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View Full Version : Carlton Powell - Where does he fit in?


Popps
03-10-2009, 05:40 PM
We've discussed Marcus Thomas a lot as of late, and I'm in agreement with many that he may have a bit of a rebirth in this system. I think he's a perfect fit for a 3-4 DE.

Another guy who we'll almost be getting for "free" this year is Carlton Powell.
I didn't realize he was a former linebacker!? I also thought he was shorter than 6'2". Isn't Seymore about 6'2"? So, do we try to bulk him up and play him in the middle, or get him into the DE rotation? He's certainly got a knack for chasing down ball-carriers.

Here's a pretty glowing write-up:

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/16675-watch-out-for-carlton-powell-in-the-nfl-draft

When you think about the quintessential college football player, you envision a guy who works hard in the weight room, diligently breaks down film, builds solid relationships with his teammates, and still finds time to excel in the classroom.

These qualities represent what Virginia Tech senior Carlton Powell is all about.

As the NFL Draft approaches, prospective players spend an inordinate amount of time training for the Combine. As result, we sometimes come to view them as a collection of names and statistics.

Powell is something more.

Carlton Powell is a natural leader. He’s willing to go the extra mile for the sake of his team. He makes the players around him better. Given all that, it should be no surprise that he looks up to Packers QB Brett Favre.

“[Farve’s] got a go-get-it attitude—he always plays, and never takes a day off,” said Powell.

A former linebacker in high school, the 6’2”, 301-pound Powell switched to defensive tackle upon enrolling at Virginia Tech. He went on to establish himself as one of the most successful defensive tackles in Hokie history.

Powell finished his career with 104 tackles (21.5 tackles for loss), 5.5 sacks, 30 quarterback pressures, and two forced fumbles. He was named to second team All-ACC as a senior.

That growth couldn’t have occurred without the tutelage of 21-year VT head coach Frank Beamer.

“[Coach Beamer] had us on a tight schedule,” Powell said. “Everyone had mandatory study hall and breakfast check to make sure we were getting up early to go to classes because that first year is real hard for a lot of students.”

The support group of coaches and players undoubtedly helped Powell cope after the shootings at Virginia Tech last spring. Many VT students, meanwhile, found solace in Hokie athletics.

As Powell said, “There was a lot of pressure on us to succeed, but all of the coaches and players came together which made it easier for us.”

Despite the pressure, Powell helped the Hokies finish No. 9 in the AP Poll with an 11-3 record, including a 30-16 win over Boston College in the ACC Championship Game in Jacksonville. Powell described the title game as the best moment of his college career.

“It definitely felt good to get the revenge game against Boston College,” he said. “It was my senior year, we were out there playing for another championship…We stayed out on the field and celebrated long after the game was over.”

With that glory behind him, Powell is now prepared for the next step in his life. He graduated with a degree in Human Nutrition, Foods, and Exercise, and will pursue that field when his playing days are over.

For now, though, it’s time to focus on the NFL.

“I’m in the best shape of my life,” he said. “I’m pretty physically prepared. The film speaks for itself, but I just want work hard and compete in the drills and show everybody what I can do.”

With a track record like Powell’s, you can bet the scouts will be paying attention.


more...

Strengths: Is quick an athletic consistenly gets off the snap fast and falshes the ability to be a disruptive force. gets on top of OL quickly to jolt them upright and clogs holes. Shows quick hands and feet to defeat blocks with amr over or spin moves

Weaknesses: does not consistently play with knees bent or leverage. When popping uprighht at snap he loses leverage and struggles to shed blocks. When playing upright he cannot pressure the QB. Does not use his hands well to protect legs from cut blocks.

Summary: Has size and strenght teams covet but does not always play to his ability. Teams should be wary of overrating him. Has the talent to become a Quality NFL starter but will likely be a backup. This does further prove what has been said that Slow will be running a speedier scheme, in which case I hope Niko can cover the gaps they do leave open or it will be a long season.


Not bad for a 5th rounder I would think, my only problem is that he has another NFL caliber tackle out for the draft, in which case they both may look better than they are by playing next to each other.

Analysis

Compares To: DEWAYNE ROBERTSON-New York Jets...Both of these players rely on suddenness and brute strength to gain advantage. Powell is a dominant run stuffer who does a fine job of handling double-team blocks. He needs to improve his lateral range to be more effective when chasing down plays and must use his hands better to protect himself from low blocks. But when he locks on to a blocker, he will quickly shed. Where he excels is clogging the rush lanes, as when he keeps his pads down, lead blockers are soon to be pushed back through the hole. For a team using the "under tackle" position, Powell is the perfect fit.

http://www.nfl.com/draft/profiles/carlton-powell?id=296

From NFL.com

Because of the constant multiple coverage that they face, the Hokies' defensive tackles do not have eye-opening statistics, but head coach Frank Beamer has noted the need for his defensive tackles to dominate vs. the inside running game.



While Tech has produced quality run-stuffing tackles in recent seasons, none has shown the ability to simply shut down the opposition's ground game the way Carlton Powell, Jr. can.



How dominant has Powell been? In 73 plays that he made vs. the run, he held the opponent to minus-21 yards rushing. Since Powell was inserted into the starting lineup, Tech has led the nation in total defense the last two years (2005-06) and led the Division 1-A ranks in scoring defense in 2006, after placing second the previous two seasons.

broncofan7
03-10-2009, 05:43 PM
Granted, we have never seen him play--that write up does sound intriguing---although I do wonder how Shanny's draftees will fair this training camp when the cuts start coming down........

SouthStndJunkie
03-10-2009, 05:44 PM
http://bleacherreport.com/articles/16675-watch-out-for-carlton-powell-in-the-nfl-draft

Who was the author....C. Powell?

TonyR
03-10-2009, 05:48 PM
He sounds like a 4-3 DT to me, unfortunately.

montrose
03-10-2009, 05:50 PM
I think he'll be given a try at DE in camp.

Popps
03-10-2009, 05:53 PM
He sounds like a 4-3 DT to me, unfortunately.

Yea, I sort of felt that way, too.

But, if you look at Pittsburgh's DEs, they have something like 6 combined sacks on the season. So, his lack of pass-rush skills wouldn't totally preclude him from playing 3-4 DE, perhaps.

I just love the fact that he played LB at one point. 3-4 DEs have to be strong in run-support, and it sounds like his forte. I'm pretty excited to see him in camp.

Rock Chalk
03-10-2009, 05:55 PM
Can Powell play QB for us?

Popps
03-10-2009, 05:57 PM
Can Powell play QB for us?

If you believe that Bleacher Report article, probably so.

BroncoBuff
03-10-2009, 05:59 PM
Now this is a great thread topic ... we don't even know this guy yet.

He seems pretty well suited to a 3-4 DE in my view, size and strength wise. It's the only spot for him actually, at 305 he's too light for NT, too heavy for LB. And although I don't know how they compile this stat, in his senior year at Va. Tech, he was ranked the #1 D-lineman in the nation for yards allowed against the run. I'm really looking forward to watching his this Summer.
.

Popps
03-10-2009, 06:01 PM
Best case scenario, homer-orange glasses outlook:

-Marcus Thomas flourishes as a 3-4 DE using his size and athleticism to make plays.

-Carlton Powell makes a push for a starting role at DE using his run-stuffing ability and agility as a former LB.

-Jarvis Moss moves to OLB and is able to use his speed in open space to make plays and chase down QBs.

-Tim Crowder beefs up and makes a case for himself as a 3-4 DE in the rotation.


If any ONE of those things happen, it would be a huge boost. I really am interested to see who the scheme-change might benefit, if anyone.

TheReverend
03-10-2009, 06:01 PM
De

Popps
03-10-2009, 06:11 PM
Wow, very interesting....

Here's an interview I found on BroncosForums, but it was pulled off of a Steelers blog, apparently. (?)

Steelers Draft Prospect Interview: DT Carlton Powell
Steelers Fever Exclusive Editorial
Saturday, March 08, 2008
By Paul Eide
Steelers Fever Columnist

One look at the Steelers current depth at defensive tackle is all it takes to realize help is needed for the upcoming 2008 season. With Free Agency now nearly a week old and with all notable names (and even not so notable names i.e. Damione Lewis) off the market, it has become obvious that the Steelers will look to fill this need through the upcoming NFL Draft.

One name that has been tossed around frequently as a great late round high reward/low risk selection is Virginia Tech defensive tackle Carlton Powell.

Powell already has the frame to fit the Steelers nose tackle model and played in a similar system at Virginia Tech, where his job was to eat up at least two blockers on every snap and free up the linebackers to roam freely much like current nose tackle Casey Hampton.

The former Hokie would add depth behind Hampton and would have the chance to learn the nuances of the position from a four time Pro Bowler who is as valuable to his team's defensive scheme as any player in the league.

Steelers Fever - How did you get invited to the Combine? Can you kind of explain how you felt once you found out?

Carlton Powell - Man, it was truly a blessing! It came in the mail and I was like, 'I think this is an invite to the Combine.' So I was there with my parents, looking at it making sure everything was right. It was a great moment, very exciting.

SF - Was training at Tom Shaw's in Orlando with fellow defensive tackle Glenn Dorsey prior to the Combine a good reference point for you in terms of how you stack up against 'the best'?

CP - It was definitely great competition, working out against such a big name guy, but I felt like I held my own and stacked up pretty well. In a situation like that it's definitely sink or swim and I felt like I proved a lot, but it wasn't anything I didn't know in my heart already.

SF - At VT you played Left Defensive Tackle in their 4-3 alignment. Does it make a difference to you whether you play in a 4-3 or a 3-4?

CP - I can play any position on the line. I can adjust to whatever. I am a smart player and I can roll with whatever comes my way.

SF - On 33 plays versus the run last year, opponents ran for only 13 yards and one first down. What is the key to that type of success?

CP - It's definitely being physical and I really don't like the ball getting past me when it comes my way more than anything. Whatever it takes, I'm taking them down. It just doesn't happen a lot.

SF - You also had 15 QB pressures last year in 12 starts. What's the most important thing in getting to the QB when a lot of the time you're getting double teamed?

CP - A lot of it is presnap reads and knowing that you're going to get pass protection and knowing down and distance. If its third and long you know its probably a pass or screen. Getting a good presnap read before the play and knowing what you're going to do before it even happens. That gives you a big advantage.

SF - Of all NFL Players, who do you compare yourself to?

CP - I take bits and pieces from a lot of guys. Footwork kind of like Darryl Tapp. The way Albert Haynesworth uses his hands, I've got a little of that. The way Kris Jenkins gets after the QB, the way Casey Hampton stuffs the run; I try to take a little from everybody.

SF - Speaking of Casey Hampton and the Steelers, did they show any interest at the Combine?

CP - Oh yeah. They were one of the teams I talked to a lot. I mean, at the Combine you pretty much talk to every team there even if it isn't for long. But the Steelers were one of the teams I spoke to the most.

SF - Have NFL teams begun to work with your agent or is it too early for that? Have the Steelers specifically contacted you?

CP - Oh yeah, they definitely converse back and forth, getting game film and just doing research trying to find out as much as they can about me. I know the Steelers are one of many teams, but at this stage it's pretty hard to tell what's for real and what is just part of the general evaluation process that all teams do.

SF - Some have said that you aren't stout enough to be an NFL caliber DT. Have you tried to bulk up?

CP - Bulking up has never really been a problem for me. What good is it to be 300+ lbs if it's a sloppy 300? Mostly I'm working on speed and agility in the morning and we lift after that with a lower body day or upper body day.

SF - Regardless of your weight, at Virginia Tech you were said to be benching 400 lbs and squatting 500 lbs. Is that still accurate?

CP - I'm benching around 430 right now and squatting close to 600. I'd say I'm getting close to my plateau now but I never really hit a sticking point or anything before.

SF - Was there a Combine drill that you looked forward to the most or least?

CP - Well, I probably look forward to the 40 as I've been running a 4.9 in training. But my weakest point is my vertical.

SF - Are their certain things an opposing guard will do that let you know how he's going to block you?

CP - Definitely. There's always tendencies. Like you look at the splits between linemen like if they have a tight split you're probably getting a double team if they got wider splits you're looking at one on one. You look at how much weight they got on their down hand and if their leaning forward they're probably going to run block. If they're leaning back a little nit its probably pass protection. So there are a lot of things that go into it.

SF - Are reads and techniques like that something you get at a prestigious school like VT that maybe you don't learn as well somewhere else?

CP - Definitely at Tech, because when I was in high school I played linebacker and didn't know too much about defensive line until I got there. So that helped a lot.

SF - Do the Pro Scouts look favorably upon a guy of your size playing LB in high school? Do they mention that to your agent as a strength?

CP - Yeah that is a strength they recognize. Being able to move around a lot quicker and being agile means I have great feet for my size. Its definitely an advantage they notice against offensive linemen.

SF - You're known as a disruptive type of player in the vein of a Warren Sapp. Is that an extension of your quickness or a result of your will?

CP - I'd say both, you know. Getting back there, causing trouble, getting penetration, not waiting for things to happen, you make the play react to you rather than reacting to the play. It works out a lot better from that approach.

SF - Is their a moment in your college career that stands out as your favorite moment?

CP - Man, of course. First game I ever played in was against USC who was ranked #1 at the time at night on national TV at Fed Ex field and I had goose bumps! It was amazing. All those fans? Oh my god. That's when I knew, "I'm here now!" There are so many things running through your head, so many feelings.

SF - Have you spoken to any current or former Virginia Tech NFL players about making the jump to the NFL?

CP - Yeah, Darryl Tapp mainly (of the Seattle Seahawks). He's a defensive end so he can kind of relate to what I'm going through. He's had a really good first two years (10 sacks, four forced fumbles, two INT's and one TD) so I really ask him mostly about football but also about other stuff.

SF - With the Combine over, do you find yourself more nervous or more excited now that the Draft is the next event on the horizon?

CP - More than anything I'm excited but it's excited, anxious, nervous all that rolled into one. I'm just can't wait to get on a team and let everyone know what Carlton Powell brings to the table.

BroncoBuff
03-10-2009, 06:11 PM
Best case scenario, homer-orange glasses outlook:

-Marcus Thomas flourishes as a 3-4 DE using his size and athleticism to make plays.
Easy call, I'll say YES on this

-Carlton Powell makes a push for a starting role at DE using his run-stuffing ability and agility as a former LB.
I dunno about "pushing to start" just yet, but a solid backup 3-4 DE, yes

-Jarvis Moss moves to OLB and is able to use his speed in open space to make plays and chase down QBs.
50-50 chance ... but he better be the starter, cause you can't hang around as a backup
LB in this league unless you play on special teams.

-Tim Crowder beefs up and makes a case for himself as a 3-4 DE in the rotation.
I say no. The "Bust Train" has left town, and Tim was on it.

There ya go.
,

Anaximines
03-10-2009, 06:14 PM
I hope Niko can cover the gaps they do leave open or it will be a long season.

hope for Niko.. that takes me back.

I agree that Powell seems to fit at DE but we'll have to see how he plays. Nice to be able to add him to the potential list of bodies there though.

Popps
03-10-2009, 06:22 PM
hope for Niko.. that takes me back.

I agree that Powell seems to fit at DE but we'll have to see how he plays. Nice to be able to add him to the potential list of bodies there though.

Yea, my hope for Niko lasted about one pre-season game, I think. Good lord, was he slow and bad. Another Shanahan head-scratcher.

Powell is intriguing, though. Again, this is like a free draft pick if he comes back healthy.

Popps
03-10-2009, 06:24 PM
There ya go.
,

Yea, I had a hard time even coming up with a fantasy where Crowder was effective.

Moss will also be interesting. He didn't handle being locked up too well, but in space, might be effective.

Rohirrim
03-10-2009, 06:28 PM
Well, we've gone to having just about zero in the way of a 3/4 to having at least some respectable camp competition. Anyway I look at it, at this point, I see an upgrade from last season. I'll say one thing, I'm about 99% sure the first pick is a LB. If I had to take a stab at who right now I'd have to say Cushing. He's the surest tackler and the one with the most football smarts.

BroncoMan4ever
03-10-2009, 07:25 PM
Best case scenario, homer-orange glasses outlook:

-Marcus Thomas flourishes as a 3-4 DE using his size and athleticism to make plays.

-Carlton Powell makes a push for a starting role at DE using his run-stuffing ability and agility as a former LB.

-Jarvis Moss moves to OLB and is able to use his speed in open space to make plays and chase down QBs.

-Tim Crowder beefs up and makes a case for himself as a 3-4 DE in the rotation.


If any ONE of those things happen, it would be a huge boost. I really am interested to see who the scheme-change might benefit, if anyone.


i have more faith that Doom could become a pro bowl OLB before Moss could be even a good rotational guy in the league much less on this team.

SpiritGuy
03-10-2009, 08:59 PM
This was part of an article on the Broncos blogs today


Powell spent the entirety of the 2008 season on the reserve/physically unable to perform list after he suffered a torn achilles’ tendon before training camp even started last year.

He was always around Dove Valley throughout 2008, working out and trying to get back into shape, but he wasn’t able to contribue on the field. Now, however, he’s ready.

“I’ve just been preparing in the training room with Greek (Head Athletic Trainer Steve Antonopulos) every day,” Powell said. “I’m basically back to 100 percent now, and it feels great. I’m very anxious to get started. The conditioning program starts up Monday, so I want to see where I’m at.”

Powell has been around a lot in the offseason as well, and he has had a chance to visit with all his coaches, and in particular, he got to talk with defensive coordinator Mike Nolan and Head Coach Josh McDaniels.

“I’m definitely ready to get back with the team. We have a lot of new faces, but we’ve got to get together to make things happen.”

http://blog.denverbroncos.com/denver...date-march-10/

Hope my adoptee has a great year this year.

mhgaffney
03-10-2009, 09:14 PM
A 4.9 40????

For a 300 pound lineman??

azbroncfan
03-10-2009, 09:32 PM
He fit's in John Engelberger's lunch pail if he gets hurt or doesn't bring it this year.

Popps
03-10-2009, 09:45 PM
i have more faith that Doom could become a pro bowl OLB before Moss could be even a good rotational guy in the league much less on this team.

True, though I was writing those scenarios with Dumervil pretty much penciled in as a potential starter, or at least a regular contributor as a 3-4 OLB.

I was focusing more on either 2nd year guys, or guys who hadn't produced a whole lot just yet.

Popps
03-10-2009, 09:47 PM
This was part of an article on the Broncos blogs today


Powell spent the entirety of the 2008 season on the reserve/physically unable to perform list after he suffered a torn achilles’ tendon before training camp even started last year.

He was always around Dove Valley throughout 2008, working out and trying to get back into shape, but he wasn’t able to contribue on the field. Now, however, he’s ready.

“I’ve just been preparing in the training room with Greek (Head Athletic Trainer Steve Antonopulos) every day,” Powell said. “I’m basically back to 100 percent now, and it feels great. I’m very anxious to get started. The conditioning program starts up Monday, so I want to see where I’m at.”

Powell has been around a lot in the offseason as well, and he has had a chance to visit with all his coaches, and in particular, he got to talk with defensive coordinator Mike Nolan and Head Coach Josh McDaniels.

“I’m definitely ready to get back with the team. We have a lot of new faces, but we’ve got to get together to make things happen.”

http://blog.denverbroncos.com/denver...date-march-10/

Hope my adoptee has a great year this year.

Wow, great to hear he's at 100%. Those are tough injuries to come back from. But, he's young. Should be interesting.