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View Full Version : NFLN is showing 1/2 hour SB highlights of each Superbowl...


Sassy
01-25-2009, 02:16 PM
...I'm assuming they'll be on again...I couldn't get on the Mane to post it! Ha!
I caught the end of SB 32 and all of SB 33....then I watched the fade get trounced by
the Bucs...who said their wasn't football today ;D
...and GREAT football at that!!! LOL!

PS...what were you doing 11 years ago TODAY!

Ninjatime
01-25-2009, 02:42 PM
Yeah I saw the buccs smash oakland too

clint7
01-25-2009, 02:43 PM
Yeah I saw the buccs smash oakland too

Yeah, I never get tired of watching that one. :)

Sassy
01-25-2009, 02:45 PM
SB32 and SB33 still bring tears to my eyes!

Miss I.
01-25-2009, 02:46 PM
...I'm assuming they'll be on again...I couldn't get on the Mane to post it! Ha!
I caught the end of SB 32 and all of SB 33....then I watched the fade get trounced by
the Bucs...who said their wasn't football today ;D
...and GREAT football at that!!! LOL!

PS...what were you doing 11 years ago TODAY!

Um I was working as part of a halftime show in San Diego trying to get drunk rich people to do the wave during the Superbowl halftime. Didn't work too well. Pamela Anderson just looked at me like I was an idiot, which I find kind of ironic coming from her.;)

Ninjatime
01-25-2009, 02:47 PM
Yeah, I never get tired of watching that one. :)

ARE YOU OUT OF YOUR MIND!

BIG BACKS, BIG BACKS, SMASH EM!

THEY'RE TRYING TO GRAB YOU 'CUZ THEY CANT RUN WITH YOU!

I love the Gruden Quotes rofl.

BABronco
01-25-2009, 02:48 PM
...I'm assuming they'll be on again...I couldn't get on the Mane to post it! Ha!
I caught the end of SB 32 and all of SB 33....then I watched the fade get trounced by
the Bucs...who said their wasn't football today ;D
...and GREAT football at that!!! LOL!

PS...what were you doing 11 years ago TODAY!

11 years ago I was living in Eau Claire, Wisconsin and was around 7 running up and down the street yelling with my sister after the game.

Sassy
01-25-2009, 02:48 PM
Um I was working as part of a halftime show in San Diego trying to get drunk rich people to do the wave during the Superbowl halftime. Didn't work too well. Pamela Anderson just looked at me like I was an idiot, which I find kind of ironic coming from her.;)

You were at SB32! We hate you! LOL! Great deal!

Miss I.
01-25-2009, 02:51 PM
You were at SB32! We hate you! LOL! Great deal!

I wouldn't envy me too much, the NFL treats it's "volunteers" like crap and worked us 3 16 hours days in a row, and one day may have been longer then that. And then after the halftime show they made us leave.

El Guapo
01-25-2009, 02:53 PM
SB32 and SB33 still bring tears to my eyes!

Same here. I watched it this afternoon and it was pure bliss... again. Unfortunately it has been over 10 years since. ugh.

Sassy
01-25-2009, 02:54 PM
I wouldn't envy me too much, the NFL treats it's "volunteers" like crap and worked us 3 16 hours days in a row, and one day may have been longer then that. And then after the halftime show they made us leave.

UGH! That sucks!

Sassy
01-25-2009, 02:57 PM
http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2008/0124/20080124__20080125_D01_SP25FBNBRONX~p1.JPG

Sassy
01-25-2009, 02:58 PM
After three failures in the Big One, Broncos QB John Elway celebrated a breakthrough win in Super Bowl XXXII. (Associated Press file photo )
Related
Jan 25:
Where are they now ... What they're sayingJan 24:
When Tyrone Braxton looks at the New York Giants, he sees another team from another time and another town. A team that, despite all the odds stacked against it, and despite all the playoff road trips seemingly headed nowhere, found a way to win a Super Bowl.

"We got that confidence going on the road, just like the Giants have right now," Braxton said. "All we heard was, 'How can they stop that potent Green Bay offense? How can they stop that big defensive line?' But we knew we were going to win. We could smell it. I hate to say it because it's a cliche, but it was destiny. We were destined to win that game."

And, though Terrell Davis got to see only bits and pieces of it, they did. Ten years ago today, the Broncos beat the Packers

in Super Bowl XXXII for their first championship. Then, just to show it was no accident, they won it again the next year.
But that was no match for Jan. 25, 1998, the day when all the sorrow drowned in laughter. That's when the quarterback who couldn't win the big one and the franchise not worthy of having a player elected to the Hall of Fame sent the pro football world spinning off its axis.

"When I look back, that was a special team," Broncos owner Pat Bowlen said. "There was a certain perseverance about that team. We won three games in a row on the road (in the playoffs). Not that Super Bowl XXXIII wasn't special, but we were expected to win in XXXIII. We weren't expected to win XXXII."

Said ESPN analyst Mark Schlereth, the '97 Broncos' starting left guard: "I remember how much freer and easier that Super Bowl seemed than any of the other ones I played in. We were seven-point favorites the next year. When that one was over, there was more a sense of relief. But when we won that first one, it was complete euphoria. It was the best feeling of my sports career."

There was a sense of apprehension, if not imminent doom, polluting the mile-high air in the days preceding the game. Understandably so. The Broncos had, after all, been blown out in three Super Bowls from 1986-89. And the Packers, coming off their victory over New England in Super Bowl XXXI, were 12-point favorites.

The Broncos had been underdogs almost a month earlier at Kansas City, but ground out a 14-10 victory that ended the Chiefs' season. And they were underdogs a week later in the AFC championship game at Pittsburgh.

Hey, stuff happens when you're desperately seeking redemption after the most embarrassing playoff loss in franchise history, the likes of which the Broncos experienced a year earlier against Jacksonville.

"It was absolutely devastating," former Broncos wide receiver Ed McCaffrey said. "One of my most vivid memories is the day after the game, when everyone

reported to the facility. Half the players on the team were lifting weights in the weight room. It was almost as if they didn't know what else to do. That's the kind of determination that team had. We didn't feel sorry for ourselves. We regrouped and got ready for the next season."
Said Braxton: "Everybody tells me, 'You'd have won three in a row if you hadn't lost to Jacksonville.' I tell them, 'Shoot, that's the reason we won two in a row, because we lost to Jacksonville.' After that game, we were determined not to let anything stop us."

The back-to-back playoff victories at Kansas City and Pittsburgh came in cities where the Broncos had lost a few weeks earlier. After winning those games, the prospect of facing the Packers and three-time MVP Brett Favre in San Diego was anything but daunting.

"It's exactly what the Giants are going through now," said Schlereth. "We had a certain toughness, a certain calloused feeling. We were battle-tested, man. After winning at Kansas City and Pittsburgh, we were like, 'Throw it at us, bring it on.' We weren't going to be intimidated by anyone."

Proving everybody wrong

Behind closed doors and during the Broncos' practices, a groundswell of confidence was growing by the minute a decade ago.

"We knew if we went out there and patted (the Packers) on the back, everybody would buy into it," said former Broncos fullback Howard Griffith. " 'The Packers are the greatest thing since sliced bread. They have an unbelievable defensive line. There's no way Tony Jones is going to be able to handle Reggie White.' That's what made it so sweet, when we proved everybody wrong."

Bowlen remembers going to practice early in the week at the San Diego Chargers' facility. He planned to mill around and shout out encouragement to his players, but left after a few minutes.

"The attitude of the players was unbelievable," Bowlen said. "There was such a camaraderie. I remember thinking, 'I don't need to be out here.' So I went inside and worked out."

Camaraderie. Perseverance. Attitude. The '97 Broncos were a special mix, an eclectic bunch of savvy veterans and wide-eyed kids who came together for a common cause. For one magical year, all the stars and all the all-stars were aligned in Denver.

Seems the only trait that team didn't have was ego. In the players' parking lot, there were considerably more Harleys and pickups than Mercedes. In the locker room, Davis, who overcame a migraine and blurred vision to win the Super Bowl MVP award, often could be spotted wearing frayed boxer shorts. Even John Elway, the consummate superstar, didn't wear his stature on his sleeve. If anything, he had been humbled, having felt the sting of all three Super Bowl blowouts.

Elway gains redemption

It was hardly a surprise that the most famous play from Super Bowl XXXII turned out to be Elway's "helicopter" run, in which he was hit high, low and all points in between by three Packers defenders, only to hold on to the ball for a key third-down conversion. A tough play by a tough guy playing for a tough team.

Afterward, after John Mobley had knocked down Favre's desperation pass to seal the 31-24 victory, Bowlen stood on sacred ground, the podium reserved for the winning team, and proclaimed, "This one's for John!"

Bowlen had fretted all week over what to say if, as he suspected, the Broncos would pull off the upset.

"You always prepare yourself," he said. "As the owner, what do you say? I thought to myself, You know what? This team is different. I don't have to say much. This one's for John! Four words. That's all."

Not that it was really for John. Not in the Broncos' locker room anyway. In there, the players won it for each other.

For Elway, who passed the torch to Davis during the season, saying, "It's Terrell's team now." For Gary Zimmerman, the gritty left tackle who came out of retirement in September and played through pain that often forced him into bed at 5 p.m. For coach Mike Shanahan, who pushed all the right buttons. For Alfred Williams, who played in the Super Bowl despite two torn triceps.

For all of them, and for all the others. From the Pro Bowlers to the special teamers. From A (Allen Aldridge) through Z (Zimmerman). That's who the '97 Broncos played for.

"There wasn't anybody in the locker room saying 'This one's for John,' " said Williams. "That was Mr. Bowlen. There was no 'Rah, rah, let's get this thing done for John.' John wouldn't have wanted it that way, either. We were happy to win for each other."

Jim Armstrong: 303-954-1269 or jmarmstrong@denverpost.com

Sassy
01-25-2009, 03:05 PM
Where are they now?
This was in the Denver Post a year ago ...

http://www.denverpost.com/ci_8070460

Sassy
01-25-2009, 03:07 PM
SAN DIEGO — They tore apart history and wrote their own. For the first time in 38 years, for the first time ever, the Denver Broncos are masters of the football universe.

World champions.

It has a ring to it.

In a Super Bowl XXXII classic, the Broncos played a classic game, mastering football, conquering the sport, humbling the defending world champions. The Broncos beat the odds and the Packers 31-24. They halted the AFC's ignominious 13-game Super-Bowl losing streak, became the second wild-card team ever to win the Super Bowl, notched the second biggest upset in Super Bowl history and, in the


And as Broncos owner Pat Bowlen stood on a postgame platform that made him feel a Mile High, accepting the Vince Lombardi Trophy from NFL commissioner Paul Tagliabue, he delivered a message loud enough for the 69,812 in San Diego's Qualcomm Stadium and everyone partying across Colorado to hear. "There's one thing I want to say here tonight, and it's only four words," Bowlen said. "This one's for John." Wonder boys come and go. But Elway remained. And endured.

And, in the end, triumphed.

"That," said a teary-eyed Elway, who just might have wrapped up his 15-year Hall-of-Fame career with the most memorable game of his career, "was the ultimate win."

Elway's numbers did not match up to MVP running back's Terrell Davis, he of the 157 yards and Super-Bowl record three touchdowns, including the 1-yard game-winner with 1:45 remaining. But winners don't count numbers.

Not until Broncos linebacker John Mobley swatted away a fourth-and-6 Packers pass from Brett Favre to tight end Mark Chmura with 28 seconds remaining could Denver celebrate. Mobley ran downfield, the Broncos' sideline spilled onto the field, and champagne flowed into the night.

"Who cut the cheese?" Broncos linebacker Keith Burns screamed. "WHO CUT THE CHEESE?"

The Broncos, 12-point underdogs, the second biggest underdogs in Super Bowl history to win, did. Now they are the NFL's big cheese. And the losers are a local story that only Green Bay cares about now.

The win was for Elway who had won support, admiration, games, hearts, everything but a Super Bowl. It was for the trumpeted Class of '83. It was for coach Mike Shanahan's three-year plan that built a champion from rubble. It was for Bowlen, who had compared the feeling of losing a Super Bowl to the feeling of losing his father. It was for papa Jack Elway, Denver's director of pro scouting. It was for a new stadium that now can be called the

John Elway hoists the Lombardi trophy after the 1998 Super Bowl victory. (The Denver Post | Karl Gehring)House The 1997 Broncos Built.
It was for the 53 Broncos, and the rest of the organization, who have been working for their shining moment since July and a whole lot longer. It was for all the Broncos past who wore predominantly orange uniforms but never a Super-Bowl ring. It was for the American Football Conference that no longer has to answer questions about its 13-year inferiority complex as if it were sitting in a psychologist's chair rather than a press conference.

And mostly this Super Bowl XXXII win that Denver will talk about from now until September, and beyond, was for a city whose heart has pumped orange all these years only to have felt it broken on four other super-miserable Sundays.

"Oh man," said Broncos defensive end Alfred Williams, who now has won a national championship with the University of Colorado and a world championship with Denver. "Our city must be going crazy. I was there when the Avalanche had their parade after they won the Stanley Cup. And all I can say is, I can't wait until we have our parade."

At the front of it should be Davis, the soldier who beat down the oncoming migraine Sunday night as well as a stout Packers defensive front. Davis is scheduled to be at Disneyland today, on the "Tonight Show with Jay Leno" tonight, and burned into the Packers' psyche and history for a long time.

After a first quarter in which he rushed nine times for 64 yards and a 1-yard touchdown run that gave Denver its first score of the game, tying the score at 7, Davis took a blow to the head from Packers safety Eugene Robinson and defensive tackle Santana Dotson. It triggered the symptoms of a migraine for Davis. He lost his vision. The Broncos lost their way.

With Davis out of the lineup, the Broncos had three second-quarter carries for zero rushing yards. Meanwhile the Packers strung together a half-ending 17-play, 95-yard long march, culminating when Chmura beat safety Tyrone Braxton - the same player beaten on Green Bay's first touchdown of the game, a 22-yard strike to wide receiver Antonio Freeman - to narrow Denver's lead to 17-14.

The only consolation for Denver? The Dihydroergotamine nasal spray that Broncos trainers treated Davis with halted his migraine. Davis was able to return for a second half in which he would run for 93 more yards and two more touchdowns. The only headaches going around were hitting the Packers' defense. Davis ran on a defense many said couldn't be run on.

"Like I told the students at Lincoln," Davis said of his San Diego high school where his jersey was retired last week. "Don't listen when someone tells you that you can't do it."

Davis did it. He was instrumental on Denver's two second-half touchdowns, scoring both of them on 1-yard runs, one giving Denver a 24-17 lead, the other their 31-24 lead. But then, fittingly, Elway also was instrumental. He engineered a 92-yard drive that featured maybe the highlight play of his career.

On a third and 6 from the Packers' 12, Elway scrambled, dived, collided with Packers Pro Bowl safety LeRoy Butler and wound up with 8 yards and a first down. Thirty-seven-year-old quarterbacks are not supposed to be duplicating the moves of the helicopters that flew over Broncos practices last week. But then, no other 37-year-old quarterback besides John Unitas had ever won the Super Bowl.

"You could just see it in his eyes how badly he wanted it," Broncos wide receiver Ed McCaffrey said.

The Broncos had a chance to ice the game and the champagne. On the ensuing kickoff after Davis' second touchdown run, Broncos safety Tony Veland hit return man Freeman and forced a fumble that cornerback Tim McKyer recovered on the Packers' 22. But on the ensuing play, Elway tied a Super Bowl record he did not want any part of.

Throwing to Smith, Elway instead threw an end-zone interception to safety Robinson. The Packers turned the interception into a tie game, when Freeman did a Yancey Thigpen on Broncos cornerback Darrien Gordon and beat him on three successive plays, the final one a 13-yard touchdown pass that tied the score at 24. But the Broncos had Davis. And they had a defense that forced Favre into two turnovers that led to 10 first-half points; a defense that stopped Green Bay on its final series the way it stopped Kansas City.

And then Elway had it. They all had it. Denver's first NFL championship.

A season that had great expectations and great expectorations ... ruptured biceps and torn triceps ... snowmobiles in Denver and helicopters in San Diego ... crushing road losses in Kansas City and Pittsburgh and even bigger road wins back in Kansas City and Pittsburgh on a Revenge Tour ... will be saluted through the winter and beyond.

"Nobody gave us a chance," said Broncos linebacker Bill Romanowski, the great "expectorator" who won his third Super Bowl. "But we knew in our hearts that we were the best team."

All season long, Shanahan had compared the Broncos' plight to that of a boxer's. Like a boxer, the Broncos had many rounds to fight before a decision could be rendered. But one was rendered Sunday night, unanimously, after Denver finished with a 16-4 record.

In the back of the Broncos' locker room hung a white banner with blue writing that read: "Round 20. Knock 'Em Out."

The Broncos obliged. They knocked out all the history and Packers that stood in their way.

Sassy
01-25-2009, 03:08 PM
http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2008/0124/20080124__Parade1998~p1.jpg

Kind of fun looking at the articles/pics again...

Sassy
01-25-2009, 03:15 PM
Paige: Titletown has a Mile High address
By Woody Paige
The Denver Post
Posted: 01/24/2008 10:56:19 PM MST
Updated: 01/25/2008 12:54:24 AM MST


Denver Broncos running back Terrell Davis holds the Lombardi trophy in the air after Denver beat the Green Bay Packers 31-24 in Super Bowl XXXII A moment to share with those you love Editor's note: This article was originally published in The Denver Post on January 26, 1998.

SAN DIEGO — Dreams do come true.

The dream of a lifetime is real, and the goal has been realized.

Suuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuuper

Broncooooooooooooooooooos!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

The Broncos, those dazzling dream weavers of destiny, finally are WORLD CHAMPIONS. Today Denver is the Mile-Highest City and the new Titletown.

And that's as good as it gets.

This is the 1. This 1's for Colorado; this 1's for the Rocky Mountains; this 1's for the Broncos, and, as owner Pat Bowlen said, "This 1's for John." John The Bronco is a winner.

In the greatest Super Bowl of them all, the Broncos beat the Green Bay Packers


"It's better than I ever dreamed it would be," said the old quarterback, John Elway, who had been on the losing side in three previous Super Bowls. But in No. XXXII and his 15th season and his inclining years, the Duke of Denver — and the sentimental favorite of a nation that had turned its eyes toward him — directed his 45th game-saving drive in the fourth quarter before everybody and God. Two hours after the game, Elway came back out. He always comes back. He came back on the field, and hundreds of lingering Broncos' loyalists yelled: "Elway Elway Elway." El-Way to go.

On the 20th anniversary of the Broncos' first Super Bowl defeat, they removed the burden of King Kong from their backs, in the manner of the last utterance of the movie: "It was beauty killed the beast."

The beauty of the Broncos killed the beast of all those years of Denver being deemed a loser in the AFL and the NFL and a failure in the Super Bowl, and it was a beautiful Broncos' performance that killed the beast from Green Bay.

Whew, what a game! The two best teams in football, the defending champs and the team that dreamed, played down to the very end in San Diego.

Terrell Davis, the Most Valuable Man in America, scored his third touchdown with 1:45 remaining to give the Broncos the lead for good and forever. Then the Broncos, as they had in Kansas City and in Pittsburgh as overlooked and underdog wild cards, held off the last drive by the Packers. On fourth down, Brett Favre's pass from the Broncos' 31 was not complete, but the Broncos were complete, at last.

Every Broncos' fan from the striped stocks start to the new uniforms beginning sighed, then celebrated.

The victory was the second-biggest upset ever in the Super Bowl and ended 37 years of frustration for the Broncos and 13 years of failure by the American Conference. Ding dong, the witch is dead. (And I was wrong again. I picked Denver 31-27.)

In the end zone, a fan in orange, who would have crawled from Colorado on hot asphalt covered with broken glass to see the Broncos win, said: "I've been dreaming about the Broncos being world champions since I was born" 32 years ago.

Davis, born and well-bred in San Diego, ran dearly in his home town, but, more importantly, ran over, through and around the Packers for 157 yards and became the most proficient running back in one season in the NFL. Yet, his head was burning, and his body was slumping on the bench in the second quarter. He had been forced to the sideline and initially was diagnosed with a concussion. Actually, Davis was feeling the onset of a migraine headache, the demon condition that has cursed him since childhood and often made him consider suicide.

"We didn't think he would be out there in the second half," linebacker Bill Romanowski said. The Packers were hoping he wouldn't return. But Davis knew he would run again. And he did, wearing down, then out, the Green Bay Packers, the most storied name in football.

"I'm numb right now," Davis said. "But I planned it like that. Since I was a kid, I dreamed of winning the Super Bowl. And before the season, I was still dreaming we would win the Super Bowl."

The Broncos fell behind 7-0, but replied on their first possession with a touchdown. They went ahead 17-7 in the second quarter, but the Packers scored just before halftime to creep to within three. The Broncos led 24-17 after three quarters — and — surprise, surprise — were still in the Super Bowl for the first time in four — but then it was 24-24.

Not again? Not again!

The Broncos got the ball at midfield with 3:27 left.

Elway threw to the other, unknown, blocking back, Howard Griffith, for 23 yards to the Green Bay 8 yard line at the two-minute warning. Davis picked up 7, but the Broncos were penalized for holding. No matter. Davis knifed and twisted for 17 yards on the next play and put the Broncos at the 1 yard line. It was only fitting that he walked into the end zone from there.

Hallelujah! The flight of fantasy is over.

Wake up the world. The Broncos are not dreaming. They won.

Super.

Sassy
01-25-2009, 03:16 PM
http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2008/0124/20080124__Davis1998~p1_200.jpg

orinjkrush
01-25-2009, 04:51 PM
it really was the best of times....

but, I heard the North beat the South in the War between the States too.

Old history.

broncosteven
01-25-2009, 08:23 PM
it really was the best of times....

but, I heard the North beat the South in the War between the States too.

Old history.

People take everything for granted.

History should be celebrated, not taken for granted.

La Caspa Del Diablo
01-25-2009, 08:27 PM
What's scary I just noticed today's date was January 25 and quickly remembered what happened 11 years ago. It seems like it was only yesterday.

broncosteven
01-25-2009, 08:27 PM
What's scary I just noticed today's date was January 25 and quickly remembered what happened 11 years ago. It seems like it was only yesterday.

For those of us over 16 here it was.

La Caspa Del Diablo
01-25-2009, 08:32 PM
For those of us over 16 here it was.

It's amazing there's now a segment of Broncos fans that view Elway/TD era as the old days.

As for me and some of the older folk here, I am still shocked the Broncos won a Super Bowl. It still seems surreal.

Sassy
01-25-2009, 08:41 PM
What's scary I just noticed today's date was January 25 and quickly remembered what happened 11 years ago. It seems like it was only yesterday.

That was my point of the SB articles/pics :yayaya: LOL

Miss I.
01-25-2009, 08:49 PM
That was my point of the SB articles/pics :yayaya: LOL

Hey Sassy, if we ever do meet you can have my SB Volunteer Sweatshirt (probably made in Taiwaan). It's super sexy. :wave: