1.jpg

Hubble Ultra Deep field, the futhest away we have ever seen, about 13 billion light years away.

Los Broncos
03-31-2009, 10:19 PM
Thats some pretty interesting stuff thanks for the photos.

Cito Pelon
04-01-2009, 01:48 PM
The Hubble Deep Field pic's are awesome. What we see as millions of stars are actually millions of galaxies.

Cito Pelon
04-01-2009, 01:55 PM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0d/Hubble_ultra_deep_field_high_rez_edit1.jpg/600px-Hubble_ultra_deep_field_high_rez_edit1.jpg

Hubble Ultra Deep field, the futhest away we have ever seen, about 13 billion light years away.

All those little stars one sees at night? This Deep Field pic shows those little stars are actually galaxies. And all those little dots in this Deep Field pic are also galaxies. Pure awesome.

Br0nc0Buster
04-01-2009, 02:57 PM
I said this in another thread, but it is interesting none the less

If you shrunk our solar system down to the size of a quarter, it would take an area the size of the United States to represent the Milky Way

That is how tiny our solar system is in our own galaxy

And the Milky Way is but one of hundreds of billions of galaxies in the universe

Cito Pelon
04-01-2009, 03:54 PM
I said this in another thread, but it is interesting none the less

If you shrunk our solar system down to the size of a quarter, it would take an area the size of the United States to represent the Milky Way

That is how tiny our solar system is in our own galaxy

And the Milky Way is but one of hundreds of billions of galaxies in the universe

Yup. Just look at that gyldenlove Deep Field. There must be a million galaxies just in that pic. Awesome. Every single speck of light in that Deep Field pic is a galaxy like the Milky Way. Awesome. There's probably a billion stars like our own sun in the Milky Way, we're way out on the perimiter of the spiral galaxy that we call the Milky Way, on the periphery of one of the arms of the spiral galaxy we call the Milky Way. It's interesting that we're nothing way out of the galaxy center, but we're something, discussing it, and have pictures of all those other galaxies.

Rock Chalk
04-01-2009, 04:39 PM
This is my desktop background. I had to shrink its size down because you cant see my whole desktop on this. I hope its still big enough to really get.

This is a 360 degree photograph taken at night in Death Valley.

Rohirrim
04-01-2009, 04:45 PM
I love this stuff. It's magnificent.

SureShot
04-01-2009, 04:47 PM
I love this stuff. It's magnificent.

Same here can't get enough of it.

Rock Chalk
04-01-2009, 04:48 PM
My desktop background in full size. Will take a while to show though, be forewarned.

http://www.adamwooden.com/desktopbg.jpg

Rock Chalk
04-01-2009, 04:51 PM
http://www.adamwooden.com/desktopbg.jpg

Cito Pelon
04-01-2009, 05:04 PM
This is my desktop background. I had to shrink its size down because you cant see my whole desktop on this. I hope its still big enough to really get.

This is a 360 degree photograph taken at night in Death Valley.

That's the Milky Way. Suberp pic, Alec. Depending on the time of year, that entire picture will move. It moves as the Earth rotates around our little sun. We're way far out on a spiral arm of our own galaxy.