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View Full Version : Plane crashes into the Hudson River


Rocky Mountain Stampede
01-15-2009, 01:58 PM
Airing on all the news networks right now. Amazingly, the plane is still in one piece!

OBF1
01-15-2009, 02:06 PM
okay?

B-Love
01-15-2009, 02:07 PM
Not far from where I live.

Looks like everyone MAY be OK. Passenger interviews are early but some think everyone is OK.

Great news.

Hotrod
01-15-2009, 02:09 PM
So since everyone walked away the thread title is alittle misleading. Should it not be "crash lands" :)

missingnumber7
01-15-2009, 02:10 PM
This thread is pointless without pictures.

B-Love
01-15-2009, 02:12 PM
Looks like a bird to the engine may have brought it down.

Unreal if a little bird could bring down an Airbus.

Houshyamama
01-15-2009, 02:12 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/22887506#22887506

DomCasual
01-15-2009, 02:13 PM
In case of a water landing, your seats can be used as flotation devices.

DomCasual
01-15-2009, 02:18 PM
I have a joke for you.

What's the last thing to go through a bird's mind before it hits the engine of an Airbus A320?

(Nobody died, or I wouldn't go there.)

DomCasual
01-15-2009, 02:24 PM
Okay, not to monopolize this thread, but...

watching this on CNN, it is crazy that they were able to land it without anyone dying. That pilot either got really lucky, or he has some mad skills.

Hotrod
01-15-2009, 02:26 PM
Okay, not to monopolize this thread, but...

watching this on CNN, it is crazy that they were able to land it without anyone dying. That pilot either got really lucky, or he has some mad skills.

Blah blah blah thats all great but what is the answer to the joke? his ass???

bronco militia
01-15-2009, 02:27 PM
Blah blah blah thats all great but what is the answer to the joke? his ass???

LOL...that what I was wondering

what a dick!

frerottenextelway
01-15-2009, 02:31 PM
Reports are that it was a flock of Canadian Geese that brought it down. Wonder when we will invade .....

BroncoBuff
01-15-2009, 02:35 PM
What's the last thing to go through a bird's mind before it hits the engine of an Airbus A320?A General Electric-brand fanjet turbine blade?

DomCasual
01-15-2009, 02:35 PM
Blah blah blah thats all great but what is the answer to the joke? his ass???

:) Yep.

If it turns out that anyone, God forbid, has died or is seriously injured, I'm deleting my posts in this thread (although now you quoted me, you bastard, so my insensitivity is locked).

But, the answer to the joke is "his ass." :)

Rohirrim
01-15-2009, 02:38 PM
Reports are that it was a flock of Canadian Geese that brought it down. Wonder when we will invade .....

Does this qualify as an act of Canadian terrorism?

Kaylore
01-15-2009, 02:45 PM
What a feel good story. I bet that pilot picked on Rambo as a child.

bombay
01-15-2009, 02:50 PM
I have a couple of good friends who are US Airways flight attendants, based in Charlotte where the flight was going. It's really great to hear everyone apparently survived.

DomCasual
01-15-2009, 02:50 PM
What a feel good story. I bet that pilot picked on Rambo as a child.

I bet the pilot could break off 2K in our system.

Spider
01-15-2009, 03:03 PM
New yorkers kick ass in times like these

MechanicalBull
01-15-2009, 03:07 PM
The flight was actually heading back towards LaGuardia due to the birds/geese.

I am actually heading down to Charlotte the first week in Feb but taking Jetblue out of JFK not LaGuardia.

BigPlayShay
01-15-2009, 03:44 PM
The new face of terrorism:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3241/2612535949_47c94fc7fc.jpg

B-Love
01-15-2009, 03:46 PM
The new face of terrorism:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3241/2612535949_47c94fc7fc.jpg

Canada's revenge terrorist plot for LA stealing Gretzky back in '88.

socalorado
01-15-2009, 03:46 PM
What a feel good story. I bet that pilot picked on Rambo as a child.

Turns out Chuck Norris was on board and took over the controls when he spotted the suicide geese out the window.
He landed the plane purposely in the Geese' natural habitat killing the geese offspring/terrorists and nesting area/hideout in one fell swoop.

PRBronco
01-15-2009, 03:47 PM
Does this qualify as an act of Canadian terrorism?

We call it "Phase 1" ;)

Please note I wouldn't make that joke if anyone was hurt.

Alkazar
01-15-2009, 03:53 PM
Does this qualify as an act of Canadian terrorism?

Nah, they were actually Liberian Geese......

BigPlayShay
01-15-2009, 03:53 PM
Considering everyone is ok, I kinda wish this bird was the one that was no longer terrorizing the world:

http://www.taisha.org/test/jryd/photo/2008F04F25810802311.jpg

crawdad
01-15-2009, 03:56 PM
Rep for that. Those commercials are so irritating

missingnumber7
01-16-2009, 10:42 AM
That ranks third among annoying commercials...
1. So easy a Caveman can do it.
2. Stupid lizzard
3. Duck

Quoydogs
01-16-2009, 11:47 AM
The new face of terrorism:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3241/2612535949_47c94fc7fc.jpg

So now that we know that a Canadian goose was a act of terrorism, does this mean we are going to invade France?

cutthemdown
01-16-2009, 12:13 PM
This just in.......

PETA announced today that all air travel should be banned unless bird safety issues can be sorted out.

theAPAOps5
01-16-2009, 12:28 PM
Do you know that is the first ever successful ditching of an aircraft with zero fatalities. I mean purposeful ditching not like what happened in DC where that plane slid into the Potomac. But to land and airplane on water and keep it in tact and survive is a masterful job by that pilot.

theAPAOps5
01-16-2009, 12:30 PM
On the local news here in Denver they asked Denver International Airports wildlife program for a piece on this wreck. DIA officially stated that they will not disclose their program. Its because we have a certififed Wildlife biologist who drives around with a riffle and can pick off a coyote on a dead run from an ungodly distance. And she is drop dead gorgeous. But yeah DIA's plan is to kill the little ****ers!

Majik
01-16-2009, 01:20 PM
Miracle, I can't imagine what it must have been like to hear the Pilot say "prepare for impact".

One flight i've been on was hit by lightening, a loud pop transpired followed by the interior lights of the plane going out (for what seemed like an eternity but was only for 30 some seconds). Everyone and everything was completely silent for the next few minutes (again seemed more like 10 minutes) then the pilot finally came on and told us what happened and that everything was ok and we were still on schedule to Chicago.

Now that was an intense experience, but still not even comparable to the ride those people got yesterday.

Do you guys consider the pilot a hero (like the media is portraying him)?

cutthemdown
01-16-2009, 01:28 PM
I don't know about hero but one hell of a pilot for sure.

Majik
01-16-2009, 01:38 PM
Yeah that's my thinking too.

Rocky Mountain Stampede
01-16-2009, 01:44 PM
I don't know about hero but one hell of a pilot for sure.

The price for his services skyrocketed, too.

Even when he reaches the age where he's too old to fly commercial jets, some rich cat will pay him a handsome sum to become his personal pilot. He's set.

He could even go on tour, tell his story and make a lot of money.

theAPAOps5
01-16-2009, 01:45 PM
I don't know about hero but one hell of a pilot for sure.

He's a hero. Because with the risk of the plane sinking, exploding, etc. he made 2 passes checking for trapped or people that were hurt. He also pulled of a ditching with a metal glider.

socalorado
01-16-2009, 02:17 PM
I don't know about hero but one hell of a pilot for sure.

Just outta total curiosity, and since its slow, just who would you consider to be a Hero? Could you give us an example? If you dont want to get into a big long $h!tstorm of criticism, i understand.

Spider
01-16-2009, 07:06 PM
He's a hero. Because with the risk of the plane sinking, exploding, etc. he made 2 passes checking for trapped or people that were hurt. He also pulled of a ditching with a metal glider.

he is a hero , landing that plane like he did was no easy task , one engine to boot ? 1 wing tips into the water and it is all over .......... But there were alot of heroes that day , from people working on the river , to the people to helped once the survivors got to shore ........ As I said , wen things go bad , count on New yorkers to kick ass and take care of the problem

peacepipe
01-16-2009, 08:14 PM
The new face of terrorism:

http://farm4.static.flickr.com/3241/2612535949_47c94fc7fc.jpgGood thing GWB is on his way out cuz we would probably be occupying a cattle farm otherwise.

theAPAOps5
01-16-2009, 08:18 PM
he is a hero , landing that plane like he did was no easy task , one engine to boot ? 1 wing tips into the water and it is all over .......... But there were alot of heroes that day , from people working on the river , to the people to helped once the survivors got to shore ........ As I said , wen things go bad , count on New yorkers to kick ass and take care of the problem

Not one engine. Limping on 2 bad engines. Teterboro was close but BOTH engines were so damaged he couldn't even make it that far. My second week at DIA we had a regional jet ingest 3 Sandhill Cranes. One engine was destroyed the other was reduced to 40% power. I'll never forget the tower calling out the alert and relaying the pilot did not think it was going to make it back.

Spider
01-16-2009, 08:38 PM
Not one engine. Limping on 2 bad engines. Teterboro was close but BOTH engines were so damaged he couldn't even make it that far. My second week at DIA we had a regional jet ingest 3 Sandhill Cranes. One engine was destroyed the other was reduced to 40% power. I'll never forget the tower calling out the alert and relaying the pilot did not think it was going to make it back.

Some bad ass stuff ..........

Bronco Bob
01-16-2009, 09:10 PM
If you ever get in an incident like that, you want this pilot.
Turns out he was a fighter pilot in the Air Force.
He got his pilotís license as a teenager, flew F-4 Phantoms for the Air Force
and was a 1973 graduate of the Air Force Academy (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/united_states_air_force_academy/index.html?inline=nyt-org), where he received the
Outstanding Cadet in Airmanship Award, given to the top flier in each
graduating class.
He has been an airline pilot for 30 years. He had worked with federal
aviation officials investigating crashes and improving training and methods
for evacuating aircraft in emergencies.
And he even flies gliders. Which came in handy, consider that with
both engines destroyed, he was basically flying a huge metal glider.

Sassy
01-16-2009, 09:42 PM
The safest seats on the plane???
Not in first class...

http://www.popularmechanics.com/science/air_space/4219452.html

cutthemdown
01-17-2009, 02:19 AM
If you ever get in an incident like that, you want this pilot.
Turns out he was a fighter pilot in the Air Force.
He got his pilotís license as a teenager, flew F-4 Phantoms for the Air Force
and was a 1973 graduate of the Air Force Academy (http://topics.nytimes.com/top/reference/timestopics/organizations/u/united_states_air_force_academy/index.html?inline=nyt-org), where he received the
Outstanding Cadet in Airmanship Award, given to the top flier in each
graduating class.
He has been an airline pilot for 30 years. He had worked with federal
aviation officials investigating crashes and improving training and methods
for evacuating aircraft in emergencies.
And he even flies gliders. Which came in handy, consider that with
both engines destroyed, he was basically flying a huge metal glider.

Except the jetliners don't glide very well. It was the pilots quick decision that he couldn't make any airport and that he was ditching in the river that saved those people. If you think about it that would be a tough decision to make quickly without military training.

TailgateNut
01-17-2009, 08:17 AM
He's a hero. Because with the risk of the plane sinking, exploding, etc. he made 2 passes checking for trapped or people that were hurt. He also pulled of a ditching with a metal glider.

No doubt. A controlled crash requires nerves of steel. I put down two Hueys during test flights. One at Camp Humpreys in Korea and another in the James river off of Ft Eustis, Va.
The one in Ft. Eustis was caused by the maintenence crew not installing a cable clamp which allowe the cable to "lasso" the cyclic stick in a right forward position, so as soon as I initiated a right turn the "****er" did a nosedive and I couldn't pull the stick back.
The on in Korea was due to a transmission failure during a assembly commission test flight. Autorotation works well as long as the transmission allows the rotor to turn while in "free-fall" mode. But this sucker locked up due to internal gear failures. That one was ugly. I still remember the tail number of that POS (66-043). Yep, a vintage 1966 UH-****ing 1

I have to salute this pilot for his courage and quick decision making abilities. He not only save his passengers, but also hundreds of lives on the ground, had he crashed into a populated area of the city.

azbroncfan
01-17-2009, 01:23 PM
Okay, not to monopolize this thread, but...

watching this on CNN, it is crazy that they were able to land it without anyone dying. That pilot either got really lucky, or he has some mad skills.

Ditching an aircraft that is controllable into fairly smooth water isn't that big of a deal if the aircraft doesn't come apart. It wasn't luck that is for sure and pilots train on the situation. The stress and magnitude of the situation which diminshes abilities and decisions in a very short time is what makes it hard. To the people that aren't calling him a hero what would you be saying if you wife or mother were on the plane? WHat price tag do you think a human life is worth?

TailgateNut
01-17-2009, 02:44 PM
Ditching an aircraft that is controllable into fairly smooth water isn't that big of a deal if the aircraft doesn't come apart. It wasn't luck that is for sure and pilots train on the situation. The stress and magnitude of the situation which diminshes abilities and decisions in a very short time is what makes it hard. To the people that aren't calling him a hero what would you be saying if you wife or mother were on the plane? WHat price tag do you think a human life is worth?


Doing it without thrust, or diminished engine capability IS tough. It's tough to keep the attitude of the aircraft as needed to prevent the nose from diving into the water.

azbroncfan
01-17-2009, 04:36 PM
Doing it without thrust, or diminished engine capability IS tough. It's tough to keep the attitude of the aircraft as needed to prevent the nose from diving into the water.

The pilots know to keep the speed up if your ditching the aircraft and not to stall it in the water but rather fly it on the surface. The airbus has a ditching button which will allow it to float for awhile since it closes all of the valves to make it air tight. Making the decision and living with it under pressure is probably the hardest part. Also there was another very experienced pilot sitting next to the Captain. The event carried out exactly as they are trained to do and had the best possible ending that could of happened.

TailgateNut
01-18-2009, 07:01 AM
The pilots know to keep the speed up if your ditching the aircraft and not to stall it in the water but rather fly it on the surface. .


If your engine is disabled (engine stalled, kind of like when doing a top end test flight. Taking a bird to the point when the bleed bands on the turbine activate. You have no f-in power to do ****.) it's kind of tough to "keep the speed up".:spit:

This pilot is a hero, plain and simple.

crawdad
01-18-2009, 07:21 AM
I assume that all he had was auxiliary hydraulic power to operated the flaps. With no engine power, this pilot made an excellent ditch landing.

azbroncfan
01-18-2009, 08:26 AM
If your engine is disabled (engine stalled, kind of like when doing a top end test flight. Taking a bird to the point when the bleed bands on the turbine activate. You have no f-in power to do ****.) it's kind of tough to "keep the speed up".:spit:

This pilot is a hero, plain and simple.

Lower the nose. Funny that there is no mention of the FO who was actually flying the airplane. Yes they are hero's and I'm not saying they are but I am saying they are lucky the hudson was right there and noone was killed on the plane or the ground.

Florida_Bronco
01-18-2009, 02:39 PM
No doubt. A controlled crash requires nerves of steel. I put down two Hueys during test flights. One at Camp Humpreys in Korea and another in the James river off of Ft Eustis, Va.
The one in Ft. Eustis was caused by the maintenence crew not installing a cable clamp which allowe the cable to "lasso" the cyclic stick in a right forward position, so as soon as I initiated a right turn the "****er" did a nosedive and I couldn't pull the stick back.
The on in Korea was due to a transmission failure during a assembly commission test flight. Autorotation works well as long as the transmission allows the rotor to turn while in "free-fall" mode. But this sucker locked up due to internal gear failures. That one was ugly. I still remember the tail number of that POS (66-043). Yep, a vintage 1966 UH-****ing 1

I have to salute this pilot for his courage and quick decision making abilities. He not only save his passengers, but also hundreds of lives on the ground, had he crashed into a populated area of the city.

I didn't know you were a pilot, I thought you were just a passenger on those birds.

slyinky
01-18-2009, 09:12 PM
Actual crash video of US Airways 1549
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