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Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 04:21 PM
If you people are interested in learning another language, the commercials are not an exaggeration for the Rosetta Stone.

I got version 1and it was good, I just got version 3 and I gotta tell you, I cant think of a better way to learn a language than this. My 7 year old already speaks some of the basic Japanese, and can recognize some of the basic kana and even a few of the Kanji. Where she is at in 2 nights took me about 2 months in college to get to.

Its kind of pricey, and by kind of I mean its ****ing expensive. 600 bucks! But if you are of the nefarious sort, you can get it on torrents. However, for 600 bucks its a good investment because there is no doubt in my mind that within 6 months you could be proficient in the language of your choice and within a year be extremely fluent in reading and speaking.

I speak Japanese, but got this because I have grown rather rusty over the last few years not having the chance to speak it often, so I got this in the hopes of brushing up and Ive actually learned a few things (granted, I started on disk 3 which is about 9 months into the course I guess). My wife even tried it for about an hour last night (just to toy around with it) and she said she learned enough to continue with it since it was engaging, interesting and it worked. She remembered everything she was taught (even today) from her hour session last night.

I highly recommend you getting this is you are interested in learning another language. There is not a better way to learn (unless you are watching Sesame Street in another language 24/7, but even still, this is probably just as good).

Dedhed
01-15-2009, 04:29 PM
I've looked into it over the years, but never had any 1st hand feedback. Sounds like it's for real.

Br0nc0Buster
01-15-2009, 04:30 PM
Interesting, I have been considering looking into Spanish again.
I took 2 years of it in highschool but dont remember sh**

Although I hear it is easier for kids to learn new languages

broncosteven
01-15-2009, 04:42 PM
If you people are interested in learning another language, the commercials are not an exaggeration for the Rosetta Stone.

I got version 1and it was good, I just got version 3 and I gotta tell you, I cant think of a better way to learn a language than this. My 7 year old already speaks some of the basic Japanese, and can recognize some of the basic kana and even a few of the Kanji. Where she is at in 2 nights took me about 2 months in college to get to.

Its kind of pricey, and by kind of I mean its ****ing expensive. 600 bucks! But if you are of the nefarious sort, you can get it on torrents. However, for 600 bucks its a good investment because there is no doubt in my mind that within 6 months you could be proficient in the language of your choice and within a year be extremely fluent in reading and speaking.

I speak Japanese, but got this because I have grown rather rusty over the last few years not having the chance to speak it often, so I got this in the hopes of brushing up and Ive actually learned a few things (granted, I started on disk 3 which is about 9 months into the course I guess). My wife even tried it for about an hour last night (just to toy around with it) and she said she learned enough to continue with it since it was engaging, interesting and it worked. She remembered everything she was taught (even today) from her hour session last night.

I highly recommend you getting this is you are interested in learning another language. There is not a better way to learn (unless you are watching Sesame Street in another language 24/7, but even still, this is probably just as good).


How does one say ****ing Gay in Japaniseee?

Chris
01-15-2009, 04:44 PM
baka chibi

i speak mandarin chinese... but i learnt it growing up in a chinese place ;)

Rosetta Stone has helped many peopel I know. Pimsleur is also recommended.

Dedhed
01-15-2009, 04:46 PM
Interesting, I have been considering looking into Spanish again.
I took 2 years of it in highschool but dont remember sh**

Although I hear it is easier for kids to learn new languages
I took 3 years in HS and 1 in college, and thought I was fluent. Then I went to Tijuana.

Borks147
01-15-2009, 04:52 PM
downloading the torrent is a ratio killer. oh well.

Pimsleur is another good option, but it is much more conversational (ie you'll be illiterate)

Dedhed
01-15-2009, 04:53 PM
How does one say ****ing Gay in Japaniseee?
"abroncoastevena"

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 05:38 PM
How does one say ****ing Gay in Japaniseee?

faakingu gee

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 05:41 PM
Version 1 was good but this one is so much better. The speech recognition is insanely good AND you can set the difficulty of the pronunciation so where you have to either say it perfectly to get it right or you get it wrong. There are different levels of that difficulty you can set.

It also teaches you reading and has combination drills for reading and listening, writing and listening, pronunciation, listening and proncunciation. Version 3 is just an excellent advancement from version 1 (I never got 2) and by the time you are done with the first part of any language a light will have gone off in your head and the basics you have learned you will not only know but UNDERSTAND which of course, is the hardest part.

Jens1893
01-15-2009, 05:53 PM
Version 1 was good but this one is so much better. The speech recognition is insanely good AND you can set the difficulty of the pronunciation so where you have to either say it perfectly to get it right or you get it wrong. There are different levels of that difficulty you can set.

It also teaches you reading and has combination drills for reading and listening, writing and listening, pronunciation, listening and proncunciation. Version 3 is just an excellent advancement from version 1 (I never got 2) and by the time you are done with the first part of any language a light will have gone off in your head and the basics you have learned you will not only know but UNDERSTAND which of course, is the hardest part.

Actually speaking it is the hardest part IMO.

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 06:02 PM
Actually speaking it is the hardest part IMO.

Depends on the language. Japanese has three sounds in the entire language that are difficult for ENglish speakers to say but only takes a bit of practice. Conversely, Vietnamese is full of wierd ass sounds English speakers have difficulty saying. The ng sound in Vietnamese is frickin impossible unless preceeded by an "i" (i.e. "ing" as in ****ing, ****ting) but the Vietnamese use it in the BEGINNING of words.

The Japanese have great difficulty with English "l"'s and "r"'s, Their "r" sound is more like a short rolled Spanish "r" and really sounds like a "d". My friend Yui has been speaking English for nearly ten years and still refuses to say the word "world". Says its "muri" (impossible). And railroad is out of the question for him, he just says place where train goes. Hahaha, that cracks me up. For me, the hardest part about languages are the particles (i.e. "the"). How the **** do you explain what "the" means to someone who speaks a language that has no equivalent? Most European languages use the particle the (spanish has like thirty versions of it) but Japanese does not. However, Japanese have the partcle "wa" that is proceeding the noun in most sentences but has no real direct correlation to English. THAT, for me is the hardest part.

Also, no plural's in Japanese at all. Thats just ****ing wierd.

cabronco
01-15-2009, 06:11 PM
I just got a laptop loaded with learning tutorials for vocational rehab. I saw this program, Rosetta stone on the desktop , but havent checked it out yet til now. I have the same version 3. Looks pretty cool ! Alot of stuff they loaded on here for me and can work at my own pace. This works out much better than a classroom for me...too cool.

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 06:16 PM
i'm sorry, BroncoSteven, but just what is your issue?

Are you opposed to learning other languages?
Are you opposed to this particular software?

I don't want to jump to conclusions, but you come off as pretty ****ing gay yourself.

Haha. Let me explain.

I used to say "That's ****ing gay" a lot around here, particularly when referring to one of Taco's opinions on [insert subject]. Broncosteven loved it (in fact I got a rep every time I said it back when rep actually meant something). Now, he tends to say that in a lot of the posts and threads I make. Its not a problem with me or the content of the post, its more of an inside thing between me and him.

Personally, I think its ****ing gay. But he likes it so I roll with it.

Ninjatime
01-15-2009, 06:18 PM
I don't learn new languages, I'm an ethnocentristic **** and think everyone should learn the superior language.

Malcontent
01-15-2009, 06:19 PM
Thanks Al! I was pondering this for a while now, and your input will push it over the edge..I live in AZ, so guess what language I need to learn? Job seekers are finding that fluency in Spanish can get you that job over even more qualified applicants! I wonder if in some way it can be a tax writeoff?

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 06:19 PM
I don't learn new languages, I'm an ethnocentristic **** and think everyone should learn the superior language.

I used to think that way until I noticed that people that speak more than one language make more money.

For me, its about the money.

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 06:20 PM
Thanks Al! I was pondering this for a while now, and your input will push it over the edge..I live in AZ, so guess what language I need to learn? Job seekers are finding that fluency in Spanish can get you that job over even more qualified applicants! I wonder if in some way it can be a tax writeoff?

It can if you learned it specifically for work (and in most cases you can use that as an excuse).

I bought three computers this year for my family and since I work at home all are getting written off as work expenses.

SouthStndJunkie
01-15-2009, 06:22 PM
I know you can get the Rosetta Stone software at many of the public libraries here in NW Ohio.

houghtam
01-15-2009, 06:40 PM
Programs like Rosetta Stone are good if you're looking to be able to "stay afloat", so to speak. But as someone with a degree in German and a background in linguistics, nothing can replace classroom learning. Not because it's in a classroom, but because you're getting repetitive experience and get a chance (in well-taught classrooms, anyhow) to actually use the language in real-life situations with other people.

One other program I would suggest anyone seriously looking into learning a second language should look into is the Berlitz online language course. I used to teach for them online, and it's basically a joint-feed MSPaint program where the teacher can upload images and webpages real-time all while communicating via voice chat with the student.

broncosteven
01-15-2009, 07:02 PM
i'm sorry, BroncoSteven, but just what is your issue?

Are you opposed to learning other languages?
Are you opposed to this particular software?

I don't want to jump to conclusions, but you come off as pretty ****ing gay yourself.

Mein Freunde,

Ich Habst zwei jahre Deuche in eine gymnasyum.

Heren Alec ist sauteuer lustig!

Danke Bitte

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 08:48 PM
Programs like Rosetta Stone are good if you're looking to be able to "stay afloat", so to speak. But as someone with a degree in German and a background in linguistics, nothing can replace classroom learning. Not because it's in a classroom, but because you're getting repetitive experience and get a chance (in well-taught classrooms, anyhow) to actually use the language in real-life situations with other people.

One other program I would suggest anyone seriously looking into learning a second language should look into is the Berlitz online language course. I used to teach for them online, and it's basically a joint-feed MSPaint program where the teacher can upload images and webpages real-time all while communicating via voice chat with the student.

I took Japanese in college for 2 years, (4 semesters of it) and I learned more listening to Japanese radio online and watching anime than I did in the classroom. The language taught in the classroom is hardly conversational language. They focus too much on common phrases and not enough on actual dialog.

Its not the what you learn that makes Rosetta Stone so awesome IMO, its HOW you learn. No translations, just figure it out through a kind of immersion and NOTHING beats immersive learning. Not a classroom, not any program on Earth. You learn fastest when no one around you speaks your language and you have no choice but to learn or not communicate.

SportinOne
01-15-2009, 08:56 PM
Mein Freunde,

Ich Habst zwei jahre Deuche in eine gymnasyum.

Heren Alec ist sauteuer lustig!

Danke Bitte

Well now. Don't i look foolish.

broncosteven
01-15-2009, 08:56 PM
I took Japanese in college for 2 years, (4 semesters of it) and I learned more listening to Japanese radio online and watching anime than I did in the classroom. The language taught in the classroom is hardly conversational language. They focus too much on common phrases and not enough on actual dialog.

Its not the what you learn that makes Rosetta Stone so awesome IMO, its HOW you learn. No translations, just figure it out through a kind of immersion and NOTHING beats immersive learning. Not a classroom, not any program on Earth. You learn fastest when no one around you speaks your language and you have no choice but to learn or not communicate.

I agree with immersion.

I have been out of commision for months due to neck surgery, I have been checking out foreign films from the library. After a couple hours of German it kinda comes back and I don't need the subtitles or sometimes I can tell if they get lazy with the subtitles.

Atlas
01-15-2009, 09:16 PM
If you people are interested in learning another language, the commercials are not an exaggeration for the Rosetta Stone.

I got version 1and it was good, I just got version 3 and I gotta tell you, I cant think of a better way to learn a language than this. My 7 year old already speaks some of the basic Japanese, and can recognize some of the basic kana and even a few of the Kanji. Where she is at in 2 nights took me about 2 months in college to get to.

Its kind of pricey, and by kind of I mean its ****ing expensive. 600 bucks! But if you are of the nefarious sort, you can get it on torrents. However, for 600 bucks its a good investment because there is no doubt in my mind that within 6 months you could be proficient in the language of your choice and within a year be extremely fluent in reading and speaking.

I speak Japanese, but got this because I have grown rather rusty over the last few years not having the chance to speak it often, so I got this in the hopes of brushing up and Ive actually learned a few things (granted, I started on disk 3 which is about 9 months into the course I guess). My wife even tried it for about an hour last night (just to toy around with it) and she said she learned enough to continue with it since it was engaging, interesting and it worked. She remembered everything she was taught (even today) from her hour session last night.

I highly recommend you getting this is you are interested in learning another language. There is not a better way to learn (unless you are watching Sesame Street in another language 24/7, but even still, this is probably just as good).

Copy them and sell them cheaper. Get some of that money back.

Rock Chalk
01-15-2009, 09:23 PM
Copy them and sell them cheaper. Get some of that money back.

You are assuming of course that Im not the nefarious type?

houghtam
01-15-2009, 11:40 PM
Well of course immersion is the best form of learning, but I didn't bother mentioning that, simply because most people don't have the resources or money to allow for it.

Middlebury College in Vermont offers a very good program where you sign a contract saying you'll only speak the language you're there to learn for the entire summer or you get kicked out and no refund. I was fortunate enough to have my German department pay for it, but the $7,000 price tag is steep for almost anyone.

A lot of it depends on the classroom, too. There is a huge rift (and probably always will be) in the linguistics community on language acquisition...and for that reason there are still too many classrooms devoted to rote memorization of vocabulary, as opposed to learning how to actually speak in any given situation. That said, studies have also shown that those who focus on learning a language by hearing and speaking often suffer greatly when it comes to reading and writing, and vice versa. Obviously the answer isn't just one or just the other.

Jens1893
01-16-2009, 12:05 AM
Depends on the language. Japanese has three sounds in the entire language that are difficult for ENglish speakers to say but only takes a bit of practice. Conversely, Vietnamese is full of wierd ass sounds English speakers have difficulty saying. The ng sound in Vietnamese is frickin impossible unless preceeded by an "i" (i.e. "ing" as in ****ing, ****ting) but the Vietnamese use it in the BEGINNING of words.

The Japanese have great difficulty with English "l"'s and "r"'s, Their "r" sound is more like a short rolled Spanish "r" and really sounds like a "d". My friend Yui has been speaking English for nearly ten years and still refuses to say the word "world". Says its "muri" (impossible). And railroad is out of the question for him, he just says place where train goes. Hahaha, that cracks me up. For me, the hardest part about languages are the particles (i.e. "the"). How the **** do you explain what "the" means to someone who speaks a language that has no equivalent? Most European languages use the particle the (spanish has like thirty versions of it) but Japanese does not. However, Japanese have the partcle "wa" that is proceeding the noun in most sentences but has no real direct correlation to English. THAT, for me is the hardest part.

Also, no plural's in Japanese at all. Thats just ****ing wierd.

Hell, I dunno but then my knowledge of Japanese or Vietnamese is non existent, was rather talking about me and English and as itīs not my first language. I have absolutely no problem understanding the language and I frequently read English books and watch movies in English, but I am uncomfortable actually speaking it sometimes, especially on the phone, although Iīd say itīs good enough for me have a conversation in that language.

Play2win
01-16-2009, 12:59 AM
Copy them and sell them cheaper. Get some of that money back.

Yeah, good luck doing that with Rosetta Stone... LOL

(Atleast off the DVD)

ZONA
01-16-2009, 01:25 AM
Lets face it, English is the most desired language to learn worldwide. It's one of the most difficult to learn because of all the different meanings the same words have and with the sheer volume of words in the dictionary, that's alot to learn. Then you have the slang on top of all that.


I mean, just take the word good. In English, there has to be so many other words but really mean the same damn thing.

excellent, exceptional, favorable, great, marvelous, splendid, stupendous, super, superb, superior, wonderful

I mean, how many damn words do you need that mean the same frickin thing?

and then you have words like wind. Is that "to wind a clock" or "the wind is strong today". Must be as confusing as hell to people trying to learn English.

Jens1893
01-16-2009, 02:09 AM
Lets face it, English is the most desired language to learn worldwide. It's one of the most difficult to learn because of all the different meanings the same words have and with the sheer volume of words in the dictionary, that's alot to learn. Then you have the slang on top of all that.


I mean, just take the word good. In English, there has to be so many other words but really mean the same damn thing.

excellent, exceptional, favorable, great, marvelous, splendid, stupendous, super, superb, superior, wonderful

I mean, how many damn words do you need that mean the same frickin thing?

and then you have words like wind. Is that "to wind a clock" or "the wind is strong today". Must be as confusing as hell to people trying to learn English.

i see your point about the vocabulary although i never really had that much of a problem with it myself and the thousand ways to describe the same damn thing and to express yourself actually might be one of the reasons why i like the english language, but what sets english apart and makes it somewhat easier to learn than other languages is that the grammar is pretty straight forward ... at least in my opinion.

german is my native language and i neither think its nice nor do i think its easy to learn, in fact, i think itīs an utter bitch of a language.

Popps
01-16-2009, 02:25 AM
baka chibi

i speak mandarin chinese... but i learnt it growing up in a chinese place ;)

Rosetta Stone has helped many peopel I know. Pimsleur is also recommended.

I though chibi meant small. My wife is half Japanese and our baby's hamster is named Chibi. Maybe she named it fag! LOL

24champ
01-16-2009, 02:46 AM
I don't know about you guys, but every time I see that Rosetta Stone Commercial...I want to speak the "international language" with that chick in the pink blouse...


<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/k2Vx9Tz6AA0&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/k2Vx9Tz6AA0&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowscriptaccess="always" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Dark Helmet
01-16-2009, 05:02 AM
I just spoke to one of our University of Phoenix military spouses in Germany. She said she knows several people there that have used Rosetta Stone as it's free for soldiers and spouses. Apparently it works very well and most who have used it speak fluent German.

Mediator12
01-16-2009, 06:56 AM
Nihongo desu ka, adam?

Good for you. I lost most of mine after college, but still can read hiragana and katakana. Kanji, well no.

I was considering rosetta stone again for this and I thank you for the endorsement.

Pick Six
01-16-2009, 07:03 AM
This is America, so I need to learn Spanish. I might look into it...

baja
01-16-2009, 07:30 AM
I took Japanese in college for 2 years, (4 semesters of it) and I learned more listening to Japanese radio online and watching anime than I did in the classroom. The language taught in the classroom is hardly conversational language. They focus too much on common phrases and not enough on actual dialog.

Its not the what you learn that makes Rosetta Stone so awesome IMO, its HOW you learn. No translations, just figure it out through a kind of immersion and NOTHING beats immersive learning. Not a classroom, not any program on Earth. You learn fastest when no one around you speaks your language and you have no choice but to learn or not communicate.

I am immersed.

houghtam
01-16-2009, 08:42 PM
Lets face it, English is the most desired language to learn worldwide. It's one of the most difficult to learn because of all the different meanings the same words have and with the sheer volume of words in the dictionary, that's alot to learn. Then you have the slang on top of all that.


I mean, just take the word good. In English, there has to be so many other words but really mean the same damn thing.

excellent, exceptional, favorable, great, marvelous, splendid, stupendous, super, superb, superior, wonderful

I mean, how many damn words do you need that mean the same frickin thing?

and then you have words like wind. Is that "to wind a clock" or "the wind is strong today". Must be as confusing as hell to people trying to learn English.

Statistically speaking, Chinese is every bit as popular as English, and though I have no experience with Eastern language, they're every bit as difficult to learn as English is...from the perspective of someone coming from Western languages.

And that is where I think you're a little off base in saying English is the most difficult language to learn...I really don't think one language is much easier than another in and of itself. It all depends on where you're coming from. Native speakers in the United States certainly don't learn English any later in life than native speakers of German learn to speak German.

Each language that I've had experience with (I have extensive experience with German, French, Spanish, Greek, and Latin) has their own idiosyncrasies, idioms, and slang. Most Western languages have multiple meanings for many words. While your example for "wind" is spot on in English, the word "wenn" in German can mean "if" as well as "whenever". To someone coming from an English background, that often produces a "WTF were those Germans thinking" moment. :D