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alkemical
06-09-2008, 09:30 AM
Instead of all my threads - i think i'm going to reduce it to a running thread - ala my other news thread(s) - but this one will include all matters of things that i find interesting. I am a fan of optimistic ideas, and ways we can get out of the jams we are in. Anyone is invited to participate.

~Amesj

alkemical
06-09-2008, 09:33 AM
The Maltese cart ruts are considered to be one of the most enduring ancient enigmas. But could it be that they are precisely what their name suggests: cart ruts?

http://www.philipcoppens.com/cartruts.html

http://www.philipcoppens.com/cartruts_1.jpg

Kaylore
06-09-2008, 09:49 AM
The Maltese cart ruts are considered to be one of the most enduring ancient enigmas. But could it be that they are precisely what their name suggests: cart ruts?

http://www.philipcoppens.com/cartruts.html

I always thought they were! It's usually the obvious, most-practical thing.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 11:18 AM
Steampunk Rising (http://www.crn.com/hardware/208400607;jsessionid=SL31BAL4UPMWEQSNDLOSKHSCJUNN2 JVN?pgno=1)

ORIGINS OF STEAMPUNK
Steampunk as an active sub-culture arose from the science fiction sub-genre of the same name that became popular in the mid- to late-1990s. Novels like "The Difference Engine" by William Gibson and Bruce Sterling re-imagine a Victorian age where steam-powered technology is far more advanced than it really was in the 19th century. The rollicking, fantastical adventures created by Steampunk authors fit squarely in the tradition of Jules Verne and H.G. Wells, but with the twist that modern writers know how technologies like computing actually developed and thus can retro-fit today's tech to an earlier time in an almost plausible fashion. The central conceit of "The Difference Engine," for example, is that Charles Babbage's designs for computational machines, which in reality were never built, have been developed to usher in the Information Age a full century before it actually occurred. Interestingly, the steam-powered computers in Gibson and Sterling's novel are inspired by Babbage's designs for what he called an "Analytical Engine," widely regarded today as the first architectural breakthrough in computing, not his separate plans for a Difference Engine, which was a very powerful but ultimately non-computational calculating machine. Did Gibson and Sterling simply make a mistake? Not likely, says Steampunk author G. D. Falksen, who guesses that the pair probably preferred the way "Difference Engine" rolls off the tongue to the clunkier "Analytical Engine." Falksen credits writers Kevin Jeter and Paul Di Filippo with coining the term "steampunk," a play on the sci-fi genre of "cyberpunk" that was popular in the 1980s and 90s.

http://i.cmpnet.com/crn/slideshows/2008/steam/4dmworking2.jpg

Odysseus
06-09-2008, 11:31 AM
Cool idea. Thank you.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 11:32 AM
Cool idea. Thank you.

The steampunk thing? I've been seeing lots of posts and articles on it - and it's got my interest. One of my "secret" loves is victorian things.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 11:42 AM
http://blog.wired.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/06/05/spice_must_flow.jpg

Odysseus
06-09-2008, 11:49 AM
I love history and things that are old.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 11:52 AM
I love history and things that are old.

Coolio man.....

Odysseus
06-09-2008, 12:04 PM
http://blog.wired.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/06/05/spice_must_flow.jpg

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Steve_Oedekerk

I just ordered the whole Thumbs Series and you think your cat is freaky. Geez. Those Thumbs were off the chain. I liked Frankenthumb the best. Must have been the mindless violence and all those weird looking thumbs!

Check it out.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 12:06 PM
lol, i will seems interesting!

alkemical
06-09-2008, 12:32 PM
Living computers solve complex math puzzle (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/24880713/)
Tweaked bacteria show promise in problem-solving applications

Scientists have genetically tweaked E. coli bacteria to create simple computers capable of solving a classic math puzzle, commonly called the “Burnt Pancake Problem.”

The resulting advance in synthetic biology, according to researchers, hints at the ability of tiny “living computers” to aid in data storage, evolutionary comparisons and even tissue engineering.

The mathematical problem imagines pancakes of varying sizes stacked in random order — each with a burnt side and a golden brown side. The solution requires using the minimum number of manipulations to stack the pancakes according to size, with their burnt sides all facedown. Each manipulation involves flipping one or more pancakes, reversing both their order and orientation.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 01:23 PM
http://www.coloribus.com/paedia/prints/2008/1/18/197352/

http://www.boingboing.net/veggie-king.jpg

alkemical
06-09-2008, 01:27 PM
Awesome Or Off-Putting: Homeless Japanese Lady Secretly Not Homeless In Victim’s Closet (http://www.hecklerspray.com/awesome-or-off-putting-homeless-japanese-lady-secretly-not-homeless-in-victims-closetawesome-or-off-putting-homeless-japanese-lady-secretly-not-homeless-in-victims-closet/200814474.php)

alkemical
06-09-2008, 01:36 PM
http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20080429222111data_trunc_sys.shtml

"Massive" Horizontal Gene Transfer In Animal Kingdom Revealed

If you're an animal, you inherit your genes from your parents at the moment of conception, right? Not quite, according to scientists from the Woods Hole Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL), who have uncovered evidence of "massive" horizontal gene transfer in the animal known as the bdelloid rotifer. Reporting their findings in Science, the researchers say they have discovered numerous chunks of foreign DNA in its genome, from bacteria, fungi, and even from plants. Gene transfer on such a large scale was, until now, thought impossible in the animal kingdom.

"It is quite amazing that bdelloids are able to recruit foreign genes, which were acquired from remarkably diverse sources, to function in the new host," says MBL's Irina Arkhipova. "Bdelloids may have the capacity for tapping into the entire environmental gene pool, which may be of [evolutionarily] adaptive significance during expansion into new ecological niches, and may even contribute to bdelloid speciation."

The new findings may help to explain why bdelloids, which are exclusively asexual, have managed to diversify into more than 360 species over 40 million years of evolution. Sometimes called an "evolutionary scandal," bdelloids contradict the notion that sex - which recombines the DNA from the parents in their offspring - confers diversity and greater adaptability on a population, thereby boosting its evolutionary success. Arkhipova's study suggests that if bdelloids can incorporate foreign DNA from their environment, they could also pick up DNA from other bdelloids which, from an evolutionary standpoint, is almost as good as having sex.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 01:38 PM
Sounds and colour influence the taste of food (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2008/05/30/scisound130.xml)

Researchers have also found that changing the colour of a food can influence the flavour experienced by consumers.

The sound of sizzling bacon can prompt diners to taste it - Sounds and colour influence the taste of food
The sound of sizzling bacon can prompt diners to taste it

Food manufacturers are now hoping to exploit the findings in a bid to make their foods more appealing.

Previously it was thought that the sense of taste and smell were the only human senses that played a role in experiencing flavour. Professor Charles Spence, a sensory psychologist at Oxford University, believes it is possible to change the flavour of food simply by exciting people's sense of hearing and vision.

He has found that by tinkering with the sound a food makes while it is being eaten can make it seem crunchier or softer in the mouth.

Playing sounds of the seaside while diners are eating can make them detect seafood flavours while the sound of clucking chickens or sizzling bacon brings out the taste of eggs or bacon.

alkemical
06-09-2008, 03:22 PM
http://technology.newscientist.com/channel/tech/mg19826596.300-silicon-chip-filters-out-cancer-cells.html?feedId=online-news_rss20

Silicon chip filters out cancer cells

* 07 June 2008
* David Robson
* Magazine issue 2659

IT'S harder than finding a needle in a haystack. Unusual or rare cells, such as those that cause the spread of cancer, are difficult to isolate from thousands of other cells in a sample.

Now a new device has been developed which can direct and focus streams of cells in a liquid, and even separate them out according to size. "We can take a stream of cells and focus, defocus and reflect it as if it's a light beam," says Robert Austin of Princeton University, who developed the device with colleagues from Princeton and Boston University, Massachusetts.

The device is a silicon wafer studded with rows of tiny pillars through which a liquid containing particles of various sizes is made to flow. Due to friction, the liquid flows more slowly close to the pillars than midway between them. Small particles are unaffected by this, but those above a critical size ...

alkemical
06-09-2008, 03:25 PM
http://www.rosecolorednews.com/2008/06/04/self-replicating-personal-fabrication-device-successful-and-open-source/

Open source personal fabrication device creates first copy of itself
04Jun08

BroncoBuff
06-09-2008, 07:58 PM
I don't know about about this idea ... and I'm not sure about this ames guy. I preferred claviculasolominis.

Dudeskey
06-09-2008, 08:51 PM
Never heard of steampunk... awesome stuff

alkemical
06-10-2008, 07:31 AM
Never heard of steampunk... awesome stuff

Yeah, i thought so too. I want to find a convention to go to, i'd like to do a thing on it.

Kaylore
06-10-2008, 09:37 AM
Final Fatasy III(VI) was a great game in the steam-punk genre.

I don't understand why this thread is in the Religion/War/Politics forum...

alkemical
06-10-2008, 09:41 AM
is there a better place?

Kaylore
06-10-2008, 10:23 AM
is there a better place?

The main forum? There's nothing here that warrants putting this in the WRP forum. That said, some people around here don't even use the main forum and its your thread.

alkemical
06-10-2008, 10:49 AM
The main forum? There's nothing here that warrants putting this in the WRP forum. That said, some people around here don't even use the main forum and its your thread.

Not yet. But I do have some science articles in the pipeline to post, as well as some other things.

The main forum sucks, it would get buried under other ****. I could have put it in the OT forum, but -eh. Seems most people can find me here...i guess that's why it's here.

alkemical
06-10-2008, 03:14 PM
http://www.independent.co.uk/environment/climate-change/windfuelled-supergrid-offers-clean-power-to-europe-760431.html

Wind-fuelled 'supergrid' offers clean power to Europe

5,000-mile network could cut entire continent's carbon output by a quarter

alkemical
06-10-2008, 03:17 PM
http://www.naturalnews.com/023388.html

U.S. Government Sought Customer Book Purchasing Records from Amazon.com

alkemical
06-10-2008, 03:23 PM
http://www.tristateobserver.com/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=10121

WASHINGTON - Larry Matlack, President of the American Agriculture Movement (AAM), has raised concerns over the issue of U.S. grain reserves after it was announced that the sale of 18.37 million bushels of wheat from USDA’s Commodity Credit Corporation (CCC) Bill Emerson Humanitarian Trust.

Odysseus
06-10-2008, 04:44 PM
Not yet. But I do have some science articles in the pipeline to post, as well as some other things.

The main forum sucks, it would get buried under other ****. I could have put it in the OT forum, but -eh. Seems most people can find me here...i guess that's why it's here.

This belongs in a dangerous seedy neighborhood where gun play is common not among the wonderful suburbanites debating which tampon to use. Keep it here for the ambiance and .50 beer night.

alkemical
06-11-2008, 07:49 AM
hahaha! :salute!:

alkemical
06-11-2008, 09:41 AM
Light fantastic: pedestrians to generate power

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/environment/article4087518.ece

THE power of the wind and the tide have been harnessed – now the footfall of trudging shoppers is to become the latest source of emission-free energy.

Underfloor generators, powered by “heel strike” and designed by British engineers, may soon be installed in supermarkets and railway stations.

The technology could use the footsteps of pedestrians to power thousands of lightbulbs at shopping centres. It works by using the pressure of feet on the floor to compress pads underneath, driving fluid through mini-turbines that then generate electricity, which is stored in a battery.

Engineers who have modelled the effects of the technology at Victoria Underground station in central London have calculated that the 34,000 travellers passing through every hour could power 6,500 lightbulbs.

David Webb, a structural engineer at the consultant Scott Wilson, which is in discussions with Network Rail and with retail firms to install the devices, said: “It’s just picking up on the fact that all structures move a bit. This technology says, okay, we can do something useful with that energy.”

In addition to floors, the technology could also be installed beneath railway lines and on road bridges to exploit the energy of passing trains and vehicles.

alkemical
06-11-2008, 12:35 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/10/science/10plant.html?_r=3&ref=science&oref=login&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

Yet scientists have found evidence that the sea rocket is able to do something that no other plant has ever been shown to do.

The sea rocket, researchers report, can distinguish between plants that are related to it and those that are not. And not only does this plant recognize its kin, but it also gives them preferential treatment.

If the sea rocket detects unrelated plants growing in the ground with it, the plant aggressively sprouts nutrient-grabbing roots. But if it detects family, it politely restrains itself.

alkemical
06-11-2008, 12:38 PM
Testing “spooky action-at-a-distance” on the International Space Station (http://arxivblog.com/?p=460)


Entanglement is the strange and beautiful property of certain quantum particles to become so deeply linked that they share the same existence. According to quantum theory, that link should be maintained whatever the distance between the particles, whether the width of an atom or the diameter of the universe.

This led Einstein to claim that the instantaneous effects of entanglement would lead to “spooky action-at-a-distance” in violation of special relativity which prevents faster-than-light signals.

Nobody knows how the different predictions of relativity and quantum mechanics can be resolved. However, entanglement has been measured in numerous experiments over relatively short distances on Earth. The tests involve two entangled particles, photons say, being sent to distant experimenters who then perform measurements on them.

In every one of these tests, the results agree entirely with the predictions of quantum mechanics. And yet naysayers continue to unearth loopholes that allow them to claim that there is a way in which the results are fixed, perhaps because quantum mechanics works only only over the short distances that can be exploited on Earth or by the existence some kind of hidden variable that determines in advance how the particles will behave when they are separated.

There is one way to settle the matter for sure: send entangled photons to two orbiting astronauts on board different spacecraft with large relative velocities. That leaves no room for hidden variable theories or any other fix because the peculiarities of special relativity allow both astronauts to claim the measurement on their photon was performed before the other.

Today Anton Zeilinger from the University of Vienna in Austria, says he wants to try just such an experiment and has put together an impressive international team to design and promote idea. The team has submitted its proposal, called Space-QUEST, to the European Space Agency in the hope that one end of the experiment could hosted on the Columbus module, Europe’s orbiting laboratory attached to the International Space Station.

The other observer need only be on the ground since Zeilinger has already proven that single photons can be bounced off orbiting satellites and detected on the ground.

That should please mission planners for the International Space Station which has yet to host a single significant experiment in space. Zeilinger’s Space-QUEST experiment looks like a genuine attempt to push the envelope of physics. The quicker they get it into orbit, the better.

alkemical
06-11-2008, 12:40 PM
http://nymag.com/restaurants/features/breakfast/47395/

The Coffee Junkie’s Guide to Caffeine Addiction
We’re hooked like never before. Is that bad?

alkemical
06-11-2008, 12:51 PM
Anticipating the Future to ‘See’ the Present (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/06/10/health/research/10mind.html?ei=5070&em=&en=80ca2c9109a0272e&ex=1213329600&adxnnl=1&adxnnlx=1213183164-UX79ReZJhefd2P0bjueY0w)

staring at a pattern meant to evoke an optical illusion is usually an act of idle curiosity, akin to palm reading or astrology. The dot disappears, or it doesn’t. The silhouette of the dancer spins clockwise or counterclockwise. The three-dimensional face materializes or not, and the explanation always seems to have something to do with the eye or creativity or even personality.

That’s the usual cue to nod and feign renewed absorption in the pattern.

In fact, scientists have investigated such illusions for hundreds of years, looking for clues to how the brain constructs a seamless whole from the bouncing kaleidoscope of light coming through the eyes. Brain researchers today call the illusions perceptual, not optical, because the entire visual system is involved, and their theories about what is occurring can sound as exotic as anyone’s.

In the current issue of the journal Cognitive Science, researchers at the California Institute of Technology and the University of Sussex argue that the brain’s adaptive ability to see into the near future creates many common illusions.

“It takes time for the brain to process visual information, so it has to anticipate the future to perceive the present,” said Mark Changizi, the lead author of the paper, who is now at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. “One common functional mechanism can explain many of these seemingly unrelated illusions.” His co-authors were Andrew Hsieh, Romi Nijhawan, Ryota Kanai and Shinsuke Shimojo.

One fundamental debate in visual research is whether the brain uses a bag of ad hoc tricks to build a streaming model of the world, or a general principle, like filling in disjointed images based on inference from new evidence and past experience. The answer may be both. But perceptual illusions provide a keyhole to glimpse the system.

When shown two images in quick succession, one of a dot on the left of a screen and one with the dot on the right, the brain sees motion from left to right, even though there was none. The visual system has apparently constructed the scenario after it has been perceived, reconciling the jagged images by imputing motion.

alkemical
06-11-2008, 02:08 PM
http://www.corpwatch.org/article.php?id=15090



A BBC investigation estimates that around $23bn (£11.75bn) may have been lost, stolen or just not properly accounted for in Iraq.

For the first time, the extent to which some private contractors have profited from the conflict and rebuilding has been researched by the BBC's Panorama using US and Iraqi government sources.

A US gagging order is preventing discussion of the allegations.

The order applies to 70 court cases against some of the top US companies.

alkemical
06-11-2008, 02:22 PM
http://cryptogon.com/?p=2722

If a car that gets 100 miles per gallon of gasoline sounds like a driver’s futile fantasy, think again.

Scientists at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory in Golden are testing a spruced-up Toyota Prius, a plug-in hybrid sedan complete with a solar panel attached to its oval roof and a bigger battery in the trunk to supply power in lieu of the gasoline-fueled engine.

The result: A spunky Prius that runs the initial 60 miles mostly on battery, adding up to a fuel mileage of 100 miles per gallon.

“The stored power in the battery does a great job of displacing petroleum,” said Tony Markel, a senior engineer at NREL who has been working on the 2006 model Prius for the past two years. “For most people, their daily commute is about 30 miles, so this car would run virtually on battery and only need to be recharged at night.”

alkemical
06-11-2008, 02:42 PM
http://cryptogon.com/?p=2723

EMERGENCY: MULTIPLE FACTORS POINTING TO LOWER CROP YIELDS

alkemical
06-12-2008, 08:53 AM
Interesting:

Dolphin deaths: Expert suggests 'mass suicide' (http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jun/11/wildlife.conservation1)

Environmentalists alarmed by 'mass dolphin suicide' (http://www.abc.net.au/news/stories/2007/10/30/2075838.htm)

Protecting Whales from Dangerous Sonar
NRDC steps up the campaign at home and abroad to regulate active sonar systems that harm marine mammals. (http://www.nrdc.org/wildlife/marine/sonar.asp)

Navy link to dead dolphins (http://www.theage.com.au/world/navy-link-to-dead-dolphins-20080611-2ovq.html)

alkemical
06-12-2008, 09:22 AM
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/06/11/gallery/unicorn-380x540.jpg (http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/06/11/unicorn-zoom.html)

alkemical
06-12-2008, 09:24 AM
Would an antimatter apple fall up? (http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn14120-would-an-antimatter-apple-fall-up.html?DCMP=ILC-hmts&nsref=news1_head_dn14120)

New experiments are being proposed to test a big unknown in physics: how antimatter reacts to gravity.

Physicists have studied antimatter, the mirror version of ordinary matter, for decades. They know, for example, that antiparticles have the same mass as ordinary particles, but opposite charge. But no one knows what effect gravity will have on such particles.

Now several groups want to measure exactly how the Earth will pull on antimatter. The tests would create a horizontal beam of the stuff and measure how much gravity deflects it.

The complicated ballistic test may show no difference between the way matter and antimatter fall. But some experimentalists are holding out hope that they may see something completely unexpected, which could point the way to new gravity-like forces, or perhaps even antigravity.

"If antimatter fell down faster, it would mean the discovery of at least one new force, probably two. If it fell up, it would mean our understanding of general relativity is incorrect," says Thomas Phillips, a physicist at Duke University in Durham, North Carolina, US.

alkemical
06-12-2008, 09:26 AM
http://www.boston.com/business/technology/articles/2008/06/09/roadrunner_is_fastest_computer/

WASHINGTON—Scientists unveiled the world's fastest supercomputer on Monday, a $100 million machine that for the first time has performed 1,000 trillion calculations per second in a sustained exercise.
more stories like this

The technology breakthrough was accomplished by engineers from the Los Alamos National Laboratory and IBM Corp. on a computer to be used primarily on nuclear weapons work, including simulating nuclear explosions.

The computer, named Roadrunner, is twice as fast as IBM's Blue Gene system at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, which itself is three times faster than any of the world's other supercomputers, according to IBM.

"The computer is a speed demon. It will allow us to solve tremendous problems," said Thomas D'Agostino, head of the National Nuclear Security Administration, which oversees nuclear weapons research and maintains the warhead stockpile.

But officials said the computer also could have a wide range of other applications in civilian engineering, medicine and science, from developing biofuels and designing more fuel-efficient cars to finding drug therapies and providing services to the financial industry.

To put the computer's speed in perspective, it has roughly the computing power of 100,000 of today's most powerful laptops stacked 1.5 miles high, according to IBM. Or, if each of the world's 6 billion people worked on hand-held computers for 24 hours a day, it would take them 46 years to do what the Roadrunner computer can do in a single day.

alkemical
06-12-2008, 09:28 AM
http://blog.wired.com/cars/2008/06/bmw-builds-a-ca.html

Concept cars give automotive designers a chance to let their imaginations run wild, often with outlandish results. But even by that measure, BMW has come up with something as strange as it is innovative -- a shape-shifting car covered with fabric.

Instead of steel, aluminum or even carbon fiber, the GINA Light Visionary Model has a body of seamless fabric stretched over a movable metal frame that allows the driver to change its shape at will. The car -- which actually runs and drives -- is a styling design headed straight for the BMW Museum in Munich and so it will never see production, but building a practical car wasn't the point.

Chris Bangle, head of design for BMW, says GINA allowed his team to "challenge existing principles and conventional processes."

"It is in the nature of such visions that they do not necessarily claim to be suitable for series production," company officials said in unveiling the car Tuesday. "Rather, they are intended to steer creativity and research into new directions."

Giving Bangle and his team that latitude to design so radical a car "helps to tap into formerly inconceivable, innovative potential" to push the boundaries of appearance and materials as well as functions and the manufacturing process, BMW says.

Bangle and is team actually built GINA -- which stands for "Geometry and functions In 'N' Adaptions" -- six years ago, but BMW kept it under, er, wraps until Tuesday. It's built on the Z8 chassis and has a 4.4-liter V8 and six-speed automatic transmission. BMW says the fabric skin - polyurethane-coated Lycra - is resilient, durable and water resistant. It's stretched over an aluminum frame controlled by electric and hydraulic actuators that allow the owner to change the body shape. Want a big spoiler on the back? Wider fenders? No problem. "The drastic reinterpretation of familiar functionality and structure means that drivers have a completely new experience when they handle their car," BMW says.

http://blog.wired.com/photos/uncategorized/2008/06/10/bmw_gina_07_2.jpg

alkemical
06-12-2008, 10:13 AM
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121305642257659301.html

Why Is Bush Helping Saudi Arabia Build Nukes?

alkemical
06-12-2008, 10:29 AM
http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/06/12/albinos-long-shunned-face-threat-in-tanzania/

Albinos, Long Shunned, Face Threat in Tanzania

Discrimination against albinos is a serious problem throughout sub-Saharan Africa, but recently in Tanzania it has taken a wicked twist: at least 19 albinos, including children, have been killed and mutilated in the past year, victims of what Tanzanian officials say is a growing criminal trade in albino body parts.

Many people in Tanzania — and across Africa, for that matter — believe albinos have magical powers. They stand out, often the lone white face in a black crowd, a result of a genetic condition that impairs normal skin pigmentation and strikes about 1 in 3,000 people here. Tanzanian officials say witch doctors are now marketing albino skin, bones and hair as ingredients in potions that are promised to make people rich.

alkemical
06-12-2008, 10:35 AM
http://news.cnet.com/8301-13739_3-9962760-46.html

Your papers please: TSA bans ID-less flight
Posted by Chris Soghoian 30 comments

In a major change of policy, the Transportation Security Administration has announced that passengers refusing to show ID will no longer be able to fly. The policy change, announced on Thursday afternoon, will go into force on June 21, and will only affect passengers who refuse to produce ID. Passengers who claim to have lost or forgotten their proof of identity will still be able to fly.

alkemical
06-12-2008, 10:38 AM
This past September, the secretive mercenary company Blackwater USA found its name splashed across front pages throughout the world after the company's shooters gunned down seventeen Iraqi civilians in Baghdad's Nisour Square. But by early 2008, Blackwater had largely receded from the headlines save for the occasional blip on the media radar sparked by Congressman Henry Waxman's ongoing investigations into its activities. Its forces remained deployed in Iraq and Afghanistan, and business continued to pour in. In the two weeks directly following Nisour Square, Blackwater signed more than $144 million in contracts with the State Department for "protective services" in Iraq and Afghanistan alone and, over the following weeks and months, won millions more in contracts with other federal entities like the Coast Guard, the Navy and the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center.



Blackwater's Iraq contract was extended in April, but the company is by no means betting the house on its long-term presence there. While the firm is quietly maintaining its Iraq work, it is aggressively pursuing other business opportunities. In September it was revealed that Blackwater had been "tapped" by the Pentagon's Counter Narcoterrorism Technology Program Office to compete for a share of a five-year, $15 billion budget "to fight terrorists with drug-trade ties." According to the Army Times, the contract "could include antidrug technologies and equipment, special vehicles and aircraft, communications, security training, pilot training, geographic information systems and in-field support." A spokesperson for another company bidding for the work said that "80 percent of the work will be overseas." As Richard Douglas, a deputy assistant secretary of defense, explained, "The fact is, we use Blackwater to do a lot of our training of counternarcotics police in Afghanistan. I have to say that Blackwater has done a very good job."

http://www.zcommunications.org/znet/viewArticle/17885

alkemical
06-12-2008, 10:42 AM
http://esciencenews.com/articles/2008/06/02/a.computer.can.read.your.mind

A computer that can 'read' your mind


For centuries, the concept of mind readers was strictly the domain of folklore and science fiction. But according to new research published today in the journal Science, scientists are closer to knowing how specific thoughts activate our brains. The findings demonstrate the power of computational modeling to improve our understanding of how the brain processes information and thoughts. The research was conducted by a computer scientist, Tom Mitchell, and a cognitive neuroscientist, Marcel Just, both of Carnegie Mellon University. Their previous research, supported by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and the W.M. Keck Foundation, had shown that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can detect and locate brain activity when a person thinks about a specific word. Using this data, the researchers developed a computational model that enabled a computer to correctly determine what word a research subject was thinking about by analyzing brain scan data.

In their most recent work, Just and Mitchell used fMRI data to develop a more sophisticated computational model that can predict the brain activation patterns associated with concrete nouns, or things that we experience through our senses, even if the computer did not already have the fMRI data for that specific noun.

The researchers first built a model that took the fMRI activation patterns for 60 concrete nouns broken down into 12 categories including animals, body parts, buildings, clothing, insects, vehicles and vegetables. The model also analyzed a text corpus, or a set of texts that contained more than a trillion words, noting how each noun was used in relation to a set of 25 verbs associated with sensory or motor functions. Combining the brain scan information with the analysis of the text corpus, the computer then predicted the brain activity pattern of thousands of other concrete nouns.

alkemical
06-13-2008, 09:43 AM
http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/mascots-blamed-for-china-earthquake/2008/05/16/1210765174174.html

Tokens of doom: mascots seen as signs of times

http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2008/05/17/mascots_wideweb__470x229,0.jpg

HONG KONG: Superstitious bloggers have linked China's earthquake disaster and other recent misfortunes to the five Olympic mascots, a Hong Kong newspaper reported yesterday.

Gossip sites are full of speculation that four of the five cartoon mascots have fulfilled prophesies of doom with one more, connected to the Yangtze River, still to come, the South China Morning Post said.

The five Olympic mascots are Jingjing, Huanhuan, Yingying, Nini and Beibei. Jingjing, a panda, is the animal most closely associated with Sichuan province where the earthquake struck.

Huanhuan, a cartoon character with flame-red hair, is being linked by bloggers to the Olympic torch that has been dogged by anti-China protests on its round-the-world tour.

Yingying, an antelope, is an animal confined to the borders of Tibet, which has been the scene of riots and the cause of international protests against China, the bloggers say.

Nini, represented by a kite, is being viewed as a reference to the "kite city" of Weifang, in Shandong, where there was a deadly train crash last month.

That leaves only Beibei, represented by a sturgeon fish, which online doomsayers suggest could indicate a looming disaster in the Yangtze River, the only place where sturgeon is found.

A Peking University sociologist, Xie Xueluan, told the newspaper: "Chinese see major calamities as divine intervention … The absence of religion reinforces this trend."

Other online prophets of doom say the recent disasters have come on days that are related to the normally lucky Chinese number eight. The Tibet riots (14/3) and the earthquake (12/5) happened on a date whose digits add up to eight.

This bodes ill for the opening day of the Beijing Olympics - August 8, 2008 - which was chosen for its auspicious abundance of China's lucky number.

Deutsche Presse-Agentur

alkemical
06-16-2008, 08:45 AM
http://www.physorg.com/news132577096.html

Scientists confirm that parts of earliest genetic material may have come from the stars

The finding suggests that parts of the raw materials to make the first molecules of DNA and RNA may have come from the stars.

The scientists, from Europe and the USA, say that their research, published in the journal Earth and Planetary Science Letters, provides evidence that life's raw materials came from sources beyond the Earth.

The materials they have found include the molecules uracil and xanthine, which are precursors to the molecules that make up DNA and RNA, and are known as nucleobases.

The team discovered the molecules in rock fragments of the Murchison meteorite, which crashed in Australia in 1969.

They tested the meteorite material to determine whether the molecules came from the solar system or were a result of contamination when the meteorite landed on Earth.

alkemical
06-16-2008, 08:52 AM
Some art:

http://aegis-strife.net/

http://www.oscarwoodruff.com/home

alkemical
06-16-2008, 09:03 AM
http://www.worldchanging.com/archives//007427.html

"Impossible!" you say. "Even wind and solar have carbon emissions from their manufacturing, and biofuels are carbon neutral at best. How can a fuel be carbon negative?" But listen to people working on gasification and terra preta, and you'll have something new to think about.

We've mentioned terra preta before: it's a human-made soil or fertilizer. "Three times richer in nitrogen and phosphorous, and twenty times the carbon of normal soils, terra preta is the legacy of ancient Amazonians who predate Western civilization." Although we don't know how it was made back then, we do know how to make it now: burn biomass (preferably agricultural waste) in a special way that pyrolisizes it, breaking down long hydrocarbon chains like cellulose into shorter, simpler molecules. These simpler molecules are more easily broken down by microbes and plants as food, and bond more easily with key nutrients like nitrogen and phosphorus. This is what makes terra preta such good fertilizer. Because terra preta locks so much carbon in the soil, it's also a form of carbon sequestration that doesn't involve bizarre heroics like pumping CO2 down old mine shafts. What's more, it may reduce other greenhouse gases as well as water pollution: according to Biopact, a network that promotes biofuels and biomass energy,

Char-amended soils have shown 50 - 80 percent reductions in nitrous oxide emissions and reduced runoff of phosphorus into surface waters and leaching of nitrogen into groundwater. As a soil amendment, biochar significantly increases the efficiency of and reduces the need for traditional chemical fertilizers, while greatly enhancing crop yields. Experiments have shown yields for some crops can be doubled and even tripled.

As it happens, the process of burning/pyrolisizing agricultural char is also a way to produce energy. MIT Professor Amy Smith, a recipient of the prestigious MacArthur "genius award," gave a TED Conference talk in 2006 on using agricultural char as fuel in developing countries. It works because the chemical reactions that break down the long hydrocarbon chains also give off hydrogen gas, methane, and various other burnable fuel gases. (As well as tars and non-useful gases like CO2.) This is gasification. The fuel gas can be burned for heat, or if it's pretty clean (that is, if the tar levels are low), it can be used to power an engine.

alkemical
06-16-2008, 09:06 AM
http://www.mechabolic.org/index.html

The Mechabolic: Technology of Gasification

Gasification is the general term used for processes where heat is applied to transform solid biomass into a "natural gas like" gaseous fuel. Through gasification, we can take nearly any solid biomass waste and convert it into a clean burning, carbon neutral, flammable fuel. Whether starting with wood scraps or coffee grounds, municipal trash or junk tires, pistachio nut shells or avocado pits, the end product is a flexible gaseous fuel you can burn in your gasoline engine, cooking stove, heating furnace and/or flamethrower. Apply a little additional effort through liquefaction technologies like Fischer-Trospch or other catalyst based processes, and methanol, ethelyene, and diesel are possible too a modest complexity.

Sound impossible?

Well, over 1,000,000 vehicles in Europe ran onboard gasifiers during WWII to make fuel from wood, as gasoline and diesel were rationed and/or unavailable. Long before there was biodiesel and SVO, we actually succeeded in a large-scale, alternative fuels redeployment. That redeployment was made possible by the gasification of waste biomass, using simple gasifiers about as complex as a traditional wood stove. Gasifiers are easily reproduced (and improved) today by DIY enthusiasts, using simple hammer and wrench technology. (see www.woodgas.com and http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gasification for more background info).

The Mechabolic project intends to reintroduce this technology for contemporary DIY enthusiasts, with improvements in design following from the many sensing and embedded control potentials that were not available during the previous "woodgas" deployment. We intend for this "artistic deployment" to seque into a growing collection of usable wood gas converted cars and other machines for off playa purposes. In fact, we are currently in the process of converting Ritual Café on Valencia street to run entirely on its own coffee grounds waste. Coffee in: electricity, heat and gaseous fuel out. (our current DIY gasification efforts are here and here

alkemical
06-16-2008, 09:10 AM
http://cryptogon.com/?p=2736

Who’s More Innovative When it Comes to Electric Vehicles? The Soviet Ministries of Ford and GM, or a Besieged Palestinian in Gaza?

Ford and GM are asking for subsidies to accomplish a fraction of what Fayez Annan has already done… under siege conditions. Never mind Think, Phoenix, Aptera and all the rest. Let’s look at Ford and GM vs. a man living under siege conditions to see who can produce a better EV.

Story 1: DOE Awards $30 Million for Plug-in Hybrid Electric Car Research

One has to wonder if this news is too little too late already but, Ford, General Motors and General Electric will split $30 million to develop and demonstrate Plug-in Hybrid Electric Vehicles research projects over the next three years.

The Department of Energy said today the projects will hasten the development of vehicles capable of traveling up to 40 miles without recharging, which includes most daily roundtrip commutes and satisfies 70% of the average daily travel in the US. The projects will also address critical barriers to achieving DOE’s goal of making such cars cost-competitive by 2014 and ready for commercialization by 2016. Of course by then gas could cost so much people will be happy to push their cars.

Story 2: In Besieged City, Man Builds Electric Vehicle with 110 Mile Range

Fayez Annan turns the silver key to start the power, pushes the green button on the standard industrial jog-run-stop switch on the dashboard, and eases the white Peugeot 205 into the main east-west shopping street in Gaza City.

With traffic abnormally sparse, thanks to the acute fuel shortages caused by the Israeli blockade, he soon reaches the distinctly un-urban and pedestrian-scattering speed of 37 miles per hour (60kph).

But then Mr Annan is proudly trying to make a point that, while it might be electric, this Peugeot is no milkfloat. “It can do 100kph (62mph),” he says with a grin, as our knuckles whiten in the passenger seats. Whether or not Mr Annan’s friend Hesham Abu Sido, an electrical consultant, is justified in describing the electric vehicle as a “genius idea” which is “the most fantastic thing that has happened in Gaza”, it is certainly a case of turning adversity into opportunity.

It also proves that Gaza’s famous entrepreneurial spirit has not yet been snuffed out by the draconian economic blockade imposed by Israel after the Palestinian militant group Hamas seized full control of the Strip by force a year ago tomorrow.

Since then, Gaza has seen continuing conflict, ever-deepening poverty, shortages, unemployment and despair. Against that background, the white Peugeot has become a symbol of Gaza’s suppressed potential. “People who have seen it are even happier than we are,” says Mr Annan. “They see it as something to be proud of in Gaza, which they haven’t had in a long time.”



The electric Peugeot is the brainchild of Mr Annan, 42, whose family owns a white goods business, and his friend Wasseem Al Khazendar, 48, who runs the largest company in Gaza selling electrical motors and switchgear to industry.

“I had been wanting to do something like this for a long time,” said Mr Khazendar. “I wanted to make a car which was environment-friendly. Even if you aren’t adding cooking oil, diesel is bad for the environment and an electric car is much cheaper to run.”

As indeed it is. With desperately scarce petrol costing about £1 per litre – and more than three times that on the black market – a six or seven-hour charge provides enough power to cover 110 miles at a cost of just over 90p. And all you need to charge the batteries is a simple mains plug. “It is like charging your mobile,” says Mr Annan. “You can do it anywhere – even while you are shopping.”

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:00 AM
http://www.wired.com/techbiz/startups/magazine/16-06/st_cyberwalk#

An Omnidirectional Treadmill Means One Giant Leap for Virtual Reality

One of the problems with virtual reality has always been that you had to either confine yourself to a joystick or strap into some crazy Lawnmower Man-style harness. Hardly natural. This April, however, a team based at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany, unveiled the CyberWalk, an omnidirectional treadmill designed to serve as a VR-capable movement platform.

Treadmills have been tried in VR before, of course, but early models were unconvincing — either too small to keep goggled wanderers on the platform or too slow, bouncy, or gap-ridden to feel the least bit real. The CyberWalk solves these problems with a stiff, gapless, 20 x 20-foot floor and movement and feedback systems that enable quick, fluid changes of direction.

We know what you're thinking: Halo! But gamers must wait. For now, access goes to spatial-cognition and perception researchers, who will use the CyberWalk to "explore all sorts of things we haven't been able to explore before," says William Thompson, a University of Utah computer scientist. In addition to studying our brains and understanding space and movement, they'll assess potential for military and disaster-response operations and see if the device can be used to treat medical issues such as Parkinson's. After that, and only if you're good boys and girls, maybe you'll get to use it for Halo.

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:02 AM
http://wikkid.nullinator.net/index.php/28_May_2008

Mind War 4

By Hamid Golpira, Tehran Times

Everyone is worried about World War III breaking out but almost no one has noticed that we’re in the middle of Mind War 4.

Actually, the mind wars are so clandestine that we may be in the middle of Mind War 40 for all we know.

The matrix is real. The Mind War has entrapped the minds of most of humanity, and most people live in a fantasy world totally disconnected from reality.

Fortunately, a liberation movement has arisen, the freethinking resistance, which is trying to help people free their minds.

The freethinking resistance is made up of diverse groups with various ideologies. Under normal circumstances, they would be competing with each other in their endeavors to win people over.

However, having realized the gravity of the situation, they have banded together in a loose alliance in resistance to the Mind War.

Basically, the freethinking resistance tells people: “We don’t care if you think like us, but please think. Do not lose your power of reasoning.”

Each of the diverse groups in the freethinking resistance believes it is better if people think and oppose their ideology than if they blindly follow the ideology.

Mindless followers often defect to the enemy, and even if they don’t, the fact that they don’t think things through deeply undermines the movement.

In addition, accepting mindless followers destroys a movement from within because it means that they have begun using the strategy and tactics of the enemy.

It is better to have a few followers who understand the goals of the movement.

And this is why encouraging people to think for themselves is the main objective of the freethinking resistance.

There is a system of mind control that attempts to discourage people from using their higher brain centers so their thinking becomes focused in their reptilian brain, which is the most primitive part of the brain.

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:04 AM
A paper on dogs knowing when their owners are home:

http://www.sheldrake.org/articles/pdf/40.pdf

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:06 AM
http://www.treehugger.com/files/2006/07/china_unveils_w.php

The World's First "Magnetic Levitation" Wind Turbines Unveiled in China

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:07 AM
Who’s afraid of a synthetic human? (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/guest_contributors/article3949986.ece)

In the future there will be no more human beings. This is not something we should worry about.

Much of today’s scientific research may enable us eventually to repair the terrible vulnerability to which our present state of evolution has exposed us. It is widely thought inevitable that we will have to face the end of humanity as we know it. We will either have died out altogether, killed off by self-created global warming or disease, or, we may hope, we will have been replaced by our successors.

The Human Fertilisation and Embryology Bill would allow for inter-species embryos that will not only enable medical science to overcome the acute shortage of human eggs for research, but would provide models for the understanding of many disease processes, an essential precursor to the development of effective therapies.

Darwinian evolution has taken millions of years to create human beings; the next phase of evolution, a phase I call “enhancement evolution”, could occur before the end of the century. The result may be the emergence of a new species that will initially live alongside us and eventually may entirely replace humankind.

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:09 AM
The United States of Advertising (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/programmes/from_our_own_correspondent/7453357.stm)

have been taking a keen interest in television adverts for indigestion products lately.

This habit more or less coincided with my discovery of beef jerky, an American food whose classiness you can judge from the fact that it is mainly found in petrol stations.

You could make it yourself at home by cutting a tough, thin steak into tiny strips and leaving them on a sunny window ledge to dry when you went away for your summer holiday.

Please turn on JavaScript. Media requires JavaScript to play.

That should give you the very essence of jerky - dry and rubbery at the same time, and chewy - like Bovril-flavoured lino.

I started off munching on slivers of it on long drives through America's far horizons, but now I am perfectly capable of eating my own body weight of the stuff on a trip to the shops.

Advertising standards

As is often the case with addictions, I began dabbling in adverts for indigestion tablets and slowly found myself hooked on the darker, stronger material contained in commercials for prescription drugs.

America is, I think, the only country in the world which permits advertising of drugs which are available only through your doctor.

The insidious message is simple; if your doctor is not offering you this drug, maybe you should be asking for it.

Americans do accept advertising in areas where it does not tend to appear elsewhere.

It is not uncommon here for a sports presenter to be required to break away from the main business in hand to draw your attention to the succulence of a sausage or the ruggedness of a truck.

Prescription drugs though are surely different. After all, the whole point of them is that it is not considered safe to let us simply buy them over the counter.

They are so strong or so habit forming that it is up to the doctor to decide that we really need them.

Advertising subtly changes that relationship by sending us in to see the doctor filled with nameless dreads about the symptoms of diseases we might have, and a detailed knowledge of the drugs that might help us.

The TV spots in other words insidiously furnish us with the tools to torture ourselves.


On the occasions when I do lie awake at night these days the floppy, flabby, mis-shapen demons of my own future link hands and dance around my bed

I am happy enough for example, and secretly regard anyone who is happier as slightly mad - but who I am to say that the bottled sunshine of the prescription anti-depressant would not lift my mood a couple of notches further.

I sleep well enough too, but I certainly do not start the day with the radiant lustre of the woman in the sleeping pill advert.

She is perhaps the jolliest person in TV advert land's world of impotence, flatulence and obesity.

On the occasions when I do lie awake at night these days the floppy, flabby, mis-shapen demons of my own future link hands and dance around my bed.

Do I suffer from the curiously named symptoms which would alert me to my serious illnesses?

Straining. Going Too Often. Not going at all. Going when you were not expecting to. Incomplete emptying - which always puts me in mind of an inefficiently run fire drill in a public building, but which of course refers to an altogether different, trouser-dampening reality.

The biggest single market is in drugs that deal with erectile dysfunction. My favourite features a group of men who gather together to play in a band.

Side effects

I think it is meant to show them looking relaxed and happy, but they are such good musicians you cannot help noting that impotence has left them with plenty of time on their hands to practise their instruments.

The best part of the adverts tends to come towards the end when the law requires the pharmaceutical company to list the possible side effects of the various products.

Sometimes these are spelled out in a warm tone implying this is all a bit of a formality imposed by our fuss-budget of a government.

On other occasions they are rattled out at speeds normally only reached by horse racing commentators in the closing stages of a big race.

The symptoms include coughs and sneezes, runny noses and rashes but there is a more alarming end of the spectrum too where you are solemnly warned of the possibility - presumably small - of suffering a stroke, a heart attack or even death - the last and greatest side-effect of them all.

'Profoundly different'

I think about those adverts - and those side-effects - every time I open a fresh pack of dried beef using my gigantic, jerky-reinforced arms.

They are a daily reminder of the many ways in which America - superficially so similar to Western Europe - is really profoundly different.

Those adverts with their sure sense of how to play on our doubts and insecurities are a symptom of the restless energy of American capitalism and of the belief that it can apply to issues of health and happiness just as readily as it can apply to polish or pet food.

The downside of the system for me? Well, I have rampant, raging hypochondria these days to add to my chronic, jerky-induced indigestion.

And the upside? Well, there is bound to be something I can take for it.

If I can just manage to plant myself in front of the television until an advert for the tablets I am waiting for eventually pops up.

From Our Own Correspondent will be broadcast on Saturday 14 June, 2008 at 1130 BST on BBC Radio 4. Please check the programme schedules for World Service transmission times.
Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/2/hi/programmes/from_our_own_correspondent/7453357.stm

Published: 2008/06/14 11:14:36 GMT

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:13 AM
http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Terminator_Mosquitoes_to_Control_Dengue.php

Millions of transgenic mosquitoes are to be released into the fishing village of Pulau Ketam off Selangor, Malaysia, as part of an international series of field trials to fight dengue fever [1]. The Malaysian field trials will be undertaken by the Health Ministry's Institute of Medical Research (IMR) in collaboration with Oxitec Ltd., a spin-off biotech company from the University of Oxford in the UK. This follows the reported success of confined laboratory trials conducted under the supervision of the IMR over the past year.

The technique, which has won Oxitec the Technology Pioneers 2008 award at the World Economic Forum, involves releasing transgenic male Aedes mosquitoes carrying a ‘killer' gene to mate with wild female mosquitoes, which causes (nearly) all their progeny to die. This is a variant of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) that has been successfully used in wiping out other insect vectors in the past [2], though the sterile males were created by X-irradiation, and not by transgenesis.

The release of sterile males is considered “environmentally benign” [2], as only female mosquitoes bite and suck blood and transmit the disease-causing virus; not the male mosquitoes.

If the Pulau Ketam trials are successful, the transgenic killer mosquitoes will be released in bigger towns which have a high incidence of dengue [1]. Dengue is reported to be the fastest growing vector-borne disease in the world, affecting 55 percent of the global population with an estimated 100 million cases in over 100 countries. Chikungunya, a disease similar to dengue fever and also spread by the Aedes mosquito, has become a major problem, at least in India, where there were 140 000 cases in 2007.

Oxitec has received regulatory and import permits for confined evaluation in the US, France and Malaysia, while still holding discussions with regulators of other endemic countries such as India.

Environmental groups fear that releasing the transgenic mosquitoes may affect the ecosystem and cause further damage. But there has been remarkably little informed reporting on the nature of the potential hazards involved.

alkemical
06-16-2008, 10:18 AM
NASA provides "Explanation" of China Earthquake: "Electrical disturbances on edge of atmosphere & impending quakes" (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=9225)


For something to chew on:

<embed src="http://www.disclose.tv/embedPlayer.php?vid=13d7dc096493e1f77fb4ccf3e" FlashVars="config=http://www.disclose.tv/videoConfigXmlCode.php?pg=video_4730_no_0_extsite" quality="high" bgcolor="#000000" width="425" height="355" name="flvplayer" align="middle" allowScriptAccess="always" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" allowFullScreen="true" /><br><a href="http://www.disclose.tv/action/viewvideo/4730/">Benjamin Fulford: Chinese Earthquake done by HAARP</a>



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Frequency_Active_Auroral_Research_Program

The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is an investigation project to "understand, simulate and control ionospheric processes that might alter the performance of communication and surveillance systems." Started in 1993, the project is proposed to last for a period of twenty years. The project is jointly funded by the United States Air Force, the Navy, the University of Alaska and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The system was designed and built by Advanced Power Technologies, Inc. (APTI) and since 2003, by BAE Systems Inc.

alkemical
06-17-2008, 12:59 PM
http://www.technologyreview.com/Biotech/20845/

Drugs to Grow Your Brain

Compounds that trigger the growth of new brain cells might help treat depression.

alkemical
06-17-2008, 01:08 PM
The age of the rage: why are we so angry?
Our society is becoming more and more angry - with stressful situations increasingly ending in acts of physical violence (http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/the_way_we_live/article4123001.ece)

kappys
06-17-2008, 03:16 PM
http://www.i-sis.org.uk/Terminator_Mosquitoes_to_Control_Dengue.php

Millions of transgenic mosquitoes are to be released into the fishing village of Pulau Ketam off Selangor, Malaysia, as part of an international series of field trials to fight dengue fever [1]. The Malaysian field trials will be undertaken by the Health Ministry's Institute of Medical Research (IMR) in collaboration with Oxitec Ltd., a spin-off biotech company from the University of Oxford in the UK. This follows the reported success of confined laboratory trials conducted under the supervision of the IMR over the past year.

The technique, which has won Oxitec the Technology Pioneers 2008 award at the World Economic Forum, involves releasing transgenic male Aedes mosquitoes carrying a ‘killer' gene to mate with wild female mosquitoes, which causes (nearly) all their progeny to die. This is a variant of the Sterile Insect Technique (SIT) that has been successfully used in wiping out other insect vectors in the past [2], though the sterile males were created by X-irradiation, and not by transgenesis.

The release of sterile males is considered “environmentally benign” [2], as only female mosquitoes bite and suck blood and transmit the disease-causing virus; not the male mosquitoes.

If the Pulau Ketam trials are successful, the transgenic killer mosquitoes will be released in bigger towns which have a high incidence of dengue [1]. Dengue is reported to be the fastest growing vector-borne disease in the world, affecting 55 percent of the global population with an estimated 100 million cases in over 100 countries. Chikungunya, a disease similar to dengue fever and also spread by the Aedes mosquito, has become a major problem, at least in India, where there were 140 000 cases in 2007.

Oxitec has received regulatory and import permits for confined evaluation in the US, France and Malaysia, while still holding discussions with regulators of other endemic countries such as India.

Environmental groups fear that releasing the transgenic mosquitoes may affect the ecosystem and cause further damage. But there has been remarkably little informed reporting on the nature of the potential hazards involved.

This is amazing. Potentially the chance to kill or replace the vectors for malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, rift valley fever, and host of viral encephalities. If successful this would be arguably the greatest public health victory in the history of the world comparable to the eradication of smallpox and the advent of widespread vaccination.

Tombstone RJ
06-17-2008, 04:20 PM
Good stuff, keep it coming...

Kaylore
06-17-2008, 04:22 PM
http://www.wired.com/techbiz/startups/magazine/16-06/st_cyberwalk#

An Omnidirectional Treadmill Means One Giant Leap for Virtual Reality

One of the problems with virtual reality has always been that you had to either confine yourself to a joystick or strap into some crazy Lawnmower Man-style harness. Hardly natural. This April, however, a team based at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tübingen, Germany, unveiled the CyberWalk, an omnidirectional treadmill designed to serve as a VR-capable movement platform.

Treadmills have been tried in VR before, of course, but early models were unconvincing — either too small to keep goggled wanderers on the platform or too slow, bouncy, or gap-ridden to feel the least bit real. The CyberWalk solves these problems with a stiff, gapless, 20 x 20-foot floor and movement and feedback systems that enable quick, fluid changes of direction.

We know what you're thinking: Halo! But gamers must wait. For now, access goes to spatial-cognition and perception researchers, who will use the CyberWalk to "explore all sorts of things we haven't been able to explore before," says William Thompson, a University of Utah computer scientist. In addition to studying our brains and understanding space and movement, they'll assess potential for military and disaster-response operations and see if the device can be used to treat medical issues such as Parkinson's. After that, and only if you're good boys and girls, maybe you'll get to use it for Halo.
here you go

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/d-8eVcN2z3k&hl=en"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/d-8eVcN2z3k&hl=en" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Kaylore
06-17-2008, 04:27 PM
Who’s afraid of a synthetic human? (http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/guest_contributors/article3949986.ece)

In the future there will be no more human beings. This is not something we should worry about.

After reading his article, this man has a very narrow view of humanity.

alkemical
06-18-2008, 07:45 AM
This is amazing. Potentially the chance to kill or replace the vectors for malaria, dengue fever, yellow fever, rift valley fever, and host of viral encephalities. If successful this would be arguably the greatest public health victory in the history of the world comparable to the eradication of smallpox and the advent of widespread vaccination.

ya i agree - i also see the dystopian view of say....releasing a SARS or something - but as with anything - it's a tool....

alkemical
06-18-2008, 07:47 AM
After reading his article, this man has a very narrow view of humanity.

Well, he IS a professor. ;p

alkemical
06-18-2008, 12:24 PM
Don't Talk To The Police (http://www.disinfo.com/content/story.php?title=Dont-Talk-To-Police)

Law professor James Duane explains why innocent civilians should never talk to the police, about anything. He presents a myriad of reasons why an innocuous conversation with (or the act of providing information to) the police could come back to haunt you.

Interestingly, in a quarter of wrongfully-convicted cases later exonerated by DNA evidence, the innocent defendants were convicted based on 'incriminating' statements made to the police.

alkemical
06-18-2008, 12:26 PM
AN ARMY OF FUN - VIDEO ARCADE TO LURE RECRUITS (http://www.nypost.com/seven/06152008/news/regionalnews/an_army_of_fun_115560.htm)

June 15, 2008 -- We're going to Army World!

In August, the military plans to open its first Army Experience Center, a combination recruiting center/video arcade/retail store to promote serving your country.

Rumored to becoming to Times Square, it'll be like the Disney Store, except with guns and camouflage.

The 14,500-square-foot center will be a multimedia extrava ganza with high-tech gadgetry, including flight simulators and life-size soldier video games.

That person greeting you at the door? That's an actual Army of ficer.

While the Army will sell a small amount of merchandise at the venue, the focus is on building "brand experi ences" that give poten tial recruits a taste of military service. (cont'd on site...)

alkemical
06-18-2008, 02:28 PM
http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2008/06/16/2275686.htm?site=science&topic=latest

Scientists to mimic earth's spinning core

kappys
06-18-2008, 09:42 PM
Don't Talk To The Police (http://www.disinfo.com/content/story.php?title=Dont-Talk-To-Police)

Law professor James Duane explains why innocent civilians should never talk to the police, about anything. He presents a myriad of reasons why an innocuous conversation with (or the act of providing information to) the police could come back to haunt you.

Interestingly, in a quarter of wrongfully-convicted cases later exonerated by DNA evidence, the innocent defendants were convicted based on 'incriminating' statements made to the police.


Perhaps there's more behind those stop snitchin T-shirts than I originally gave them credit for.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 09:34 AM
Most complex crop circle ever discovered in British fields (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/2144652/Most-complex-crop-circle-ever-discovered-in-British-fields.html)

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/00679/crop404_679706c.jpg

"The code is based on 10 angular segments with the radial jumps being the indicator of each segment.

"Starting at the centre and counting the number of one-tenth segments in each section contained by the change in radius clearly shows the values of the first 10 digits in the value of pi."

Lucy Pringle, a researcher of crop formations, said: "This is an astounding development - it is a seminal event."

Mathematics codes and geometric patterns have long been an important factor in crop circle formations. One of the best known formations showed the image of a highly complex set of shapes known as The Julia Set, 12 years ago.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 10:26 AM
Why are NASA Astrobiologists Investigating a Remote Canadian Lake? (http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2008/06/why-are-nasa-as.html)

At first glance, the remote lake and the surrounding landscape is not a place where you’d expect to find anything NASA would be interested in, but they’ve been studying the area for over a decade now. What is it they are after?

Greg Slater, an environmental geochemist in the Faculty of Science at McMaster University, is a part of the latest exploration effort at the lake. He says the objects of interest are far down below the surface. Unique carbonate rock structures, known as microbialites are are covered with microbes. These mysterious long, red fingers stand like sentinels at the bottom of the mysteriously deep Pavilion Lake, B.C. Are they life forms? An international team of researchers that includes NASA astronauts and a multi-disciplinary team of other scientists, want to answer that question, and by doing so they hope to unlock secrets useful for the search for life on Mars. The unique growths are home to a thriving population of various kinds of bacteria. The researchers are trying to determine whether bacteria built the structures, and if so, how. How are single-celled organism able to build impressively sized structures, and could single-celled organisms be doing the same thing on other planets as well?

"Are they the result of biological or geological processes? Why are there different microbes living on them and how long have these microbial communities been preserved? These are some of our big questions," says Slater, part of an international team researching these strange specimens.

This has been an ongoing mystery for scientists. They didn’t know what they were when they were first discovered in 1997, and they still don’t know exactly what they are and how they formed.

"These unique and rare microbialite formations are important to NASA's astrobiology effort because they are big, macroscopic evidence of microscopic life," said Dr. Chris McKay, a scientist with the NASA Astrobiology Institute said back in 1998 when NASA first started exploring the lake. "They are helping us understand one of the big astrobiology questions how early life took hold and began to flourish on Earth. These fossils are like seeing a billion-year-old footprint in the sand and comparing it to a modern human foot.”

alkemical
06-19-2008, 10:30 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/world/europe/article4158509.ece

http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=4077

http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=4088

“Why do bin Laden and [his accomplice] al-Zawahiri take the trouble to send tapes to the media rather then call them? They know there are technologies that can trace people’s location and therefore they avoid it,” he explains.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 10:34 AM
http://secretsun.blogspot.com/2008/06/new-city-of-sun.html

The New City of the Sun?

The Sun's been popping up so much in so many strange contexts that it's really getting past the point of brushing it all off as a design fad. Especially when you look at advertisements like this. Now, when you think of American cities that would be associated with the Sun you think Phoenix, Los Angeles, Miami, Atlanta, maybe Houston- I guarantee there's probably one city that no one thinks of...

...and that's Philadelphia. I love Philly, but I'm a bit stumped what the exoteric explanation would be for using that alchemical-looking Sun as the new logo for "Historic Philadelphia." But considering that Philly was an historic stronghold for the Freemasons I sure as hell can guess what the esoteric one might be. Just in case you've never seen it, the logo for the Grand Lodge of Pa. is not entirely dissimilar to the logo for this new advertising blitz...

Philadelphia was also the first city on the latest King Tut tour, which was at the Franklin Institute. In case you forgot, King Tut was the regent who restored the old gods to Egypt after a period of strife and plague during the tumultuous reign of the fantatical monotheist Akhenaten.

And -of course- there never seems to be any kind of museum exhibit dealing with Egypt that isn't followed by something to do with Mars. And the Franklin Institute's "Next Stop Mars" exhibit is certainly no exception. Must be those nutty high-placed Hoagland fans again...

alkemical
06-19-2008, 10:45 AM
http://www.ft.com/cms/s/0/04dfa24c-3db6-11dd-bbb5-0000779fd2ac.html?nclick_check=1

US N-weapons parts missing, Pentagon says

By Demetri Sevastopulo in Washington

Published: June 19 2008 05:13 | Last updated: June 19 2008 05:13

The US military cannot locate hundreds of sensitive nuclear missile components, according to several government officials familiar with a Pentagon report on nuclear safeguards.

Robert Gates, US defence secretary, recently fired both the US Air Force chief of staff and air force secretary after an investigation blamed the air force for the inadvertent shipment of nuclear missile nose cones to Taiwan.

According to previously undisclosed details obtained by the FT, the investigation also concluded that the air force could not account for many sensitive components previously included in its nuclear inventory.

One official said the number of missing components was more than 1,000.

The disclosure is the latest embarrassing episode for the air force, which last year had to explain how a bomber mistakenly carried six nuclear missiles across the US. The incidents have raised concerns about US nuclear safeguards as Washington presses other countries to bolster counter-proliferation measures.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 10:51 AM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080617151845.htm

Symmetry Of Homosexual Brain Resembles That Of Opposite Sex, Swedish Study Finds

ScienceDaily (Jun. 18, 2008) — Swedish researchers have found that some physical attributes of the homosexual brain resemble those found in the opposite sex, according to an article published online (June 16) in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 12:01 PM
<embed src="http://www.metacafe.com/fplayer/397767/the_musical_pillars_of_vittahla_temple_hampi.swf" width="400" height="345" wmode="transparent" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"> </embed><br><font size = 1><a href="http://www.metacafe.com/watch/397767/the_musical_pillars_of_vittahla_temple_hampi/">The Musical Pillars Of Vittahla Temple Hampi</a> - <a href="http://www.metacafe.com/">Click here for another funny movie. </a></font>

alkemical
06-19-2008, 12:33 PM
http://hiddenmysteries.net/geeklog/article.php?story=20070512093125130

The Ahmes code

The mathematical system in ancient Egypt was application-oriented, devised -- complete with fractions -- to manage practical matters. Assem Deif sums up the old methods

If an ancient Egyptian wanted to divide a loaf of bread among a group of workers or figure out the manpower needed to achieve a certain task, he used addition and doubling instead of the four operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication, and division we use today. It was their script that compelled them to use these operations, since they could double any given number by simply drawing the same symbol next to it. For a similar reason they are only used with unit fractions -- those whose numerator is 1 -- when solving problems about ratios.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 12:39 PM
Healthy lifestyle triggers genetic changes: study (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25201082)

In a small study, the researchers tracked 30 men with low-risk prostate cancer who decided against conventional medical treatment such as surgery and radiation or hormone therapy.

The men underwent three months of major lifestyle changes, including eating a diet rich in fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and soy products, moderate exercise such as walking for half an hour a day, and an hour of daily stress management methods such as meditation.

As expected, they lost weight, lowered their blood pressure and saw other health improvements. But the researchers found more profound changes when they compared prostate biopsies taken before and after the lifestyle changes.

After the three months, the men had changes in activity in about 500 genes -- including 48 that were turned on and 453 genes that were turned off.

The activity of disease-preventing genes increased while a number of disease-promoting genes, including those involved in prostate cancer and breast cancer, shut down, according to the study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 12:48 PM
NASA provides "Explanation" of China Earthquake: "Electrical disturbances on edge of atmosphere & impending quakes" (http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=9225)


For something to chew on:

<embed src="http://www.disclose.tv/embedPlayer.php?vid=13d7dc096493e1f77fb4ccf3e" FlashVars="config=http://www.disclose.tv/videoConfigXmlCode.php?pg=video_4730_no_0_extsite" quality="high" bgcolor="#000000" width="425" height="355" name="flvplayer" align="middle" allowScriptAccess="always" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" allowFullScreen="true" /><br><a href="http://www.disclose.tv/action/viewvideo/4730/">Benjamin Fulford: Chinese Earthquake done by HAARP</a>



http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/High_Frequency_Active_Auroral_Research_Program

The High Frequency Active Auroral Research Program (HAARP) is an investigation project to "understand, simulate and control ionospheric processes that might alter the performance of communication and surveillance systems." Started in 1993, the project is proposed to last for a period of twenty years. The project is jointly funded by the United States Air Force, the Navy, the University of Alaska and Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). The system was designed and built by Advanced Power Technologies, Inc. (APTI) and since 2003, by BAE Systems Inc.


HAARP, Chemtrails and Earthquakes – Any connection? (http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/65097)

Dudeskey
06-19-2008, 12:53 PM
I've read a bit about HAARP... like Tesla on steroids... scary ****

matter of fact I saw that video a couple weeks ago...

alkemical
06-19-2008, 01:17 PM
I've read a bit about HAARP... like Tesla on steroids... scary ****

matter of fact I saw that video a couple weeks ago...

Ya, i'm interested in it. I've followed it a bit on Coast2coastam - when Art would cover it a lot.....

alkemical
06-19-2008, 01:18 PM
http://www.allheadlinenews.com/articles/7011278519

Tallahassee, FL (AHN) -- A study released this week by the Florida Medical Examiners Commission showed that prescription drug deaths are three times that of deaths caused by illegal drugs.

Researchers examined 168, 900 autopsy reports and concluded that there has been an 80 percent increase in prescription drug related deaths over the last six years.

According to reports, monitoring laws are less stringent in Florida than in other states due to concerns over privacy. This makes is easier for doctor shoppers, liberal providers, and drug shipment robbers to obtain the legal drugs, and the result is a large quantity of prescription drugs are available to people with out a prescription.

The study found that 2,328 people died of opiate, or painkiller, overdoses. Another 743 died from over-consuming benzodiazepine, which include drugs like Valium and Xanax. Those numbers were compared to the 989 people who died of cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamine overdoses.

According to the Drug Enforcement Administration, as many as 7 million Americans are abusing prescription medication, which is more than people using cocaine, heroin, hallucinogens, Ecstasy and inhalants combined.

Prescription drug deaths are also the fourth leading cause of death in the United States, after heart disease, cancer and stroke.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 01:46 PM
Import, or export UFO?

http://astrobio.net/news/modules.php?op=modload&name=News&file=article&sid=2772&mode=thread&order=0&thold=0

University of Florida mechanical and aerospace engineering associate professor Subrata Roy has submitted a patent application for a circular, spinning aircraft design reminiscent of the spaceships seen in countless Hollywood films. Roy, however, calls his design a "wingless electromagnetic air vehicle," or WEAV.

The proposed prototype is small - the aircraft will measure less than six inches across - and will be efficient enough to be powered by on-board batteries.

Roy said the design can be scaled up and theoretically should work in a much larger form. Even in miniature, though, the design has many uses.

The most obvious functions would be surveillance and navigation. The aircraft could be designed to carry a camera and light and be controlled remotely at great distances, he said.

Fittingly, Roy said his flying saucer one day could soar through atmospheres other than Earth's own. For example, the aircraft would be an ideal vehicle for the exploration of Titan, Saturn's sixth moon, which has high air density and low gravity, Roy said. The technology could benefit future astrobiology studies on Titan concerning the moon's organic chemistry. Studying organic chemistry on Titan could yield clues about the origin of life's precursor molecules on Earth.

http://www.astrobio.net/albums/mission/adb.jpg


http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=080617111108.b1lbw8yy&show_article=1&image=large

Chinese company develops 'UFO': report

A Chinese company has developed a prototype flying saucer that can hover in the air and be controlled remotely from afar, state press said Tuesday.

The aircraft is 1.2 metres (four feet) in diameter and is able to take off and land vertically and hover at an altitude of up to 1,000 metres (yards), Xinhua news agency said.

The unmanned disc is driven by a propeller and can be controlled remotely or sent on a preset flight path, it said.

Its top speed is 80 kilometres (50 miles) per hour, it added.

It took the Harbin Smart Special Aerocraft Co Ltd 12 years and 28 million yuan (4.1 million dollars) to develop the prototype craft, which is designed for aerial photography, geological surveys and emergency lighting, the report said.

http://img.breitbart.com/images/2008/6/17/080617111108.b1lbw8yy/CPS.MTB95.170608131048.photo00.photo.jpg

alkemical
06-19-2008, 01:51 PM
http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2008/06/language_specific_ma.html

I've just found this fascinating study on language and psychosis that found that multilingual psychotic patients can present with either different or less psychotic symptoms depending on the language they use.

It's a 2001 study from The British Journal of Medical Psychology that collected existing case studies from the medical literature and reports on several new examples.

There have been previous accounts of bilingual or 'polyglot' patients who only hear voices in one of their languages, but this seems to be the first study to assess psychotic symptoms using a standardised measure.

This is from the introduction, which outlines some of the curious effects:

Zulueta’s (1984) review article on the implications of bilingualism in the study and treatment of psychiatric disorders showed that certain psychotic fluent bilinguals, who had learnt their second language during or after puberty, could present with different psychotic phenomena depending on which language they used. Most of these patients tended to present as more disturbed in their primary ‘mother tongue’ and as less disturbed in their second language (Castillo, 1970; Hemphill, 1971).

Some patients were thought disordered in one language and less so or not at all in their other language; some complained of having delusions in one language and not in their other language, and some experienced auditory hallucinations in one language and not in another. Moreover, some patients who were fluent bilinguals lost their linguistic competence in their second language during their psychotic illness (Heinemann & Assion, 1996; Hughes, 1981).

The case of Mr Z illustrates the marked change in phenomenology that can be observed in such patients. He was a 30-year-old patient diagnosed as hypomanic with a history of bipolar illnesses. His mother tongue was English, and he had learnt Spanish after puberty. When he spoke in English, he was markedly thought-disordered and complained of hallucinations. On one occasion, whilst being interviewed by his psychiatrist, he addressed her spontaneously in Spanish, knowing that she was a Spanish speaker.

To his surprise, and hers, he discovered that when he spoke in Spanish, he no longer appeared to be thought-disordered. He commented on this difference by observing, in Spanish, that when he spoke in this language, he felt he was ‘sane’, but when he spoke in English, he went ‘mad’ (Zulueta, 1984). This bilingual dialogue took place within the space of half an hour. It would seem that in this case and in others with similar differences in psychotic phenomena across languages, the second language may, in some cases, exert a protective function in terms of psychotic symptoms.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 01:59 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/mg19826605.000-navigating-seals-perform-a-star-turn.html

Navigating seals perform a star turn

SEALS in the open ocean may be able to navigate by the stars.

Whales, sea lions and seals exhibit a behaviour called spyhopping, where they stick their heads out of the water, apparently surveying their surroundings. This led some biologists to suspect that these mammals might use the stars for navigation.

Björn Mauck of the University of Southern Denmark in Odense and colleagues used a specially built pool planetarium to test two harbour seals on their ability to recognise and orient themselves by the stars. The 5-metre round pool was covered by a dome onto which was projected a simulation of the northern sky, with about 6000 stars.

The team highlighted a particular star with a laser pointer, rewarding the seals for swimming towards it. They found that even when the whole sky was rotated at random, the seals could still home in on the star with very high accuracy (Animal Cognition, DOI: 10.1007/s10071-008-0156-1).

"Seals and many other animals are exposed to the starry sky every clear night, and thus certainly have sufficient opportunities to learn the patterns of stars," says Mauck.

The seals' technique appears to be similar to that of Polynesian sailors, who traditionally linked stars to spots on the horizon where they rise.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 02:02 PM
Dino's in the news:

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/06/080617-utah-dinosaurs.html

http://ngm.nationalgeographic.com/2008/07/tyrannosaur-trap/gwin-text

alkemical
06-19-2008, 02:37 PM
http://www.reason.com/news/show/127058.html

The Perils of Potent Pot

Is better marijuana really worse for you?

alkemical
06-19-2008, 03:05 PM
Kellogg's, LEGO team up to train kids to choke

http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/29059

alkemical
06-19-2008, 03:05 PM
http://www.judicialwatch.org/iraqi-oil-maps.shtml

These are documents turned over by the Commerce Department, under a March 5, 2002 court order as a result of Judicial Watch’s Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) lawsuit concerning the activities of the Cheney Energy Task Force. The documents contain a map of Iraqi oilfields, pipelines, refineries and terminals, as well as 2 charts detailing Iraqi oil and gas projects, and “Foreign Suitors for Iraqi Oilfield Contracts.” The documents are dated March 2001. Click here to view the press release.

alkemical
06-19-2008, 03:09 PM
Monsoon hits India early for first time in more than a century, killing 23 (http://canadianpress.google.com/article/ALeqM5hbe0bXM-heBaw25gK1qR-B6qmyUA)

alkemical
06-20-2008, 02:04 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/article/dn14168-cancer-patient-cured-with-his-own-immune-system.html

A cure for cancer teems through our veins, but the trick is harnessing the immune system's tumour-destroying cells, say doctors.

Now, a US team has developed a new way to turn a patient's T-cells against a deadly, metastasised skin cancer. A 55-year old man who received the immune boost lives tumour-free, more than two years after treatment.

“He had a remarkable response,” says Cassian Yee, an immunologist at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Washington, US, who developed the new treatment.

Yee’s team treated eight other melanoma patients, but he says it is too early to tell whether their tumours have vanished as well.

Other cancer experts say the results could pave the road for a cancer vaccine, but more proof with additional patients is needed.

alkemical
06-20-2008, 02:06 PM
BroadStar Achieves Breakthrough In Low-Cost Energy Production With New Generation Wind Turbine (http://www.energy-daily.com/reports/BroadStar_Achieves_Breakthrough_In_Low_Cost_Energy _Production_With_New_Generation_Wind_Turbine_999.h tml)

alkemical
06-20-2008, 02:08 PM
Splinter OTO Groups Can No Longer Call Themselves “OTO” (http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/06/19/splinter-oto-groups-can-no-longer-call-themselves-oto/)

“The Ordo Templi Orientis (O.T.O.), an esoteric fraternal order which is perhaps best known for its associations with former leader and primary ritualist/liturgist Aleister Crowley, has recently achieved two major legal victories. The more important of the two regards trademark control over the terms “OTO” and “O.T.O.” in the UK.

“I am happy to report that OTO has prevailed against Starfire Publishing Ltd.’s opposition to our trademarks for “OTO” and “O.T.O.” in the United Kingdom. In her decision of June 8, Anna Carbone, the Appointed Person hearing OTO’s appeal, found in favor of OTO, overturning a previous decision in favor of Starfire. OTO’s registrations of the marks “OTO” and “O.T.O.” are now proceeding normally in the UK, joining our previous registrations of “Ordo Templi Orientis” and the OTO Lamen. Under UK law, there can be no further appeal of a decision by an Appointed Person, in either the Trademark Registry or High Court.”

What does this decision mean? Joined with the international order’s trademark control in the United States (and the rest of the world), it means that a variety of splinter groups using the term “OTO” (or variations thereof) must now cease or risk legal action. The OTO’s official press release specifically names British occultist Kenneth Grant’s “Typhonian” Ordo Templi Orientis in its warning to groups started by expelled or resigned members.”

alkemical
06-23-2008, 10:19 AM
Large ‘Planet X’ may lurk beyond Pluto - Hidden world would explain dynamics of solar system’s outer regions (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25244693/)

An icy, unknown world might lurk in the distant reaches of our solar system beyond the orbit of Pluto, according to a new computer model.

The hidden world — thought to be much bigger than Pluto based on the model — could explain unusual features of the Kuiper Belt, a region of space beyond Neptune littered with icy and rocky bodies. Its existence would satisfy the long-held hopes and hypotheses for a "Planet X" envisioned by scientists and sci-fi buffs alike.

alkemical
06-23-2008, 10:20 AM
Christianity 'could die out within a century' (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/2160495/Christianity-%27could-die-out-within-a-century%27.html#continue)

Research by the Orthodox Jewish organisation Aish found that just over a third of people thought religions like Christianity and Judaism would still be practiced in Britain in 100 years' time.

Although four in 10 people said they would choose to be a member of the Christian religion, almost the same number said they would rather practice no religion at all.

Buddhism however, proved more attractive than both Islam and Judaism, and was chosen by nine per cent of those questioned.

alkemical
06-23-2008, 10:22 AM
Inside a NWO Control Grid Tradeshow (http://pupaganda.com/2008/06/19/inside-a-nwo-control-grid-tradeshow.aspx)

Since the CIA’s al-Qaeda does not pose a threat to the “homeland” and the domestic terrorists routinely paraded before us are nothing more than a sick joke, the question is: what the heck will all the “toys” in this video be used for? Obviously, they will be used against you, that is if you resist the government or dare organize in protest. It is no mistake there are Black Hawk helicopters buzzing around Denver, Colorado, as I write this, and it is also no mistake there are Marines in Indianapolis. As Lee Rogers writes, it is all about engineering us to accept the NWO control grid. “Homeland Security” is a growth business… and so is fascism.

Kaylore
06-23-2008, 10:43 AM
Inside a NWO Control Grid Tradeshow (http://pupaganda.com/2008/06/19/inside-a-nwo-control-grid-tradeshow.aspx)

Since the CIA’s al-Qaeda does not pose a threat to the “homeland” and the domestic terrorists routinely paraded before us are nothing more than a sick joke, the question is: what the heck will all the “toys” in this video be used for? Obviously, they will be used against you, that is if you resist the government or dare organize in protest. It is no mistake there are Black Hawk helicopters buzzing around Denver, Colorado, as I write this, and it is also no mistake there are Marines in Indianapolis. As Lee Rogers writes, it is all about engineering us to accept the NWO control grid. “Homeland Security” is a growth business… and so is fascism.

LOL I love the slippery slope. There are black hawk helicopters in Colorado!!!!!! Marines are in Indianapolis!!!!!!!!!! We upgrade our technology!!!!!!!! \/\/3 R t3h 7@C1$t$!!!11!!1!11!

alkemical
06-23-2008, 11:53 AM
The video is pretty good though, it was from a TIME broadcast at the tradeshow - was interesting.

Dudeskey
06-23-2008, 12:34 PM
Inside a NWO Control Grid Tradeshow (http://pupaganda.com/2008/06/19/inside-a-nwo-control-grid-tradeshow.aspx)

Since the CIA’s al-Qaeda does not pose a threat to the “homeland” and the domestic terrorists routinely paraded before us are nothing more than a sick joke, the question is: what the heck will all the “toys” in this video be used for? Obviously, they will be used against you, that is if you resist the government or dare organize in protest. It is no mistake there are Black Hawk helicopters buzzing around Denver, Colorado, as I write this, and it is also no mistake there are Marines in Indianapolis. As Lee Rogers writes, it is all about engineering us to accept the NWO control grid. “Homeland Security” is a growth business… and so is fascism.

Yep... DHS isn't here for us... its to protect them from us when we all finally get pissed at the gubmint... Why do you think FEMA has jack **** for equipment?

alkemical
06-23-2008, 12:35 PM
Yep... DHS isn't here for us... its to protect them from us when we all finally get pissed at the gubmint... Why do you think FEMA has jack **** for equipment?

you win a prize - but...well- i'm broke.

Dudeskey
06-23-2008, 12:43 PM
you win a prize - but...well- i'm broke.

lol, me too... I'm working toward getting out of the trucking game so I'm taking online classes...

alkemical
06-23-2008, 12:58 PM
lol, me too... I'm working toward getting out of the trucking game so I'm taking online classes...

I've just been payin' **** off.

Life took an interesting turn....

anyway - thanks for checking out this thread - if at anytime anyone has cool **** to post - you can put it here. I'm always interested in interesting things.

alkemical
06-23-2008, 12:59 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/femail/article-1028222/I-create-gods-time--I-think-exist.html

I create gods all the time - now I think one might exist, says fantasy author Terry Pratchett

alkemical
06-23-2008, 02:27 PM
A new look at mystical Los Angeles and its high priest, Manly Hall (http://www.latimes.com/features/books/la-et-hall21-2008jun21,0,5026720.story)

alkemical
06-24-2008, 08:34 AM
HAARP, Chemtrails and Earthquakes – Any connection? (http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/65097)


http://www.conspiracyarchive.com/Commentary/HAARP_Colorado.htm

Agenda-Driven Response: HAARP and the Army's Land-Grab in Colorado

alkemical
06-24-2008, 09:37 AM
http://intelstrike.com/?p=276

Psychopathic Groups and Distorted Definitions

Trademark of the Psychopath

The use of an inner, or esoteric, language to intentionally deceive is a trademark characteristic of the psychopathic personality or a psychopathically dominated group. This is nicely summarized in Andrew M. Lobaczewski’s Political Ponerology: A Science on the Nature of Evil Adjusted for Political Purposes (1998) [1]:

“An ideology of a secondarily ponerogenic association [secondary stage of infiltration by psychopathic individuals] is formed by gradual adaptation of the primary ideology to functions and goals other than the original formative ones. A certain kind of layering or schizophrenia of ideology takes place during the ponerization process. The outer layer closest to the original content is used for the group’s propaganda purposes, especially regarding the outside world, although it can in part also be used inside with regard to disbelieving lower-echelon members. The second layer presents the elite with no problems of comprehension: it is more hermetic, generally composed by slipping a different meaning into the same names. Since identical names signify different contents depending on the layer in question, understanding this “doubletalk” requires simultaneous fluency in both languages.

Average people succumb to the first layer’s suggestive insinuations for a long time before they learn to understand the second one as well. Anyone with certain psychological deviations, especially if he is wearing the mask of normality with which we are familiar [a psychopath], immediately perceives the second layer to be attractive and significant; after all, it was built by people like him. Comprehending this doubletalk is therefore a vexatious task, provoking quite understandable psychological resistance; this very duality of language, however, is a pathognomonic [specific characteristics of a disease] symptom indicating that the human union in question is touched by the ponerogenic process to an advanced degree.” - 116

alkemical
06-24-2008, 12:55 PM
The Fat Lady's Aria? Humanity's Last Stand? Or Just Another Apocalypse Soon? (http://www.lacitybeat.com/cms/story/detail/the_fat_lady_s_aria_humanity_s_last_stand_or_just_ another_apocalypse_soon/7137/)

December 21, 2012, is coming in hard with multiple threats, and conflicting theories being actively debated on any and all forums that offer media time to the fringe and the fantastic. One marketplace of such ideas is George Noory’s Coast to Coast AM syndicated radio show. As the successor to the legendary Art Bell, Noory maintains the same format of paranormal and paranoid talk radio that gave Bell the highest ratings in syndicated nighttime talk. Call-in listeners warn of 12.21.2012 bringing an instant extinction of our current reality, much in the manner of the last episode of The Sopranos, but encompassing the entire universe. Alternative scenarios range from the conventional – exploding volcanoes, boiling oceans, shifting tectonic plates, and/or alien invasion, to a more metaphysical bonding that will bring humanity closer to a functioning, Jungian-style planetary mind, enabling us to clean up the mess we’ve made with our rugged individualism. (Noory added his own spike of drama to the mix when he announced he would only extend his current Coast to Coast AM contract until 2012, so he could see out the significant date on air. Later, however, pragmatism kicked in and his deal now runs to 2017.)

At the core of the flourishing furor over 2012 is the Mayan calendar. A circular replica of a Mesoamerican calendar stone has hung for years on the wall behind my desk, a flat ceramic disc the green of corroded copper. Right now a version of the same calendar stone, in the form of a spring-loaded spinning top, is currently being given away by Burger King with Kids Meals as part of a promotion for Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull. Both are actually copies of the huge Aztec calendar stone preserved in the Museo Nacional de Antropologia in Mexico City. Aztec rather than Mayan, but close enough for discomfort when it’s also used on Web pages explaining how the Mayan calendar supposedly predicts that the Fat Lady’s Terminal Aria will sound, dead on the Winter Solstice of 2012.

That the “Long Count” of the Mayan calendar mysteriously appears to come to an end in 2012 has been discussed in the counterculture since writer and supposed mystic José Arguelles promoted his concept of the Harmonic Convergence in 1987. Before Arguelles raised the hackles of skeptics by extending his idea of an earth-changing planetary alignment beyond Mayan mathematics to claims of telepathically received prophecies, the Book of Revelation, and a race of “galactic masters,” we learned that the Mayan calendar was incredibly complicated, dated back to the sixth century B.C., and functioned on mind-snapping multiples of synchronized and interlocking cycles. A 260-day sacred year is combined with a more conventional 360-day solar year, plus a lunar calendar, and the notorious Long Count that starts from the Mayans’ concept of the dawn of time – around 3114 B.C. – and runs to its calculated termination at the Winter Solstice of 2012. Just to add to the difficulties for those who aren’t Mayan scholars, the calendar also reflects the Mayans’ belief that time was not only cyclic, but its cycles involved the regular destruction and rebirth of the universe.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 12:56 PM
Baltic Midsummer Feast Draws on a Distant Past (http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/06/23/baltic-midsummer-feast-draws-on-a-distant-past/)


“Estonians, Latvians and Lithuanians around the world are set to celebrate midsummer festivals Monday night with rites drawing deeply on pagan traditions of the Baltic people. “Marking the two longest days of the year, the celebration is called Jani (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/J%C4%81%C5%86i) in Latvia, Jaanipaev in Estonia, and Saint Jonas festival in Lithuania.

Christianity adopted the sun-worship holiday as the one dedicated to John the Baptist, but centuries later, pagan traditions still remain an integral part of the celebration. On June 23, Latvians crowned with wreaths of oak leaves flock to the countryside. Regarded as a holy tree in pagan times, the oak still features widely in Latvian folk songs. As the evening draws in, Latvians and Estonians light bonfires and sing folk songs or jump through the flames, seen as a way to guarantee prosperity. The white sandy beaches of the Gulf of Riga light up with bonfires as Latvians and Estonians flee cities to nature.”

alkemical
06-24-2008, 01:33 PM
Socialists made eugenics fashionable (http://www.nationalpost.com/opinion/story.html?id=592291)

An exhibition of the history of those scientific ideas that gave a grimy intellectual veneer to the Nazi genocide opened recently at the Canadian War Museum in Ottawa. The collection centres on eugenics, the notion that humanity can be improved and perfected by selective breeding and the elimination of individuals and groups considered to be undesirable. Entitled Deadly Medicine: Creating the Master Race, it reveals how it was not thoughtless right-wing thugs as much as writers and scientists, the intellectual elite, who led the movement.

The exhibit is important, accurate but, regrettably, long overdue. It also fails to stress just how much the socialist left initiated and supported the eugenics campaign, not only in Germany but in Britain, the U. S. and the rest of Europe. Playwright George Bernard Shaw, English social democrat leader Sydney Webb and, in Canada, Tommy Douglas were just three influential socialists who called, for example, for the mass sterilization of the handicapped. In his Master's thesis The Problems of the Subnormal Family, the now revered Douglas argued that the mentally and even physically disabled should be sterilized and sent to camps so as not to "infect" the rest of the population.

It is deeply significant that few if any of Douglas's left-wing comrades in this country or internationally were surprised or offended by his proposals. Indeed the early fascism of 1920s Italy, while unsavoury and dictatorial, had little connection with social engineering and eugenics. The latter German version of fascism was influenced not by ultra conservatism in southern Europe but, as is made clear in the writings of the Nazi ideologues, by the Marxist left.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 01:36 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1028560/As-mystery-plague-threatens-wipe-bees-scientist-reveal-survival-depends-them.html

The mountains of southern Sichuan in China are covered in pear trees.

Every April, they are home to a strange sight: thousands of people holding bamboo sticks with chicken feathers attached to the end, clambering among the blossom-laden branches.

Closer inspection reveals that children, parents and even grandparents are pollinating the trees by hand.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 01:44 PM
Exposed: Harvard Shrink Gets Rich Labeling Kids Bipolar (http://www.alternet.org/healthwellness/88333/)

On June 8, 2008, the New York Times reported the following about Joseph Biederman: "A world-renowned Harvard child psychiatrist whose work has helped fuel an explosion in the use of powerful anti-psychotic medicines in children earned at least $1.6 million in consulting fees from drug makers from 2000 to 2007 but for years did not report much of this income to university officials, according to information given congressional investigators."

Due in part to Biederman's influence, the number of American children and adolescents treated for bipolar disorder increased 40-fold from 1994 to 2003, and as Bloomberg News reported (September 2007), "The expanded use of bipolar as a pediatric diagnosis has made children the fastest-growing part of the $11.5 billion U.S. market for anti-psychotic drugs."

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:04 PM
Milwaukee: Rumor of Free Food Vouchers Draws 2,500 People to Community Services Center, Fights Break Out, Cops Called, Barricades Established; No Food Vouchers Today (http://cryptogon.com/?p=2787)

Via: Milwaukee Journal Sentinel:

Milwaukee police said they have restored order this morning but will remain outside of the Marcia P. Coggs Human Services Center after a crowd awaiting free food vouchers - which never were to be distributed - became unruly this morning.

Police Department spokeswoman Anne E. Schwartz said Vliet St., between N. 12th and N. 13th streets, is blocked, and barricades have been installed so people are able to line up around the block of the building at 1220 W. Vliet St.

“That line is pretty huge,” Schwartz said. “We are going to be here for the duration.”

Police responded to the building about 7 a.m. after 2,500 people lined up on the sidewalk and eventually began to block traffic in the street. A number of people had rushed the door, and some people became caught in the crush; however, there were no serious injuries, according to Schwartz.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:05 PM
MIT Group Makes Low-Cost Solar Concentrator (http://cryptogon.com/?p=2791)

Via: Boston Herald:

Spencer Ahrens, a 23-year-old mechanical engineer, was on MIT’s campus last week, holding a wooden plank, surrounded by onlookers.

Slowly, he turned that wooden plank before a series of mirrors that had been placed inside an aluminum frame, until the wood caught fire.

That was quite a moment, recalled Matthew Ritter, one of the onlookers.

“Let’s just say it was a small combustion for wood materials, but a giant explosion of solar energy,” he said.

Ahrens, Ritter and the other people who helped create the solar-powered dish that harnessed the sunlight that eventually burned the wood say they’ve just created the world’s most cost-efficient solar power system.

They also say these dishes may revolutionize global energy production.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:15 PM
You Are What You Keep - A psychologist says your stuff reveals a lot more about you than you'd think (http://www.newsweek.com/id/142921)

A psychology professor who spends his days poking around in other people's bedrooms, offices, and medicine cabinets, Gosling believes that our artifacts--our books, music, photos, posters, and, yes, even our bottle caps--serve as nonverbal cues to the rest of the world as to who we are and what we value. As he writes in his book "Snoop: What Your Stuff Says About You," "people's possessions can tell us even more about their personalities than face-to-face meetings, or, sometimes, what their best friends say about them." The reporter with the messy floor, for example, struck Gosling as most likely a male in his early 30s. (Correct.) He also intuited the reporter is an extravert, emotionally stable, open, creative, liberal, disorganized, has a quirky sense of humor, and is "a good person to get a party going." (All pretty accurate, says the reporter.) Another, more austere office, lacking in personal photos, indicated its occupant could be introverted, slightly neurotic, a bit of a hoarder, and "possibly a little lonely." Pretty basic stuff, right? But effective snooping is not as simple as equating pictures with popularity, or assuming someone with a lot of CDs likes music. "It's dangerous to look for the things that stick out," Gosling says. "You want to look for themes. The meaning of one thing modifies the meaning of another." In the case of the extraverted reporter, that means a bottle of Hooters hot sauce on the bookshelf doesn't necessarily signify a regular Hooters patron: it's probably there for ironic effect. (The reporter says: no comment.)

(Duh! for me - but maybe interesting for some of you)

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:17 PM
http://www.livinginperu.com/blogs/features/496

Inti Raymi: The Festival of the Sun

Father's Day may be over, but Cusqueñans are getting ready to honor the daddy of the Inca world--the Sun God "Inti"--during the annual festival known as Inti Raymi held next Tuesday, June 24. Occurring on the Winter Solstice of the Southern Hemisphere, the celebration today gathers hundreds of thousands of people from around Peru and the world, including celebrities such as last year's attendee Bill Gates. They all come to witness the reenactment of this ancient Inca ceremony which has roots dating as far back as the 13th century.


Considered the most important ceremony celebrated in the Inca Empire, the rituals that take place during the event are re-created thanks to the memories of the peasants who still practice them during the year and who have kept the traditions alive for centuries.

The Inca religion, which is based around nature, sees the sun as the most important aspect in daily life. It provides light and warmth, two things which civilizations back then (and today) couldn't live without. Though he was second in-line to Viracocha, the creator of civilization, Inti the Sun God received the most offerings--most especially from farmers who depended on the sun for their harvest. The ruler of the Inca people, Sapa Inca, claimed divine heritage in that he was a direct descendant of Inti.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:18 PM
http://www.economist.com/science/displaystory.cfm?story_id=11579107

It’s mine, I tell you

Jun 19th 2008
From The Economist print edition
Mankind’s inner chimpanzee refuses to let go. This matters to everything from economics to law

“I AM the most offensively possessive man on earth. I do something to things. Let me pick up an ashtray from a dime-store counter, pay for it and put it in my pocket—and it becomes a special kind of ashtray, unlike any on earth, because it’s mine.” What was true of Wynand, one of the main characters in Ayn Rand’s novel “The Fountainhead”, may be true of everyone. From basketball tickets to waterfowl-hunting rights to classic albums, once someone owns something, he places a higher value on it than he did when he acquired it—an observation first called “the endowment effect” about 28 years ago by Richard Thaler, who these days works at the University of Chicago.

The endowment effect was controversial for years. The idea that a squishy, irrational bit of human behaviour could affect the cold, clean and rational world of markets was a challenge to neoclassical economists. Their assumption had always been that individuals act to maximise their welfare (the defining characteristic of economic man, or Homo economicus). The value someone puts on something should not, therefore, depend on whether he actually owns it. But the endowment effect has been seen in hundreds of experiments, the most famous of which found that students were surprisingly reluctant to trade a coffee mug they had been given for a bar of chocolate, even though they did not prefer coffee mugs to chocolate when given a straight choice between the two.

Moreover, it is now possible to see the effect in the brain. In the June 12th edition of Neurone, Brian Knutson of Stanford University describes a brain-scanning study he carried out recently. The pattern and location of the activity he observed suggests the endowment effect works by enhancing the salience of possible loss. But that still does not explain why this sense of loss should be felt. The question is whether such behaviour is truly irrational, or just “differently” rational. That might be the case if, for instance, it was a hangover from the evolutionary past that worked then, but is no longer appropriate now.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:19 PM
http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20080518214753data_trunc_sys.shtml

Microbe Colonies Show Sophisticated Learning Behaviors

Microbes may be smarter than we think, at least that's according to Princeton University researchers who have shown for the first time that bacteria don't just react to changes in their surroundings - they anticipate and prepare for them. The findings, reported in Science, challenge the prevailing notion that only organisms with complex nervous systems have this ability.

The biologists and engineers who conducted the research used lab experiments to demonstrate this phenomenon in common bacteria. They also turned to computer simulations to explain how a microbe species' internal network of genes and proteins could evolve over time to produce such complex behavior.

"What we have found is the first evidence that bacteria can use sensed cues from their environment to infer future events," explained Saeed Tavazoie, a molecular biologist who conducted the study along with graduate student Ilias Tagkopoulos and post-doctoral researcher Yir-Chung Liu.

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:20 PM
Scientists reveal why glass is glass
Despite solid appearance, glass is actually in a "jammed" state of matter (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/25335806/)

Scientists have made a breakthrough discovery in the bizarre properties of glass, which behaves at times like both a solid and a liquid.

The finding could lead to aircraft that look like Wonder Woman's plane. Such planes could have wings of glass or something called metallic glass, rather than being totally invisible.

The breakthrough involved solving the decades-old problem of just what glass is. It has been known that that despite its solid appearance, glass and gels are actually in a "jammed" state of matter — somewhere between liquid and solid — that moves very slowly. Like cars in a traffic jam, atoms in a glass are in something like suspended animation, unable to reach their destination because the route is blocked by their neighbors. So even though glass is a hard substance, it never quite becomes a proper solid, according to chemists and materials scientists.



http://www.abc.net.au/science/articles/2008/06/23/2282753.htm?site=science&topic=latest

Glass structure could strengthen steel

Futuristic alloys

The jammed random arrangement of atoms in glass is what makes it very strong, but brittle. Metals form a regular crystal lattice pattern, which allows them to be distorted or bent, but makes them less strong and prone to metal failure.

Combining the two materials to form a metallic glass alloy, could result in a material that has strength and flexibity.

Doctor Rob O'Donnell, a senior materials scientist from the CSIRO, says this research has identified the step that materials go through on the journey from being in a liquid glassy state to being crystalline, and could pave the way for newer alloys.

"At the moment quasi-crystals are more of an anomaly. People see the quasi-crystals but don't actually make an entire quasi-crystalline material," O'Donnell says. "But if you knew how to do that, then it may enable you to make them more easily."

He says metallic glasses would be suitable for products that need to be very strong, very light and have a degree of flexibility that will allow them to bend a little and not break.

"Glassy metals probably will have much higher strength than a normal crystalline metal, improved corrosion resistance and they can produce lighter and stiffer components," O'Donnell says.

"This research has helped identify the mechanism which will allow these metals to be able to make more easily."

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:29 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1028194/Love-air-Amazing-images-clouds-space.html

alkemical
06-24-2008, 02:36 PM
http://www.smh.com.au/news/world/mascots-blamed-for-china-earthquake/2008/05/16/1210765174174.html

Tokens of doom: mascots seen as signs of times

http://www.smh.com.au/ffximage/2008/05/17/mascots_wideweb__470x229,0.jpg

HONG KONG: Superstitious bloggers have linked China's earthquake disaster and other recent misfortunes to the five Olympic mascots, a Hong Kong newspaper reported yesterday.

Gossip sites are full of speculation that four of the five cartoon mascots have fulfilled prophesies of doom with one more, connected to the Yangtze River, still to come, the South China Morning Post said.

The five Olympic mascots are Jingjing, Huanhuan, Yingying, Nini and Beibei. Jingjing, a panda, is the animal most closely associated with Sichuan province where the earthquake struck.

Huanhuan, a cartoon character with flame-red hair, is being linked by bloggers to the Olympic torch that has been dogged by anti-China protests on its round-the-world tour.

Yingying, an antelope, is an animal confined to the borders of Tibet, which has been the scene of riots and the cause of international protests against China, the bloggers say.

Nini, represented by a kite, is being viewed as a reference to the "kite city" of Weifang, in Shandong, where there was a deadly train crash last month.

That leaves only Beibei, represented by a sturgeon fish, which online doomsayers suggest could indicate a looming disaster in the Yangtze River, the only place where sturgeon is found.

A Peking University sociologist, Xie Xueluan, told the newspaper: "Chinese see major calamities as divine intervention … The absence of religion reinforces this trend."

Other online prophets of doom say the recent disasters have come on days that are related to the normally lucky Chinese number eight. The Tibet riots (14/3) and the earthquake (12/5) happened on a date whose digits add up to eight.

This bodes ill for the opening day of the Beijing Olympics - August 8, 2008 - which was chosen for its auspicious abundance of China's lucky number.

Deutsche Presse-Agentur

http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1448-Has-the-final-Olympic-curse-struck.html

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080619/od_nm/curse_dc;_ylt=Ao1A9AKwkLkYGqXlQLKJ2sLtiBIF

BEIJING (Reuters) - Floods sweeping southern China seem to have fulfilled the final stanza of an Internet curse involving Beijing's Olympic mascots, but censors have been quick to remove postings that might fuel the superstition.

alkemical
06-25-2008, 09:44 AM
http://www.bookslut.com/features/2008_06_012943.php

Bookslut.com has a fascinating interview with Jeff Warren, author of The Head Trip: Adventures on the Wheel of Consciousness [The Head Trip] (Amazon US and UK). Warren's book is a personal exploration of the various modes of consciousness that we encounter, from day-to-day changes through to the more earth-shaking changes experienced in psychedelic trips and the like.

One of the more interesting parts of the interview (though there's certainly nothing 'less interesting' about the rest of it) is when Warren starts discussing the altered state of dreaming, and in particular, the self-awareness that occurs in lucid dreams:

[W]hen you’re self-consciously aware inside the dream you can then squeeze up real close to the walls with your little magnifying glass and look for suture marks. You can conduct experiments. You come to realize that there is a set of laws operating in the dream world that is every bit as real as the laws of physics in the waking world. What are these laws? And why aren’t there as many scientists down here with their slide rules and theories as there are out there? We spend our lives in two worlds and yet we only pay attention to one of them -- the other is seen as an embarrassing curiosity, a forum for banality-rehearsal and botched sex.

People protest: “but it’s not real, stop living in fantasy.” All experience is real. On the personal side, dreams reveal all kinds of junk about the self. On the scientific side, our dreams represent an unparalleled opportunity to examine the dynamics of consciousness. I mean think about it: without sensory input to dilute everything, you get consciousness in a pure culture. And it so happens that this pure culture -- The Dream -- runs like an underground creek beneath the waking world, muddying the ground in all kinds of interesting ways.

And that’s just the conventional science. Who knows what else we may discover digging around in the dream world. For those interested in the wooly world of mind-matter speculation, the epistemological rabbit hole goes very deep indeed.

This is going to sound hyperbolic but I really believe we’re at are at the dawn of a new age of scientific exploration. The external world is mapped; now the explorers are turning inward. The galleons have left port. They’re approaching a huge mysterious continent. They won’t be the first to arrive. There are paths already cut in the forest, where shamans and monks and others have set up outposts and launched their own expeditions into the interior.

Warren also has what are, in my opinion, some valid insights and worthy warnings about the use of psychedelics to explore modes of consciousness:

I’m interested in drug-induced alternations of consciousness, but my feeling is they’re the really obvious ****. Too many “investigators of consciousness” overlook the fine-grained shifting texture of day-to-day consciousness. It’s the difference between the big budget Hollywood blockbuster and the art house Henry James adaptation. Drug-induced alterations of consciousness have great CGI -- which is fine, I mean who doesn’t appreciate form constant explosions and DMT Machine Elves? -- the problem is, character development sucks, or rather, the characters -- and by characters I mean the objects of consciousness -- tend to be cartoons. They’re exaggerated, that’s what psychedelics do -- “non-specific amplifiers” Stanislav Grof calls them. They expand the whole topography of the mind. It’s possible more than this is going on but that’s another story.

This expansion can be valuable for understanding consciousness since it boosts the resolution of previously discreet mental dynamics. But cartoons, of course, are caricatures. If you watch only Jerry Bruckheimer movies you risk losing your ability to appreciate -- and even notice -- the subtleties and complexities of real life and consciousness, which, to circle back to my original metaphor, is more like a Henry James adaptation.

That’s a long way of saying to understand conscious experience, I think it helps to start from the more subtle naturally-occurring variations, and then work your way out.

Something else I’ve noticed about the hard-core psychonaut set: if you get too deep into the mind you can become convinced of anything. Certain psychedelics -- ayahuasca, ibogaine, DMT, LSD -- they’re like cannons, they can fire you so far that you can’t find your way back out again. People can become permanently disoriented, one basket filled with brilliant insights, one with grotesque delusions. It’s serious: the mind is both a reality-perceiving and an illusion-generating machine. So people confuse their metaphysics with their epistemology, to paraphrase the philosopher Jerry Fodor.

I could have quoted the entire thing, it's that interesting. Head on over to Bookslut.com and check out the interview in its entirety.

alkemical
06-25-2008, 09:51 AM
http://www.hacknmod.com/displayMOD.php?hack=1514

DIY - Save a Wet Cell Phone using Rice

So, you dropped your phone in water. You are screwed, right? Nope, just order some Chinese Food, and you're good to go - Sort of. Actually, submerging your phone in dry rice or silica gel packets are a simple, effective way to resurrect your phone. Moisture absorbant silica gel packets can be purchased for a few bucks and effectively dry your phone. Dry rice has this same affect as well and helps to unbrick your phone. Read more about saving a wet cell phone.

For further reading, also see What to do if you spill liquid on your laptop.

"One final, perhaps surprising, note: If your phone gets soaked in salt water, you should probably flush the whole thing in fresh water before it dries. When salt water evaporates, it leaves crystals that can damage a phone's fragile components. Just be sure to remove the battery before flooding the device."

alkemical
06-25-2008, 09:54 AM
http://www.theatlantic.com/doc/200807/google

Is Google Making Us Stupid?

alkemical
06-25-2008, 10:11 AM
http://www.customreceipt.com/index.php

BroncoBuff
06-25-2008, 10:15 AM
I have AT&T, and I just move my SIM chip into a new phone. As long as you save all your data onto the SIM memeory (as opposed to the phone memory), you're golden ....

alkemical
06-25-2008, 10:15 AM
http://www.darkroastedblend.com/2008/05/angel-falls-worlds-highest-waterfall.html

http://lh3.ggpht.com/abramsv/SD-kSyFUazI/AAAAAAAATMg/49R9QmPdRMs/s800/231670700_971f261c5f_o.jpg

alkemical
06-25-2008, 10:25 AM
http://www.smashingmagazine.com/2008/05/26/beautiful-and-original-product-designs/

alkemical
06-25-2008, 10:52 AM
math pi piano solo

http://www.tomdukich.com/math%20pi%20piano%20solo.html

alkemical
06-25-2008, 11:00 AM
http://www.wonderhowto.com/how-to/video/how-to-remove-scratches-on-an-lcd-or-cd-with-an-egg-143178/

alkemical
06-25-2008, 11:13 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VHWuD8a3INs

THC Kills Glioma Cancer Cells - Medical Miracles from Europe (Video)
2008 06 25
Before speaking to the 5th Clinical Conference on Cannabis Therapeutics in Pacific Grove, CA, Deputy Director of NORML Paul Armentano talks about new science on Cannabis (marijuana) and the Endo-Cannabinoid system being done in Europe, while American cancer patients, many with tragic cases of Glioma brain tumors, seek any news of an alternative therapy. Paul references the work of Dr. Manuel ...

alkemical
06-25-2008, 11:14 AM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080613163213.htm

Using Brainwaves To Chat And Stroll Through Second Life: World's First

ScienceDaily (June 16, 2008) — On 7th June 2008, Keio University succeeded in the world’s first demonstration experiment with the help of a disabled person to use brainwave to chat and stroll through the virtual world.

alkemical
06-25-2008, 11:16 AM
Ion Microprobe Technology Reveals Earth was Habitable 4.3 Billion Years Ago (http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2008/06/ion-microprobe.html)

A team of scientists led by University of Wisconsin-Madison geologists Takayuki Ushikubo, Valley and Noriko Kita have completed an analysis of ancient minerals called zircons which shows liquid water existed at least 4.3 billion years ago and that heavy weathering by an acrid climate possibly destroyed the surface of the Earth's earliest continents when the planet was a mere 150 million years old.

alkemical
06-25-2008, 11:19 AM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1028462/Scientists-childbirth-wonder-drug-cure-shyness.html

Scientists find childbirth wonder drug that can 'cure' shyness

alkemical
06-26-2008, 08:28 AM
http://www.brainsturbator.com/site/comments/our_fractal_universe_a_sneak_peek_at_the_new_cosmo logy/

Our Fractal Universe: A Sneak Peek at the New Cosmology

Our Fractal Universe: A Sneak Peek at the New Cosmology

Buddhabrot Mandelbrot VisualizationWe talk about the third dimension a lot, but most humans don’t live in it. Abbot’s Flatland was not so much a metaphor as an operational description of the sensory world most people inhabit: a continuous, unbroken plane that, despite surface variations and wrinkles, remains a flat stage for our two dimensional lives. This is inevitable, since humans cannot hover or fly without technology assistance, and few of us can jump higher than three feet off the ground.

And let’s be serious, here—what is a dimension? Have anyone ever even proved they existed? Sure, you can draw a Cartesian XYZ grid on paper, but you can also draw a unicorn vomiting angels. I’ve been digging through the concept of time for a month, and it’s a concept nobody can really define, despite the fact we all experience it. I’ve come to realize there’s very little humans can say for sure about space, either. The more we learn, the less we know. Everything you were taught in school is currently falling apart—so let’s take a look at a theory that will likely be replacing all this Big Bang horse****: the Universe is fractal and infinite at every level of scale.

Rethinking Occam’s Razor

“Each time we formulate a hypothesis, we take the simplest one possible. But what obligates the Universe to be simple?”

--James Peebles

I seriously question the assumption that the simplest explanation is usually the best. I find it truly bizarre that after the past century of scientific discovery, which has shown every single aspect of our Universe to be stranger and more complex than we ever thought possible, people still discuss the concept of Occam’s Razor with a straight face. Of course, most people having that discussion don’t even know Occam’s Razor, since the literal translation goes like this:

“...entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity.”

Before I dismiss the concept, I want to bring up one of the more interesting cognitive biases that humans are afflicted with: The Conjunction Fallacy. As puts it in his excellent paper, “Cognitive Biases Affecting Assessment of Global Risk”:

According to probability theory, adding additional detail onto a story must render the story less probable. Yet human psychology seems to follow the rule that adding an additional detail can make the story more plausible.

Of course, once you really dig into the field of cognitive bias, you’re left with the disturbing realization that our brain is just a hall of mirrors run by a monkey. It can be hard to get work done under those circumstances, so the less said about it, the better.

*That was from sept 21st - today i see this in the news:

http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn14200-galaxy-map-hints-at-fractal-universe.html

Galaxy map hints at fractal universe

* 00:00 25 June 2008
* NewScientist.com news service
* Amanda Gefter


s the matter in the universe arranged in a fractal pattern? A new study of nearly a million galaxies suggests it is – though there are no well-accepted theories to explain why that would be so.

Cosmologists trying to reconstruct the entire history of the universe have precious few clues from which to work. One key clue is the distribution of matter throughout space, which has been sculpted for nearly 14 billion years by the competing forces of gravity and cosmic expansion. If there is a pattern in the sky, it encodes the secrets of the universe.

A lot is at stake, and the matter distribution has become a source of impassioned debate between those who say the distribution is smooth and homogeneous and those who say it is hierarchically structured and clumpy, like a fractal.

Nearly all physicists agree that on relatively small scales the distribution is fractal-like: hundreds of billions of stars group together to form galaxies, galaxies clump together to form clusters, and clusters amass into superclusters.

The point of contention, however, is what happens at even larger scales. According to most physicists, this Russian doll-style clustering comes to an end and the universe, on large scales, becomes homogeneous.

___


Both stories are cont'd on their sites - so check it out

TheReverend
06-26-2008, 08:47 AM
Not the biggest fan of the fractal articles... LOVE the dream state study article.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 08:57 AM
Not the biggest fan of the fractal articles... LOVE the dream state study article.

I dig on the fractals for reasons i told you in rep. I dunno man, i just have a vast interest in EVERYTHING. Like i devour it all.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 09:11 AM
The Midsummer Fires (http://secretsun.blogspot.com/2008/06/midsummer-fires.html)

How is it that the more technologically advanced this culture becomes, the more pagan it becomes? Or that some of the most enthusiastic pagans seem to be the ones most immersed in technology?

Untold millions of teenaged boys are receiving their daily tutorials in militaristic paganism every day in the immersive online game World Of Warcraft. Remember this is the exact same age group that spent their pre-teen years pretending to play Yu Gi Oh and watching Cardcaptors.

I wanted to do a post on the Saint John's Fires but couldn't find any good images, mainly because no one needs to call them that anymore. I found a couple good ones for the Midsummer Fires (still celebrated in the Celtic Fringe) but this image kept coming up. It turns out this is a week-long celebration of the Midsummer Fires.

On World of Warcraft.

Read this jaunty little blurb aloud in your best Ren-Fair English accent:

Ah, so you weren't chosen for Flamekeeper this year? Don't fret, my friend! The Midsummer Fire Festival isn't merely about that traditional honor; it's a time of merriment, a chance to celebrate the hottest season of the year by lighting great fires across the land and sharing in what the elemental spirits can offer. Come to our camps and join in the revelry!

So war it is, again, and magic. And technology. Quite a concoction. I wonder what the kids cutting their teeth on Wizards of Waverly Place will be into a few years from now.

I asked my son about the Midsummer Fire Festival and he was genuinely shocked- and a little outraged, I might add. How could a non-WoW initiate know about such a thing? Not realizing it's been around in the real world for thousands of years.

I guess this is sort of a virtual Burning Man. Which is fine.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 09:28 AM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080624151827.htm

Oral Cannabis Ineffective In Treating Acute Pain, Study Finds

ScienceDaily (June 25, 2008) — A study published in the July issue of the Journal Anesthesiology discovered that oral cannabis (a form of medical marijuana) not only failed to alleviate certain types of pain in human volunteers but, surprisingly, it instead caused increased sensitivity to some forms of pain

alkemical
06-26-2008, 09:51 AM
http://www.timboucher.com/journal/2006/06/18/chinese-death-van/

Makers of the death vans say the vehicles and injections are a civilized alternative to the firing squad, ending the life of the condemned more quickly, clinically and safely. The switch from gunshots to injections is a sign that China “promotes human rights now,” says Kang Zhongwen, who designed the Jinguan Automobile death van

alkemical
06-26-2008, 09:56 AM
New “Intelligent” CCTV Cameras Can See and Hear (http://cryptogon.com/?p=2798)

One camera for every 14 people in the UK.

Via: Telegraph:

Researchers hope the smart cameras will have a dramatic impact on crime detection and prevention by cutting response times and ensuring that more incidents are caught on tape.

A team at the University of Portsmouth has already developed software which enables cameras to spot visual clues to anything from violent crime to vandalism, by looking for tell-tale signs such as someone raising their arm suddenly or even a snapped car aerial.

Now the artificial intelligence software is being taught to recognise sounds which are associated with crimes, including breaking glass, shouted obscenities and car alarms going off. Cameras which ‘hear’ the sounds will automatically swivel to the direction they have come from, and will alert the person monitoring the system to a possible crime in progress.

Dr David Brown, who is leading the team at the university’s Institute of Industrial Research, said: “We have already developed visual recognition software, but the next stage is to develop audio recognition software to listen for particular sounds.

“We can teach the cameras to listen out for things like a swear word being shouted in an aggressive way, or for other words which might signify a crime taking place. The camera will be able to swivel to the direction of the sound at the same speed someone turns their head when they hear a scream, or about 300 milliseconds.

“People monitoring CCTV images have banks of screens in front of them, and this system helps them by alerting them to something the system has spotted. The person looking at the screen can then quickly identify if it is a crime taking place, or whether the camera has simply picked up on something innocent, like a child screaming, and act on it accordingly.”

Although the new system will inevitably raise concerns about the unstoppable march of the “surveillance state”, with one CCTV camera for every 14 people in the UK, Dr Brown said there were no plans for the system to record conversations.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 09:59 AM
UK Will Allow Anonymous Witnesses in Some Court Cases (http://cryptogon.com/?p=2796)

June 25th, 2008

Anonymous witnesses. Anonymous evidence. Double plus good.

Via: BBC:

The government has vowed to change the law to allow anonymous witnesses in some court cases after a key Law Lords ruling effectively halted the practice.

Justice Secretary Jack Straw said there was a real need for some witnesses to have their identities protected.

Mr Straw told BBC Radio 4’s Today programme that the law will be changed “as quickly as possible”.

The ruling quashed the murder conviction of a man who was convicted with the aid of anonymous evidence.

Police have warned that serious criminals could walk free as a result.

“I am looking at this very urgently indeed,” Mr Straw said of the ruling, which applies to criminal cases in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

He said the reality of violence and intimidation in some criminal circles means accommodations must be made within the rules of evidence.

Mr Straw signalled that planned government legislation to enshrine the use of anonymous witnesses where intimidation is a risk would now become a priority.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 10:00 AM
Supreme Court Cuts Exxon Punitive Damages for Valdez Oil Spill by 80% (http://cryptogon.com/?p=2801)

Via: San Francisco Chronicle:

The Supreme Court, winding up a term of victories for businesses, cut punitive damages for Alaskans harmed by the Exxon Valdez oil spill by 80 percent today in a ruling that may signal new limits on damage awards for victims of corporate wrongdoing.

In a 5-3 decision, the justices reduced punitive damages from $2.5 billion to about $500 million for 32,000 commercial fishers, food processors and Alaskan natives whose livelihoods were damaged by the 1989 tanker spill, the worst in U.S. history. The court said Exxon’s conduct had not been motivated by malice or greed and noted that the jury had awarded the plaintiffs another $500 million as compensation for their losses.

Just as important for future cases, the court, which has imposed new restrictions on punitive damages for business misconduct in the last five years, suggested that the standard it used for Exxon - limiting punitive awards to an amount equal to the jury’s verdict on compensation - might apply to all class actions involving significant damages.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 10:06 AM
http://www.scienceagogo.com/news/20080515225806data_trunc_sys.shtml

DNA Precursors In Meteorite Confirmed As Extraterrestrial

alkemical
06-26-2008, 10:07 AM
The End of Theory: The Data Deluge Makes the Scientific Method Obsolete (http://www.wired.com/science/discoveries/magazine/16-07/pb_theory)

So proclaimed statistician George Box 30 years ago, and he was right. But what choice did we have? Only models, from cosmological equations to theories of human behavior, seemed to be able to consistently, if imperfectly, explain the world around us. Until now. Today companies like Google, which have grown up in an era of massively abundant data, don't have to settle for wrong models. Indeed, they don't have to settle for models at all.

Sixty years ago, digital computers made information readable. Twenty years ago, the Internet made it reachable. Ten years ago, the first search engine crawlers made it a single database. Now Google and like-minded companies are sifting through the most measured age in history, treating this massive corpus as a laboratory of the human condition. They are the children of the Petabyte Age.

The Petabyte Age is different because more is different. Kilobytes were stored on floppy disks. Megabytes were stored on hard disks. Terabytes were stored in disk arrays. Petabytes are stored in the cloud. As we moved along that progression, we went from the folder analogy to the file cabinet analogy to the library analogy to — well, at petabytes we ran out of organizational analogies.

At the petabyte scale, information is not a matter of simple three- and four-dimensional taxonomy and order but of dimensionally agnostic statistics. It calls for an entirely different approach, one that requires us to lose the tether of data as something that can be visualized in its totality. It forces us to view data mathematically first and establish a context for it later. For instance, Google conquered the advertising world with nothing more than applied mathematics. It didn't pretend to know anything about the culture and conventions of advertising — it just assumed that better data, with better analytical tools, would win the day. And Google was right.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 10:13 AM
Brain scientists discover why adventure feels good (http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUSL2540332420080625)

LONDON (Reuters) - Scientists have identified a primitive area of the brain that makes us adventurous -- a finding which may help explain why people routinely fall for "new" products when shopping.

Using brain scans to measure blood flow, British researchers discovered that a brain region known as the ventral striatum was more active when subjects chose unusual objects in controlled tests.

The ventral striatum is involved in processing rewards in the brain through the release of neurotransmitters like dopamine.

Scientists believe the existence of this age-old reward mechanism indicates there is an evolutionary advantage in sampling the unknown.

"Seeking new and unfamiliar experiences is a fundamental behavioral tendency in humans and animals. It makes sense to try new options as they may prove advantageous in the long run," said Bianca Wittmann of the Wellcome Trust Centre for Neuroimaging at University College London.

alkemical
06-26-2008, 10:15 AM
http://www.livescience.com/environment/080625-pf-vortex-engine.html

How a Man-Made Tornado Could Power the Future

alkemical
06-26-2008, 10:17 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/7472722.stm

Dubai plans 'moving' skyscraper

alkemical
06-26-2008, 12:14 PM
http://www.alternet.org/waroniraq/89432/

The Five Secret Billion-Dollar Companies Sucking Obscene Amounts of Taxpayer Money

alkemical
06-26-2008, 01:23 PM
http://www.livescience.com/environment/080619-summer-solstice.html

With 8 inches of hail falling in parts of Nebraska this week and Arizona reaching triple digit temperatures last week, it may seem rather arbitrary to call June 20 the first day of the summer this year, aka the summer solstice. But scientists really do have a reason.

It's all about Earth's cockeyed leanings and some celestial configurations that even the ancients understood.

Our planet is tilted 23.5 degrees on its spin axis. On June 20 this year (some years it's June 21), the North Pole is pointing toward the sun as much as is possible.

Imagine Earth as an apple sitting on one side of a table, with the stem being the North Pole. Tilt the apple 23.5 degrees so the stem points toward a candle (the sun) at the center of the table. That's summer for the top half of the apple. Now keep the stem pointing in the same direction but move the apple to the other side of the table: Now the stem points away from the candle, and it's winter on the top half of the fruit.

The setup at June solstice puts the sun as high in our sky as it can go, yielding the longest day of the year in the Northern Hemisphere.

Scientists put the exact moment of the solstice at 8:00 p.m. ET (keep in mind that the sun is always up somewhere, and the gods don't favor the Eastern time zone).

As long ago as the fourth century B.C., ancient peoples in the Americas understood enough of this that they could create giant calendars driven by sunlight. They built observatories of stone to mark the solstices and other times important for planting or harvesting crops. Shrines and even tombs were also designed with the sun in mind.

The sun comes up each day (except at the poles) because our planet rotates once on its axis every 24 hours or so. It is Earth's tilt, and our 365-day orbit around the sun, that explain much about how our world changes during the year.

TheReverend
06-26-2008, 01:48 PM
You should be reading, you son of a bitch!

alkemical
06-26-2008, 02:25 PM
You should be reading, you son of a b****!

I got to page 31 so far.... :)

alkemical
06-27-2008, 09:14 AM
http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/06/26/the-unclear-origins-of-oil/

The Unclear Origins of Oil
June 26th, 2008 by Klintron

Kevin Kelly writes:

Crude oil is almost $140 per barrel.

By now you’d think we would know where it comes from.

No one really knows. The conventional wisdom is that oil descends from algae from eons ago. Lots and lots of algae. Unimaginable mounds of dead algae in quantities no longer found on this planet, pressed, and cooked into hydrocarbon liquids. Thus: fossil fuel. Others, notably the Russians, have an alternative theory that oil comes from non-biological carbon compounds deep in this planet, like the methane oceans we find on other planets. In this scenario oil is a planetary phenomenon. Indeed this abiogenic oil could still be forming in the earth. Thousands of Russian papers supporting this view have still not been translated. The American astrophysicist Thomas Gold also advocated a similar idea (which may or may not have been influenced by the Russians) in his book “The Deep Hot Biosphere : The Myth of Fossil Fuels”.

alkemical
06-27-2008, 09:15 AM
I got to page 31 so far.... :)

page 60

TheReverend
06-27-2008, 09:37 AM
page 60

I might pump out a couple hundred more over the fourth of July weekend if Random House wants to fund some hard work, otherwise I'll be taking my time with part 2.

alkemical
06-27-2008, 09:58 AM
I might pump out a couple hundred more over the fourth of July weekend if Random House wants to fund some hard work, otherwise I'll be taking my time with part 2.

I had hit a stall point with my magazine.

But i have a "dream" of running my own publishing company: Alkemical Ink (yes, a pun)

alkemical
06-27-2008, 02:21 PM
http://www.creatusitio.com/_media/imgs/articles/a226_p3.jpg

alkemical
06-27-2008, 02:22 PM
http://www.creatusitio.com/_media/imgs/articles/a226_p4.jpg

BroncoBuff
06-27-2008, 02:31 PM
What, now you're Jay Leno?

alkemical
06-27-2008, 02:35 PM
What, now you're Jay Leno?

I can't fill that chin.

alkemical
06-27-2008, 02:37 PM
http://www.geekologie.com/2008/06/love_it_or_hate_it_its_still_a.php

http://www.geekologie.com/2008/06/26/steampunk-desk.jpg

alkemical
06-27-2008, 02:38 PM
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/06/080626-mars-lander.html

Soil near the north pole of Mars is surprisingly Earthlike, with a pH not unlike many vegetable gardens, according to preliminary results from the Phoenix Mars Lander.

"You might be able to grow asparagus in it, but strawberries, probably not very well," said Samuel Kounaves, a chemistry professor at Tufts University, during a NASA press conference this afternoon.


http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn14217-martian-soil-could-grow-turnips-phoenix-finds.html

Some Martian dirt has the same basic chemistry as garden soil, a new analysis from the Phoenix lander suggests. The find widens the range of organisms that might be able to live on Mars.

Although the analysis is not yet complete, the lander has already found trace levels of nutrients like magnesium, sodium, potassium and chloride. Although these ingredients were known to exist in Martian soil, until now no one was sure whether they would be soluble in water and thus potentially available for life.

The encouraging result came from a test of soil excavated from the top few centimetres of a region called Wonderland at the lander's site in the northern plains of Mars. The sample was delivered on Wednesday to the lander's wet chemistry laboratory in the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument.

In addition to detecting soluble nutrients, MECA also found the sample to be fairly alkaline, with a pH of 8 or 9. This level of alkalinity is common for many Earth soils, and myriad bacteria and plants, including vegetables like asparagus and turnips, can thrive at such a pH. (Exotic terrestrial microbes have even been found in water with pH levels of 12 and higher - similar to bleach.)

"We were all very flabbergasted at the data we got back," said MECA wet chemistry lead Samuel Kounaves from Tufts University in Medford, Massachusetts, US.

alkemical
06-27-2008, 02:40 PM
http://wanderling.tripod.com/1991_vg.html

Abstract: A 10-metre object on a heliocentric orbit, now catalogued as 1991 VG, made a close approach to the Earth in 1991 December, and was discovered a month before perigee with the Spacewatch telescope at Kitt Peak. Its very Earth-like orbit and observations of rapid brightness fluctuations argued for it being an artificial body rather than an asteroid. None of the handful of man-made rocket bodies left in heliocentric orbits during the space age have purely gravitational orbits returning to the Earth at that time. In addition, the small perigee distance observed might be interpreted as an indicator of a controlled rather than a random encounter with the Earth, and thus it might be argued that 1991 VG is a candidate as an alien probe observed in the vicinity of our planet.


The approach taken in this paper is to investigate the different probabilities regarding the nature of the near-earth pass of the object designated 1991 VG.

Three distinct possibilities are apparent. The first is that it was a natural asteroid, to which we assign a probability P(n), that is, Probability natural. The second is that it was a man-made spacecraft, probability P(s), or Probability spacecraft. The third is that it was an alien artifact, probability P(a), Probability artifact. If we assume that there are no other possible explanations then the three taken together and written in formula P(n) + P(s) + P(a) = 1. The scepticism of a scientist (myself included) leads one to assume that P(a) = 0, but that assumption, it will be seen, is not supported by our knowledge of 1991 VG and its discovery circumstances. I show below that these indicate both P(n) and P(s) to be small, implying that P(a) , Probability artifact, is significant.


Chapman-Rietschi 1 has noted, following Arkhipov2, that much work and discussion of SETI tends to overlook the possibility of discovering alien artifacts within the Solar System. Such a pursuit is normally known as SETA (Search for Extra-Terrestrial Artifacts3,4). Over the past two decades various authors have debated whether the best place to look for such artifacts is in the asteroid belt5, in the outer Solar System6 on planetary surfaces7, or as extraterrestrial probes in the inner Solar System8-10, whereas the famous Fermi Paradox argument is based upon the understanding that such probes have not been detected, and thus extraterrestrial intelligent beings do not exist11,12. The aim of this communication is to point out (very tentativeIy) that an extraterrestrial spaceprobe may have been detected in late 1991 in near-Earth space.


The 0.91-m Spacewatch telescope of the University of Arizona commenced operation in 1989, since when it has been used to detect asteroids of an unprecedentedly small size in the Earth's vicinity13, On 1991 November 6 Spacewatch observer Jim Scotti discovered a body initially described as being a "fast-moving asteroidal object" at a geocentric distance of 0.022 AU, a month before its closest approach (at 0.0031 AU) to the Earth14. Its heliocentric orbital elements at discovery were a = 1.04AU, e = 0.065, i = 0°.39, so that the suggestion was soon made that "this might be a returning spacecraft" (ref. 14). The fly-by of the Earth-Moon system resulted in slight changes in its osculating elements15-17. Assuming the albedo of an S-type asteroid is appropriate its spectral reflectivity was not dissimilar to main-belt S-type asteroids13 it would be about 9 m in size, or 19 m with the albedo of a C-type. However, observations by Richard West and Olivier Hainaut from ESO, close to the time of nearest approach, indicated a non-asteroidal nature for the object, with strong, rapid brightness variations which can be interpreted as transient specular reflections from the surfaces of a rotating spacecraft18,19. Contrary to this, Wieslaw Wisniewski at Kitt Peak found only a slowly-varying brightness18 but under poor observing conditions. The question of the nature of this object might have been answered by radar observations, but radar sounding attempts failed16,20 1991 VG was also observed in 1992 April with larger telescopes at Kitt Peak21, but it is unlikely to be observed again soon (see below). However, that recovery allowed an improvement of the ephemeris (in both cartesian and frequency space) for the time of the radar observations, which may make identification of 1991 VG in those data possible when they are fully analyzed20.


As outlined in the opening quote at the top of the page, the approach taken here is to investigate the different probabilities for the nature of this object, given our incomplete knowledge. Three distinct possibilities are considered apparent. The first is that it was a man-made spacecraft. The second is that it was a natural asteroid. The third is that it was an alien artifact.

alkemical
06-27-2008, 02:43 PM
http://www.slate.com/id/2192211

How Smart Is the Octopus?

ristotle didn't have a high opinion of the octopus. "The octopus is a stupid creature," he wrote, "for it will approach a man's hand if it be lowered in the water." Twenty-four centuries later, this "stupid" creature is enjoying a much better reputation. YouTube is loaded with evidence of what some might call octopus intelligence. One does an uncanny impression of a flounder. Another mimics coral before darting away from a pushy camera. A third slips its arms around a jar, unscrews it, and dines on the crab inside. Scientific journals publish research papers on octopus learning, octopus personality, octopus memory. Now the octopus has even made it into the pages of the journal Consciousness and Cognition (along with its fellow cephalopods the squid and the cuttlefish). The title: "Cephalopod consciousness: behavioral evidence."

BroncoBuff
06-28-2008, 04:58 AM
Count every " F " in the following text:

FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE
SULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTI
FIC STUDY COMBINED WITH
THE EXPERIENCE OF YEARS...

HOW MANY ?

WRONG, THERE ARE 6 -- no joke.
READ IT AGAIN !
Really, go back and try to find the 6 F's before you scroll down.
The reasoning behind is further down.

alkemical
06-28-2008, 07:58 AM
at first my brain was only looking for F's in the front of words.

alkemical
06-28-2008, 08:14 AM
Pt2 of the grant morrison talk at the disinfo talks - he discusses sedjual magick.


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alkemical
06-28-2008, 08:36 AM
pt4 of the same speech

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/VKLLnAAgQBs&hl=en"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/VKLLnAAgQBs&hl=en" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

alkemical
06-28-2008, 08:45 AM
<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/H7RxbBIGo54&hl=en"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/H7RxbBIGo54&hl=en" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

alkemical
06-28-2008, 08:47 AM
<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/yY5r_zox-a8&hl=en"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/yY5r_zox-a8&hl=en" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

alkemical
06-28-2008, 09:29 AM
Al-Qaeda and the “War on Terrorism” (http://www.globalpolicy.org/empire/terrorwar/analysis/2008/0120history.htm)

Introduction

One of the main objectives of war propaganda is to "fabricate an enemy". The "outside enemy" personified by Osama bin Laden is "threatening America". Pre-emptive war directed against "Islamic terrorists" is required to defend the Homeland. Realities are turned upside down. America is under attack.

In the wake of 9/11, the creation of this "outside enemy" has served to obfuscate the real economic and strategic objectives behind the war in the Middle East and Central Asia. Waged on the grounds of self-defense, the pre-emptive war is upheld as a "just war" with a humanitarian mandate. As anti-war sentiment grows and the political legitimacy the Bush Administration falters, doubts regarding the existence of this illusive "outside enemy" must be dispelled.

Counter-terrorism and war propaganda are intertwined. The propaganda apparatus feeds disinformation into the news chain. The terror warnings must appear to be "genuine". The objective is to present the terror groups as "enemies of America." Ironically, Al Qaeda --the "outside enemy of America" as well as the alleged architect of the 9/11 attacks-- is a creation of the CIA. From the outset of the Soviet-Afghan war in the early 1980s, the US intelligence apparatus has supported the formation of the "Islamic brigades". Propaganda purports to erase the history of Al Qaeda, drown the truth and "kill the evidence" on how this "outside enemy" was fabricated and transformed into "Enemy Number One".

The US intelligence apparatus has created it own terrorist organizations. And at the same time, it creates its own terrorist warnings concerning the terrorist organizations which it has itself created. Meanwhile, a cohesive multibillion dollar counterterrorism program "to go after" these terrorist organizations has been put in place.

Portrayed in stylized fashion by the Western media, Osama bin Laden, supported by his various henchmen, constitutes America’s post-Cold war bogeyman, who "threatens Western democracy". The alleged threat of "Islamic terrorists", permeates the entire US national security doctrine. Its purpose is to justify wars of aggression in the Middle East, while establishing within America, the contours of the Homeland Security State.

Bronco_Beerslug
06-28-2008, 06:18 PM
Scientists: Nothing to fear from atom-smasher


By DOUGLAS BIRCH, Associated Press Writer Sat Jun 28, 3:08 PM ET

<!-- end storyhdr --> MEYRIN, Switzerland - The most powerful atom-smasher ever built could make some bizarre discoveries, such as invisible matter or extra dimensions in space, after it is switched on in August.
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http://d.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20080628/capt.0a3a7a4006084d75a20fd89a43d738d4.doomsday_col lider__ny358.jpg?x=400&y=266&sig=3fvUdgBDm4bZQwW3VfUHJA--
In this Feb. 29, 2008 file photo, the last element, weighing 100 tons, of the ATLAS (A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS) experiment is lowered into the cave at the European Organization for Nuclear Research CERN (Centre Europeen de Recherche Nucleaire) in Meyrin, near Geneva, Switzerland. ATLAS is part of five experiments which, from mid 2008 on, will study what happens when beams of particles collide in the 27 km (16.8 miles) long underground ring LHC (Large Hadron Collider). ATLAS is one of the largest collaborative efforts ever attempted in the physical sciences. There are 2100 physicists (including 450 students) participating from more than 167 universities and laboratories in 37 countries.
<cite id="captionCite"> (AP Photo/Keystone, Martial Trezzini, FILE)</cite>

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But some critics fear the Large Hadron Collider could exceed physicists' wildest conjectures: Will it spawn a black hole that could swallow Earth? Or spit out particles that could turn the planet into a hot dead clump?


Ridiculous, say scientists at the European Organization for Nuclear Research, known by its French initials CERN — some of whom have been working for a generation on the $5.8 billion collider, or LHC.
"Obviously, the world will not end when the LHC switches on," said project leader Lyn Evans.


David Francis, a physicist on the collider's huge ATLAS particle detector, smiled when asked whether he worried about black holes and hypothetical killer particles known as strangelets.
"If I thought that this was going to happen, I would be well away from here," he said.
The collider basically consists of a ring of supercooled magnets 17 miles in circumference attached to huge barrel-shaped detectors. The ring, which straddles the French and Swiss border, is buried 330 feet underground.
The machine, which has been called the largest scientific experiment in history, isn't expected to begin test runs until August, and ramping up to full power could take months. But once it is working, it is expected to produce some startling findings.


Scientists plan to hunt for signs of the invisible "dark matter" and "dark energy" that make up more than 96 percent of the universe, and hope to glimpse the elusive Higgs boson, a so-far undiscovered particle thought to give matter its mass.
The collider could find evidence of extra dimensions, a boon for superstring theory, which holds that quarks, the particles that make up atoms, are infinitesimal vibrating strings.


The theory could resolve many of physics' unanswered questions, but requires about 10 dimensions — far more than the three spatial dimensions our senses experience.
The safety of the collider, which will generate energies seven times higher than its most powerful rival, at Fermilab near Chicago, has been debated for years. The physicist Martin Rees has estimated the chance of an accelerator producing a global catastrophe at one in 50 million — long odds, to be sure, but about the same as winning some lotteries.
By contrast, a CERN team this month issued a report concluding that there is "no conceivable danger" of a cataclysmic event. The report essentially confirmed the findings of a 2003 CERN safety report, and a panel of five prominent scientists not affiliated with CERN, including one Nobel laureate, endorsed its conclusions.
Critics of the LHC filed a lawsuit in a Hawaiian court in March seeking to block its startup, alleging that there was "a significant risk that ... operation of the Collider may have unintended consequences which could ultimately result in the destruction of our planet."
One of the plaintiffs, Walter L. Wagner, a physicist and lawyer, said Wednesday CERN's safety report, released June 20, "has several major flaws," and his views on the risks of using the particle accelerator had not changed.


On Tuesday, U.S. Justice Department lawyers representing the Department of Energy and the National Science Foundation filed a motion to dismiss the case.
The two agencies have contributed $531 million to building the collider, and the NSF has agreed to pay $87 million of its annual operating costs. Hundreds of American scientists will participate in the research.


The lawyers called the plaintiffs' allegations "extraordinarily speculative," and said "there is no basis for any conceivable threat" from black holes or other objects the LHC might produce. A hearing on the motion is expected in late July or August.


In rebutting doomsday scenarios, CERN scientists point out that cosmic rays have been bombarding the earth, and triggering collisions similar to those planned for the collider, since the solar system formed 4.5 billion years ago.
And so far, Earth has survived.
CONT.

alkemical
06-30-2008, 10:44 AM
http://www.cracked.com/article_16239_5-psychological-experiments-that-prove-humanity-doomed.html

5 Psychological Experiments That Prove Humanity is Doomed

Psychologists know you have to be careful when you go poking around the human mind because you're never sure what you'll find there. A number of psychological experiments over the years have yielded terrifying conclusions about the subjects.

Oh, we're not talking about the occasional psychopath who turns up. No, we're talking about you. The experiments speak for themselves:

alkemical
06-30-2008, 10:59 AM
http://www.physorg.com/news10312.html

Meditation found to increase brain size

People who meditate grow bigger brains than those who don't. Researchers at Harvard, Yale, and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology have found the first evidence that meditation can alter the physical structure of our brains. Brain scans they conducted reveal that experienced meditators boasted increased thickness in parts of the brain that deal with attention and processing sensory input.



http://www.tampabay.com/features/humaninterest/article623228.ece


A scientist's brain scans produce a photo album of the soul

In the early '90s, Newberg had fallen under the mentorship of psychiatrist Eugene d'Aquili, an early pioneer in the effects of religious and mystical experiences on the brain.

Newberg was then a student at the University of Pennsylvania medical school. He was completing an extra year of research in nuclear medicine. But he had always been interested in psychiatry and brain research. D'Aquili's work looked especially novel, esoteric.

He made a pitch to d'Aquili: Why not test your theories in the brain scan lab, using human guinea pigs? Why not photograph brains during religious experiences?

They found willing volunteers among three disparate groups: Tibetan Buddhist monks, cloistered nuns and Pentecostals who speak in tongues.

Starting with the monks and nuns, they shot them up with radioactive isotopes and zapped them with the SPECT machine.

If the brain houses such things as souls, they did locate them:

Everywhere.



“Untraining The Brain”: Meditation and Executive Function (http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/06/29/untraining-the-brain-meditation-and-executive-function/)

“In a fascinating review of the cognitive neuroscience of attention, authors Raz and Buhle note that most research on attention focuses on defining situations in which it is no longer required to perform a task - in other words, the automatization of thought and behavior. Yet relatively few studies focus on whether thought and behavior can be de-automatized - or, as I might call it if I were asking for trouble, deprogrammed.

What would count as deprogramming? For example, consider the Stroop task, where subjects must name the ink color of each word in a list of color words (e.g., “red” might be written in blue ink, and the task is to say “blue” while suppressing the urge to automatically read the word “red”). Reaction time is reliably increased when subjects name the ink color of incongruent words (”red” written in blue ink) relative to congruent words (”red” written in red ink), presumably because the subjects need to inhibit their prepotent tendency to read the words. But is it possible to regain control over our automatized processes - in this case, reading - and hence name the ink color of incongruent words as quickly as we would name the ink color of congruent or even non-words?

Some meditative practices purport to reverse automatization of thought and behavior, such as transcendental or mindfulness meditation, and indeed there is some evidence that these techniques can reduce interference on the Stroop task. For example, in a study by Alexander, Langer, Newman, Chandler, and Davies from the Journal of Personality and Social psychology, 73 elderly participants were randomly assigned to either no treatment, a transcendental meditation program, mindfulness training, or relaxation training. Note that transcendental and mindfulness techniques are frequently described as inducing a state of “pure consciousness” during which the mind is “silent,” and yet not empty: in this state, meditators claim to be intensely aware only of awareness itself. Less cryptically, this state is also referred to as “restful alertness.”

alkemical
06-30-2008, 11:05 AM
http://gizmodo.com/5020303/house-of-representatives-passes-bill-to-protect-us-from-asteroids

Don't worry, folks: Our trusted representatives in government just saw the movie Armageddon, and they aren't going to take the threat posed by this mediocre 1998 action movie lying down. They're going to pass laws to make sure we're prepared to face any asteroid-related threat without having to send a bunch of oil drillers into space.

The House of Representatives just passed bill H.R. 6063, directing NASA to come up with plans for a cheap mission to send a craft to the Apophis asteroid to attach a tracking device. Apophis is on route to come closer to Earth than geostational satellites in 2029, and if it smacked into the planet we'd be a little bit screwed.

In addition to paying close attention to Apophis, the bill requires the Director of the White House's Office of Science and Technology Policy to come up with a policy for notifying Federal agencies and other emergency response groups of an impending near-Earth object threat. Hopefully they'll come up with better plans than whatever it is they have enacted for natural disasters now, because their track record doesn't really inspire confidence. [KurzweilAI]

alkemical
06-30-2008, 11:12 AM
http://www.scientificblogging.com/news_releases/cancer_cured_granulocytes_treatment_worked_100_per cent_in_mice_work_but_will_it_work_in_humans

Cancer Cured? Granulocytes Treatment Worked 100 Percent In Mice Work But Will It Work In Humans?
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Submitted by News Account on 28 June 2008 - 3:07pm. Public Health

Scientists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center are about to embark on a human trial to test whether a new cancer treatment will be as effective at eradicating cancer in humans as it has proven to be in mice.

The treatment will involve transfusing specific white blood cells, called granulocytes, from select donors, into patients with advanced forms of cancer. A similar treatment using white blood cells from cancer-resistant mice has previously been highly successful, curing 100 percent of lab mice afflicted with advanced malignancies.

Zheng Cui, Ph.D., lead researcher and associate professor of pathology, will be announcing the study June 28 at the Understanding Aging conference in Los Angeles.

The study, given the go-ahead by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, will involve treating human cancer patients with white blood cells from healthy young people whose immune systems produce cells with high levels of cancer-fighting activity.

The basis of the study is the scientists' discovery, published five years ago, of a cancer-resistant mouse and their subsequent finding that white blood cells from that mouse and its offspring cured advanced cancers in ordinary laboratory mice. They have since identified similar cancer-killing activity in the white blood cells of some healthy humans.

"In mice, we've been able to eradicate even highly aggressive forms of malignancy with extremely large tumors," Cui said. "Hopefully, we will see the same results in humans. Our laboratory studies indicate that this cancer-fighting ability is even stronger in healthy humans."

The team has tested human cancer-fighting cells from healthy donors against human cervical, prostate and breast cancer cells in the laboratory – with surprisingly good results. The scientists say the anti-tumor response primarily involves granulocytes of the innate immune system, a system known for fighting off infections.

Granulocytes are the most abundant type of white blood cells and can account for as much as 60 percent of total circulating white blood cells in healthy humans. Donors can give granulocytes specifically without losing other components of blood through a process called apheresis that separates granulocytes and returns other blood components back to donors.

In a small study of human volunteers, the scientists found that cancer-killing activity in the granulocytes was highest in people under age 50. They also found that this activity can be lowered by factors such as winter or emotional stress. They said the key to the success for the new therapy is to transfuse sufficient granulocytes from healthy donors while their cancer-killing activities are at their peak level.

For the upcoming study, the researchers are currently recruiting 500 local potential donors who are 50 years old or younger and in good health to have their blood tested. Of those, 100 volunteers with high cancer-killing activity will be asked to donate white blood cells for the study. Cell recipients will include 22 cancer patients who have solid tumors that either didn't respond originally, or no longer respond, to conventional therapies. The study will cost $100,000 per patient receiving therapy, and for many patients (those living in 22 states, including North Carolina) the costs may be covered by their insurance company. There is no cost to donate blood. For general information about insurance coverage of clinical trials, go to the American Cancer Society's web site at www.cancer.org/docroot/ETO/content/ETO_6_2x_State_Laws_Regarding_Clinical_Trials.asp. )

For more information about qualifications for donors and participants, go to www.wfubmc.edu/LIFT (Web site will be available the evening of 6/27.) Cancer-killing ability in these cells is highest during the summer, so researchers are hoping to find volunteers who can afford the therapy quickly.

"If the study is effective, it would be another arrow in the quiver of treatments aimed at cancer," said Mark Willingham, M.D., a co-researcher and professor of pathology. "It is based on 10 years of work since the cancer-resistant mouse was first discovered."

Volunteers who are selected as donors – based on the observed potential cancer-fighting activity of their white cells – will complete the apheresis, a two- to three-hour process similar to platelet donation, to collect their granulocytes. The cancer patients will then receive the granulocytes through a transfusion – a safe process that has been used for more than 30 years. Normally, the treatment is used for patients who have antibiotic-resistant infectious diseases. The treatment will be given for three to four consecutive days on an outpatient basis. Up to three donors may be necessary to collect enough blood product for one study participant.

"The difference between our study and the traditional white cell therapy is that we're selecting the healthy donors based on the cancer-killing ability of their white blood cells," said Cui. The scientists are calling the therapy Leukocyte InFusion Therapy (LIFT).

The goal of the phase II study is to determine whether patients can tolerate a sufficient amount of transfused granulocytes for the treatment. Participants will be monitored on a regular basis, and after three months scientists will evaluate whether the treatment results in clear clinical benefits for the patients. If this phase of the study is successful, scientists will expand the study to determine if the treatment is best suited to certain types of cancer.

Yikong Keung, M.D., a medical oncologist, is the chief clinical investigator of the study. Gregory Pomper, M.D., assistant professor of pathology and the director of the Wake Forest Baptist blood bank, will oversee the blood banking portion of the study.

alkemical
06-30-2008, 01:16 PM
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alkemical
06-30-2008, 02:16 PM
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alkemical
06-30-2008, 02:23 PM
don't call me white

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alkemical
06-30-2008, 02:36 PM
<embed id="VideoPlayback" style="width:400px;height:326px" allowFullScreen="true" src="http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=7839732753868234884&hl=en&fs=true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"> </embed>

alkemical
07-01-2008, 07:51 AM
Calif. man gets prison for burning Burning Man (http://www.comcast.net/articles/news-odd/20080628/Burning.Man.Burned/)

http://static-p-a.comcast.net/api/assets/bin-200807/c19de4d3b39e22a25f7e7f930c52f9da.jpg

alkemical
07-01-2008, 12:21 PM
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alkemical
07-01-2008, 03:04 PM
http://online.wsj.com/article/SB121450609076407973.html?mod=hps_us_inside_today

Get Out of Your Own Way
Studies Show the Value of Not Overthinking a Decision
June 27, 2008; Page A9

Fishing in the stream of consciousness, researchers now can detect our intentions and predict our choices before we are aware of them ourselves. The brain, they have found, appears to make up its mind 10 seconds before we become conscious of a decision -- an eternity at the speed of thought.

Their findings challenge conventional notions of choice.

"....Studying the brain behavior leading up to the moment of conscious decision, the researchers identified signals that let them know when the students had decided to move 10 seconds or so before the students knew it themselves. About 70% of the time, the researchers could also predict which button the students would push....."

alkemical
07-01-2008, 03:11 PM
http://www.physorg.com/news134108296.html

Cancer cells revert to normal at specific signal threshold, researchers find
Medicine & Health / Cancer
Cancer starts when key cellular signals run amok, driving uncontrolled cell growth. But scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine report that lowering levels of one cancer signal under a specific threshold reverses this process in mice, returning tumor cells to their normal, healthy state. The finding could help target cancer chemotherapy to tumors while minimizing side effects for the body's healthy cells.

alkemical
07-01-2008, 03:12 PM
Your brain can lie to you

BY Sam Wang and Sandra Aamodt

New york

June 30: False beliefs are everywhere. One poll has found that 18 per cent of Americans think the sun revolves around the earth.

Thus it seems slightly less egregious that, according to another poll, 10 per cent think that the Senator, Mr Barack Obama is a Christian instead of a Muslim.

The Obama campaign has created a website to dispel misinformation. But this effort may be more difficult than it seems, thanks to the quirky way in which our brains store memories — and mislead us along the way.

The brain does not simply gather and stockpile information as a computer’s hard drive does. Facts are stored first in the hippocampus, a structure deep in the brain about the size and shape of a fat man’s curled pinkie finger.

But the information does not rest there. Every time we recall it, our brain writes it down again, and during this re-storage, it is also reprocessed. In time, the fact is gradually transferred to the cerebral cortex and is separated from the context in which it was originally learned.

For example, the capital of California is Sacramento, but no one probably remembers how one has learnt it. This phenomenon, known as source amnesia, can also lead people to forget whether a statement is true. Even when a lie is presented with a disclaimer, people often later remember it as true.

With time, this misremembering gets worse. A false statement from a non-credible source that is at first not believed can gain credibility during the months it takes to reprocess memories from short-term hippocampal storage to longer-term cortical storage.

As the source is forgotten, the message and its implications gain strength. This could explain why, during the 2004 presidential campaign, it took weeks for the Swift Boat Veterans for Truth campaign against the Senator, Mr John Kerry to have an effect on his standing in the polls. Even if they do not understand the neuroscience behind source amnesia, campaign strategists can exploit it to spread misinformation. In 1919, Justice Oliver Wendell Holmes wrote that "the best test of truth is the power of the thought to get itself accepted in the competition of the market." The thought is admirable in realising the truth. — Reuters

alkemical
07-02-2008, 10:19 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2008/06/26/scihawking126.xml

Stephen Hawking's explosive new theory

By Roger Highfield, Science Editor
Last Updated: 12:01am BST 26/06/2008

Prof Stephen Hawking has come up with a new idea to explain why the Big Bang of creation led to the vast cosmos that we can see today.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/graphics/2008/06/26/scihawking126.jpg

"...Most models of the universe are bottom-up, that is, you start from well-defined initial conditions of the Big Bang and work forward. However, Prof Hertog and Prof Hawking say that we do not and cannot know the initial conditions present at the beginning of the universe. Instead, we only know the final state - the one we are in now.

Their idea is therefore to start with the conditions we observe today - like the fact that at large scales one does not need to adopt quantum lore to explain how the universe (it behaves classically, as scientists say) - and work backwards in time to determine what the initial conditions might have looked like.

In this way, they argue the universe did not have just one unique beginning and history but a multitude of different ones and that it has experienced them all.

The new theory is also attractive because it fits in with string theory - the most popular candidate for a "theory of everything."

String theory allows the existence of an" unimaginable multitude of different types of universes in addition to our own," but it does not provide a selection criterion among these and hence no explanation for why our universe is, the way it is", says Prof Hertog.

"For this, one needs a theory of the wave function of the universe."

And now the world of cosmology has one. The next step is to find specific predictions that can be put to the test, to validate this new view of how the cosmos came into being. ...."

alkemical
07-02-2008, 12:11 PM
I get rep comments here and there for this thread. I say thanks, and thanks to those that post articles. I do find them interesting (even if i don't comment/rep).

I figure this thread should exemplify *WHERE* we can go, and to not fall into the trappings of the "damned" part of being human.

alkemical
07-02-2008, 12:54 PM
Drawing Lines: Magical Tribalism (http://www.key64.net/feature/1392-drawing-lines-magical-tribalism/)

alkemical
07-02-2008, 03:17 PM
Neopaganism growing quickly (http://www.denverpost.com/news/ci_9695062?source=pop_section_news)

alkemical
07-02-2008, 03:26 PM
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=long-trip-magic-mushrooms

Long Trip: Magic Mushrooms' Transcendent Effect Lingers


People who took magic mushrooms were still feeling the love more than a year later, and one might say they were on cloud nine about it, scientists report in the Journal of Psychopharmacology.

"Most of the volunteers looked back on their experience up to 14 months later and rated it as the most, or one of the five most, personally meaningful and spiritually significant of their lives," comparing it with the birth of a child or the death of a parent, says neuroscientist Roland Griffiths of Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, who led the research. "It's one thing to have a dramatic experience you say is impressive. It's another thing to say you consider it as meaningful 14 months later. There's something about the saliency of these experiences that's stunning."


http://www.stamfordadvocate.com/livingandhealth/ci_9760531

Mad for mushrooms
By Ronnie Fein
Special Correspondent
Article Launched: 07/02/2008 01:00:00 AM EDT

Click photo to enlarge

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Mushrooms have always had an aura of mystery about them. There are tales of "fairy rings," stemming from the circular pattern in which they grow and myths about the need to gather the fungi at night. Eat the wrong one and you could wind up with a severe stomach ache or a night haunted by violent hallucinations. Or far worse.

But the risk was always part of mushrooms' lure. Long ago, someone discovered that these wild, weird-looking things were among earth's finest delicacies - worth foraging for the right ones.

In ancient times, mushrooms were considered too exotic for the hoi polloi; they were food for royalty, reserved for pharaohs and Roman nobles. Today, you might still pay a king's ransom for some kinds but most are fairly inexpensive. They were once difficult to come by, but now are widely available. Today, even many so-called wild varieties are cultivated and for sale at most markets. Even noncultivated species are fairly easy to find.

These days you needn't worry about nightmares, seeing things or being poisoned when you eat store-bought mushrooms. Emperor Claudius may have been done in by mushroom ragout but markets today sell only edible varieties.

Although mushrooms are commonplace now, they are as worthy as ever. They make good eating in any season, but summer is prime time for indulging our mycological fancies, if only because mushrooms pair so well with the season's best produce: locally grown goods picked up at the farmer's market or even


(recipes at end of story)


http://www.newswise.com/articles/view/542247/

Mushrooms the Hidden Superfood



http://www.reuters.com/article/newsOne/idUSN2936154720080629

Accidental fungus leads to promising cancer drug

alkemical
07-03-2008, 08:26 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20080702/sc_nm/stradivarius_dc

Wood density holds key to Stradivarius sweet sound

alkemical
07-03-2008, 02:54 PM
http://cryptogon.com/?p=2859

CIA Operative Fired for Refusing to Suppress or Falsify Reports That Iran Had Suspended Work on Nuclear Weapon

alkemical
07-03-2008, 03:11 PM
DNA Technology Posts Dramatic Speed Increases

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/07/british-institu.html

A prominent genetics institute recently sequenced its trillionth base pair of DNA, highlighting just how fast genome sequencing technology has improved this century.

Every two minutes, the Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute sequences as many base pairs as all researchers worldwide did from 1982 to 1987, the first five years of international genome-sequencing efforts.

That speed is thanks to the technology underlying genomics research, which has been improving exponentially every couple of years, similar to the way computer tech improves under Moore's Law.

"Up to 2006, the various cycles of new technology and introduction were cutting costs in half for a similar product every 22 months," said Adam Felsenfeld, a program director at the National Human Genome Research Institute, which invests about as much money in DNA sequencing as the Sanger Institute.

Progress in DNA sequencing has been as breathtaking as any technological change in the IT realm. The Human Genome Project was estimated to cost $3 billion -- to sequence a single genome -- when it began in 1990, but cost reductions during the decade-long effort drove its actual cost closer to $300 million. By the end of the project, researchers estimated that if they were starting again, they could have sequenced the genome for less than $50 million.

By 2006, Harvard's George Church estimated that his lab could sequence a genome for $2.2 million. In 2007, the sequencing of James Watson's genome was said to cost less than $1 million. Looking into the future, the NIH wants genomes to cost a mere $100,000 by 2009, and $1,000 five years later.

With dropping costs and increasing speed, a flood of genetic data is flowing out of international institutes across the world. Previous progress was measured in gigabases (billions of DNA base pairs), but now major research centers are stepping up to the terabase level (trillions of bp, as they are abbreviated). (Human genomes contain about 3 gigabases.)

alkemical
07-03-2008, 03:12 PM
https://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/080701-st-earth-sounds.html

Earth's Cries Recorded in Space

alkemical
07-03-2008, 03:29 PM
<embed id="VideoPlayback" style="width:400px;height:326px" allowFullScreen="true" src="http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=-6397969444849518864&hl=en&fs=true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"> </embed>

Marshall McLuhan speech (this is good stuff). 30min

alkemical
07-03-2008, 03:34 PM
http://www.disinfo.com/content/story.php?title=Viacom-Knows-What-Youve-Watched

Google has been ordered to hand over all of its electronic data on the videos watched by users on YouTube to Viacom. The data, which is 12 terabytes in size, includes records of every video watched by every user, including the user's login name and IP address.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 08:35 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/07/02/digital.augmentedreality/index.html

Who wants straight reality when you can augment it

Augmented reality (AR) -- or the "real world Web" -- has been listed by research firm Gartner as one of the most disruptive technologies companies could face over the next few years. The possibilities of AR are impressive.

During a heart transplant, identifier labels can be superimposed over the valves and chambers of a beating heart. On airplane factory floors, AR visors help electricians navigate complex mazes of wiring. Military minds dream up darker uses of AR.

Early on, consumer products might be predominantly entertainment-oriented, available not just on cell phones but also handheld gaming and other devices.

For instance there's the "magic book" idea, where every page can host a virtual 3-D pop-up that's viewable through a visor.

Or "AR tennis," where a virtual tennis court is superimposed on a real table and you view the action through your cell phone screen. The "racket" is your cell phone, which you wave through the air to hit the virtual ball. (Just don't topple your beer with your backhand.)

Offerings similar to these might reach store shelves within a year or so, believes Blair MacIntyre, who directs the Augmented Environments Lab at the Georgia Institute of Technology, which devised the cemetery experiment.

But it will be some time before you can "click on people," or stand on a street corner and look at an augmented world through your phone or visor.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 08:39 AM
“To fight the Empire is to be infected by its derangement. This is a paradox; whoever defeats a segment of the Empire becomes the Empire; it proliferates like a virus, imposing its form on its enemies. Thereby it becomes its enemies.”
Philip K. Dick’s VALIS




http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/02/us/02detain.html?_r=2&sq=chinese%20torture&st=nyt&adxnnl=1&oref=slogin&scp=1&adxnnlx=1215112358-1aT1Pym5JJXUwaMA7lmfZw&oref=slogin

Correction Appended

WASHINGTON — The military trainers who came to Guantánamo Bay in December 2002 based an entire interrogation class on a chart showing the effects of “coercive management techniques” for possible use on prisoners, including “sleep deprivation,” “prolonged constraint,” and “exposure.”

What the trainers did not say, and may not have known, was that their chart had been copied verbatim from a 1957 Air Force study of Chinese Communist techniques used during the Korean War to obtain confessions, many of them false, from American prisoners.

The recycled chart is the latest and most vivid evidence of the way Communist interrogation methods that the United States long described as torture became the basis for interrogations both by the military at the base at Guantánamo Bay, Cuba, and by the Central Intelligence Agency.

Some methods were used against a small number of prisoners at Guantánamo before 2005, when Congress banned the use of coercion by the military. The C.I.A. is still authorized by President Bush to use a number of secret “alternative” interrogation methods.

Several Guantánamo documents, including the chart outlining coercive methods, were made public at a Senate Armed Services Committee hearing June 17 that examined how such tactics came to be employed.

But committee investigators were not aware of the chart’s source in the half-century-old journal article, a connection pointed out to The New York Times by an independent expert on interrogation who spoke on condition of anonymity.

The 1957 article from which the chart was copied was entitled “Communist Attempts to Elicit False Confessions From Air Force Prisoners of War” and written by Albert D. Biderman, a sociologist then working for the Air Force, who died in 2003. Mr. Biderman had interviewed American prisoners returning from North Korea, some of whom had been filmed by their Chinese interrogators confessing to germ warfare and other atrocities.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 08:45 AM
http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/02/nations-spies-w.html#previouspost

U.S. Spies Want to Find Terrorists in World of Warcraft

Be careful who you frag. Having eliminated all terrorism in the real world, the U.S. intelligence community is working to develop software that will detect violent extremists infiltrating World of Warcraft and other massive multiplayer games, according to a data-mining report from the Director of National Intelligence.

The Reynard project will begin by profiling online gaming behavior, then potentially move on to its ultimate goal of "automatically detecting suspicious behavior and actions in the virtual world."

* The cultural and behavioral norms of virtual worlds and gaming are generally unstudied. Therefore, Reynard will seek to identify the emerging social, behavioral and cultural norms in virtual worlds and gaming environments. The project would then apply the lessons learned to determine the feasibility of automatically detecting suspicious behavior and actions in the virtual world.

* If it shows early promise, this small seedling effort may increase its scope to a full project.

Reynard will conduct unclassified research in a public virtual world environment. The research will use publicly available data and will begin with observational studies to establish baseline normative behaviors.

The publicly available report -- which was mandated by Congress following earlier concerns over data-mining programs -- also mentions several other data-mining initiatives. These include:

* Video Analysis and Content Extraction - software to automatically identify faces, events and objects in video

* Tangram - A system that wants to create surveillance and threat warning system that evaluates known threats and finds unknown threats to issue warnings ahead of an attack

* Knowledge Discovery and Dissemination - This tool is reminiscent of the supposedly-defunct Total Information Awareness program (http://www.wired.com/politics/law/news/2002/12/56620). It seeks to access disparate databases to find patterns of known bad behavior. The program plans to work with domestic law enforcement and Homeland Security.

The report gives no indication why the find-a-terrorist cell in Sims project is called Reynard, though that is a traditional trickster figure in literature (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Reynard).

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:00 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/06/world/middleeast/06stone.html

July 6, 2008
Ancient Tablet Ignites Debate on Messiah and Resurrection
By ETHAN BRONNER

JERUSALEM — A three-foot-tall tablet with 87 lines of Hebrew that scholars believe dates from the decades just before the birth of Jesus is causing a quiet stir in biblical and archaeological circles, especially because it may speak of a messiah who will rise from the dead after three days.

If such a messianic description really is there, it will contribute to a developing re-evaluation of both popular and scholarly views of Jesus, since it suggests that the story of his death and resurrection was not unique but part of a recognized Jewish tradition at the time.

The tablet, probably found near the Dead Sea in Jordan according to some scholars who have studied it, is a rare example of a stone with ink writings from that era — in essence, a Dead Sea Scroll on stone.

It is written, not engraved, across two neat columns, similar to columns in a Torah. But the stone is broken, and some of the text is faded, meaning that much of what it says is open to debate.

Still, its authenticity has so far faced no challenge, so its role in helping to understand the roots of Christianity in the devastating political crisis faced by the Jews of the time seems likely to increase.

Daniel Boyarin, a professor of Talmudic culture at the University of California at Berkeley, said that the stone was part of a growing body of evidence suggesting that Jesus could be best understood through a close reading of the Jewish history of his day.

“Some Christians will find it shocking — a challenge to the uniqueness of their theology — while others will be comforted by the idea of it being a traditional part of Judaism,” Mr. Boyarin said.

Given the highly charged atmosphere surrounding all Jesus-era artifacts and writings, both in the general public and in the fractured and fiercely competitive scholarly community, as well as the concern over forgery and charlatanism, it will probably be some time before the tablet’s contribution is fully assessed. It has been around 60 years since the Dead Sea Scrolls were uncovered, and they continue to generate enormous controversy regarding their authors and meaning......

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:07 AM
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&pageId=68469

Democratic Party official accused in satanic rape, kidnap
Woman, husband said to shackle victims to beds, keep them in dog cages without food

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:08 AM
US Government Patents Medical Pot (http://blog.norml.org/2008/07/03/us-government-patents-medical-pot/)


The extent of the federal government’s hypocrisy on the issue of medicinal cannabis truly knows no bounds. Don’t believe me? Just click here.

(Thanks to Huffington Post blogger Brinna for the link.)

US Patent 6630507 - Cannabinoids as antioxidants and neuroprotectants

Application: filed on 2/02/2001

US Patent Issued on October 7, 2003

Assignee: The United States of America, as represented by the Department of Health and Human Services

And there you have it. The same federal government that steadfastly denies pot has any medicinal value also holds the medical patents on the plant’s various therapeutic cannabinoids. And they aren’t the only ones who do.

NORML podcaster Russ Belville and I will be discussing this issue in depth — as well as the related issue of whether or not Big Pharma is behind the prohibition of pot — on the Daily Audio Stash next week.

Stay tuned.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:12 AM
http://www.americanchronicle.com/articles/66505

The McCormack-Dickstein Committee was established to investigate a homegrown American fascist plot hatched in 1933. Here's how the BBC promoted its recent story:

"Document uncovers details of a planned coup in the USA in 1933 by right-wing American businessmen. The coup was aimed at toppling President Franklin D Roosevelt with the help of half-a-million war veterans. The plotters, who were alleged to involve some of the most famous families in America, (owners of Heinz, Birds Eye, Goodtea, Maxwell Hse & George Bush´s Grandfather, Prescott) believed that their country should adopt the policies of Hitler and Mussolini to beat the great depression. Mike Thomson investigates why so little is known about this biggest ever peacetime threat to American democracy."

Actually, if you listen to the 30-minute BBC story, there is not one word of so much as speculation as to why this story is so little known. I think a clue to the answer can be found by looking into why this BBC report has not led to any U.S. media outlets picking up the story this week.

The BBC report provides a good account of the basic story. Some of the wealthiest men in America approached Marine Corps Major General Smedley Butler, beloved of many World War I veterans, many of them embittered by the government's treatment of them. Prescott Bush's group asked Butler to lead 500,000 veterans in a take-over of Washington and the White House. Butler refused and recounted the affair to the congressional committee. His account was corroborated in part by a number of witnesses, and the committee concluded that the plot was real. But the names of wealthy backers of the plot were blacked out in the committee's records, and nobody was prosecuted. According to the BBC, President Roosevelt cut a deal. He refrained from prosecuting some of the wealthiest men in America for treason. They agreed to end Wall Street's opposition to the New Deal.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:20 AM
http://www.oldthinkernews.com/Articles/oldthinker%20news/reece_committee.htm

In 1954 the Reece Committee, chaired by Carroll B. Reece, produced its findings regarding the influence of tax-exempt foundations in the field of education.* The report also briefly mentions their influence in politics, propaganda, social sciences and international affairs. The Rockefeller Foundation, Ford Foundation, Carnegie Foundation and others were discussed during the Committee hearings.

The Reece Committee was smeared by the media and by John D. Rockefeller the 3rd himself as being wholly inaccurate, but historical hindsight gives us a perspective that shows what the Committee found is far closer to the truth than Rockefeller would have you believe.

A predominant theme found in the Committee's findings is the desire of the foundations and those behind them to create a system of world governance. The use of propaganda and social engineering was identified as a means to and end to achieve this goal. In 1932, the president of the Rockefeller Foundation, Max Mason, stated that "The social sciences... will concern themselves with the rationalization of social control..."

The Committee cited a report from the President's Commission on Higher Education, published in 1947, which outlines the goals of social engineering programs; The realization on part of the people of the necessity of world government "...psychologically, socially and... politically". The cited report states,

"In speed of transportation and communication and in economic interdependence, the nations of the globe are already one world; the task is to secure recognition and acceptance of this oneness in the thinking of the people, as that the concept of one world may be realized psychologically, socially and in good time politically.

It is this task in particular that challenges our scholars and teachers to lead the way toward a new way of thinking. There is an urgent need for a program for world citizenship that can be made a part of every person's general education.

It will take social science and social engineering to solve the problems of human relations. Our people must learn to respect the need for special knowledge and technical training in this field as they have come to defer to the expert in physics, chemistry, medicine, and other sciences." [emphasis added] (p. 483)

Rene A. Wormser, author of the book Foundations: Their Power and Influence, served as counsel for the Committee. Wormser discussed the investigation of the social sciences on part of the foundations - such as the Rockefeller and Carnegie foundations - and the influence that they wield.

"Mr. WORMSER. Professor, back to this term "social engineering," again, is there not a certain presumption, or presumptuousness, on the part of social scientists, to consider themselves a group of the elite who are solely capable and should be given the sole opportunity to guide us in our social development? They exclude by inference, I suppose, religious leaders and what you might call humanistic leaders. They combine the tendency toward the self-generated social engineering concept with a high concentration of power in that interlocking arrangement of foundations and agencies, and it seems to me you might have something rather dangerous." [emphasis added] (p. 579)

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:28 AM
DENVER -- Talk show host Rush Limbaugh is sparking controversy again after he made comments that appear to call for riots in Denver during the Democratic National Convention this summer.

He said the riots would ensure a Democrat is not elected as president, and his listeners have a responsibility to make sure it happens.

"Riots in Denver, the Democrat Convention would see to it that we don't elect Democrats," Limbaugh said during Wednesday's radio broadcast. He then went on to say that's the best thing that could happen to the country. (http://www.thedenverchannel.com/news/15980105/detail.html)

-------------------------

ReCreate 68 Starting to Look Like a Threat to Peaceful Activist Groups (http://www.prisonplanet.com/articles/april2008/160408_b_threat.htm)

ReCreate 68 has been handing out the image above on cards around Denver. The left image is the front and the right image is the back. On the website for the group, they identify with disobedience by claiming people should "join them in the streets of Denver as they resist a two-party system that allows imperialism and racism to continue unrestrained." On their website, they have called the police pigs and are educating people on the $50 million the city spent on security for the DNC. A link states "Weapons Used by the Pigs to Take Your Rights Away!" See the website here: http://www.recreate68.org/

Denver area hospitals and law enforcement have been receiving emails and faxes to prepare for terrorism and mass riots in Denver for the DNC similar to the one below. In the memo, a security alert has been issued including, in some cases, the naming of one activist group, ReCreate 68, as a potential threat.

------------------


NY Police Report Bomb to Frame Activist as Terrorist
"By the time the government finds out, you'll be in the hole thirty days" 9/11 Truther is Told By Officer Who Admits to False Accusation of Having a Bomb (http://www.jonesreport.com/articles/270407_false_bomb_threat.html)

--------------

Dangerous pattern emerges as activists are framed, calls for violence are declared for Denver DNC (http://www.oldthinkernews.com/Articles/oldthinker%20news/dangerous_pattern_emerges_as_act.htm)


By Daniel Taylor

A dangerous pattern has emerged as We are Change activists are framed for assault, and open calls for violence at the upcoming Democratic National Convention are proclaimed.

Rush Limbaugh has openly called for mass riots in "operation chaos" at the upcoming Democratic National Convention in Denver Colorado. "I am not inspiring or inciting riots, I am dreaming of riots in Denver," said Limbaugh. Limbaugh stated that he hopes for a replay of the Chicago riots.

This follows the revelation that the anarchist group recreate 68 is preparing to stage violent acts at the DNC. Truthalliance.net reports,

"ReCreate 68 has a massive anti war protest planned for the DNC on the 24th, to which they were never issued a permit for. Sparking the press to cover the story, Glenn Spagnuolo, the organizer of the group, threatened the City of Denver and all who visit the Democratic National Convention with potential violence, making a direct threat regarding his un-permited plan to occupy the Civic Center, "If the cops try to stop us, we'll see what happens." The threat estimates there will be 50,000 anti-war demonstrators who will overwhelm law enforcement. Re-create 68 is now on a collision course with law enforcement to re-create the violence of the 1968 Democratic National Convention in Chicago."

In addition to the danger of violence at the DNC, the peaceful activist group We are Change has been the target of multiple frame up attempts.

Luke Rudkowski, founder of We are Change, was called a "terrorist" by police for standing in front of the new World Trade Center #7 building and threatened with being put "...in the hole for 30 days".

"A terrorist act-- I guess they go away for about 30 days," said the officer. Rudkowski responds, saying that he is an American citizen, when the officer states, "You're right. But by the time the government figures it out, you'll be in the hole for 30 days."

In August of last year, peaceful protesters who gathered in Montebello Canada to protest the SPP encountered police posing as protesters with threatening rocks, but the peaceful activists were wise enough to spot them and denounce their tactics.

Members of We are Change Ireland were smeared recently in a supposed attack on a European MEP. Paul Watson writes,

"During an attempt to assault activists who asked him a question in Dublin, a European MEP tripped and fell on his face and the entire incident was caught on camera, but that didn't stop the media from reporting that an "anti-EU gang" of thugs had screamed abuse and assaulted Proinsias de Rossa - in a crass attempt to smear opposition to the European Union."

Now, We are Change activist Gary Talis has been smeared for supposedly attacking a wheelchair bound girl. Cowardly calls for violence against Mr. Talis are prevalent in the wake of this most recent frame up.

As this current pattern unfolds, peaceful groups need to be wary of provocateurs attempting to incite violence or frame peaceful activists for committing criminal acts. Keep your cameras rolling and stand strong. Attempts to frame and provocateur peaceful groups only serve to demonstrate the frustration and fear the establishment is feeling.

If violence does ensue at the DNC or elsewhere, the expanding police state will be empowered even further. The provocateurs' goal is to fulfill the image that the mainstream media is attempting to create surrounding peaceful activists as being violent anarchists who damage America's image. Violence will only tighten the grip of the already tightening system.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:34 AM
Anticipatory Conformity: Will the Growing Surveillance Panopticon Cause us to Self-censor? (http://www.oldthinkernews.com/Articles/oldthinker%20news/anticipatory_conformity_will_the_growing_surveilla nce_panopticon.htm)

What sociological and psychological effects will the trend toward an expanded surveillance apparatus have on our social interactions?

Lynne Duke writes in the Washington Post,

"If we know we’re being watched and know there is an expected mode of behavior, how does that change our actions?"

Duke is referring to a term coined in 1988 by Harvard psychologist Shoshana Zuboff called "anticipatory conformity." Duke quotes Zuboff in her explanation of the term,

“I think the first level of that is we anticipate surveillance and we conform, and we do that with awareness,” she says. “We know, for example, when we’re going through the security line at the airport not to make jokes about terrorists or we’ll get nailed, and nobody wants to get nailed for cracking a joke. It’s within our awareness to self-censor. And that self-censorship represents a diminution of our freedom.

Applying that concept to the post-9/11 era, Zuboff says she sees anticipatory conformity all around and expects it to grow even more intense."

Duke comments,

"We self-censor, she says, not only to follow the rules, but also to avoid the shame of being publicly singled out.
Once anticipatory conformity becomes second nature, it becomes progressively easier for people to adapt to new impositions on their privacy, their freedoms.

The habit has been set."

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:37 AM
Constitutional expert: FISA bill 'is an evisceration of the Fourth Amendment' (http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Turley_FISA_bill_is_evisceration_of_0619.html)

"People need to be very, very much aware of this bill," he charged. "What you're seeing in this bill is an evisceration of the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution. It is something that allows the President and the government to go into law-abiding homes, on their word alone--their suspicion alone--and to engage in warrantless surveillance.

TailgateNut
07-07-2008, 09:41 AM
Constitutional expert: FISA bill 'is an evisceration of the Fourth Amendment' (http://rawstory.com/news/2008/Turley_FISA_bill_is_evisceration_of_0619.html)

"People need to be very, very much aware of this bill," he charged. "What you're seeing in this bill is an evisceration of the Fourth Amendment of the Constitution. It is something that allows the President and the government to go into law-abiding homes, on their word alone--their suspicion alone--and to engage in warrantless surveillance.


It's quasi terrorism by our goverment.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:43 AM
http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/07/05/meditation-yoga-might-switch-off-stress-genes/

Meditation, Yoga Might Switch Off Stress Genes
July 5th, 2008 by TiamatsVision

“Researchers say they’ve taken a significant stride forward in understanding how relaxation techniques such as meditation, prayer and yoga improve health: by changing patterns of gene activity that affect how the body responds to stress. The changes were seen both in long-term practitioners and in newer recruits, the scientists said.

“It’s not all in your head,” said Dr. Herbert Benson, president emeritus of the Benson-Henry Institute for Mind/Body Medicine at Massachusetts General Hospital and an associate professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School. “What we have found is that when you evoke the relaxation response, the very genes that are turned on or off by stress are turned the other way. The mind can actively turn on and turn off genes. The mind is not separated from the body.”

One outside expert agreed. “It’s sort of like reverse thinking: If you can wreak havoc on yourself with lifestyle choices, for example, [in a way that] causes expression of latent genetic manifestations in the negative, then the reverse should hold true,” said Dr. Gerry Leisman, director of the F.R. Carrick Institute for Clinical Ergonomics, Rehabilitation and Applied Neuroscience at Leeds Metropolitan University in the U.K.”

alkemical
07-07-2008, 09:46 AM
It's quasi terrorism by our goverment.

I seriously am waiting for the US Supreme Ct. to rule the US Constitution as "unconstitutional" -

alkemical
07-07-2008, 10:27 AM
http://www.physorg.com/news134226755.html

Some fundamental interactions of matter found to be fundamentally different than thought

Collisions have consequences. Everyone knows that. Whether it's between trains, planes, automobiles or atoms, there are always repercussions. But while macroscale collisions may have the most obvious effects - mangled steel, bruised flesh - sometimes it is the tiniest collisions that have the most resounding repercussions.

Such may be the case with the results of new experimental research on collisions between a single hydrogen atom and a lone molecule of deuterium -t he smallest atom and one of the smallest molecules, respectively - conducted by a team led by Richard Zare, a professor of chemistry at Stanford University.

When an atom collides with a molecule, traditional wisdom said the atom had to strike one end of the molecule hard to deliver energy to it. People thought a glancing blow from an atom would be useless in terms of energy transfer, but that turns out not to be the case, according to the researchers.

"We have a new understanding of how energy can be transferred in collisions at the molecular scale," said Zare, senior author of a paper presenting the results in the July 3 issue of Nature.

Every atom or molecule, even if it has no charge, has electrostatic forces around it-sort of like the magnetic field of the Earth. Those chemical forces exert a pull on any other atom or molecule within range, trying to form a chemical bond.

What Zare and his team found is that a speeding hydrogen atom does not have to score a direct hit on a deuterium molecule, a form of molecular hydrogen made up of two heavy isotopes of hydrogen, to set the molecule vibrating. It only needs to pass closely enough to exert its tiny chemical force on the molecule. Vibrating molecules matter because they are more energized, making them more reactive. Thus, energy transfer effectively softens them up for future reactions.

"This has changed a very simple idea that we cherished-that to make a molecule highly vibrationally excited, you basically had to crush it, squeeze it, hit it over the head. Compress some bond and the molecule would snap back," Zare said. "We found quite the opposite."

One could compare it to the difference between a punch in the stomach and a caress on the cheek. Both can set the senses tingling, but in very different fashions.

Zare's team discovered that as a hydrogen atom passed close to a deuterium molecule, the chemical forces tugged on the nearest of the deuterium atoms in the molecule, pulling it away from the other deuterium atom. But if the tug was not strong enough to break the two deuterium atoms apart, as the hydrogen atom moved farther away its hold on the deuterium atom would weaken. The deuterium atom would eventually slip from its grip and snap back toward the other deuterium atom, initiating an oscillation, or vibration.

"What we are really seeing is the result of a frustrated chemical reaction," Zare said. "The molecule wants to react. It just didn't get into the right position with the right conditions so that it could react."

Zare went on to picture this process as follows: "The deuterium molecule is in a happily married state until the hydrogen atom flies by and attracts the nearest deuterium atom. This deuterium atom in the middle is in a giant tug of war. It is being fought over by two lovers, two highly similar atoms that are both attracted to the middle deuterium atom. This affair is a love triangle. In energy transfer, the original spouse wins out. The middle deuterium atom decides not to stray and rebounds to the other deuterium atom-its first love-setting both to vibrate rapidly."

The new findings may have ramifications for understanding what happens in any chemical reaction, in addition to interactions between chemicals that do not result in a reaction but instead result in energy transfer. So far, one instance has been discovered, but Zare believes that this behavior is likely to be found in many other collision systems.

"This is very fundamental stuff as to what happens in transformations of matter from one state to another," Zare said. "It's very fundamental chemistry."

Comparing the ramifications of the new findings to a ripple spreading out from a pebble dropped into a pond, Zare said, "Maybe this will be the sound of one hand clapping, if the ripple doesn't go anywhere. Taken together, the only way we advance is making these ripples and following them as they spread outward."

Zare's group did the experiments that revealed the energy transfer occurring during "soft" collisions between the hydrogen atom and the deuterium molecule by using techniques and equipment for measuring the molecular interactions that had previously been developed in his laboratory. The experimental work is a major portion of the doctoral thesis of his graduate student Noah T. Goldberg, who was assisted in these measurements by Jianyang Zhang, a postdoctoral researcher, and graduate student Daniel J. Miller. The theoretical calculations that provided the model used to explain the observations is the result of work done by co-authors Stuart Greaves of the University of Bristol and Eckart Wrede of the University of Durham, both in Britain.

Source: Stanford University

alkemical
07-07-2008, 10:29 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/science/07/01/solar.textiles/index.html

LONDON, England (CNN) -- Imagine every time you closed your curtains, you were capturing enough solar energy to power your laptop. The technology is available, but no one's packaged it up in a handy DIY kit at your local hardware store.

Sheila Kennedy hopes to be the first. She's not an interior designer but an architect and professor in practice at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology who is convinced that solar textiles will revolutionize the way we collect and consume power.

"I've been thinking about what happens when power and light become flexible, literally flexible," she said.

She calls it "soft power," as in the "soft energy path," a term coined Amory Lovins in the 1970s as a way to describe a world where renewable energy would gradually replace the centralized grid.

Later, Joseph Nye used the term "soft power" to describe the ability of persuasion, values and culture to influence change.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 10:31 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2008/07/03/scicoldsore103.xml

Cold sores could be banished for good


"...Now scientists have found out how the cold sore virus hides and are testing a way to smoke it out, so that it can be eradicated, an approach that could be extended to other latent infections, such as shingles and genital herpes.

Duke University Medical Centre scientists studied how the herpes simplex virus 1 is able to lie dormant in the trigeminal nerve of the face until triggered to reawaken by excessive sunlight, fever, or other stresses.

"We have provided a molecular understanding of how HSV1 hides," said Prof Bryan Cullen of Duke, one of the team that reports the study in Nature. The team focused on the one sign of a latent infection by the virus, when it is out of the reach of treatments, the production of a molecule called latency associated transcript RNA or LAT RNA.

"It has always been a mystery what this product, LAT RNA, does," Prof Cullen said.

Now studies in mice have revealed LAT RNA keeps the virus dormant by sending out molecular signals that block the production of the proteins that make the virus reproduce. This reveals both how the virus can launch a new infection, and how to treat it too.

After a larger stress the virus starts making more instructions to multiply than LAT RNA can block, and it starts to reproduce, travelling down the trigeminal nerve, to the site of the initial infection at the mouth.

Now the team is testing a way to block LAT RNA, so the virus starts to reproduce. Once the virus is active, a patient would then take acyclovir, a drug that effectively kills replicating HSV1.

"In principle, you could activate and then kill all of the virus in a patient," Prof Cullen said.

"This would completely cure a person, and you would never get another cold sore."

He and the team are working with drug development companies in animal trials to begin to answer questions about how to deliver this drug most effectively...."


____________


http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7071576.stm

Evidence is building that the cold sore virus may be linked to Alzheimer's disease, an expert says.

In lab tests, Manchester University found brains infected with the herpes simplex virus, HSV-1, saw a rise in a protein linked to Alzheimer's.

Scientists believe the discovery could pave the way for a vaccine that may help prevent the brain disorder, New Scientist magazine reported.

But such a breakthrough was a long-time off, experts said.

alkemical
07-07-2008, 10:34 AM
Big Pharma Is in a Frenzy to Bring Cannabis-Based Medicines to Market (http://www.alternet.org/drugreporter/90469/)

alkemical
07-07-2008, 10:42 AM
http://thisissand.com/

alkemical
07-08-2008, 12:59 PM
http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/07/doj-policy-woul.html

DoJ Policy Would Sanction Racial Profiling, Let FBI Target Americans Without Cause
By Kim Zetter EmailJuly 02, 2008 | 9:25:48 PMCategories: Crime, Surveillance
Fbi_seal

The Justice Department is considering establishing a new policy that would allow the FBI to target Americans for investigation even in the absence of evidence or other compelling indications that the person was breaking a law, according to the Associated Press.

The policy, being considered as part of the attorney general's guidelines to the FBI, would allow the agency to conduct racial profiling -- potentially singling out Muslim- and Arab-Americans -- and to open preliminary terrorism investigations against targets simply on the basis of patterns established through data mining public records and other information.

The agency would be allowed to profile targets based on their race and activities, such as travel to the Middle East or any other part of the world associated with terrorism. But race would be only one factor in the decision to open an investigation.

The changes would allow FBI agents to ask open-ended questions about activities of Muslim- or Arab-Americans, or investigate them if their jobs and backgrounds match trends that analysts deem suspect.

FBI agents would not be allowed to eavesdrop on phone calls or dig deeply into personal data — such as the content of phone or e-mail records or bank statements — until a full investigation was opened.

The guidelines focus on the FBI's domestic operations and run about 40 pages long, several officials said. They do not specifically spell out what traits the FBI should use in building profiles.

The DoJ is revamping the guidelines to support the FBI's change in focus from fighting traditional crimes to gathering intelligence and countering domestic terrorism. The new guidelines would be put in place before the presidential administration changes next January.

Targeting a person based on race, of course, would seem to be a clear violation of civil rights. A DoJ official told the AP that the guidelines wouldn't really give the FBI any more authority than it already has to create "threat assessments" of individuals. A DoJ spokesman added that the guidelines cannot authorize any activity that is unconstitutional or prohibited by statute.

alkemical
07-08-2008, 01:01 PM
http://www.opednews.com/articles/WHAT-HAPPENS-WHEN-GAS-REAC-by-Allen-L-Roland-080706-974.html

When gas reaches 7 dollars a gallon ~ those making less than 25 thousand a year will be spending 20% of their income on gasoline. Hoarding will turn a deep recession into a deeper depression and it's rapidly becoming a reality. A reality the Bush administration refuses to acknowledge and still covers up: Allen L Roland

alkemical
07-08-2008, 01:05 PM
Mark Twain: Our Original Superstar (http://www.time.com/time/magazine/article/0,9171,1820166,00.html)

What, if anything, about this benighted moment of American life will anyone in the future look back on with nostalgia? Well, those of us who have cable are experiencing a golden age of sarcasm (from the Greek sarkazein, "to chew the lips in rage"). Jon Stewart, Stephen Colbert, Bill Maher and Keith Olbermann are digging into our direst forebodings so adroitly and intensely that we may want to cry, "Stop tickling!" Forget earnest punditry. In a world of hollow White House pronouncements, evaporating mainstream media and metastasizing bloggery, it's the mocking heads who make something like sense.

Let not those heads swell, however. News in the form of edgy drollery may seem a brave new thing, but it can all be traced back to one source, the man Ernest Hemingway said all of modern American literature could be traced back to: Mark Twain. Oh, that old cracker-barrel guy, you may say. White suit, cigar, reports of my death have been greatly exaggerated--but he died back in 1910, no? White, male, and didn't he write in dialect? What does he have to do with the issues of our day?

As it happens, many of these were also the issues of his day, and he addressed them as eloquently as anyone has since. The idea that America is a Christian nation? Andrew Carnegie brought that up to him once. "Why, Carnegie," Twain answered, "so is Hell."

What about those Abu Ghraib photographs? In "King Leopold's Soliloquy," a fulminating essay he published in 1905, when he was a very cantankerous 70, Twain imagines the ruler of Belgium pitying himself for the inconvenience of photos showing natives of the Congo whose hands have been cut off by Belgian exploiters. In the good old days, Leopold complains, he could deny atrocities and be believed. "Then all of a sudden came the crash! That is to say, the incorruptible Kodak--and all the harmony went to hell! The only witness I have encountered in my long experience that I couldn't bribe."

Waterboarding? In 1902, American soldiers were involved in a war to suppress rebels in the Philippines, which the U.S. had taken from Spain in the Spanish-American War, then decided to keep for itself instead of granting the Filipinos the independence they thought they had been promised. That outcome enraged Twain. So did "the torturing of Filipinos by the awful 'water-cure.'"

"To make them confess--what?" Twain asked. "Truth? Or lies? How can one know which it is they are telling? For under unendurable pain a man confesses anything that is required of him, true or false, and his evidence is worthless."

Whether Twain was talking about racism at home, the foreign misadventures of the Western powers or the excesses of the era of greed he initially flourished in after the Civil War, his target was always human folly and hypocrisy, which turn out to be perennial topics for further study.

Here he is in Letters from the Earth, speaking in the voice of Satan commenting on the strangeness of man's ways: "He has imagined a heaven, and has left entirely out of it the supremest of all his delights ... sexual intercourse! It is as if a lost and perishing person in a roasting desert should be told by a rescuer he might choose and have all longed-for things but one, and he should elect to leave out water!"

Strong stuff, especially when it's funny. Sometimes unsettling too. But the man who said those things came from America's heart. Mark Twain, who was born Samuel Langhorne Clemens in 1835, grew up on the nation's literal main stream, the Mississippi River, in Hannibal, Mo. Having failed to find a ship that would take him to South America and the fortune he proposed to make from coca, by the age of 23 he had become a Mississippi-steamboat pilot. It was a job he held just briefly, but the memory of the river, its enchantments and dangers, found its way years later into his most powerful book, Adventures of Huckleberry Finn. It also found its way into his pen name. Mark Twain, the name he began to write under in 1863, was a river man's term meaning a depth of two fathoms, or 12 ft. (3.7 m).

(cont'd on site)

alkemical
07-08-2008, 02:58 PM
<embed id="VideoPlayback" style="width:400px;height:326px" allowFullScreen="true" src="http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=5589263822022732006&hl=en&fs=true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"> </embed>

alkemical
07-08-2008, 03:00 PM
The lucifer principle - howard bloom disinfo interview

<embed id="VideoPlayback" style="width:400px;height:326px" allowFullScreen="true" src="http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=3913920820403350169&hl=en&fs=true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"> </embed>

alkemical
07-08-2008, 03:03 PM
Marylin Manson interview:

<embed id="VideoPlayback" style="width:400px;height:326px" allowFullScreen="true" src="http://video.google.com/googleplayer.swf?docid=-1864057556175107630&hl=en&fs=true" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"> </embed>

alkemical
07-09-2008, 09:13 AM
http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/07/07/lottery.tickets/index.html?eref=rss_topstories

'Zero' chance lottery tickets stun some players

Hoover, a business professor at Washington and Lee University in Virginia, wasn't surprised when his tickets didn't bring him the $75,000 grand prize, but he was shocked to learn the top prize had been awarded before he bought the ticket.

"I felt duped into buying these things," Hoover said.

He discovered the Virginia State Lottery was continuing to sell tickets for games in which the top prizes were no longer available. Public records showed that someone had already won the top prize one month before Hoover played. He is now suing the state of Virginia for breach of contract.

alkemical
07-09-2008, 09:17 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/crime/article4260737.ece

One of the two French research students found dead in a burnt-out London flat had been stabbed 196 times, the detective leading the murder investigation said today. His friend had 47 separate injuries.

[…]

An Imperial College spokesman said that Mr Bonomo was studying a parasite which can spread from cats to human foetuses. Mr Ferez’s research was into bacteria which create ethanol for use as fuel.

alkemical
07-09-2008, 09:23 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2008/jul/03/biofuels.renewableenergy


Secret report: biofuel caused food crisis

Internal World Bank study delivers blow to plant energy drive

alkemical
07-09-2008, 09:58 AM
http://thegrowinglife.com/2008/05/alternative-lifestyle-designing-the-rabbit-hole-tax-and-baselining/

A few months ago, I met a guy named Leonard Knight who’s spent the last 20 years building a folk art masterpiece called "Salvation Mountain." Leonard lives in the back of his pickup truck and usually sleeps under the stars. Visitors bring him food, paint, and minor donations, and Leonard continues to work on his adobe mountain and ~200 other folk art projects meant to convey the message that "God Loves Everyone." Leonard’s mountain has been likened to an epic work of folk art “comparable to the Watts Towers,” is entered it into the Congressional Record as a national treasure, and was also featured in the movie Into the Wild.

http://thegrowinglife.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/05/slab-city-kirbmart1000-2.jpg

alkemical
07-09-2008, 10:04 AM
http://www.energy-daily.com/images/broadstar-wind-turbine-bg.jpg

BroadStar Achieves Breakthrough In Low-Cost Energy Production With New Generation Wind Turbine (http://www.energy-daily.com/reports/BroadStar_Achieves_Breakthrough_In_Low_Cost_Energy _Production_With_New_Generation_Wind_Turbine_999.h tml)

alkemical
07-09-2008, 10:06 AM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/06/080630102737.htm

ScienceDaily (June 30, 2008) — Scientists have determined how to fortify the cassava plant, a staple root crop in many developing countries, with enough vitamins, minerals and protein to provide the poor and malnourished with a day's worth of nutrition in a single meal.

alkemical
07-09-2008, 10:11 AM
http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2543

Playing with Dry Water

The Waterboard is an interactive installation by Mike Burton giving the user a chance to play with water without getting wet. By drawing lines on the whiteboard, the water will follow a different course. Abstract life forms may appear in basins and where the water is stagnant it will become turbid.

<img src="http://www.nextnature.net/research/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/waterboard01.jpg">

<img src="http://www.nextnature.net/research/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/waterboard03.jpg">

<img src="http://www.nextnature.net/research/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/waterboard02.jpg">

alkemical
07-09-2008, 10:12 AM
http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2554

Rotating Skyscraper

<img src="http://www.nextnature.net/research/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/dynamic_architecture_nextnature.jpg">

Remember the wind shaped pavilion? In Dubai they do it bigger. Architect David Fisher designed a skyscraper that rotates by wind power. Each floor rotates independently at different speeds, resulting in an ever changing shape that is not only spectacular but – with a wind turbine on every floor – should also be self-powered.

On the inside: Luxury penthouse villas, which will be over 1,000 square meters, will be completely custom-made to fulfill individual buyer’s personal needs, they will also include an indoor swimming pool, voice activated features, demotic control systems, built in phone system. Villa’s residents will have the possibility to drive directly into the building were a special elevator take their car to their floor and park at the entrance to their Villa’s.

You’ve got to see it to believe it. Although – as we write – construction is yet to start. The rotating tower is one of those structures to become famous already from their computer renderings. Seems to be a whole architectural category of its own nowadays. We call it image building… and Dubai is taking the lead.

alkemical
07-09-2008, 10:15 AM
http://cryptogon.com/?p=2876

UK: Government Asks Stores to Stockpile Food in Case of Infrastructure Breakdown
July 7th, 2008

Via: Times:

Ministers are in talks with supermarkets about emergency food reserves in case fuel protests lead to shortages at shops.

The government wants to ensure retailers and suppliers can continue to sell basics such as meat, bread and milk if hauliers bring the country to a halt.

They have asked supermarkets to make contingency plans “in case the infrastructure of the country breaks down”.

Among those who have taken part are farmers, dairies, bakeries and supermarkets.
Related Links

At least four government departments are involved. The operation is being led by Bruce Mann, director of civil contingencies at the Cabinet Office.

The government has commissioned IGD, a company that collects intelligence on international food and grocery chains, to supply data about how food is moved around the country and where stocks are held. The information has been used to put together a “map” of depots and supply lines.

The move comes as hauliers warn that direct action over soaring fuel prices is a “very strong possibility”.

alkemical
07-09-2008, 10:24 AM
Over caviar and sea urchin, G8 leaders mull food crisis (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/politics/over-caviar-and-sea-urchin-g8-leaders-mull-food-crisis-862051.html)

alkemical
07-09-2008, 10:25 AM
Cthulhu is left-tentacled?! (http://www.independent.co.uk/news/science/do-octopuses-have-a-favourite-tentacle-861263.html)

alkemical
07-10-2008, 08:33 AM
http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2008/07/japanese-scient.html

Japanese Scientists Create Artificial DNA

Some complain that modern life contains too many artificial aspects: concrete instead of countryside, the internet instead of interaction, and all those sweeteners in our food. Just wait till they hear about the Japanese scientists who've rewritten DNA with entirely artificial basepairs.

alkemical
07-10-2008, 08:33 AM
Some complain that modern life contains too many artificial aspects: concrete instead of countryside, the internet instead of interaction, and all those sweeteners in our food. Just wait till they hear about the Japanese scientists who've rewritten DNA with entirely artificial basepairs.

http://www.dailygalaxy.com/my_weblog/2008/07/japanese-scient.html

alkemical
07-10-2008, 08:36 AM
Migrating Birds Understand "Foreign Languages"

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/07/080702-bird-calls.html


Like avid travelers picking up local languages, migrating birds appear to learn and understand the common calls of unrelated bird species that they encounter during their long journeys, new research reveals.

alkemical
07-10-2008, 08:41 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/americas/7497078.stm

Aribert Heim's crimes rank among the worst of the Holocaust, and after a hunt that has spanned almost half a century, Nazi-hunters believe they are closing in on him.

alkemical
07-10-2008, 08:44 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/10/washington/10fisa.html?_r=1&oref=slogin

WASHINGTON — The Senate gave final approval on Wednesday to a major expansion of the government’s surveillance powers, handing President Bush one more victory in a series of hard-fought clashes with Democrats over national security issues.

The measure, approved by a vote of 69 to 28, is the biggest revamping of federal surveillance law in 30 years. It includes a divisive element that Mr. Bush had deemed essential: legal immunity for the phone companies that cooperated in the National Security Agency wiretapping program he approved after the Sept. 11 attacks.

The vote came two and a half years after public disclosure of the wiretapping program set off a fierce national debate over the balance between protecting the country from another terrorist strike and ensuring civil liberties. The final outcome in Congress, which opponents of the surveillance measure had conceded for weeks, seemed almost anticlimactic in contrast.

BroncoBuff
07-10-2008, 09:17 AM
'Zero' chance lottery tickets stun some players

He discovered the Virginia State Lottery was continuing to sell tickets for games in which the top prizes were no longer available. Public records showed that someone had already won the top prize one month before Hoover played. He is now suing the state of Virginia for breach of contract.
I love it .... problem is, breach of contract damages merely make you whole:

"We're sorry, sir. Here is your dollar back."

alkemical
07-10-2008, 10:22 AM
I love it .... problem is, breach of contract damages merely make you whole:

"We're sorry, sir. Here is your dollar back."

At least he's not greedy. :o)

alkemical
07-10-2008, 10:22 AM
http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1469-Policeman-attacked-by-trolls-for-crossing-their-bridge.html

Policeman attacked by trolls for crossing their bridge

Another one for the annal of strange crime and an interesting one to write up on the arrest sheet: "Took into custody two 'trolls' who were extorting money with menaces from people trying to cross their bridge".

A man who acted as a modern-day bridge troll faces charges in Boulder after he and his companion allegedly got into a confrontation with an off-duty sheriff's deputy.

...

Police said that Hibbs insisted he was a troll and owned the bridge the deputy was trying to cross.

Witnesses told police that Hibbs and Bradley Boville, 19, were demanding $1 from joggers and bikers who attempted to cross the bridge.

The off-duty deputy, who was not identified, told police the confrontation with Hibbs started after the man hit his bike with a broken golf club when he forced his way past without paying. The two became involved in an altercation and Hibbs hit the deputy with a golf club, the police report stated. The deputy said he took the golf club away from Hibbs and struck him in an attempt to defend himself.


An explanation is easy to find:

Boville, who was with Hibbs, reportedly told police that they had consumed LSD and that Hibbs was having a bad trip.

Police said they confiscated a large marijuana joint rolled in $1 bills at the scene and then searched Boville's apartment and recovered drugs and drug paraphernalia.


Although if they were using dollar bills instead of Rizlas*, could we have stumbled across some uber-secret US government plan to turn people into trolls using a smokable ink (presumably one of the magic varieties we here so much about these days). Or it could be the LSD, stranger things have happened.

alkemical
07-14-2008, 09:21 AM
http://www.livescience.com/health/080711-skin-brain.html

Your Skin Produces Marijuana-Like Substance

alkemical
07-15-2008, 02:06 PM
Earth's hum predicts quake danger spots (http://environment.newscientist.com/article/mg19926644.900-earths-hum-predicts-quake-danger-spots.html?DCMP=ILC-hmts&nsref=news2_head_mg19926644.900)

THE faint sound of crashing waves can travel across continents through Earth's rocks. Now it seems this ambient hum can be harnessed to help predict how destructive an earthquake will be.

Estimating the degree to which the ground will shake during a quake of a given magnitude is tricky because seismic waves can be muffled or amplified by geological structures en route from the epicentre, such as sedimentary basins.

According to Gregory Beroza and Germán Prieto of Stanford University in California, you can predict these effects using measurements of the ambient hum. They were able to see how the underlying geology affected waves travelling through the Earth's crust when they correlated measurements of the hum, taken near the town of Big Bear on the San Andreas fault, with corresponding readings at four seismic stations across Los Angeles.

Their analysis shows that seismic waves are trapped and amplified on this route, probably by a bowl of sedimentary rock under Los Angeles. That is borne out by a 2001 earthquake close to Big Bear with a magnitude of 4.6, which shook LA more intensely and for longer than it should have for its magnitude (Geophysical Research Letters, DOI: 10.1029/2008GL034428).

alkemical
07-15-2008, 02:07 PM
http://english.pravda.ru/science/earth/15-07-2008/105784-water-0

Mankind to wage wars for water by 2025

alkemical
07-15-2008, 02:10 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/2300298/The-Volkswagen-that-can-travel-from-London-to-Scotland-on-and1638.50-of-fuel.html

The Volkswagen that can travel from London to Scotland on £8.50 of fuel

The 'tandem' style car is called the One-Litre because that is how much fuel it needs to travel 100km.

It has a lightweight frame and boasts 282 miles per gallon, according to the manufacturer.

Motorists would be able to drive from London to Edinburgh without refuelling and the entire journey would cost only £8.50.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/00690/vw-one-litre_690003c.jpg

alkemical
07-15-2008, 02:13 PM
http://www.inhabitat.com/2008/07/14/revolutionary-concentrated-solar-array-by-mit/

Researchers at MIT recently revealed a cutting-edge solar technology that promises a “tenfold increase in the amount of power converted by solar cells.” The development utilizes dye-glazed glass panels to capture and concentrate sunlight and then transfer it to an edge-aligned framework of photovoltaic cells. The resulting system uses cheap and readily available materials, is easy to manufacture, and modular systems can even be layered over existing photovoltaic systems to effectively double their energy efficiency for a minimal additional cost.

Dukes
07-15-2008, 02:17 PM
http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2554

Rotating Skyscraper

<img src="http://www.nextnature.net/research/wp-content/uploads/2008/07/dynamic_architecture_nextnature.jpg">

Remember the wind shaped pavilion? In Dubai they do it bigger. Architect David Fisher designed a skyscraper that rotates by wind power. Each floor rotates independently at different speeds, resulting in an ever changing shape that is not only spectacular but – with a wind turbine on every floor – should also be self-powered.

On the inside: Luxury penthouse villas, which will be over 1,000 square meters, will be completely custom-made to fulfill individual buyer’s personal needs, they will also include an indoor swimming pool, voice activated features, demotic control systems, built in phone system. Villa’s residents will have the possibility to drive directly into the building were a special elevator take their car to their floor and park at the entrance to their Villa’s.

You’ve got to see it to believe it. Although – as we write – construction is yet to start. The rotating tower is one of those structures to become famous already from their computer renderings. Seems to be a whole architectural category of its own nowadays. We call it image building… and Dubai is taking the lead.

That is awesome. Can't wait to see real pictures