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dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 09:21 AM
:rofl: I knew this would get some of you pervs to open this thread!

Now the problem for those w/ any mechanical experience: I went to check my oil this morning in my truck ('96 Dodge) and there was a white sludge on my dipstick. I'm thinking head gasket but hoping it's something else. I just changed the oil pump last month and there was no presence of any sludge. I drive my truck every day and there has been no noticeable loss of power or acceleration. Anyone have any other ideas what might cause this? Thanks.

loborugger
02-03-2009, 09:25 AM
LOL

Well, it might get all us Pervs to open it, but I think you want the mechanics to open this thread...

theAPAOps5
02-03-2009, 09:28 AM
My first guess is Head Gasket starting to go. But you may also want to check your PCV Valve as if that fails the condensation may back up.

Other than that I have nothing else to offer.

bronclvr
02-03-2009, 09:39 AM
Being it's a Dodge I'm guessing it's a Cummins? If not, tell us more-

Many Diesel's have an integrated Cooler (sometimes mounted inside the Block or Radiator-I've seen them rupture and leak into the Oil-that's an easier fix. Is this an Automatic Transmission?

Also, there is a problem that higher stressed Diesel's have-it's called Electrolysis, and it's and expensive malady-essentially you have a sleeved engine, and the rust and contaminants in conjunction with the combustion process work togehter to create implosions which take tiny bits of sleeve and block metal away-eventually the o-rings on your sleeves can't control the anti-freeze and it gets into the oil (making it milky)-the fix is to replace the sleeves ($$$) and put on a water filter kit, although this generally happens on higher horsepower Diesels-

If it were me, I'd put a pressure tester on your Radiator and pump it up, then look for bubbles-the problem is that the Radiator works at 10-18 p.s.i. and the engine is putting out 40-80 p.s.i.-

You are heading down the right alley, generally milky colored Oil is Water in the Oil-there are other options, tell us more about your Truck-these are genrealized guesses-

The best Tech that I ever knew (and I've work and managed a lot of them)said that people always look too deep at a problem-most of them are easy fixes-

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 09:58 AM
Being it's a Dodge I'm guessing it's a Cummins? If not, tell us more-

Many Diesel's have an integrated Cooler (sometimes mounted inside the Block or Radiator-I've seen them rupture and leak into the Oil-that's an easier fix. Is this an Automatic Transmission?

Also, there is a problem that higher stressed Diesel's have-it's called Electrolysis, and it's and expensive malady-essentially you have a sleeved engine, and the rust and contaminants in conjunction with the combustion process work togehter to create implosions which take tiny bits of sleeve and block metal away-eventually the o-rings on your sleeves can't control the anti-freeze and it gets into the oil (making it milky)-the fix is to replace the sleeves ($$$) and put on a water filter kit, although this generally happens on higher horsepower Diesels-

If it were me, I'd put a pressure tester on your Radiator and pump it up, then look for bubbles-the problem is that the Radiator works at 10-18 p.s.i. and the engine is putting out 40-80 p.s.i.-

You are heading down the right alley, generally milky colored Oil is Water in the Oil-there are other options, tell us more about your Truck-these are genrealized guesses-

The best Tech that I ever knew (and I've work and managed a lot of them)said that people always look too deep at a problem-most of them are easy fixes-

No, not a deisel. It's has a 3.9L V6, about 189K miles on it. Nothing special. I noticed same milky substance right before I started having oil pump problems. I drained the oil and pulled off the pan and it looked pretty clean inside. It's always smoked when I started it (I've had it for about six years) but has always run pretty good. I'll probably just scrap it it it's in fact the head gasket. Not worth the money to fix. Thanks for your input.

crazyhorse
02-03-2009, 10:03 AM
It's either the head gasket, cracked block or warped head.
It's major

If it's just a head gasket that would be the easiest to fix. If it's a warped head it's a pain but salvageable. If it's the block your looking at a new motor.

TheReverend
02-03-2009, 10:04 AM
I can change a tire......

That's it

Rohirrim
02-03-2009, 10:19 AM
189K? What more do you expect? Shoot it, bury it, and go shopping. ;D

Probably head gasket, but at 189k it's only the beginning.

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 10:23 AM
189K? What more do you expect? Shoot it, bury it, and go shopping. ;D

Probably head gasket, but at 189k it's only the beginning.

I know, I know...I just hate to spend money on a new vehicle when I could pay off a few bills instead.

Quoydogs
02-03-2009, 10:35 AM
I know, I know...I just hate to spend money on a new vehicle when I could pay off a few bills instead.

Change the PVC Valve. If the oil looked clean and there was no milky matter in the oil pan then you are just fine.

The PCV or Positive crank case ventilation valve can cause too much pressure to build in your motor. This causes moisture to build in your engine and will blow out oil seals. It should cost you around 7 bucks at any auto store.

cutthemdown
02-03-2009, 10:41 AM
I know, I know...I just hate to spend money on a new vehicle when I could pay off a few bills instead.

Most sound financial planner say to get at least a decade out of an automobile before you buy new. Sounds like you had a good run almost 200k. Don't go so far that your truck starts costing you a ton to maintain and keep on the road.

You could probably get a killer deal on a new truck right now.

Hotrod
02-03-2009, 10:57 AM
http://pimpedfiction.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/condom.jpg

Hotrod
02-03-2009, 10:57 AM
Most sound financial planner say to get at least a decade out of an automobile before you buy new. Sounds like you had a good run almost 200k. Don't go so far that your truck starts costing you a ton to maintain and keep on the road.

You could probably get a killer deal on a new truck right now.

Yep, ford sales were down 40% in Jan

Quoydogs
02-03-2009, 10:57 AM
Most sound financial planner say to get at least a decade out of an automobile before you buy new. Sounds like you had a good run almost 200k. Don't go so far that your truck starts costing you a ton to maintain and keep on the road.

You could probably get a killer deal on a new truck right now.

Did you know that you can put up to 2000 dollars into your vehicle every year and come out way ahead of buying a new one. You have to be happy with it but it is much better to fix what you have rather then buy a new one. This is the problem in America, why do you want to go more into debt when you should just fix or use what you have. Also if you car is paid off, keep making your self a car payment of 100.00 a month. You will never get a 100.00 a month car payment and this will pay for any repairs that are needed. Plus you will get paid interest on your own car loan.


If you put 2000.00 every year into your car it will look pretty nice after 10 years. Also cheaper insurance and you can make it the way you want it not the way some Dumbsh!t wanted it.

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 11:18 AM
Did you know that you can put up to 2000 dollars into your vehicle every year and come out way ahead of buying a new one. You have to be happy with it but it is much better to fix what you have rather then buy a new one. This is the problem in America, why do you want to go more into debt when you should just fix or use what you have. Also if you car is paid off, keep making your self a car payment of 100.00 a month. You will never get a 100.00 a month car payment and this will pay for any repairs that are needed. Plus you will get paid interest on your own car loan.


If you put 2000.00 every year into your car it will look pretty nice after 10 years. Also cheaper insurance and you can make it the way you want it not the way some Dumbsh!t wanted it.

Yeah, but putting $2000 worth of repairs in a veh that's only worth $1000 just sounds borderline retarded. I'm all for a $40 part here and there but $2000? I have enough for a decent down payment or to buy a more economical veh outright. Let me just tinker with the PVC valve thing for now, see if that helps any. Thanks again.

Taco John
02-03-2009, 11:36 AM
Wait until the month is over.

Fedaykin
02-03-2009, 11:39 AM
:rofl: I knew this would get some of you pervs to open this thread!

Now the problem for those w/ any mechanical experience: I went to check my oil this morning in my truck ('96 Dodge) and there was a white sludge on my dipstick. I'm thinking head gasket but hoping it's something else. I just changed the oil pump last month and there was no presence of any sludge. I drive my truck every day and there has been no noticeable loss of power or acceleration. Anyone have any other ideas what might cause this? Thanks.


In cold weather you can get condensation in the oil pan which would produce the white sludge. I noticed this on my brand new truck the first winter I had it and took it in to the dealer.

Still I would have someone check it out.

Quoydogs
02-03-2009, 11:44 AM
Yeah, but putting $2000 worth of repairs in a veh that's only worth $1000 just sounds borderline retarded. I'm all for a $40 part here and there but $2000? I have enough for a decent down payment or to buy a more economical veh outright. Let me just tinker with the PVC valve thing for now, see if that helps any. Thanks again.

All i'm trying to say is, the US economy is not doing very well right now and going more into debt is not a good idea.

Fedaykin
02-03-2009, 11:47 AM
Yeah, but putting $2000 worth of repairs in a veh that's only worth $1000 just sounds borderline retarded. I'm all for a $40 part here and there but $2000? I have enough for a decent down payment or to buy a more economical veh outright. Let me just tinker with the PVC valve thing for now, see if that helps any. Thanks again.

If you are financially capable of buying a "new" car then don't put large amounts of money into a car that is on it's last legs anyway (any way you slice it, a ~200k vehicle is on it's last legs). It doesn't make financial sense.

Buying new is rarely a financially sound decision, but buying used is. Let someone with money to blow pay for the deprecation in value you get from driving a new car off the lot =)

Los Broncos
02-03-2009, 12:29 PM
Check your **** man.

DeuceOfClub
02-03-2009, 12:29 PM
Yeah, but putting $2000 worth of repairs in a veh that's only worth $1000 just sounds borderline retarded. I'm all for a $40 part here and there but $2000? I have enough for a decent down payment or to buy a more economical veh outright. Let me just tinker with the PVC valve thing for now, see if that helps any. Thanks again.

The reason its worth only $1000 is because everyone else (almost) rather buy a new one than repair or fix their old cars.
the depreciation rates in the US on almost every item is ridicules.

bronco militia
02-03-2009, 12:31 PM
Sludge on your dipstick is common side affect of surprise buttsex

broncosteven
02-03-2009, 12:32 PM
I would have run 3jettripleanusright on hutty hut hut at the end of the 2nd quarter in the SB.

Florida_Bronco
02-03-2009, 12:46 PM
I'm going with the PVC valve too. If you had a blown head gasket, you'd probably notice other effects like loss of power, detonation and over heating.

Dudeskey
02-03-2009, 12:51 PM
pcv valve or just pop off the oil cap. If you have buildup that looks like snot on there, then you could have a blown gasket and/ or cracked head. And if thats the case, go get this Bar's leaks stuff... pretty good **** if you want to temporarily fix the problem for cheap...™
http://www.barsproducts.com/products/1108.gif
http://www.barsproducts.com/1108.htm

crazyhorse
02-03-2009, 12:59 PM
I'm going with the PVC valve too. If you had a blown head gasket, you'd probably notice other effects like loss of power, detonation and over heating.

I've never seen sludge on the dipstick from "blow by". That's a lot of moisture. Sludge would come from conderable moisture. Once the engine warms sufficiently the moisture from blow by is generally dried out.

Not to say it's impossible. But that would be a lot of moisture suddenly generated since the oil pump replacement.

Head gasket can let water by without losing compression.

One way to check out head gasket breakage is to check the radiator. If it's low, you're losing water. If it's still full, then a couple bucks on a valve is worth trying. That doesn't mean it's not a broken gasket, but is a good sign that it might not be blown.

Another way to check a head gasket is to pull plugs (one at a time) and see if they are clean. If there is a slight browning or even black, that's a dry plug. If it's clean like a new plug it could come from steam in the cylinder which would indicate a broken gasket.

Quoydogs
02-03-2009, 12:59 PM
pcv valve or just pop off the oil cap. If you have buildup that looks like snot on there, then you could have a blown gasket and/ or cracked head. And if thats the case, go get this Bar's leaks stuff... pretty good **** if you want to temporarily fix the problem for cheap...
http://www.barsproducts.com/products/1108.gif
http://www.barsproducts.com/1108.htm

No that crap is bad..... Snot build up on the oil cap is normal also. It is not sealed very well and and can get moisture on it as well. If you use bars leak in a newer car you will make tech's like me very happy however you won't be. If it were a older ( 80 or older ) Then bars leak would be a temp fix. New radiator don't like the stuff besides you could just put some whole pepper corns in it or a egg and save your self the 12. bucks. Just my two cents.

Dudeskey
02-03-2009, 01:01 PM
Ok... thanks for the insight.

PaintballCLE
02-03-2009, 01:52 PM
if you had a cracked head gasket........your antifreeze would be low because it would be mixing with the oil.

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 03:05 PM
if you had a cracked head gasket........your antifreeze would be low because it would be mixing with the oil.

Yeah, someone else mentioned that, too. The resevior is full but I haven't looked inside the radiator itself.

Florida_Bronco
02-03-2009, 03:17 PM
Yeah, someone else mentioned that, too. The resevior is full but I haven't looked inside the radiator itself.

If your reservoir is full then you are likely fine there. The radiator pulls coolant out of the reservoir if it's needed, so if you were losing coolant your reservoir would be low or dry.

Florida_Bronco
02-03-2009, 03:24 PM
I've never seen sludge on the dipstick from "blow by". That's a lot of moisture. Sludge would come from conderable moisture. Once the engine warms sufficiently the moisture from blow by is generally dried out.

Not to say it's impossible. But that would be a lot of moisture suddenly generated since the oil pump replacement.

Head gasket can let water by without losing compression.

One way to check out head gasket breakage is to check the radiator. If it's low, you're losing water. If it's still full, then a couple bucks on a valve is worth trying. That doesn't mean it's not a broken gasket, but is a good sign that it might not be blown.

Another way to check a head gasket is to pull plugs (one at a time) and see if they are clean. If there is a slight browning or even black, that's a dry plug. If it's clean like a new plug it could come from steam in the cylinder which would indicate a broken gasket.

Good post. You're almost certainly better with this stuff than I am, but one thing I know is that I've never seen someone with a blown headgasket that wasn't experiencing some kind of other problem to hint at the head gasket. Of course this is from dealing with Mustangs, maybe the Dodges are different.

Maybe it's possible he let water get into the oil when he changed the pump? An oil change might be in order to see if that was the cause.

I'd definetly change the PCV valve. Even if it's not the problem, it's only a few bucks and it's pry due for a change anyways.

TheDave
02-03-2009, 03:25 PM
http://pimpedfiction.files.wordpress.com/2007/05/condom.jpg

Sounds like it is too late for that...

At this point i recommend 12 cc's of penicillin.

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 04:44 PM
Sounds like it is too late for that...

At this point i recommend 12 cc's of penicillin.

I'm on my way to the Juarez pharmacy as we speak! :thumbsup:

Spider
02-03-2009, 04:47 PM
1 st problem it is a Dodge ............
What to do about it .........
trade it off get a ford , marry a super model and live happily ever after

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 04:52 PM
1 st problem it is a Dodge ............
What to do about it .........
trade it off get a ford , marry a super model and live happily ever after

Sounds like good advice. Now if I could only get my wife to share the bed with a super model! :wiggle:

crazyhorse
02-03-2009, 04:52 PM
Good post. You're almost certainly better with this stuff than I am, but one thing I know is that I've never seen someone with a blown headgasket that wasn't experiencing some kind of other problem to hint at the head gasket. Of course this is from dealing with Mustangs, maybe the Dodges are different.

Maybe it's possible he let water get into the oil when he changed the pump? An oil change might be in order to see if that was the cause.

I'd definetly change the PCV valve. Even if it's not the problem, it's only a few bucks and it's pry due for a change anyways.

Personal experience:

I had a Ford Windstar. It had a pinhole sized leak in the head gasket. So small that when it was warm it didn't leak. It only leaked when the engine cooled to a certain temp. When it did leak it shot a direct stream of coolant right onto the end of the spark plug. So when I would start the engine it would misfire on that plug for a few revolutions until it was dry and then run fine.

Because it was on start up when the engine was cold (when an engine usually runs a little rough in old cars) I couldn't find why it was throwing a code all the time. It ran great and had no coolant in the oil. That van ran fine for 2 years with that gasket leak with no other issues. All the while losing maybe a pint of coolant.

Do I think thats whats happening here? No. Just wanted to share one of my headaches with you. I cant tell you all the stuff I tried to do to fix that code. It wasn't until the leak became big enough to cause other problems before I found it. So your points are very valid.

In the end the PCV system is designed to evacuate unburned fuel vapor from the engine crankcase back into the intake and burn it off. If there is so much moisture inside the engine that it causes "water in the oil", then you have a problem. The PCV is not designed to evacuate water. If there is so much water that you have sludge a PCV will not solve that problem. It is not designed to to act in that capacity. It's a valve desined to relieve crank pressure from the fuel vapor. It is then released into the intake for emmisions purposes.

The 3.9 5.2 and a 5.9 were 3 engines that I know of that had an intake gasket that either had a water channel that ended at the intake or passed through the intake. If it's one of those engines, then it is also possible that it's a lower intake gasket. I don't know much about chrysler so there may be other engines that are designed the same way. But those 3 also have a water channel to the intake.

If this has been a good vehicle and it cost 2000 to fix, it's probably worth it IMO. But do it all at once. Head gaskets, intake gaskets along with valve body gaskets. It's all stuff you're taking off anyway and it does have medium to high mileage.

If it's just the PCV then forget evertything I said.

Good luck.

Spider
02-03-2009, 04:53 PM
Sounds like good advice. Now if I could only get my wife to share the bed with a super model! :wiggle:

LOL ..wives are kinda funky about that part aint they

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 04:56 PM
Personal experience:

I had a Ford Windstar. It had a pinhole sized leak in the head gasket. So small that when it was warm it didn't leak. It only leaked when the engine cooled to a certain temp. When it did leak it shot a direct stream of coolant right onto the end of the spark plug. So when I would start the engine it would misfire on that plug for a few revolutions until it was dry and then run fine.

Because it was on start up when the engine was cold (when an engine usually runs a little rough in old cars) I couldn't find why it was throwing a code all the time. It ran great and had no coolant in the oil. That van ran fine for 2 years with that gasket leak with no other issues. All the while losing maybe a pint of coolant.

Do I think thats whats happening here? No. Just wanted to share one of my headaches with you. I cant tell you all the stuff I tried to do to fix that code. It wasn't until the leak became big enough to cause other problems before I found it. So your points are very valid.

In the end the PCV system is designed to evacuate unburned fuel vapor from the engine crankcase back into the intake and burn it off. If there is so much moisture inside the engine that it causes "water in the oil", then you have a problem. The PCV is not designed to evacuate water. If there is so much water that you have sludge a PCV will not solve that problem. It is not designed to to act in that capacity. It's a valve desined to relieve crank pressure from the fuel vapor. The fact it is then released into the intake is for emmisions purposes.

The 3.9 5.2 and a 5.9 were 3 engines that I know of tat had an intake gasket that either had a water channel that nded at the intake or passed through the intake. If it's one of those engines, then it is also possible that it's a lower intake gasket. I don't know much about chrysler so there may be other engines that are designed the same way. But those 3 also have a water channel to the intake.

If this has been a good vehicle and it cost 2000 to fix, it's probably worth it IMO. But do it all at once. Head gaskets, intake gaskets along with valve body gaskets. It's all stuff you're taking off anyway and it does have medium to high mileage.

If it's just the PCV then forget evertything I said.

Good luck.

Thanks crazy. The more I think about it, the more I think I'll just do some shopping around and hope it holds up until I find a suitable replacement. Thanks for the input all. :thumbsup:

crazyhorse
02-03-2009, 05:49 PM
Thanks crazy. The more I think about it, the more I think I'll just do some shopping around and hope it holds up until I find a suitable replacement. Thanks for the input all. :thumbsup:

If you plan on driving it at all, I would do no less than put an oil change on it and monitor it close. If there is sludge in the pan you are not getting adequate lubrication. You wont make it far that way.

You're welcome.

Quoydogs
02-03-2009, 06:14 PM
If you plan on driving it at all, I would do no less than put an oil change on it and monitor it close. If there is sludge in the pan you are not getting adequate lubrication. You wont make it far that way.

You're welcome.

Did I miss something? He said there was sludge on his dip stick. Thats is pretty normal. If there is water in his oil that would be different but he said he changed it and it was clean.

DomCasual
02-03-2009, 06:25 PM
Sounds to me like a fetzer valve.

I'd spray it down with some 3-in-1 oil.

crazyhorse
02-03-2009, 06:28 PM
Did I miss something? He said there was sludge on his dip stick. Thats is pretty normal. If there is water in his oil that would be different but he said he changed it and it was clean.

Maybe I misread the post. I read it as, there was no sludge when he changed the pump. But now there is sludge in the oil.

If it has clean oil, then I have spoken out of turn. I definately didn't mean to alarm him. I may have misread it all. When I think of "sludge" on the dipstick, I'm thinking sludge in the oil.

dbfan4life
02-03-2009, 06:56 PM
Maybe I misread the post. I read it as, there was no sludge when he changed the pump. But now there is sludge in the oil.

If it has clean oil, then I have spoken out of turn. I definately didn't mean to alarm him. I may have misread it all. When I think of "sludge" on the dipstick, I'm thinking sludge in the oil.

There was sludge on the dipstick before the oil pump problem. I drained the oil and pulled the pan off and there was no sludge in the pan. That was about a month ago. Checked the oil this morning and the sludge was on the stick again, from top to bottom. Checked again this evening, it wasn't as bad but still there. Now, the PVC (or PCV) valve...is that the plastic elbow shaped piece the snugs into the valve cover? Because that piece was completely broken.

crazyhorse
02-03-2009, 08:00 PM
There was sludge on the dipstick before the oil pump problem. I drained the oil and pulled the pan off and there was no sludge in the pan. That was about a month ago. Checked the oil this morning and the sludge was on the stick again, from top to bottom. Checked again this evening, it wasn't as bad but still there. Now, the PVC (or PCV) valve...is that the plastic elbow shaped piece the snugs into the valve cover? Because that piece was completely broken.


Yes, the black thing is the PCV. If broken has no chance of working.

If the sludge is just on the stick it's probably no big deal. If it's in the oil, it is a big deal.

I'm sorry if I misread your post. Didn't mean to freak ya out. In my minds eye I was imagining you pulling the dipstick and seeing a sludge coming from your oil pan itself. Not an accumulation of moisture on the dipstick.