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alkemical
10-10-2008, 07:58 AM
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/5.12/science.html

When two protons collide in an accelerator, they are transformed into muons and other particles. One Russian physicist offers this analogy: it's like two Soviet Fiats colliding to produce a bus and a Mercedes Benz 600. That's the thing about high-energy physics: the total is different than the sum of its parts.

So it was in 1978 that when the proton beam entered Anatoli Bugorski's skull it measured about 200,000 rads, and when it exited, having collided with the inside of his head, it weighed in at about 300,000 rads. Bugorski, a 36-year-old researcher at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino, was checking a piece of accelerator equipment that had malfunctioned - as had, apparently, the several safety mechanisms. Leaning over the piece of equipment, Bugorski stuck his head in the space through which the beam passes on its way from one part of the accelerator tube to the next and saw a flash brighter than a thousand suns. He felt no pain.

From what we know about radiation, about 500 to 600 rads is enough to kill a person (though we don't know of anyone else who has been exposed to radiation in the form of a proton beam moving at about the speed of sound). The left side of his face swollen beyond recognition, Bugorski was taken to a clinic in Moscow so that doctors could observe his death over the following two to three weeks.

Over the next few days, skin on the back of his head and on his face just next to his left nostril peeled away to reveal the path the beam had burned through the skin, the skull, and the brain tissue. The inside of his head continued to burn away: all the nerves on the left were gone in two years, paralyzing that side of his face. Still, not only did Bugorski not die, but he remained a normally functioning human being, capable even of continuing in science. For the first dozen years, the only real evidence that something had gone neurologically awry were occasional petit mal seizures; over the last few years Bugorski has also had six grand mals. The dividing line of his life goes down the middle of his face: the right side has aged, while the left froze 19 years ago. When he concentrates, he wrinkles only half his forehead.

Because virtually everything connected with nuclear energy was kept secret in the Soviet Union, for more than a decade Bugorski observed an unspoken ban on talking about his accident. About twice a year he went to the Moscow radiation clinic to be examined and to commune with other members of the brotherhood of nuclear-accident victims. "Like former inmates, we are always aware of one another," he says. "There aren't that many of us, and we know one another's life stories. Generally, these are sad tales."

alkemical
10-10-2008, 08:14 AM
"UFO behaviour is more akin to magic than to physics as we know it... the modern UFOnauts and the demons of past days are probably identical." -Dr. Pierre Guerin (http://thegallowaychronicles.blogspot.com/2008/10/lam-on-run.html)

kappys
10-10-2008, 11:24 AM
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/5.12/science.html

When two protons collide in an accelerator, they are transformed into muons and other particles. One Russian physicist offers this analogy: it's like two Soviet Fiats colliding to produce a bus and a Mercedes Benz 600. That's the thing about high-energy physics: the total is different than the sum of its parts.

So it was in 1978 that when the proton beam entered Anatoli Bugorski's skull it measured about 200,000 rads, and when it exited, having collided with the inside of his head, it weighed in at about 300,000 rads. Bugorski, a 36-year-old researcher at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino, was checking a piece of accelerator equipment that had malfunctioned - as had, apparently, the several safety mechanisms. Leaning over the piece of equipment, Bugorski stuck his head in the space through which the beam passes on its way from one part of the accelerator tube to the next and saw a flash brighter than a thousand suns. He felt no pain.

From what we know about radiation, about 500 to 600 rads is enough to kill a person (though we don't know of anyone else who has been exposed to radiation in the form of a proton beam moving at about the speed of sound). The left side of his face swollen beyond recognition, Bugorski was taken to a clinic in Moscow so that doctors could observe his death over the following two to three weeks.

Over the next few days, skin on the back of his head and on his face just next to his left nostril peeled away to reveal the path the beam had burned through the skin, the skull, and the brain tissue. The inside of his head continued to burn away: all the nerves on the left were gone in two years, paralyzing that side of his face. Still, not only did Bugorski not die, but he remained a normally functioning human being, capable even of continuing in science. For the first dozen years, the only real evidence that something had gone neurologically awry were occasional petit mal seizures; over the last few years Bugorski has also had six grand mals. The dividing line of his life goes down the middle of his face: the right side has aged, while the left froze 19 years ago. When he concentrates, he wrinkles only half his forehead.

Because virtually everything connected with nuclear energy was kept secret in the Soviet Union, for more than a decade Bugorski observed an unspoken ban on talking about his accident. About twice a year he went to the Moscow radiation clinic to be examined and to commune with other members of the brotherhood of nuclear-accident victims. "Like former inmates, we are always aware of one another," he says. "There aren't that many of us, and we know one another's life stories. Generally, these are sad tales."


Very interesting - it was a concentrated beam which only affected his head. Neurons are among the most resistant cells in our body to radiation - mainly because they aren't dividing. Bone marrow and the gastrointestinal tract are the first to go in most radiation poisonings leading to overwhelming infection and death.

alkemical
10-14-2008, 08:25 AM
http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/10/09/best-site-i-found-in-2008-afrigadget-the-low-tech-goldmine/

alkemical
10-14-2008, 10:14 AM
here i am always with you
treading down to your heart
where the sun rose and set
simple beauty given
she showed her glory
in the midnight silver
she rose again in gold
i watched her change
song and tune
thoughts falling like footsteps
leaves raining upon a walked path hidden
to where a staff was given
Raise up! She sang in birds
Listen! She she said in the stream
you've been blank, waiting
for new illumnination.
Take these gifts
understand your defined drawing lines,
symbols, minterets, and alphabets

alkemical
10-14-2008, 10:16 AM
http://www.fractogene.com/

alkemical
10-14-2008, 10:19 AM
http://www.brainsturbator.com/site/comments/our_fractal_universe_a_sneak_peek_at_the_new_cosmo logy/

Our Fractal Universe: A Sneak Peek at the New Cosmology

Our Fractal Universe: A Sneak Peek at the New Cosmology

Buddhabrot Mandelbrot VisualizationWe talk about the third dimension a lot, but most humans don’t live in it. Abbot’s Flatland was not so much a metaphor as an operational description of the sensory world most people inhabit: a continuous, unbroken plane that, despite surface variations and wrinkles, remains a flat stage for our two dimensional lives. This is inevitable, since humans cannot hover or fly without technology assistance, and few of us can jump higher than three feet off the ground.

And let’s be serious, here—what is a dimension? Have anyone ever even proved they existed? Sure, you can draw a Cartesian XYZ grid on paper, but you can also draw a unicorn vomiting angels. I’ve been digging through the concept of time for a month, and it’s a concept nobody can really define, despite the fact we all experience it. I’ve come to realize there’s very little humans can say for sure about space, either. The more we learn, the less we know. Everything you were taught in school is currently falling apart—so let’s take a look at a theory that will likely be replacing all this Big Bang horse****: the Universe is fractal and infinite at every level of scale.

Rethinking Occam’s Razor

“Each time we formulate a hypothesis, we take the simplest one possible. But what obligates the Universe to be simple?”

--James Peebles

I seriously question the assumption that the simplest explanation is usually the best. I find it truly bizarre that after the past century of scientific discovery, which has shown every single aspect of our Universe to be stranger and more complex than we ever thought possible, people still discuss the concept of Occam’s Razor with a straight face. Of course, most people having that discussion don’t even know Occam’s Razor, since the literal translation goes like this:

“...entities should not be multiplied beyond necessity.”

Before I dismiss the concept, I want to bring up one of the more interesting cognitive biases that humans are afflicted with: The Conjunction Fallacy. As puts it in his excellent paper, “Cognitive Biases Affecting Assessment of Global Risk”:

According to probability theory, adding additional detail onto a story must render the story less probable. Yet human psychology seems to follow the rule that adding an additional detail can make the story more plausible.

Of course, once you really dig into the field of cognitive bias, you’re left with the disturbing realization that our brain is just a hall of mirrors run by a monkey. It can be hard to get work done under those circumstances, so the less said about it, the better.

*That was from sept 21st - today i see this in the news:

http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn14200-galaxy-map-hints-at-fractal-universe.html

Galaxy map hints at fractal universe

* 00:00 25 June 2008
* NewScientist.com news service
* Amanda Gefter


s the matter in the universe arranged in a fractal pattern? A new study of nearly a million galaxies suggests it is – though there are no well-accepted theories to explain why that would be so.

Cosmologists trying to reconstruct the entire history of the universe have precious few clues from which to work. One key clue is the distribution of matter throughout space, which has been sculpted for nearly 14 billion years by the competing forces of gravity and cosmic expansion. If there is a pattern in the sky, it encodes the secrets of the universe.

A lot is at stake, and the matter distribution has become a source of impassioned debate between those who say the distribution is smooth and homogeneous and those who say it is hierarchically structured and clumpy, like a fractal.

Nearly all physicists agree that on relatively small scales the distribution is fractal-like: hundreds of billions of stars group together to form galaxies, galaxies clump together to form clusters, and clusters amass into superclusters.

The point of contention, however, is what happens at even larger scales. According to most physicists, this Russian doll-style clustering comes to an end and the universe, on large scales, becomes homogeneous.

___


Both stories are cont'd on their sites - so check it out



http://www.fractogene.com/

FractoGene IP portfolio

A fractal geometrical generalization of the "gene" concept of the 100-year old "genetics":
The new Chapter of Dr. Pellionisz' contribution to the Algorithmic Approach to Neuro- and Genome Biology.

Protein sythesis is not achieved by a masterstroke of "gene" information.
It is an iterative process with recursive access to DNA information:

http://www.fractogene.com/fractogem_noncoding_code.jpg



Ultraconserved Sequences: The Core Code of DNA? (http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/10/13/ultraconserved-sequences-the-core-code-of-dna/)

Funny thing about DNA science: when huge breakthroughs get proclaimed, they generally only lead to more questions and collapse into hype upon any serious scrutiny. Likewise, when baffling new mysteries are announced, they tend to point the way towards a fuller understanding of the DNA cipher. Case in point — this weekend’s headline, Mysterious DNA Found to Survive Eons of Evolution.

The precise term is “ultraconserved sequences,” and as one observer on the RI forum eloquently summarized it, “this mutation-free DNA has shared eveolutionary benefits through out the entire class Mammilia without producing a visible or identifiable shared characteristic.” More meat from the article itself:

…about 500 regions of our DNA have apparently remained intact throughout the history of mammalian evolution, or the past 80 million to 100 million years, basically free of mutations. The researchers call these mystery snippets “ultraconserved regions,” and found that they are about 300 times less likely than other regions of the genome to be lost during the course of mammalian evolution. “These regions seem to be under intense purifying selection — almost no mutations take hold permanently,” said researcher Gill Bejerano.

Technoccult readers might also be interested in the lucid heresy of Dr. Andras J. Pellionisz, author of the Fractogene website. This new discovery connects quite perfectly with the Pellionisz theory that genes aren’t a sequential list of instructions but rather a fractal and iterative template for organic growth. I would also highly recommend the work of Chris King, who’s been making the same assertion about the fabric of the entire universe. He recently published a dense but readable 7 page summary of his work, Why the Universe is Fractal, that’s worth printing out and chewing over.

alkemical
10-14-2008, 10:20 AM
http://www.livescience.com/health/081009-mystery-dna.html

Mysterious DNA Found to Survive Eons of Evolution

alkemical
10-14-2008, 10:22 AM
http://www.math.auckland.ac.nz/~king/Preprints/index.htm

alkemical
10-14-2008, 10:23 AM
http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/10/11/taz-history-mound-bayou-mississippi/

<img src="http://www.technoccult.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/mound_bayou.jpg">

I’ve been collecting a history of Temporary Autonomous Zones. I’m grateful to Hakim Bey for the conceptual phrase, but his history was more romantic than tactically useful…and after all, he is something of a pedo. So in honor of the TAZ going down right now in PDX — YOU KNOW ABOUT ESOZONE, YES?? — I’ll be sharing some of the best stories this weekend.

One of my favorite corners of Southern History was an all-black community hidden in Northern Mississippi. The story of Mound Bayou stretches across centuries and winds through everything from the Civil War to the Civil Rights movement. Sadly, Mound Bayou exists almost nowhere online. The Wikipedia is shallow filler, and most of the online histories are short and sloppy.

Isaiah Montgomery and Ben Green founded Mound Bayou in 1887, but the story begins with Montgomery’s father, Ben, who was a slave on the David Bend plantation. For most folks alive today, our images of a plantation are based on Roots, but things were very different at Davis Bend. It was owned by Joeseph Davis (the brother of Confederate president Jefferson Davis) and he was heavily inspired by the “socialist utopianism” of an obscure thinker named Robert Owen.

As a side note, Technoccult readers might be interested to know that “Owen insisted he could communicate with great minds of the past by means of electricity.” The precise details are lost to history, but it should be noted Owens was unusually blunt after death, telling Spritualist mediums who summoned him “Oh! How you have misunderstood the laws which connect spirit with spirit…you will never understand these things…”

David Bend was an experiment in education and empowerment, and yes, I do realize how absurd that sounds when I’m still talking about white people owning slaves. Rather than draconian dormitory conditions, though, Joeseph Davis encouraged his slaves to educate themselves and even own businesses. In the aftermath of the Civil War, Davis sold his land holdings to Ben Montgomery, who had run the plantation store. The price was $300,000 in gold, and with that David Bend became one of the first autonomous black communities in the South.

The Owen-inspired focus on learning and skills carried into Mound Bayou, especially when Booker T. Washington got involved later on. This isn’t just a look into the past, though: I think that Mound Bayou has a signifigant lesson to offer us here in 2008. During the many “exodus” movements which happened throughout the history of both Davis Bend and Mound Bayou, the Montgomery family was adamant about building a strong foundation instead of leaving for the mere promise of something better. Most importantly, the education they focused on was agricultural tech and self-sufficiency techniques:

Through outlets like the town’s newspaper, The Demonstrator (1900), Mound Bayou promoted education as an essential path to community survival, in particular vocational education in scientific agriculture through the Mound Bayou Normal and Industrial Institute.

Here in 2008, John Robb, one of my favorite Big Thinkers and the author of Brave New War, has been doing an amazing series of short, potent articles revolving around global systems collapse and the concept of the Resilient Community. Although fairy tales like Gabriele D’Annunzio taking over Fiume are beautiful, they’re not realistic or sustainable solutions. Mound Bayou is a model that lasted, and it was based on smart design and hard work, not poetry and wine.

alkemical
10-14-2008, 10:28 AM
http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/10/darkmarket-post.html

http://blog.wired.com/27bstroke6/2008/10/darkmarket-post.html

Cybercrime Supersite 'DarkMarket' Was FBI Sting, Documents Confirm


"While criminals thought it was based in Eastern Europe, the internet's top English-speaking cybercrime forum was secretly run by the FBI from this building on the banks of the Monongahela River in Pittsburgh."

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:01 PM
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/27010998/?GT1=43001

http://archaeologyfacts.wordpress.com/2008/10/10/discovery-of-solar-observatory-at-peru/

Ancient Peru pyramid spotted by satellite
New remote-sensing technology reveals huge structure beneath surface

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:03 PM
http://www.physorg.com/news142780587.html

Liquid Mirror Telescopes on the Moon

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:18 PM
http://www.poconorecord.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20080928/NEWS/809280321

Researcher believes he's found key that unlocks Egypt’s advanced scientific knowledge

By HOWARD FRANK
Pocono Record Writer
September 28, 2008

A real secret message discovered by a local man among Egypt's ancient ruins could be stranger than the fictional stories we love involving Indiana Jones or "The DaVinci Code."

East Stroudsburg-born Edward Nightingale says he has unraveled the most famous of ancient Egyptian riddles.

And he believes his discovery has uncovered a collection of advanced mathematical principles that could change our understanding of matter and the universe.

But that's not all.

Now, hold on to your seats. He also believes this information was intentionally embedded in the blueprint of the ancient ruins, for future generations to discover.

The mystery

Nightingale, who lives in Upper Mount Bethel Township in Northampton County, has studied the Giza plateau in Egypt for almost 20 years. He even traveled there with famed Egyptologist John Anthony West to study the ruins.

The Giza plateau lies on the outskirts of Cairo and contains the Great Pyramid, the Great Sphinx and many other historically significant structures. A total of nine pyramids stand on the site.

The construction and layout of the complex, about one square mile in area, has been the subject of scholarly study and adventurer exploits — think Indiana Jones — for centuries.

The most well-known of the mysteries is how the actual structures were built. The pyramids include massive blocks of granite and stone, machined to amazing tolerances, and too heavy to move without modern equipment.

"There are 2.5 million blocks of stone in the Great Pyramid that cover 13 acres in the footprint and stands 480 feet tall, with blocks of granite in the interior that are up to 70 tons. They are machined to tolerances that you can't slip a dollar bill into," Nightingale said.

"That tells me they (the builders) knew something we don't, because we sure can't do it. As a craftsperson, I had to figure out how they did that."

But the larger, greater mystery is why the pyramids and other structures are arranged the way they are. Is it haphazard? Surely not, since some of the elements, constructed in different dynasties, were in perfect alignment. There seems to have been some enduring plan.

Three pyramids dominate the Giza complex: the Great Pyramid, or Pyramid of Khufru, the Pyramid of Kahfre and the the Pyramid of Menkaure. The sides of all three pyramids are astronomically oriented to be north-south and east-west, within a small fraction of a degree. Quite a feat, considering the pyramids were built thousand of years ago.

Researchers have been looking into this for centuries. There have been many theories over the years, but none have explained how to take into account all the architectural aspects of the plateau.

"Everybody who was studying this was using the Fibernachi series, and they were coming up with little snippets of what was occurring. But I wanted to allow an open mind without putting myself in that box," Nightingale said. (Fibernachi numbers are a series of figures built by adding the two prior numbers in the series, for example, 1,1,2,3,5,8.)

Other theories have been proposed. A fairly recent and now dominant one by researcher Robert Bauval suggested the arrangement of the three pyramids matched the Belt of Orion, three stars in the midsection of the Orion constellation. A shaft in one of the pyramids points to the spot in the sky Orion occupied thousands of years ago when the pyramid was built.

Enter Nightingale

Ed Nightingale was born at Pocono Hospital in East Stroudsburg but lived in Hope, N.J. "East Stroudsburg was our local hospital, the closest one to us," he said.

A master wood-carver by trade, he creates architectural elements for high-end clientele. He's worked with Dennis Collier on projects for the National Marine Museum in Washington, D.C., and Trinity Church in New York City. Nightingale also did a project for singer/actor David Bowie.

Nightingale approached the design of the Giza complex as an architect would, by creating a drawing. The complexity of the site was apparent. "They had to have a pretty good plan," he said.

To begin his journey to understanding, Nightingale back-engineered the site. "I examined it as an 'as-built blueprint,'" he said. With laser-accurate surveys, he applied his drafting and design skills.

"As a craftsman, I've been a woodworker all my life, a fussy one at that. I had an interest that these things were placed here with an incredible accuracy that we can't even accomplish," he said.

Nightingale works with geometric shapes when he plans a sculpture, and so he began to see geometrical relationships between elements in the plateau.

The Giza Template

Armed with a compass, ruler and an aerial photograph of the Giza plateau, Nightingale began to create an overlay, or template, for the complex.

"As an artist, when I start a project I begin with three things. I establish a center line, a horizontal and a reference point," he said.

Nightingale located the center point by drawing a line off the western face of the Great Pyramid and a bisecting line through the Pyramid of Kahfre.

After locating a center point, he drew a series of related circles and subdivisions, based on the location of a causeway at the site. Based on the simple proportions of a circle, he drew four, dividing the diameter by one-quarter, one-third and one-half, then divided these diameters and radiuses by factors of nine. He then drew lines through intersecting points of the circles and significant elements of the plateau.

With four circles and seven lines, he was able to explain the position of all nine pyramids in the Giza plateau.

Nightingale expressed the proportions of the circles as 4, 3 and 2.

The proportions were important, as they had other references in nature, Nightingale said. Among other things, 4-3-2 is the tuning of an "A" note in the musical scale of the ancients of that era. In music, the first three harmonics are produced at two, three and four times the original note's frequency.

If you square 432, you arrive at the speed of light in miles per second. And when you square the speed of light, you get the basic component of Einstein's theory of the relationship between energy and matter.

Nightingale said the template describes more than just the two-dimensional layout of the plateau. His theory applies to the elevation plans of the complex as well.

"The geometry explains the interiors of the pyramids, where objects like the sarcophagus are located using an elevation view." A sarcophagus is the case in where the mummy is placed at burial.

Important ramifications

Nightingale's quest goes back to the mid-1990s.

"I had a 'life event' in 1996, and it was time to re-evaluate, look for the truth, what is really going on here," he said.

Nightingale traveled to Egypt in 1997 with Egyptologist West. "I had a few ideas when I started. But I promised myself I'd look at what's really going on," he said.

West is known for his Emmy-winning 1993 NBC documentary with Charlton Heston called "The Mystery of the Sphinx." West showed evidence that the Great Sphinx is thousands of years older than conventionally thought.

West discovered water erosion on the Sphinx. Rain capable of causing that kind of erosion stopped falling on the area thousands of years before the Sphinx was previously thought to have been built.

Nightingale presented his findings to West.

"As Ed will have explained, I'm pretty well convinced that he's solved a major aspect of a puzzle that has intrigued and eluded dozens of ardent researchers for many decades: the geometry upon which the Giza plateau is based. This has many important ramifications/implications for ancient Egypt specifically but also for the history of the ancient world in general," West said.

When Nightingale realized the implications of his discovery, he was overwhelmed.

"I spent months trying to decide what to do about it," he said.

Nature's sequence

Nightingale said his template doesn't just relate to Giza. He has applied it to other ancient ruins. And he said it provides a mathematical framework to describe things as diverse as the structure of spiral constellations, DNA and music.

Nightingale used a nine-based system of numbers to divide the radius and diameters of his circles to determine his template. "That's how nature operates. The nine-based formula is more how nature assembles things," he said.

Nightingale found explanations of music in his theory. "There are sophisticated mathematics, musical proportions that are just stunning. Harmonics if you want to call it that," he said. He also refers to his theory as a harmonic view of nature.

Later, Nightingale and another craftsman were commissioned to do some carvings for Pope Benedict XVI. That led him to study religious symbolism. He found his Giza Template explained the geometry of these symbols.

He even applied it to the Great Seal of the United Sates, made famous in the movie "National Treasure." The template shows eerie alignments on both sides of the seal — as if the template predicts where objects are placed.

A secret message

So why was this information coded into the Giza plateau?

"Ancient Egypt, the Greek and Roman empires, the Megalithic and Mesopotamian civilizations all collapsed, and their knowledge was lost," author and Egyptologist Walter Cruttenden of the Binary Research Institute said.

Nightingale asks what important items would a civilization want to preserve for future generations besides life? Knowledge, he answers.

"Like Noah's Ark, they created a vessel to store knowledge. It has to last 10,000 years to be read. Since languages change over time, they had to encode it," he said.

They would have had to use geometry, Nightingale said. "I think they are encoding science there," he said.

"They postulate straight-line type civilizations. Using that as a paradigm, everything that came earlier can't be as refined as what we have now, and everything in the future is going to improve. But obviously, if we look into the records, we see that that is not true," according to Brother Anandamoy, senior monk at the Self Realization Fellowship Order, headquartered in Los Angeles. He's served the order, founded by Paramahansa Yogananda, for 43 years.

Wood-carver dude

So how does a craftsman, with no formal training in physics or mathematics, develop such an astonishing premise?

It's happened before. Surfer dude Garrett Lisi, an American physicist, dropped out of academia to chase his love of sports. He moved to Maui, learned to windsurf, and worked on ideas that culminated with a precedent-setting theory of particle physics.

Lisi had something in common with Albert Einstein. They both began their quest in theoretical physics from outside the mainstream of the scientific community. The basis of Einstein's discoveries came while he worked as a Swiss patent official, not as an academic researcher.

Nightingale believes academia forces mathematicians and physicists to think inside a box. New, outlandish theories could jeopardize tenure, government funding and stature. So they are not always encouraged.

Nightingale will present his theory, formally, at The Conference on Precession and Ancient Knowledge at the University of California at San Diego on Saturday and Sunday, Oct. 4-5. The conference includes some of the field's greatest experts. Nightingale wants his ideas out in the scientific community, subjected to peer review.

The geometry of the Giza template suggests other places for exploration on the plateau, according to Nightingale.

He plans to expand the application of his theory to other architectural mysteries that have baffled researchers. He's already begun on Stonehenge, which he said his theory explains, and is considering publishing a paper on that as well.

How did the ancients develop this advanced mathematical thinking? And how did they build the pyramids? Did they come from somewhere else?

"I don't have the answer to that. I'm just showing you the blueprint," Nightingale said. "I think it was us, but I think we've forgotten some things. Humanity's legacy is right there, in stone, and we've been looking at it for thousands of years without noticing it.

"I'm not discovering this. I'm just rediscovering what is there," he said.

Ultimately, if Nightingale's ideas are studied and verified by the scientific community, it could take years or even decades before they produce any technological advances.

Still, the possibility of that is awe-inspiring. Asked about the potential enormity of his discovery, Nightingale said, "How do you think I feel? I'm just a woodcarver."

Main Headline

To learn more about Edward Nightingale's theory, visit http://thegizatemplate.com.

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:35 PM
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/10/13/thought-helmet.html

Helmet to Convey Messages by Thought

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:36 PM
http://www.dailystaregypt.com/article.aspx?ArticleID=17050

For your information, there’s more than one Rosetta Stone, says Egyptologist

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:36 PM
http://abcnews.go.com/Technology/story?id=6007823&page=1


Army Orders Pain Ray Trucks; New Report Shows 'Potential for Death'
For $25 Million, Army Buys System That Drives Off Rioters With Microwave-Like Beam


After years of testing, the Active Denial System -- the pain ray which drives off rioters with a microwave-like beam -- could finally have its day. The Army is buying five of the truck-mounted systems for $25 million. But the energy weapon may face new hurdles, before it's shipped off to the battlefield; a new report details how the supposedly non-lethal blaster could be turned into a flesh-frying killer.

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:37 PM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081013111940.htm

Why Starving Cells Prolong Life

ScienceDaily (Oct. 14, 2008) — Cellular damage due to stress is an important factor in ageing processes. It is, thus, amazing that starving, which is a stress factor per se, decelerates ageing processes and extends the lifespan of organisms. It has long been known that proteins from the sirtuin family contribute to this mechanism. To date, the exact function of the seven members of the sirtuin family in mammals has, however, not yet been clarified.

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:38 PM
http://en.epochtimes.com/n2/science-technology/sun-war-electromagnetic-radiation-raymond-wheeler-5590.html

War and Sunspot Cycles: A Form of Electromagnetic Pollution
Could cycles of war, peace be tied to cycles of the sun?

alkemical
10-14-2008, 12:42 PM
http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story?section=news/bizarre&id=6438701

<img src="http://a.abclocal.go.com/images/wpvi/cms_exf_2007/news/bizarre/6438734_600x338.jpg">

PHILADELPHIA - October 8, 2008 (WPVI) -- Is it a bird? Is it a plane? Is it a... UFO?

One thing's for sure, there appeared to be SOMETHING in the sky over Philadelphia Saturday during the Obama rally, which rocker Bruce Springsteen headlined.

Philadelphia resident Jessica Sechrist sent us pictures and a video from what she saw. Take a look and judge for yourself.

alkemical
10-15-2008, 05:39 AM
http://edition.cnn.com/2008/TECH/science/09/24/wave.pelamis/index.html?iref=intlOnlyonCNN

A new era for wave energy

* Story Highlights
* World's first commercial wave power project is inaugurated off the Portuguese coast
* The semi-submerged machines will initially provide 2.25 megawatts of power
* A second phase will produce 21 megawatts and displace 60,000 tons of CO2

alkemical
10-15-2008, 07:57 AM
uhm....

http://www.vhemt.org/

alkemical
10-15-2008, 08:37 AM
http://www.savethemales.ca/180302.html

Gloria Steinem: How the CIA Used Feminism to Destabilize Society

March 18, 2002

by Henry Makow Ph.D.

"In the 1960's, the elite media invented second-wave feminism as part of the elite agenda to dismantle civilization and create a New World Order."

Since writing these words last week, I have discovered that before she became a feminist leader, Gloria Steinem worked for the CIA spying on Marxist students in Europe and disrupting their meetings. She became a media darling due to her CIA connections. MS Magazine, which she edited for many years was indirectly funded by the CIA.

Steinem has tried to suppress this information, unearthed in the 1970's by a radical feminist group called "Red Stockings." In 1979, Steinem and her powerful CIA-connected friends, Katharine Graham of the Washington Post and Ford Foundation President Franklin Thomas prevented Random House from publishing it in "Feminist Revolution." Nevertheless the story appeared in the "Village Voice" on May 21, 1979.

Steinem has always pretended that she had been a student radical. "When I was in college, it was the McCarthy era," she told Susan Mitchell in 1997, "and that made me a Marxist." (Icons, Saints and Divas: Intimate Conversations with Women who Changed the World 1997. p 130) Her bio-blurb in June 1973 MS. Magazine states: "Gloria Steinem has been a freelance writer all her professional life. Ms magazine is her first full-time salaried job."

Not true. Raised in an impoverished, dysfunctional family in Toledo Ohio, Steinem somehow managed to attend elite Smith College, Betty Friedan's alma mater. After graduating in 1955, Steinem received a "Chester Bowles Student Fellowship" to study in India. Curiously, an Internet search reveals that this fellowship has no existence apart from Gloria Steinem. No one else has received it.

In 1958, Steinem was recruited by CIA's Cord Meyers to direct an "informal group of activists" called the "Independent Research Service." This was part of Meyer's "Congress for Cultural Freedom," which created magazines like "Encounter" and "Partisan Review" to promote a left-liberal chic to oppose Marxism. Steinem, attended Communist-sponsored youth festivals in Europe, published a newspaper, reported on other participants, and helped to provoke riots.

One of Steinem's CIA colleagues was Clay Felker. In the early 1960's, he became an editor at Esquire and published articles by Steinem which established her as a leading voice for women's lib. In 1968, as publisher of New York Magazine, he hired her as a contributing editor, and then editor of Ms. Magazine in 1971. Warner Communications put up almost all the money although it only took 25% of the stock. Ms. Magazine's first publisher was Elizabeth Forsling Harris, a CIA-connected PR executive who planned John Kennedy's Dallas motorcade route. Despite its anti establishment image, MS magazine attracted advertising from the cream of corporate America. It published ads for ITT at the same time as women political prisoners in Chile were being tortured by Pinochet, after a coup inspired by the US conglomerate and the CIA.


(cont'd on site, not a long read)

TheReverend
10-15-2008, 09:31 AM
This article makes me so mad.

"Everybody who was studying this was using the Fibernachi series, and they were coming up with little snippets of what was occurring. But I wanted to allow an open mind without putting myself in that box," Nightingale said. (Fibernachi numbers are a series of figures built by adding the two prior numbers in the series, for example, 1,1,2,3,5,8.)

The spelling of "fibonacci" alone should be red flags to the sources credibility.

So how does a craftsman, with no formal training in physics or mathematics, develop such an astonishing premise?

He doesn't and didn't. The mathematical community that he criticizes is rightly unaccepting because it's absurd psycho babble. Much like the numerologists that devote their lives to arguing about 666 and whether its a reference to Nero, or whatever flavor of the week. It's stupid, you can twist any number to anything you'd like.

Still, the possibility of that is awe-inspiring. Asked about the potential enormity of his discovery, Nightingale said, "How do you think I feel? I'm just a woodcarver."

He should re-double his efforts back into whittling. Colossal failure at this endeavor.

alkemical
10-15-2008, 09:40 AM
This article makes me so mad.



The spelling of "fibonacci" alone should be red flags to the sources credibility.



He doesn't and didn't. The mathematical community that he criticizes is rightly unaccepting because it's absurd psycho babble. Much like the numerologists that devote their lives to arguing about 666 and whether its a reference to Nero, or whatever flavor of the week. It's stupid, you can twist any number to anything you'd like.



He should re-double his efforts back into whittling. Colossal failure at this endeavor.



have you been to the Pocono's ? ;)

TheReverend
10-15-2008, 09:44 AM
have you been to the Pocono's ? ;)

Actually, no, why? I hear there's "alien activity" there these days.

alkemical
10-15-2008, 09:48 AM
Actually, no, why? I hear there's "alien activity" there these days.

;)

ya, seems things have been busy outside and around PHI too. ;)

Nah, the article writer is poo - but i'm contacting this guy to see if i can talk to him and see if he'll go over his research with me.

TheReverend
10-15-2008, 10:05 AM
;)

ya, seems things have been busy outside and around PHI too. ;)

Nah, the article writer is poo - but i'm contacting this guy to see if i can talk to him and see if he'll go over his research with me.

Feel free, but if you really want to talk to a delusional retard, there's tons in this subforum.

alkemical
10-15-2008, 10:06 AM
Feel free, but if you really want to talk to a delusional retard, there's tons in this subforum.

This is where you and i differ....

Sometimes the de-llusion is what i'm looking for.

gyldenlove
10-15-2008, 10:57 AM
http://www.wired.com/wired/archive/5.12/science.html

When two protons collide in an accelerator, they are transformed into muons and other particles. One Russian physicist offers this analogy: it's like two Soviet Fiats colliding to produce a bus and a Mercedes Benz 600. That's the thing about high-energy physics: the total is different than the sum of its parts.

So it was in 1978 that when the proton beam entered Anatoli Bugorski's skull it measured about 200,000 rads, and when it exited, having collided with the inside of his head, it weighed in at about 300,000 rads. Bugorski, a 36-year-old researcher at the Institute for High Energy Physics in Protvino, was checking a piece of accelerator equipment that had malfunctioned - as had, apparently, the several safety mechanisms. Leaning over the piece of equipment, Bugorski stuck his head in the space through which the beam passes on its way from one part of the accelerator tube to the next and saw a flash brighter than a thousand suns. He felt no pain.

From what we know about radiation, about 500 to 600 rads is enough to kill a person (though we don't know of anyone else who has been exposed to radiation in the form of a proton beam moving at about the speed of sound). The left side of his face swollen beyond recognition, Bugorski was taken to a clinic in Moscow so that doctors could observe his death over the following two to three weeks.

Over the next few days, skin on the back of his head and on his face just next to his left nostril peeled away to reveal the path the beam had burned through the skin, the skull, and the brain tissue. The inside of his head continued to burn away: all the nerves on the left were gone in two years, paralyzing that side of his face. Still, not only did Bugorski not die, but he remained a normally functioning human being, capable even of continuing in science. For the first dozen years, the only real evidence that something had gone neurologically awry were occasional petit mal seizures; over the last few years Bugorski has also had six grand mals. The dividing line of his life goes down the middle of his face: the right side has aged, while the left froze 19 years ago. When he concentrates, he wrinkles only half his forehead.

Because virtually everything connected with nuclear energy was kept secret in the Soviet Union, for more than a decade Bugorski observed an unspoken ban on talking about his accident. About twice a year he went to the Moscow radiation clinic to be examined and to commune with other members of the brotherhood of nuclear-accident victims. "Like former inmates, we are always aware of one another," he says. "There aren't that many of us, and we know one another's life stories. Generally, these are sad tales."

Well, if the beam was only moving at the speed of sound all the protons would have reacted with the outer layer of tissue they got in contact with so that would be skin and bone, this would cause severe burning and should resemble an electric burn as in effect it is a short circuit electrocution that takes place.

Why the beam would only move at the speed of sound is a good question. There should be only little damage to deeper tissue and especially non-proliferating tissue should suffer very little damage unless it was straight in the path of the beam.

Considering a proton to be an object is erronous, protons as all hadrons are really a small field of very high energy density where quark-matter keeps annihilating and reappearing. Protons consist of millions of transient quarks and antiquarks and 3 constituent quarks, so when you collide protons with other protons you effectively create a temporary state where you have a super-particle that consists of 6 constituent quarks and millions of transient quarks and antiquarks, this is not a stable system and it tends to "explode" into a number of quark-antiquark pairs as well as lepton and anti-lepton pairs. If you really want to make a good allegory you should consider what happened when Randy Johnson hit that pigeon with a fastball, feathers and bird parts flew everywhere, which is what happens when you collide protons, the parts fly everywhere.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 07:44 AM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081010081650.htm

Mathematicians Illuminate Deep Connection Between Classical And Quantum Physics

ScienceDaily (Oct. 10, 2008) — In a seminar co-organized by Stanford University and the American Institute of Mathematics, Soundararajan announced that he and Roman Holowinsky have proven a significant version of the quantum unique ergodicity (QUE) conjecture.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 07:44 AM
http://blogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2008/10/09/mind-controlled-video-game-gets-a-tryout-in-japan/

Mind-Controlled Video Game Gets a Tryout in Japan

alkemical
10-16-2008, 07:45 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/09/us/09water.html?_r=4&scp=1&sq=dowsing&st=cse&oref=slogin&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

On Parched Farms, Using Intuition to Find Water

alkemical
10-16-2008, 07:46 AM
http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1564-Crystal-Head-Vodka-Dan-Aykroyds-latest-booze-venture.html

Crystal Head Vodka: Dan Aykroyd's latest booze venture?

alkemical
10-16-2008, 07:55 AM
Mothman stuff:

http://www.mondovista.com/mothman.html

alkemical
10-16-2008, 08:44 AM
http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1569-Aliens-appear-over-Obama-A-Fortean-US-election-special.html

In a series of essays published at www.solvinglight.com/blog/, author Robert Bowie Johnson Jr. presents evidence that Barack Obama is directly linked to Satanic teachings through his close association with Oprah Winfrey, who parrots and relentlessly promotes, worldwide, the anti-Christian doctrine of her guru, Eckhart Tolle. A summary:

...

Tolle's "Source" tells him and Oprah that the word of the God of the Bible cannot be trusted, that there is no death, and that he and Oprah both are as God, able to say of themselves, "I Am That I Am." These things that the "Source" has told Tolle and Oprah are the same things the ancient serpent told Eve in the garden. According to Scripture, Satan is another name for the ancient serpent.

"The voting public has a right to know to what degree Barack Obama, who has called himself a 'committed Christian,' considers himself and his wife to be integral parts of Oprah's and Tolle's New Age global tribe, a tribe that has adopted the "wisdom" of the ancient serpent as its own," Mr. Johnson said.


Warning: This blog entry was brought to you for entertainment purposes only and should not influence the way you vote. Although, that said, some people are probably making their minds up on far less sensible grounds, so who am I to judge?

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 09:05 AM
Hey, have you seen the History channel's special on locating the Garden of Eden? Awesome work on that special.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:07 AM
Hey, have you seen the History channel's special on locating the Garden of Eden? Awesome work on that special.

No, i haven't.

I don't get much time in front of the TV.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:21 AM
http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2008/10/the_science_of_shrin.html

The science of shrinking human heads:

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:22 AM
http://www.russia-ic.com/news/show/7139

Amazing enormous constructions of stone - megaliths - some of them weighing up to 20 tons, were erected in the Isle of Vera, Lake Turgoyak of Chelyabinsk Region.

Researchers have long tried to solve the puzzle of this enigmatic structure. Cooperation of archaeologists and divers has allowed finding out a lot of new things and create many more questions.

“First divers went underwater around Turgoyak Lake and then we followed them” - scientist Stanislav Grigoryev says - “the greatest sensation was to see a megalith at the depth of about two meters under water surface. The point is it had been practically impossible to create it underwater. It means that in those times there was a neck of land here and the present day island was a peninsula. During close examination we found some parts that remind of hand-made blockwork”.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:23 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/7669264.stm

Spain has returned some 243 priceless artefacts to Peru, more than a decade after they came to light at an exhibition in north-western Spain.

The objects were among hundreds of pieces exhibited in 1997 by a private collector, who still claims ownership of them.

They date from before the arrival of Christopher Columbus in 1492.

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 09:23 AM
No, i haven't.

I don't get much time in front of the TV.

They saved the best for last and much of it was common knowledge, but in summary:

They went over the book of genesis, and then into different Hebrew midrashes and Adam's first wife.

Then they went into historical quests for the garden, from the Crusades, to Marco Polo, to Christopher Columbus and Ponce de Leon.

Then they went into the discovery of Sumerian tablets and how they found that the flood story, Garden of Eden, tree of life and the serpent were stolen from Mesopotamian folklore and the relationship between the serpent and Tiamat.

My favorite part because it was news to me: Then they showed through satellite imaging how at roughly 7000 BCE the Persian Gulf would've been dry land... a valley specifically, and that's where the Tigris, Euphrates, Pishon and Gihon (last two have since been dried, but the sat view shows their past existence) intersect. Anyways, at roughly the time the Sumerians claim in Gilgamesh, glacial melting rose the sea levels, but because it was of its geographical surroundings, instead of a steady sinking, it would've came in a violent flood.

They also mentioned the tree of knowledge representing agriculture and that it made men like God because we could now control plants. And that we could never go back because you couldn't return to a hunting/gathering society.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:24 AM
http://www.examiner.com/x-504-Space-News-Examiner~y2008m10d15-No-aliens-in-Alabama-because-theyre-hanging-out-in-Peru

No aliens in Alabama because they're hanging out in Peru?

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:25 AM
They saved the best for last and much of it was common knowledge, but in summary:

They went over the book of genesis, and then into different Hebrew midrashes and Adam's first wife.

Then they went into historical quests for the garden, from the Crusades, to Marco Polo, to Christopher Columbus and Ponce de Leon.

Then they went into the discovery of Sumerian tablets and how they found that the flood story, Garden of Eden, tree of life and the serpent were stolen from Mesopotamian folklore and the relationship between the serpent and Tiamat.

My favorite part because it was news to me: Then they showed through satellite imaging how at roughly 7000 BCE the Persian Gulf would've been dry land... a valley specifically, and that's where the Tigris, Euphrates, Pishon and Gihon (last two have since been dried, but the sat view shows their past existence) intersect. Anyways, at roughly the time the Sumerians claim in Gilgamesh, glacial melting rose the sea levels, but because it was of its geographical surroundings, instead of a steady sinking, it would've came in a violent flood.

They also mentioned the tree of knowledge representing agriculture and that it made men like God because we could now control plants. And that we could never go back because you couldn't return to a hunting/gathering society.



Interesting...

artist - paul laffoley thinks the tree of life is the ginko plant... ;o)

Tree of knowledge.... apple tree ;)

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 09:30 AM
Interesting...

artist - paul laffoley thinks the tree of life is the ginko plant... ;o)

Tree of knowledge.... apple tree ;)

Apple=evil, I know, but the christian/jewish variation of the story has it's own twists from it's sumerian predecessor, which also might be a variation of an original... who knows?

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 09:32 AM
Thought you might find this interesting.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/10/13/eod.ghost.heart/index.html

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 09:35 AM
Thought you might find this interesting.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/10/13/eod.ghost.heart/index.html

Sweet jesus, it's gonna be such an amazing world in 30 years.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:40 AM
Apple=evil, I know, but the christian/jewish variation of the story has it's own twists from it's sumerian predecessor, which also might be a variation of an original... who knows?

You are going to laugh at this -

But man when i was 19 - i did all the comparative religion thing... I figured out that the 3 major religions all came from somewhere originally - I mean they can't have that much similarity.....

EVE-L ;)

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 09:40 AM
Sweet jesus, it's gonna be such an amazing world in 30 years.

It's crazy. Maybe we'll actually start properly funding some of this stuff and we can have it in 15 years instead.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 09:41 AM
Thought you might find this interesting.

http://www.cnn.com/2008/HEALTH/10/13/eod.ghost.heart/index.html

cool ass ****

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 09:49 AM
You are going to laugh at this -

But man when i was 19 - i did all the comparative religion thing... I figured out that the 3 major religions all came from somewhere originally - I mean they can't have that much similarity.....

EVE-L ;)

They do... the cradle of life is in that mesopotamian region, and all the religion fables can be traced to early mesopotamian folklore... from the flood, to the garden of eden, the tower of babil, etc. The only religions with any variance have a large geographical distance protecting their own cultural ideology, otherwise it'd be an even bigger mess of merged stories, adopted icons, villified predecessing gods, etc, than it already is.

kappys
10-16-2008, 09:57 AM
They do... the cradle of life is in that mesopotamian region, and all the religion fables can be traced to early mesopotamian folklore... from the flood, to the garden of eden, the tower of babil, etc. The only religions with any variance have a large geographical distance protecting their own cultural ideology, otherwise it'd be an even bigger mess of merged stories, adopted icons, villified predecessing gods, etc, than it already is.

Most religions of the world have a number of common unifying stories - such as floods, epic battles, etc.

I suspect that they might have originated even earlier in the Rift Valley in Tanzania if that is where we all orginally came from. After all humans were there for tens of thousands of years and then very rapidly spread over the rest of the world. Mesopotamia IMO is the cradle of civilization mainly because grain farming developed there and allowed for settlement - but I suspect that many of our cherished stories came from earlier times and were passed down by oral traditions.

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 10:06 AM
Most religions of the world have a number of common unifying stories - such as floods, epic battles, etc.

I suspect that they might have originated even earlier in the Rift Valley in Tanzania if that is where we all orginally came from. After all humans were there for tens of thousands of years and then very rapidly spread over the rest of the world. Mesopotamia IMO is the cradle of civilization mainly because grain farming developed there and allowed for settlement - but I suspect that many of our cherished stories came from earlier times and were passed down by oral traditions.

Where did you hear that's where we came from?

kappys
10-16-2008, 10:18 AM
Where did you hear that's where we came from?

Evolution. Its suspected that modern humans first evolved in the Rift Valley and resided there for many thousands of years before rapid expansion. Its the most widely accepted evolutionary view of human origins as far as I am aware.

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 10:19 AM
Evolution. Its suspected that modern humans first evolved in the Rift Valley and resided there for many thousands of years before rapid expansion. Its the most widely accepted evolutionary view of human origins as far as I am aware.

I'll be damned. Out of all the places I've heard in the middle east and africa, Tanzania's not one I recall.

Not that I don't believe you, but do you have a link just so I can read this in it's entirety?

kappys
10-16-2008, 10:35 AM
http://anthropology.si.edu/humanorigins/ha/sap.htm

I'm no paleontologist and I'm sure there are conflicting theories. This is just the one I know of.

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 11:00 AM
http://anthropology.si.edu/humanorigins/ha/sap.htm

I'm no paleontologist and I'm sure there are conflicting theories. This is just the one I know of.

Much appreciated. I'm off to read it now.

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 11:08 AM
http://anthropology.si.edu/humanorigins/ha/sap.htm

I'm no paleontologist and I'm sure there are conflicting theories. This is just the one I know of.

Sadly, that was nothing I haven't seen before with nothing including Ridge Valley Tanzania. I tried google searching too, to no end. Curiousity will be the death of me... got any other links?

alkemical
10-16-2008, 11:24 AM
They do... the cradle of life is in that mesopotamian region, and all the religion fables can be traced to early mesopotamian folklore... from the flood, to the garden of eden, the tower of babil, etc. The only religions with any variance have a large geographical distance protecting their own cultural ideology, otherwise it'd be an even bigger mess of merged stories, adopted icons, villified predecessing gods, etc, than it already is.



Most religions of the world have a number of common unifying stories - such as floods, epic battles, etc.

I suspect that they might have originated even earlier in the Rift Valley in Tanzania if that is where we all orginally came from. After all humans were there for tens of thousands of years and then very rapidly spread over the rest of the world. Mesopotamia IMO is the cradle of civilization mainly because grain farming developed there and allowed for settlement - but I suspect that many of our cherished stories came from earlier times and were passed down by oral traditions.


Well, according to some documents left by "Thoth"

http://i33.photobucket.com/albums/d91/CicadaStar/Inside%20The%20Cosmic%20Cube/thoth5sm.jpg


- he was prometheus - and gave man - fire, laws, agriculture, etc - and the way it's written by "his" word - this would have been in africa -

Rohirrim
10-16-2008, 11:27 AM
I think it's the Rift Valley. It's just that the Leakey's found some of the oldest fossil's there. Doesn't guarantee humans weren't elsewhere as well. The fossil record is hugely incomplete.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 11:34 AM
I think it's the Rift Valley. It's just that the Leakey's found some of the oldest fossil's there. Doesn't guarantee humans weren't elsewhere as well. The fossil record is hugely incomplete.

You know what's interesting me as well -

is the legends of giants from all over the world (ones with red hair too) - from south america, to easter island - just interesting.

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 11:53 AM
Well we know now that all of the variations of humans aren't necessarily related in a direct line of descent. Some coexisted at the same time but one died out for whatever reason. My guess is that the giants are the extinct branches of our cousins that happened to be relatively large. Encounters with them were probably passed down through the ages and when they died off they became legends and myths that became ever more exaggerated.

The fact that we are here is really amazing. We're the only surviving species in the human branch of evolution. The dozens of others have all died out. Normally when the branches of a group of species die out like that the few remaining ones follow suit. The fact that we're the last ones is either a testament to our survivability/adaptability or the last domino waiting to tip. Fortunately we'll be in charge, at least to some extent, if we tip over or not. Other species have never had that advantage.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 11:58 AM
Well we know now that all of the variations of humans aren't necessarily related in a direct line of descent. Some coexisted at the same time but one died out for whatever reason. My guess is that the giants are the extinct branches of our cousins that happened to be relatively large. Encounters with them were probably passed down through the ages and when they died off they became legends and myths that became ever more exaggerated.

The fact that we are here is really amazing. We're the only surviving species in the human branch of evolution. The dozens of others have all died out. Normally when the branches of a group of species die out like that the few remaining ones follow suit. The fact that we're the last ones is either a testament to our survivability/adaptability or the last domino waiting to tip. Fortunately we'll be in charge, at least to some extent, if we tip over or not. Other species have never had that advantage.


Maybe we were the most viscous. lol. Both "reason" & animal... ;o)

I think there's a whole "lost history" of things that went on on this earth....i'm fascinated by it all.

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 11:59 AM
Well we know now that all of the variations of humans aren't necessarily related in a direct line of descent. Some coexisted at the same time but one died out for whatever reason. My guess is that the giants are the extinct branches of our cousins that happened to be relatively large. Encounters with them were probably passed down through the ages and when they died off they became legends and myths that became ever more exaggerated.

The fact that we are here is really amazing. We're the only surviving species in the human branch of evolution. The dozens of others have all died out. Normally when the branches of a group of species die out like that the few remaining ones follow suit. The fact that we're the last ones is either a testament to our survivability/adaptability or the last domino waiting to tip. Fortunately we'll be in charge, at least to some extent, if we tip over or not. Other species have never had that advantage.

I tend to think that giants aren't even an exaggeration, just a complete myth. If I asked my five year old to come up with a new species, or some sort of myth, at that age she still has the imagination and creativity to come up with "big people". It's not complicated, nor is it odd that different cultures managed to invent the same simple story. In my opinion, of course.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 12:01 PM
I tend to think that giants aren't even an exaggeration, just a complete myth. If I asked my five year old to come up with a new species, or some sort of myth, at that age she still has the imagination and creativity to come up with "big people". It's not complicated, nor is it odd that different cultures managed to invent the same simple story. In my opinion, of course.

Just for fun....

http://www.stevequayle.com/Giants/index2.html

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 12:01 PM
Maybe we were the most viscous. lol. Both "reason" & animal... ;o)

I think there's a whole "lost history" of things that went on on this earth....i'm fascinated by it all.

Over a hundred thousand years of our existence, and not even the past five hundred are thoroughly documented. There's a ridiculous amount of lost history! Very exciting.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 12:04 PM
Over a hundred thousand years of our existence, and not even the past five hundred are thoroughly documented. There's a ridiculous amount of lost history! Very exciting.

Oh and all the different ways you can look at it....

kappys
10-16-2008, 12:06 PM
I think it's the Rift Valley. It's just that the Leakey's found some of the oldest fossil's there. Doesn't guarantee humans weren't elsewhere as well. The fossil record is hugely incomplete.

Yeah its the Rift Valley. Sorry about the bum link - I just did a quick search and it seemed to be a useful site. I honestly don't remember where I first read/heard about the Out of Africa theroy - its been a while.

I think the though process though is that we descended down a similar line as the other great apes which are all localized to Africa and therefore we probably originated in the same region. Of course there are a huge number of other possibilities.

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 12:13 PM
Just for fun....

http://www.stevequayle.com/Giants/index2.html

Oh, ****ing come on!

"Proof of giants' existence - their skeletal remains - has been quickly secreted away in obscure museums, when not destroyed."

I mean, seriously, dude...? Seriously?

A find like that would make any archaelogist, paleantologist, or anthropologist a household name with near limitless funding. No ****ing chance in hell a "giants" skeleton would get secreted away anywhere!

alkemical
10-16-2008, 12:19 PM
Oh, ****ing come on!

"Proof of giants' existence - their skeletal remains - has been quickly secreted away in obscure museums, when not destroyed."

I mean, seriously, dude...? Seriously?

A find like that would make any archaelogist, paleantologist, or anthropologist a household name with near limitless funding. No ****ing chance in hell a "giants" skeleton would get secreted away anywhere!

Dude, i said "just for fun".

The south american tribes, those one easter island, etc - all have legends of giants, and ones specifically with red-hair.


Now..."for fun".... Maybe those that found "Giant Proof", were eaten by giants....or maybe the lizard people don't want us to know... ;)

TheReverend
10-16-2008, 12:23 PM
Dude, i said "just for fun".

The south american tribes, those one easter island, etc - all have legends of giants, and ones specifically with red-hair.


Now..."for fun".... Maybe those that found "Giant Proof", were eaten by giants....or maybe the lizard people don't want us to know... ;)

:spit:

Awesome line. Also, I'll bookmark it for the next time I need a laugh.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 12:26 PM
:spit:

Awesome line. Also, I'll bookmark it for the next time I need a laugh.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Icke

David Vaughan Icke (pronounced /aɪk/), born 29 April, 1952, is a British writer and public speaker who has devoted himself since 1990 to researching "who and what is really controlling the world."[1] A former professional football player, reporter, television sports presenter, and spokesman for the Green Party, he is the author of 20 books explaining his views.

Icke argues that he has developed a moral and political worldview that combines New Age spiritualism with a passionate denunciation of what he sees as totalitarian trends in the modern world, a position that has been described as "New Age conspiracism."[2]

At the heart of Icke's theories is the view that the world is ruled by a secret group called the "Global Elite" or "Illuminati," which he has linked to The Protocols of the Elders of Zion, an anti-Semitic hoax.[3][4] In 1999, he published The Biggest Secret, in which he wrote that the Illuminati are a race of reptilian humanoids known as the Babylonian Brotherhood, and that many prominent figures are reptilian, including George W. Bush, Queen Elizabeth II, Kris Kristofferson, and Boxcar Willie.[3][5]

According to Political Research Associates, Icke's speaking engagements can draw a substantial audience in Canada, with his organisers claiming as many as 1000 people attending one in Vancouver.[6] During an October 1999 speaking tour there, he received a standing ovation from students after a four-hour speech at the University of Toronto,[7] while his books were removed from the shelves of Indigo Books across Ontario after protests from the Canadian Jewish Congress.[8]


______


You can't tell me Kristofferson isn't a lizard person....

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 12:32 PM
Oh and all the different ways you can look at it....

It's limitless really. We still can't make firm conclusions on things that happened a few hundred years ago. Somebody will always come along to revise it.

That era is probably at an end though. Until we're gone every little thing will be documented to death.

I find this thought amusing. If we die off and an alien race comes down to inspect our ancient ruins what will they find? A monument to our intelligence stacked upon a mountain of stupidity. For every great repository of knowledge we'll leave behind we'll have some guys house filled with stupid home videos, a box of old porn, and a PC filled with youtube clips and ****ty mp3's. The crap we'll leave behind will no doubt be highly amusing. Imagine what some complete stranger will make of it all. Even 1000 years from now if we're still around our descendants will probably laugh at us.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 12:33 PM
It's limitless really. We still can't make firm conclusions on things that happened a few hundred years ago. Somebody will always come along to revise it.

That era is probably at an end though. Until we're gone every little thing will be documented to death.

I find this thought amusing. If we die off and an alien race comes down to inspect our ancient ruins what will they find? A monument to our intelligence stacked upon a mountain of stupidity. For every great repository of knowledge we'll leave behind we'll have some guys house filled with stupid home videos, a box of old porn, and a PC filled with youtube clips and ****ty mp3's. The crap we'll leave behind will no doubt be highly amusing. Imagine what some complete stranger will make of it all. Even 1000 years from now if we're still around our descendants will probably laugh at us.



You imagine how "important" Mcdonalds would be? :)

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 12:48 PM
Haha, they would probably think we all worshiped at the Church of Ronald McDonald and that there was a religious war between the Followers of Wendy and the Cult of the Burger King.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 12:58 PM
Haha, they would probably think we all worshiped at the Church of Ronald McDonald and that there was a religious war between the Followers of Wendy and the Cult of the Burger King.

But Taco Bell destroyed them all.

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 01:03 PM
Only to face a new foe. The Flying Spaghetti Monster and his Church of Noodles & Company.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 01:11 PM
Only to face a new foe. The Flying Spaghetti Monster and his Church of Noodles & Company.

Spongebob smote them all!

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 01:13 PM
Spongebob or Hanna Montana? I think we all know who has the power these days.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 01:18 PM
Spongebob or Hanna Montana? I think we all know who has the power these days.

Dude, the Vagina has always had the power. Besides...what is disney trying to teach kids?

http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2175/2456058818_a91e60096d.jpg


http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showthread.php?t=61989

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 01:20 PM
I really don't know. Disney has gotten really weird in the last decade.

alkemical
10-16-2008, 01:22 PM
check out that link to the sacrificial goddess thread -

snowspot66
10-16-2008, 01:32 PM
Just did. We sure do love a spectacle.

Did you ever catch the South Park episode that covers that exact same topic?

It makes you think. A lot of what we do or how we react has roots in our evolutionary development. I wonder what part the sacrificial goddess is connected to and why as a group we seem to enjoy the spectacle.

I do my best to avoid it but it's like a train wreck. There will inevitably be some headline or photograph so "what the ****?" that it will force me to at least glance at it.

alkemical
10-17-2008, 05:49 AM
Just did. We sure do love a spectacle.

Did you ever catch the South Park episode that covers that exact same topic?

It makes you think. A lot of what we do or how we react has roots in our evolutionary development. I wonder what part the sacrificial goddess is connected to and why as a group we seem to enjoy the spectacle.

I do my best to avoid it but it's like a train wreck. There will inevitably be some headline or photograph so "what the ****?" that it will force me to at least glance at it.



There's a part of me that feels like...that awareness is reaching a point that it's starting to make itself noticed.

I haven't seen the southpark one - mostly because i don't watch much TV. When i learned to step back and observe, that's when i became more aware of these things happening all around.

Humans and their rituals - it seems in someways we are designed for it (Routine, etc).

alkemical
10-17-2008, 06:21 AM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081015120749.htm

10 Years On, High-school Social Skills Predict Better Earnings Than Test Scores

ScienceDaily (Oct. 16, 2008) — Ten years after graduation, high-school students who had been rated as conscientious and cooperative by their teachers were earning more than classmates who had similar test scores but fewer social skills, said a new University of Illinois study.

"..."My findings show that the most successful students are those who have not only high achievement test scores but also the kinds of social skills and behaviors that are highly rewarded by employers in the workplace," she said...."

alkemical
10-17-2008, 07:25 AM
http://thecleaver.blogspot.com/2008/10/into-fractal-core-get-ready-for-shift.html

alkemical
10-17-2008, 07:26 AM
http://www.philipcoppens.com/spheres.html

Rolling Stones

Bosnia not only has pyramids: it also has a number of enigmatic stone spheres, on par with similar balls found in Costa Rica several decades ago. So far, no-one has been able to explain the Middle American balls; can the Bosnian discovery assist in revealing their purpose?

alkemical
10-17-2008, 07:28 AM
http://warofillusions.wordpress.com/2008/09/25/harvard-gazette-report-on-tibetan-monks-who-can-heat-up-their-bodies-at-will/

Harvard Gazette report on Tibetan monks who can heat up their bodies at will

alkemical
10-17-2008, 07:29 AM
http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=10489

Who Owns The Federal Reserve?
The Fed is privately owned. Its shareholders are private banks

alkemical
10-17-2008, 11:35 AM
http://www.wariscrime.com/2008/09/24/news/us-military-plans-the-future-as-perpetual-warfare/

Tom Clonan | The Irish Times
September 24, 2008

The US military sees the next 30 to 40 years as involving a state of continuous war against ideologically-motivated terrorists and competing with Russia and China for natural resources and markets, writes Tom Clonan.

alkemical
10-17-2008, 11:36 AM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1066171/Buckingham-Palace-butler-ran-paedophile-sex-ring-working-Royal-Family.html

Buckingham Palace butler 'ran paedophile sex ring while working for the Royal Family'

alkemical
10-17-2008, 11:46 AM
http://www.redicecreations.com/article.php?id=4831

<img src="http://www.redicecreations.com/ul_img/4830hopffibration2.jpg">

Imagine twisting a beam of light into a knot, as if it were a piece of a string. Now grab another light beam and tie it around the first, forming its own loop. Tie on another and another, until all of space is filled up with loops of light.

Sounds preposterous, but a pair of physicists has shown that light can do just this — at least in theory. Visible light, along with all other forms of electromagnetic radiation, is governed by Maxwell’s equations, and the researchers have found a new solution to these equations in which light forms linked knots. The team is now working to create light in this form experimentally.

It’s too soon to know what the applications of knotted light will be if they succeed, but possibilities include solving one of the problems that make it difficult to produce power from nuclear fusion and manipulating flows in an exotic state of matter called a Bose-Einstein condensate.

“This is very exciting,” says Antti Niemi of Uppsala University in Sweden, who is unaffiliated with the research. “If an observation is made where one sees stable knots in light, that would also tell us a lot about the mysteries of fundamental forces that we still do not understand.”

The story begins with a mathematical discovery in 1931. Heinz Hopf found a way of filling up all of space with circles. (More precisely, he made a map from the analogue of a sphere in four dimensions to the circle.) He started with a donut shape, which mathematicians call a torus. He imagined taking a piece of string and wrapping it smoothly around the torus so that the string passes through the “donut hole” once and around the outside once as well. Enough pieces of string placed alongside this first one could cover the entire surface of the torus.

Now he just had to fill all of space with tori. He packed them like Russian dolls, extending forever both inward and outward from the starting torus. The smallest torus would be so skinny that it would simply be a circle. The biggest torus would be so fat that the “donut hole” on the torus wouldn’t be a hole at all — it would form a line extending up so far that its two ends would meet only “at infinity.” By filling space with tori and covering tori with circles, Hopf put every point in space on some circle.

Mathematicians were excited about Hopf’s discovery (called the “Hopf fibration”) because it showed that high-dimensional spheres were more complex than imagined. But it wasn’t until 20 years ago that physicists realized the Hopf fibration had implications for electromagnetism: Antonio Fernández-Rañada of Complutense University in Madrid used the Hopf fibration to create a new solution to Maxwell’s equations, and thus an example of how electromagnetism can work. He was in search of a way to build a quantum theory for light without using quantum mechanics. He used the Hopf fibration, but did not consider whether, in an experiment, light could actually be forced to follow the circular paths.

William Irvine of New York University and Dirk Bouwmeester of the University of California, Santa Barbara stumbled across Rañada’s work around 10 years ago and realized that it might describe a form light could actually take. “The main thing we did is that we took this solution seriously,” Irvine says. The pair figured out how to turn Rañada’s solution into something that might conceivably be produced in the laboratory.

Irvine and Bouwmeester show theoretically that the shape the light rays formed would distort over time, with the individual torus shapes becoming twisted and misshapen. The individual loops the light would follow would also grow larger over time.

In special situations, however, the loops might be stable, such as if light travels through plasma instead of through free space. One of the problems that has plagued experimental nuclear fusion reactors is that the plasma at the heart of them moves faster and faster and tends to escape. That motion can be controlled with magnetic fields, but current methods to generate those fields still don’t do the job. If Irvine and Bouwmeester’s discovery could be used to generate fields that would send the plasma in closed, non-expanding loops and help contain it, “that would be extremely spectacular,” Bouwmeester says.

Rañada, whose work Bouwmeester and Irvine expanded upon, is excited about their discovery. “They’ve done outstanding work,” he says, “which most probably will have some surprising consequences.”

alkemical
10-17-2008, 11:53 AM
http://www.philipcoppens.com/hawara.html



The Labyrinthine Search

Destroyed for some, intact and waiting to be discovered for others, the labyrinth of Hawara was one of ancient Egypt’s greatest achievements, on par, if not surpassing, the fame of the pyramids.

alkemical
10-17-2008, 11:55 AM
http://today.uci.edu/news/release_detail.asp?key=1808

Scientists to study synthetic telepathy

Researchers get grant to develop communication system based on thoughts, not speech

alkemical
10-17-2008, 11:56 AM
http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUSLD33620320080814?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0

Scientists in Israel have discovered a new way to test for water pollution by "listening" to what the plants growing in water have to say.

By shining a laser beam on the tiny pieces of algae floating in the water, the researchers said they hear sound waves that tell them the type and amount of contamination in the water.

"It is a red light, telling us that something is beginning to go wrong with the quality of water," said Zvy Dubinsky, an aquatic biologist at Israel's Bar Ilan University. "Algae is the first thing to be affected by a change in water quality."

Although most of the earth is covered in water, 44 percent of the world's population live in areas with high water stress, and the number is likely to increase because of factors such as global warming and rising population.

As water sources deteriorate worldwide, the testing of algae could be used to monitor water quality faster, more cheaply and more accurately than techniques now in use, Dubinsky said.

The secret, he said, is to measure the rate of photosynthesis in the algae, meaning the plant's ability to transform light into energy. During photosynthesis, plants also release oxygen into the air.

Dubinsky's technique is easy to perform because of the over-abundance of algae in the planet's water. Most of the oxygen in the atmosphere comes from algae.

A prototype tester, that occupies about one square meter of a laboratory desktop, shoots a laser beam at water samples to stimulate photosynthesis in the algae. But not all of the laser's heat is used.

Depending on the condition of the algae and the rate of photosynthesis, some of the heat is shot back into the water, creating sound waves, Dubinsky said.

With a special underwater microphone, researchers are able to analyze the strength of the sound waves and determine the health of the algae and the condition of the surrounding water.

"Algae suffering from lead poisoning, like waste discharged from battery and paint manufacturing plants, will produce a different sound than those suffering from lack of iron or exposure to other toxins," said researcher Yulia Pinchasov.

She said that testing algae photosynthesis can determine water quality more accurately and easily than labor-intensive methods now used like chemical and radioactive carbon testing.

With proper funding, Dubinsky said a commercial product could be ready in about two years.

The team has published its research in numerous scientific journals, most recently in the journal Hydrobiologia.

Article from: http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/
idUSLD33620320080814?pageNumber=2&virtualBrandChannel=0

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:00 PM
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/10/081016-rna-computer.html

Bio-Computer Created Inside Living Cel

Killer Computers

The new bio-computer consists of snippets of engineered RNA assembled inside a yeast cell.

RNA is a biological molecule similar to DNA, which encodes genetic information, such as how to make various proteins.

In engineering terms, the bio-computer's "inputs" are molecules floating around inside the cell. The "output" manifests as changes in protein production.

For example, an RNA computer may be able to bind with two different molecules. If both target molecules attach to it, they trigger the device to change shape.

The altered bio-computer is now the right shape to bind to DNA, where it can directly affect gene expression and ramp up or slow down the making of desired proteins.

Those proteins can affect the cell in various ways, such as killing it if it is cancerous.

New Awareness

Ehud Shapiro is a computer scientist and biologist at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. He was not involved in the study.

Shapiro's team had previously created a bio-computer using DNA that worked inside a test tube and could perform simple calculations, such as determining whether a list of zeros and ones contained an even number of ones.

But unlike the new RNA computer, Shapiro's test tube bio-computer was "oblivious" to its surroundings and could not interact with or be affected by its environs in any meaningful way, he said.

"The work of Smolke shows a computer that can respond to molecules inside a cell," said Shapiro, who wrote a review of the new study for Science.

Shapiro looks forward to a day when RNA computers are replaced by more sophisticated devices made from proteins.

"Proteins are the most efficient natural devices we know of," he said. "We know how to evolve RNA to do simple tasks, but do not know yet how to engineer proteins."

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:01 PM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081016124331.htm

Colossal Black Holes Common In Early Universe, Spectacular Galactic Collision Suggests

ScienceDaily (Oct. 16, 2008) — Astronomers think that many - perhaps all - galaxies in the universe contain massive black holes at their centers. New observations with the Submillimeter Array now suggest that such colossal black holes were common even 12 billion years ago, when the universe was only 1.7 billion years old and galaxies were just beginning to form.



http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7675193.stm

There's a new spark of life in iconic experiments first done in the 1950s, on the kind of primordial "soup" that may have predated life itself on Earth.



http://environment.newscientist.com/article/dn14966-volcanic-lightning-may-have-sparked-life-on-earth.html


Volcanic lightning may have sparked life on Earth

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:02 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/17/science/17life.html?_r=1&ref=science&oref=slogin

From Old Vials, New Hints on Origin of Life



In 1953, Stanley L. Miller, then a graduate student of Harold C. Urey at the University of Chicago, put ammonia, methane and hydrogen — the gases believed to be in early Earth’s atmosphere — along with water in a sealed flask and applied electrical sparks to simulate the effects of lightning. A week later, amino acids, the building blocks of proteins, were generated out of the simple molecules.

Enshrined in high school textbooks, the Miller-Urey experiment raised expectations that scientists could unravel the origins of life with simple chemistry experiments.

The excitement has long since subsided. The amino acids never grew into the more complex proteins. Scientists now think the composition of air on early Earth was much different from what Dr. Miller used, leading some to question whether the Miller-Urey experiment had any relevance to the still unsolved problem of the origin of life.

After Dr. Miller’s death in May last year, Dr. Jeffrey L. Bada of the Scripps Institution of Oceanography in San Diego, who had been one of Dr. Miller’s graduate students, discovered cardboard boxes containing hundreds of vials of dried residues collected from the experiments conducted in 1953 and 1954.

Consulting Dr. Miller’s notebooks, Dr. Bada discovered that Dr. Miller had constructed two variations of the original apparatus. One simply used a different spark generator. The second injected steam onto the sparks.

That caught Dr. Bada’s attention, because the addition of steam seemed to replicate what might have existed in lagoons and tidal pools around volcanoes.

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:03 PM
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/10/081016-egypt-abydos.html

Damaged Egyptian "Mecca" To Be Restored

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:04 PM
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/wire/sns-ap-sci-state-of-the-arctic,1,6406831.story

Report: Arctic temperatures at record highs, sea ice shrinking, reindeer declining

___

No more santa

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:07 PM
http://news.cnet.com/8301-11128_3-10062193-54.html

Urban wind power inspired by ancient Persia

Windation Energy Systems, a Menlo Park, Calif.-based start-up, has developed a wind appliance that looks more or less like the modern heating and cooling equipment you see on flat corporate building rooftops.

<img src="http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/bto/20081009/windationpowermodule_web_270x269.jpg">

Windation's appliance looks more like an HVAC machine than a turbine.
(Credit: Windation)

There's a 8-by-8-foot frame around a 10-foot-high cylinder. Wind blows in the top and is directed to the bottom where the wind turns a turbine to make up to 5 kilowatts of electricity. A single unit wouldn't generate enough power for an entire office building but could offset a significant portion, the company says.

Windation CEO and founder, Mark Sheikhrezai, who is originally from Iran, said he was inspired by ancient Persian buildings that use air currents and reservoirs of water to cool buildings. Using differences in air pressure, these wind catcher buildings create a steady flow of air without any mechanical devices.

http://www.cais-soas.com/CAIS/Architecture/wind.htm

IRANIAN ARCHITECTURE

"Wind Catchers"

The Cooling Systems in Traditional Iranian Architecture

<img src="http://www.cais-soas.com/CAIS/Images2/Misc/abgir01.gif">

Abstract: The buildings in the Iranian desert regions are constructed according to the specific climatic conditions and differ with those built in other climates. The desert buildings are equipped with air traps, arched roofed, water reservoirs with arched domes and ice stores for the preservation of ice. The operation of modern coolers is similar to the old Iranian air traps which were built at the entrance of the house over underground water reservoirs or ponds built inside the house.

Lofty walls, narrow and dry streets, highly elevated air traps, big water reservoirs and arched roofed chambers, are the outstanding features of desert towns in Iran. The ever shining scorching sun of the desert has rendered life very difficult for its hardy and warm-blooded inhabitants and has compelled them to resort to facilities that can moderate the unbearable heat. In the following article subjects relating to the building materials of desert towns and the method of operation of the traditional cooling systems in the cities with warm and arid climates are described.

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:12 PM
http://www.news.com.au/heraldsun/story/0,21985,24505353-661,00.html

POWERFUL signals from a secretive naval base are being probed as a possible cause of a Qantas jet plunge last week.

Air safety investigators say they will look into claims signals from the base used to communication with US and Australian ships and submarines may have interfered with the Qantas Airbus's computer.

During the emergency the plane plunged 650 feet in seconds, injuring more than 70 passengers and crew.

The naval communications base is at Exmouth in Western Australia’s north, 30km from where the Qantas Airbus A330-300 made an emergency landing at Learmonth last week.

There were 303 passengers and 10 crew aboard when the plane suddenly dropped altitude, hurling people around the cabin and forcing the pilot to land.

The Australian Transport Safety Bureau today said it would examine whether powerful electromagnetic signals from the communications base could have sparked the emergency.

The base uses powerful low frequency radio transmissions to US Navy and Australian Navy ships and submarines.

It is understood to be the most powerful transmission station this side of the globe and includes 13 radio towers, the tallest of which is 387m tall.

The base is named the Harold E. Holt communications station after the former Australian Prime Minister.

ATSB spokesman David Hope confirmed the new line of inquiry today, after "several" groups had raised it as a possibility.

"We're looking at everything as part of a very thorough investigation," Mr Hope said.

"That's been raised by a number of people to say that somehow or another this US military base has got a very high frequency signal tower there and that could somehow interfere with electrical devices - so we'll look at it."

The latest possibilty comes as the world's Airbus operators were warned urgently of the autopilot failure.

The ATSB has already found that the Airbus A330-300's air data computer - or inertial reference system - sent erroneous and spike information to the flight control computer causing the autopilot to disconnect.

The aircraft was cruising at 37,000 feet when the fault occurred, causing it to descend up to 650 feet in seconds.


http://www.dailygrail.com/images/places/realdharma.jpg

alkemical
10-17-2008, 01:20 PM
Australia: No Opt-Out of Filtered Internet
October 17th, 2008

Would you like filtered, or filtered?

Via: Computerworld:

Australians will be unable to opt-out of the government’s pending Internet content filtering scheme, and will instead be placed on a watered-down blacklist, experts say.

Under the government’s $125.8 million Plan for Cyber-Safety, users can switch between two blacklists which block content inappropriate for children, and a separate list which blocks illegal material.

Pundits say consumers have been lulled into believing the opt-out proviso would remove content filtering altogether.


http://cryptogon.com/?p=4533

alkemical
10-18-2008, 04:44 PM
http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008/oct/17/future-planes-cars-may-be-made-of-buckypaper/


Future planes, cars may be made of `buckypaper’

The Associated Press

Fri, Oct 17, 2008 (9:18 a.m.)

It's called "buckypaper" and looks a lot like ordinary carbon paper, but don't be fooled by the cute name or flimsy appearance. It could revolutionize the way everything from airplanes to TVs are made.

Buckypaper is 10 times lighter but potentially 500 times stronger than steel when sheets of it are stacked and pressed together to form a composite. Unlike conventional composite materials, though, it conducts electricity like copper or silicon and disperses heat like steel or brass.

"All those things are what a lot of people in nanotechnology have been working toward as sort of Holy Grails," said Wade Adams, a scientist at Rice University.

That idea _ that there is great future promise for buckypaper and other derivatives of the ultra-tiny cylinders known as carbon nanotubes _ has been floated for years now. However, researchers at Florida State University say they have made important progress that may soon turn hype into reality.

Buckypaper is made from tube-shaped carbon molecules 50,000 times thinner than a human hair. Due to its unique properties, it is envisioned as a wondrous new material for light, energy-efficient aircraft and automobiles, more powerful computers, improved TV screens and many other products.

So far, buckypaper can be made at only a fraction of its potential strength, in small quantities and at a high price. The Florida State researchers are developing manufacturing techniques that soon may make it competitive with the best composite materials now available.

"If this thing goes into production, this very well could be a very, very game-changing or revolutionary technology to the aerospace business," said Les Kramer, chief technologist for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, which is helping fund the Florida State research.

The scientific discovery that led to buckypaper virtually came from outer space.

In 1985, British scientist Harry Kroto joined researchers at Rice for an experiment to create the same conditions that exist in a star. They wanted to find out how stars, the source of all carbon in the universe, make the element that is a main building block of life.

Everything went as planned with one exception.

"There was an extra character that turned up totally unexpected," recalled Kroto, now at Florida State heading a program that encourages the study of math, science and technology in public schools. "It was a discovery out of left field."

The surprise guest was a molecule with 60 carbon atoms shaped like a soccer ball. To Kroto, it also looked like the geodesic domes promoted by Buckminster Fuller, an architect, inventor and futurist. That inspired Kroto to name the new molecule buckminsterfullerene, or "buckyballs" for short.

For their discovery of the buckyball _ the third form of pure carbon to be discovered after graphite and diamonds _ Kroto and his Rice colleagues, Robert Curl Jr. and Richard E. Smalley, were awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1996.

Separately, Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima developed a tube-shaped variation while doing research at Arizona State University.

Researchers at Smalley's laboratory then inadvertently found that the tubes would stick together when disbursed in a liquid suspension and filtered through a fine mesh, producing a thin film _ buckypaper.

The secret of its strength is the huge surface area of each nanotube, said Ben Wang, director of Florida State's High-Performance Materials Institute.

"If you take a gram of nanotubes, just one gram, and if you unfold every tube into a graphite sheet, you can cover about two-thirds of a football field," Wang said.

Carbon nanotubes are already beginning to be used to strengthen tennis rackets and bicycles, but in small amounts. The epoxy resins used in those applications are 1 to 5 percent carbon nanotubes, which are added in the form of a fine powder. Buckypaper, which is a thin film rather than a powder, has a much higher nanotube content _ about 50 percent.

One challenge is that the tubes clump together at odd angles, limiting their strength in buckypaper. Wang and his fellow researchers found a solution: Exposing the tubes to high magnetism causes most of them to line up in the same direction, increasing their collective strength.

Another problem is the tubes are so perfectly smooth it's hard to hold them together with epoxy. Researchers are looking for ways to create some surface defects _ but not too many _ to improve bonding.

So far, the Florida State institute has been able to produce buckypaper with half the strength of the best existing composite material, known as IM7. Wang expects to close the gap quickly.

"By the end of next year we should have a buckypaper composite as strong as IM7, and it's 35 percent lighter," Wang said.

Buckypaper now is being made only in the laboratory, but Florida State is in the early stages of spinning out a company to make commercial buckypaper.

"These guys have actually demonstrated materials that are capable of being used on flying systems," said Adams, director of Rice's Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. "Having something that you can hold in your hand is an accomplishment in nanotechnology."

It takes upward of five years to get a new structural material certified for aviation use, so Wang said he expects buckypaper's first uses will be for electromagnetic interference shielding and lightning-strike protection on aircraft.

Electrical circuits and even natural causes such as the sun or Northern Lights can interfere with radios and other electronic gear. Buckypaper provides up to four times the shielding specified in a recent Air Force contract proposal, Wang said.

Typically, conventional composite materials have a copper mesh added for lightning protection. Replacing copper with buckypaper would save weight and fuel.

Wang demonstrated this with a composite model plane and a stun gun. Zapping an unprotected part of the model caused sparks to fly. The electric jolt, though, passed harmlessly across another section shielded by a strip of buckypaper.

Other near-term uses would be as electrodes for fuel cells, super capacitors and batteries, Wang said. Next in line, buckypaper could be a more efficient and lighter replacement for graphite sheets used in laptop computers to dissipate heat, which is harmful to electronics.

The long-range goal is to build planes, automobiles and other things with buckypaper composites. The military also is looking at it for use in armor plating and stealth technology.

"Our plan is perhaps in the next 12 months we'll begin maybe to have some commercial products," Wang said. "Nanotubes obviously are no longer just lab wonders. They have real world potential. It's real."

gyldenlove
10-18-2008, 07:37 PM
http://www.lasvegassun.com/news/2008/oct/17/future-planes-cars-may-be-made-of-buckypaper/


Future planes, cars may be made of `buckypaper’

The Associated Press

Fri, Oct 17, 2008 (9:18 a.m.)

It's called "buckypaper" and looks a lot like ordinary carbon paper, but don't be fooled by the cute name or flimsy appearance. It could revolutionize the way everything from airplanes to TVs are made.

Buckypaper is 10 times lighter but potentially 500 times stronger than steel when sheets of it are stacked and pressed together to form a composite. Unlike conventional composite materials, though, it conducts electricity like copper or silicon and disperses heat like steel or brass.

"All those things are what a lot of people in nanotechnology have been working toward as sort of Holy Grails," said Wade Adams, a scientist at Rice University.

That idea _ that there is great future promise for buckypaper and other derivatives of the ultra-tiny cylinders known as carbon nanotubes _ has been floated for years now. However, researchers at Florida State University say they have made important progress that may soon turn hype into reality.

Buckypaper is made from tube-shaped carbon molecules 50,000 times thinner than a human hair. Due to its unique properties, it is envisioned as a wondrous new material for light, energy-efficient aircraft and automobiles, more powerful computers, improved TV screens and many other products.

So far, buckypaper can be made at only a fraction of its potential strength, in small quantities and at a high price. The Florida State researchers are developing manufacturing techniques that soon may make it competitive with the best composite materials now available.

"If this thing goes into production, this very well could be a very, very game-changing or revolutionary technology to the aerospace business," said Les Kramer, chief technologist for Lockheed Martin Missiles and Fire Control, which is helping fund the Florida State research.

The scientific discovery that led to buckypaper virtually came from outer space.

In 1985, British scientist Harry Kroto joined researchers at Rice for an experiment to create the same conditions that exist in a star. They wanted to find out how stars, the source of all carbon in the universe, make the element that is a main building block of life.

Everything went as planned with one exception.

"There was an extra character that turned up totally unexpected," recalled Kroto, now at Florida State heading a program that encourages the study of math, science and technology in public schools. "It was a discovery out of left field."

The surprise guest was a molecule with 60 carbon atoms shaped like a soccer ball. To Kroto, it also looked like the geodesic domes promoted by Buckminster Fuller, an architect, inventor and futurist. That inspired Kroto to name the new molecule buckminsterfullerene, or "buckyballs" for short.

For their discovery of the buckyball _ the third form of pure carbon to be discovered after graphite and diamonds _ Kroto and his Rice colleagues, Robert Curl Jr. and Richard E. Smalley, were awarded the Nobel Prize for chemistry in 1996.

Separately, Japanese physicist Sumio Iijima developed a tube-shaped variation while doing research at Arizona State University.

Researchers at Smalley's laboratory then inadvertently found that the tubes would stick together when disbursed in a liquid suspension and filtered through a fine mesh, producing a thin film _ buckypaper.

The secret of its strength is the huge surface area of each nanotube, said Ben Wang, director of Florida State's High-Performance Materials Institute.

"If you take a gram of nanotubes, just one gram, and if you unfold every tube into a graphite sheet, you can cover about two-thirds of a football field," Wang said.

Carbon nanotubes are already beginning to be used to strengthen tennis rackets and bicycles, but in small amounts. The epoxy resins used in those applications are 1 to 5 percent carbon nanotubes, which are added in the form of a fine powder. Buckypaper, which is a thin film rather than a powder, has a much higher nanotube content _ about 50 percent.

One challenge is that the tubes clump together at odd angles, limiting their strength in buckypaper. Wang and his fellow researchers found a solution: Exposing the tubes to high magnetism causes most of them to line up in the same direction, increasing their collective strength.

Another problem is the tubes are so perfectly smooth it's hard to hold them together with epoxy. Researchers are looking for ways to create some surface defects _ but not too many _ to improve bonding.

So far, the Florida State institute has been able to produce buckypaper with half the strength of the best existing composite material, known as IM7. Wang expects to close the gap quickly.

"By the end of next year we should have a buckypaper composite as strong as IM7, and it's 35 percent lighter," Wang said.

Buckypaper now is being made only in the laboratory, but Florida State is in the early stages of spinning out a company to make commercial buckypaper.

"These guys have actually demonstrated materials that are capable of being used on flying systems," said Adams, director of Rice's Richard E. Smalley Institute for Nanoscale Science and Technology. "Having something that you can hold in your hand is an accomplishment in nanotechnology."

It takes upward of five years to get a new structural material certified for aviation use, so Wang said he expects buckypaper's first uses will be for electromagnetic interference shielding and lightning-strike protection on aircraft.

Electrical circuits and even natural causes such as the sun or Northern Lights can interfere with radios and other electronic gear. Buckypaper provides up to four times the shielding specified in a recent Air Force contract proposal, Wang said.

Typically, conventional composite materials have a copper mesh added for lightning protection. Replacing copper with buckypaper would save weight and fuel.

Wang demonstrated this with a composite model plane and a stun gun. Zapping an unprotected part of the model caused sparks to fly. The electric jolt, though, passed harmlessly across another section shielded by a strip of buckypaper.

Other near-term uses would be as electrodes for fuel cells, super capacitors and batteries, Wang said. Next in line, buckypaper could be a more efficient and lighter replacement for graphite sheets used in laptop computers to dissipate heat, which is harmful to electronics.

The long-range goal is to build planes, automobiles and other things with buckypaper composites. The military also is looking at it for use in armor plating and stealth technology.

"Our plan is perhaps in the next 12 months we'll begin maybe to have some commercial products," Wang said. "Nanotubes obviously are no longer just lab wonders. They have real world potential. It's real."

As soon as they can massproduce Buckmeister fullerene nanotubes they should build a space elevator. Using it for anything else is a waste.

alkemical
10-19-2008, 08:44 AM
http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/10/bogus-anthrax-s.html

Not a single case of human anthrax has been reported in the United States this year, but the nation is now officially in a state of anthrax emergency.

The emergency was declared earlier this month by the Department of Health and Human Services, and will last until 2015. Whether it will protect public health is debatable, but it will certainly protect makers of faulty anthrax vaccines.

Emergency exemption from legal liability is granted to vaccine manufacturers by the Public Readiness and Preparedness Act, passed in 2005 to protect against paralyzing lawsuits during outbreaks of anthrax, avian influenza or other potentially pandemic diseases.

The act is supposed to be invoked when the Secretary of Homeland Security has determined "that there is a domestic emergency, or a significant potential for a domestic emergency, involving a heightened risk of attack with a specified biological, chemical, radiological, or nuclear agent or agents."

But as Homeland Security chief Michael Chertoff explains in a letter to the DHHS, none of these conditions are met: there's neither emergency nor heightened risk of attack nor "credible information indicating an imminent threat of an attack." But that doesn't matter.

"These findings are not necessary to make a determination," Chertoff wrote. It's enough that anthrax was declared a threat four years ago, and that "were the government to determine in the future that there is a heightened risk of an anthrax attack ... that determination would almost certainly result in a domestic emergency."

In other words, there could be an emergency someday — so we might as well declare an emergency now.

Beyond the tortured logic, there's something not quite right about this. Could it have something to do with the fact that the federal government has spent nearly a billion dollars on anthrax vaccines of questionable efficacy and safety?

The CDC's vaccine committee meets next week to discuss anthrax vaccines. It will be interesting to see what they say.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 07:22 AM
http://www.skilluminati.com/research/entry/final_total_proof_that_cell_phones_are_government_ tracking_devices/

From the "Don't Ever Call Me Paranoid Again" files:

The Washington Post reported something remarkable: "Cellphone Tracking Powers on Request," an article that plainly states that law enforcement and intelligence agencies routinely track US citizens through their cell phone's GPS capability. Please remember that I'm not being alarmist. I personally accepted the fact I live in a total surveillance police state awhile back. Rather than view that as a prison, I've decided to treat it like a stage. This is not a crisis, this is not a nightmare, this is just the world that you and I happen to live in.

With that said: the United States government military-intelligence complex has data on the daily routines of all US cell phone users. As you're no doubt aware, any and all cellular phones are also GPS tracking devices. They happen to be somewhere between convenient and nescessary, so many of us are carrying around these tracking devices voluntarily.

The issue is taking on greater relevance as wireless carriers are racing to offer sleek services that allow cellphone users to know with the touch of a button where their friends or families are. The companies are hoping to recoup investments they have made to meet a federal mandate to provide enhanced 911 (E911) location tracking. Sprint Nextel, for instance, boasts that its "loopt" service even sends an alert when a friend is near, "putting an end to missed connections in the mall, at the movies or around town."

With Verizon's Chaperone service, parents can set up a "geofence" around, say, a few city blocks and receive an automatic text message if their child, holding the cellphone, travels outside that area.

"Most people don't realize it, but they're carrying a tracking device in their pocket," said Kevin Bankston of the privacy advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Cellphones can reveal very precise information about your location, and yet legal protections are very much up in the air."

Further:

"Law enforcement routinely now requests carriers to continuously 'ping' wireless devices of suspects to locate them when a call is not being made . . . so law enforcement can triangulate the precise location of a device and [seek] the location of all associates communicating with a target," wrote Christopher Guttman-McCabe, vice president of regulatory affairs for CTIA -- the Wireless Association, in a July comment to the Federal Communications Commission. He said the "lack of a consistent legal standard for tracking a user's location has made it difficult for carriers to comply" with law enforcement agencies' demands.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 07:41 AM
http://www.edge.org/3rd_culture/dyson05/dyson05_index.html


My visit to Google? Despite the whimsical furniture and other toys, I felt I was entering a 14th-century cathedral — not in the 14th century but in the 12th century, while it was being built. Everyone was busy carving one stone here and another stone there, with some invisible architect getting everything to fit. The mood was playful, yet there was a palpable reverence in the air. "We are not scanning all those books to be read by people," explained one of my hosts after my talk. "We are scanning them to be read by an AI."

When I returned to highway 101, I found myself recollecting the words of Alan Turing, in his seminal paper Computing Machinery and Intelligence, a founding document in the quest for true AI. "In attempting to construct such machines we should not be irreverently usurping His power of creating souls, any more than we are in the procreation of children," Turing had advised. "Rather we are, in either case, instruments of His will providing mansions for the souls that He creates."



http://www.skilluminati.com/research/entry/is_google_nursing_artificial_intelligence/



"Every engineer is able to take 20 percent of their time to work on non-core projects. Google News came out of that. We want to hire the best people and for them to work on the projects that they need to but we also want them to innovate. Most teams contain from three to five engineers. At our company if you have 20 people working on something then the project is not working," said Levick.

Google has given some insights into its AI work in the past. Speaking in 2003, Google Senior Research Scientist Mehran Sahami explained that Google News was using AI techniques to handle information.

"AI applications are using the infrastructure to get people useful information in interesting ways," said Sahami, according to reports. "There is no human intervention. Google News is an example of where AI is making a huge difference. It's used several million times a day," he added.

Sahami also reportedly hinted at AI-based research in progress at Google that has yet to be deployed, such as voice-driven search and query results clustering to help users navigate. "We want to combine information retrieval, large systems, and AI to work together towards the next generation of search engines," he said.

gyldenlove
10-20-2008, 07:46 AM
http://www.skilluminati.com/research/entry/final_total_proof_that_cell_phones_are_government_ tracking_devices/

From the "Don't Ever Call Me Paranoid Again" files:

The Washington Post reported something remarkable: "Cellphone Tracking Powers on Request," an article that plainly states that law enforcement and intelligence agencies routinely track US citizens through their cell phone's GPS capability. Please remember that I'm not being alarmist. I personally accepted the fact I live in a total surveillance police state awhile back. Rather than view that as a prison, I've decided to treat it like a stage. This is not a crisis, this is not a nightmare, this is just the world that you and I happen to live in.

With that said: the United States government military-intelligence complex has data on the daily routines of all US cell phone users. As you're no doubt aware, any and all cellular phones are also GPS tracking devices. They happen to be somewhere between convenient and nescessary, so many of us are carrying around these tracking devices voluntarily.

The issue is taking on greater relevance as wireless carriers are racing to offer sleek services that allow cellphone users to know with the touch of a button where their friends or families are. The companies are hoping to recoup investments they have made to meet a federal mandate to provide enhanced 911 (E911) location tracking. Sprint Nextel, for instance, boasts that its "loopt" service even sends an alert when a friend is near, "putting an end to missed connections in the mall, at the movies or around town."

With Verizon's Chaperone service, parents can set up a "geofence" around, say, a few city blocks and receive an automatic text message if their child, holding the cellphone, travels outside that area.

"Most people don't realize it, but they're carrying a tracking device in their pocket," said Kevin Bankston of the privacy advocacy group Electronic Frontier Foundation. "Cellphones can reveal very precise information about your location, and yet legal protections are very much up in the air."

Further:

"Law enforcement routinely now requests carriers to continuously 'ping' wireless devices of suspects to locate them when a call is not being made . . . so law enforcement can triangulate the precise location of a device and [seek] the location of all associates communicating with a target," wrote Christopher Guttman-McCabe, vice president of regulatory affairs for CTIA -- the Wireless Association, in a July comment to the Federal Communications Commission. He said the "lack of a consistent legal standard for tracking a user's location has made it difficult for carriers to comply" with law enforcement agencies' demands.

Well, technically most older cell phones do not have GPS capability as doesn't most base models. You can still be tracked with them if you have reception because you can be triangulated using the signal strength of the different transmitters your phone is connected to. This process is slightly slower and more involved than GPS, but is no less effective and is often used by law enforcement and security agencies to locate or track people.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 09:03 AM
Well, technically most older cell phones do not have GPS capability as doesn't most base models. You can still be tracked with them if you have reception because you can be triangulated using the signal strength of the different transmitters your phone is connected to. This process is slightly slower and more involved than GPS, but is no less effective and is often used by law enforcement and security agencies to locate or track people.

Also if you have a phone with GPS, the only way to INACTIVE the GPS is to actually turn the phone off and take out the battery -

Of course that might be a good idea anyway

http://www.engadget.com/2006/12/03/fbi-taps-cellphone-mics-to-eavesdrop-on-criminals/

While we figured the NYPD could just install Magic Message Mirrors in every mafia hotspot in the Manhattan area, the Genovese family has proven quite the eagle-eyed bunch when it comes to spotting wiretaps, tailing, and other (failed) attempts of bugging their conversations. In order to tap into critical conversations by known mafioso and other, less glamorous criminals, police are utilizing a "roving bug" technique which remotely activates the microphone of a crime lord's cellie, giving the boys in blue convenient access to their secret agenda(s). The presumably controversial tapping was recently approved by top US DoJ officials "for use against members of a New York organized crime family who were wary of conventional surveillance techniques." Software hacks (and actual phones, too) have previously allowed such dodgy eavesdropping to occur, with "Nextel, Samsung, and Motorola" handsets proving particularly vulnerable, but this widespread approach in tracking down criminal conversations could hopefully pinpoint future targets where prior attempts failed. Of course, if mafia members hit the internet every now and then, they're probably removing those batteries right about now anyway.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 11:36 AM
the westernization of Islam:

http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3605106,00.html

'I found Allah in my mango'

Muslim woman in Sweden stunned to find words 'Allah,' 'Muhammad' in her mango

Roee Nahmias
Published: 10.04.08, 17:35 / Israel News

Rubina Sheikh, a Muslim woman residing in Sweden, sliced open a mango and noticed black lines in it that formed the Arabic words "Allah" and "Muhammad," which are holy to Muslims, a local newspaper reported.


"I sliced the fruit into two and noticed that the word 'Allah' was on one half while the word 'Muhammad' was on the other half," Sheikh told the newspaper. "It's a miracle, a sign from Allah."


Ever since word of this wonder got out, Muslims have been flocking to the woman's home in order to see it for themselves. However, a professor at a nearby university who is an expert on Islam says the discovery is not that dramatic.


“There are 14 recognized ways to create the word ‘Allah’. When you think about how many mangoes there are out there, it’s not strange that one of them has a pattern which can be interpreted to be the right combination of characters,” Jan Hjärpe told a local newspaper.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 12:13 PM
http://cbs2chicago.com/local/clown.luring.kids.2.840772.html

Cops: Man Is Dressing As Clown To Lure Kids
Offender Spotted On South Side
CHICAGO (STNG) ― A man wearing clown make-up and a wig is using balloons in an attempt to lure children into his vehicle on the South Side. Police issued the alert about a week after a man with similar description was spotted on the West Side.

The incidents were reported in the 8300 block of South Mackinaw and the 10000 block of South Normal, according to a community alert by Calumet Area detectives.

The man, who wears clown make-up and a wig, approached children with balloons attempting to lure them into his vehicle, but the children ran and called 911, the alert said.

The attempted kidnapping/child abduction occurred on Oct. 7 at 5:55 p.m. and Oct. 10 at 8:55 a.m., the alert said.

Last week Harrison Area detectives issued an alert for a man matching a similar description.

That suspect was seen on foot in the Garfield Park neighborhood and near Beidler Elementary School, 3151 W. Walnut St. and Polaris Charter Academy, 620 N. Sawyer Ave., according to a community alert from Harrison Area detectives.

In both alerts police said the suspect was driving a white four-door van or brown pickup truck.

Anyone with information or see any suspicious person should call detectives, (312) 747-8272.

(Source: Sun-Times News Group Wire © Chicago Sun-Times 2006. All Rights Reserved. This material may not be published, broadcast, rewritten, or redistributed.)

http://i240.photobucket.com/albums/ff244/ubercomments/evil/034.jpg

alkemical
10-20-2008, 12:20 PM
Margaret Cho on Christians and Christianity:

Don’t ****ing question my Christianity you ****ing idiot assholes. If you continue to have a problem, then talk to God about it, not me, you ****ing racist homophobic misogynist fake Christian ****heads. God thinks it is funny that I swear so much. He said I could use his name in vain or whatever. He just wants me to use it. He loves me. So **** you. And I guess he loves you too. Even though you are fake Christian assholes. If you were truly Christians, you would let gays get married, and send them ****ing presents from Bed Bath and Beyond!

alkemical
10-20-2008, 12:26 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20080930/sc_space/doweliveinagiantcosmicbubble;_ylt=Am40u6Vs9e26vXu6 N4CnRzYDW7oF

Do We Live in a Giant Cosmic Bubble?

Earth may be trapped in an abnormal bubble of space-time that is particularly void of matter. Scientists say this condition could account for the apparent acceleration of the universe's expansion, for which dark energy currently is the leading explanation.

Dark energy is the name given to the hypothetical force that could be drawing all the stuff in the universe outward at an ever-increasing rate. Current thinking is that 74 percent of the universe could be made up of this exotic dark energy, with another 21 percent being dark matter, and normal matter comprising the remaining 5 percent.

Until now, there has been no good way to choose between dark energy or the void explanation, but a new study outlines a potential test of the bubble scenario.

If we were in an unusually sparse area of the universe, then things could look farther away than they really are and there would be no need to rely on dark energy as an explanation for certain astronomical observations.

"If we lived in a very large under-density, then the space-time itself wouldn't be accelerating," said researcher Timothy Clifton of Oxford University in England. "It would just be that the observations, if interpreted in the usual way, would look like they were."

Scientists first detected the acceleration by noting that distant supernovae seemed to be moving away from us faster than they should be. One type of supernova (called Type Ia) is a useful distance indicator, because the explosions always have the same intrinsic brightness. Since light gets dimmer the farther it travels, that means that when the supernovae appear faint to us, they are far away, and when they appear bright, they are closer in.

But if we happened to be in a portion of the universe with less matter in it than normal, then the space-time around us would be different than it is outside, because matter warps space-time. Light travelling from supernovae outside our bubble would appear dimmer, because the light would diverge more than we would expect once it got inside our void.

One problem with the void idea, though, is that it negates a principle that has reined in astronomy for more than 450 years: namely, that our place in the universe isn't special. When Nicholas Copernicus argued that it made much more sense for the Earth to be revolving around the sun than vice versa, it revolutionized science. Since then, most theories have to pass the Copernican test. If they require our planet to be unique, or our position to be exalted, the ideas often seem unlikely.

"This idea that we live in a void would really be a statement that we live in a special place," Clifton told SPACE.com. "The regular cosmological model is based on the idea that where we live is a typical place in the universe. This would be a contradiction to the Copernican principle."

Clifton, along with Oxford researchers Pedro G. Ferreira and Kate Land, say that in coming years we may be able to distinguish between dark energy and the void. They point to the upcoming Joint Dark Energy Mission, planned by NASA and the U.S. Department of Energy to launch in 2014 or 2015. The satellite aims to measure the expansion of the universe precisely by observing about 2,300 supernovae.

The scientists suggest that by looking at a large number of supernovae in a certain region of the universe, they should be able to tell whether the objects are really accelerating away, or if their light is merely being distorted in a void.

The new study will be detailed in an upcoming issue of the journal Physical Review Letters.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 12:27 PM
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=waste-to-watts-portable-r

Waste to Watts: Portable Refinery Transforms Trash into Power
Kitchen trash stinks, unless it can be turned into electricity, starting in Army field kitchens

By David Biello

alkemical
10-20-2008, 12:46 PM
http://howto.wired.com/wiki/Make_a_Faraday_Cage_Wallet

Make a Faraday Cage Wallet
October 17th, 2008 by Klintron

From Wired How-To Wiki
Jump to: navigation, search

You already have your tin foil hat, and you’re pretty sure no one can find you on the Google. However, there’s one detail you may not have thought of, and that’s those pesky RFID chips.

RFID tags identifying who and — gasp! —- where you are can be found in passports, ATM cards, credit cards and some state-issued ID cards. The same technology will possibly even be used in paper money in the near future.

With the right equipment, these chips can be read from afar by data snoops or your friendly government official. A Faraday cage is sufficient for blocking such eavesdropping.

Here’s how to hide yourself from both the baddies and The Man.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 12:58 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1078397/Disappearing-act-The-invisibility-cloak-ready-years.html

Disappearing act: The invisibility cloak that will be ready in five years

It works by bending light around itself like the flow of water around a stone, which would make both the electromagnetic cloak and the object inside hidden.

'The whole idea behind metamaterials is to create materials designed and engineered out of artificial atoms, meta-atoms, which are smaller than the wavelengths of light itself,' Professor Vladminr Shalaev said.

In his study reported in the journal Science, Shalaev used an array of tiny needles radiating outward from a central spoke, like a round hairbrush, that would bend light around the object being cloaked inside.

These tiny needles decrease the refraction or distortion of the light to almost zero, rendering it invisible.

'Whereas relativity demonstrates the curved nature of space and time, we are able to curve space for light, and we can design and engineer tiny devices to do this,' he said.

He added that as well as bending light they could do the opposite - concentrating light in one area.

The new technique could be used to create optical microscopes so powerful they would make DNA visible to the naked eye and superfast computer microchips.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 01:00 PM
http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081016132836.htm

New Solar Energy Material Captures Every Color Of The Rainbow

ScienceDaily (Oct. 17, 2008) — Researchers have created a new material that overcomes two of the major obstacles to solar power: it absorbs all the energy contained in sunlight, and generates electrons in a way that makes them easier to capture.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 01:01 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2008/10/15/scicoma115.xml

Magnet treatment awakens car crash victim from coma

alkemical
10-20-2008, 01:02 PM
http://business.timesonline.co.uk/tol/business/economics/article4974912.ece

Bankers of the world, unite! You have nothing to lose but your bonuses, houses in Esher, holidays in the Caribbean and your Jermyn Street shirts. The upside is that you have the time, at last, to read the complete works of Karl Marx.

The prophet of revolutionaries everywhere, the scourge of capitalism, is enjoying a comeback.

In Germany Das Kapital, which for the past decade has been used mainly as a doorstop, is flying off the shelves as the newly disenfranchised business class tries to work out the root of the present crisis.

“Marx is fashionable again,” declares Jörn Schütrumpf, head of the Berlin publishing house Dietz, which brings out the works of Marx and his collaborator Friedrich Engels. Sales have trebled – albeit from a pretty low level – since 2005 and have soared since the summer.

alkemical
10-20-2008, 01:15 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?xml=/earth/2008/05/16/scibrain116.xml

DIY brain therapy could halt migraines

alkemical
10-21-2008, 06:39 AM
http://www.marketoracle.co.uk/Article6826.html

JPMorgan Responsible for the Destruction of U.S. Financial System

alkemical
10-21-2008, 06:43 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/politics/article4969312.ece

Passports will be needed to buy mobile phones

Everyone who buys a mobile telephone will be forced to register their identity on a national database under government plans to extend massively the powers of state surveillance.

Phone buyers would have to present a passport or other official form of identification at the point of purchase. Privacy campaigners fear it marks the latest government move to create a surveillance society.

A compulsory national register for the owners of all 72m mobile phones in Britain would be part of a much bigger database to combat terrorism and crime. Whitehall officials have raised the idea of a register containing the names and addresses of everyone who buys a phone in recent talks with Vodafone and other telephone companies, insiders say.

The move is targeted at monitoring the owners of Britain’s estimated 40m prepaid mobile phones. They can be purchased with cash by customers who do not wish to give their names, addresses or credit card details.

alkemical
10-21-2008, 06:45 AM
http://www.physorg.com/news143380532.html

Colossal black holes common in early universe

alkemical
10-21-2008, 07:20 AM
http://www.todayszaman.com/tz-web/detaylar.do?load=detay&link=155812&bolum=100

Amazonian queen excavations reveal ancient palace in Şanlıurfa

alkemical
10-21-2008, 07:20 AM
http://www.prisonplanet.com/huge-protests-as-new-jersey-declares-flu-vaccines-mandatory.html

Huge Protests As New Jersey Declares Flu Vaccines Mandatory

alkemical
10-21-2008, 07:21 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/politics/health/3224172/Human-tissue-could-be-taken-from-the-infirm-without-their-consent-and-used-for-research.html


Human tissue could be taken from the infirm without their consent and used for research
Human tissue could be taken from the mentally infirm without their consent and used to create embryos for experimentation, under Government proposals added to a controversial bill.

alkemical
10-21-2008, 07:22 AM
http://aftermathnews.wordpress.com/2008/10/19/canada-eu-working-towards-historic-economic-integration/

Canada, EU working towards ‘historic’ economic integration

alkemical
10-21-2008, 03:42 PM
<object width="400" height="225"> <param name="allowfullscreen" value="true" /> <param name="allowscriptaccess" value="always" /> <param name="movie" value="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=2007855&amp;server=vimeo.com&amp;sho w_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_portrait=0&amp;color=&amp;ful lscreen=1" /> <embed src="http://vimeo.com/moogaloop.swf?clip_id=2007855&amp;server=vimeo.com&amp;sho w_title=1&amp;show_byline=1&amp;show_portrait=0&amp;color=&amp;ful lscreen=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" allowscriptaccess="always" width="400" height="225"></embed></object><br /><a href="http://vimeo.com/2007855?pg=embed&amp;sec=2007855">Compromising Electromagnetic Emanations of Keyboards Experiment 1/2</a> from <a href="http://vimeo.com/user836876?pg=embed&amp;sec=2007855">Martin Vuagnoux</a> on <a href="http://vimeo.com?pg=embed&amp;sec=2007855">Vimeo</a>.


Paul Miller, endgadget: We always knew those electromagnetic emanations would amount to no good, and now here they go ruining any shred of privacy we once thought to possess. Some folks from the Security and Cryptography Lab at Switzerland's EPFL have managed to eavesdrop on the electromagnetic radiation shot off by shoddy wired keyboards with every keystroke. They've found four different ways to listen in, including one previously-published general vulnerability, on eleven keyboard models ranging from 2001 to 2008, with PS/2, USB and laptop keyboards all falling to at least one of the four attacks.

The attack works through walls, as far as 65 feet away, and analyzes a wide swath of electromagnetic spectrum to get its results. With wireless keyboards already feeling the sting of hackers, it's probably fair to say that no one is safe, and that cave bunkers far, far away from civilization are pretty much our only hope now

alkemical
10-21-2008, 04:18 PM
http://www.forbes.com/opinions/forbes/2008/1027/021_2.html

Boston Tea Party II

The Massachusetts political establishment is horrified--voters might actually pass a proposition abolishing the state income tax. The personal income tax rate is 5.3%, and the state capital gains levy peaks at 12%. Under the proposition the tax would be cut 50% on Jan. 1, 2009 and eradicated on Jan. 1, 2010. These exactions currently raise about 40% of the state's budget revenue--27% if you count all of the Bay State's off-budget spending.

A similar measure was on the ballot six years ago. With almost no promotion it garnered a 45% yes vote, stunning politicians. The measure got a majority in a third of Massachusetts towns. An earlier proposition--a mild one--had appeared on the ballot in 2000. It cut the income tax to 5% from 5.75%. It passed. But state legislators thumbed their noses at the voters, lowering the rate only to 5.3%--a graphic example of the growing disconnect between citizens and the political culture.

Naturally, opponents predict the direst of circumstances if the measure passes, even though the state legislature will probably treat the referendum the same way it did the previous tax cut initiative.

The reason the measure stands even a chance of passing is not that Bay State citizens are selfish (even though each would enjoy on average an additional $3,700 of income) but that they are angry. This is an attack on political establishments there and throughout the U.S. that routinely put their own interests above those of their constituents: lavish government pensions with payouts that would bankrupt private companies; resistance to genuine reform in Medicaid spending, which has become the biggest item on virtually every state's budget; ever more pork-barrel spending; and ever more obsequiousness to rapacious special interests.

It's telling when one of the most liberal states in the Union, with two extremely liberal U.S. senators and a House delegation with nary a Republican, is on the verge of a tax rebellion.

Bay State voters--go for your proposition. Your pols didn't enact your polite initiative of a small income tax reduction. Maybe they'll wake up when you whack them with a 2-by-4.

alkemical
10-22-2008, 06:54 AM
Archaeologists find unique, early US relic of African worship (http://www.physorg.com/news143803691.html)



Human Brain Still Awake, Even During Deep Sleep (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081008101740.htm)




Solomon, Socrates and Aristotle
In Earliest Biblical Painting, Greek Philosophers Admire King’s Wisdom (http://www.bib-arch.org/bar/article.asp?PubID=BSBA&Volume=34&Issue=5&ArticleID=7)





PHOTOS: Gigantic River Cave Revealed in Laos (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/10/photogalleries/river-caves-photos/index.html/index.html)

http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/10/photogalleries/river-caves-photos/index.html/images/primary/03-pollack-laos-461sp101608.jpg


ScienceDaily (Oct. 20, 2008) — A team of researchers in Canada have made a bold stride in the struggle to detect dark matter. The PICASSO collaboration has documented the discovery of a significant difference between the acoustic signals induced by neutrons and alpha particles in a detector based on superheated liquids (http://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2008/10/081016074659.htm).




Drug Killings Haunt Mexican Schoolchildren (http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/20/world/americas/20tijuana.html?_r=1&em&oref=slogin)




It has eluded scientists and adventurers for decades, but a team of Japanese climbers claimed to have discovered footprints of the abdominable snowman, or yeti. (http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Yeti-Footprints-Found-On-Nepal-Mountain-Japanese-Climbers-Claim-Abdominable-Snowman-Find/Article/200810315125553?lpos=World_News_Third_World_News_A rticle_Teaser_Region_0&lid=ARTICLE_15125553_Yeti_Footprints_Found_On_Nepa l_Mountain%3A_Japanese_Climbers_Claim_Abdominable_ Snowman_Find)

alkemical
10-23-2008, 07:57 AM
I'd just like to thank everyone who reads, participates, etc in this thread.

Thanks for looking at the world through a different set of lenses.

TheReverend
10-23-2008, 08:01 AM
I'd just like to thank everyone who reads, participates, etc in this thread.

Thanks for looking at the world through a different set of lenses.

So put some new stuff up already!

alkemical
10-23-2008, 08:16 AM
I got 14 tickets in the last two days...i've been a bit busy... ;)

snowspot66
10-23-2008, 09:40 AM
Tickets? Double park or something?

http://www.physorg.com/news143823997.html



Physicists find a new state of matter in a 'transistor'

McGill University researchers have discovered a new state of matter, a quasi-three- dimensional electron crystal, in a material very much like those used in the fabrication of modern transistors. This discovery could have momentous implications for the development of new electronic devices. Currently, the number of transistors that can be inexpensively crammed onto a single computer chip increases exponentially, doubling approximately every two years, a trend known as Moore's Law. But there are limits, experts say. As chips get smaller and smaller, scientists expect that the bizarre laws and behaviours of quantum physics will take over, making ever-smaller chips impossible.

More in the article page.

c_lazy_r
10-23-2008, 09:41 AM
I got 14 tickets in the last two days...i've been a bit busy... ;)

Tickets for what?

alkemical
10-23-2008, 09:56 AM
Tickets? Double park or something?

http://www.physorg.com/news143823997.html



More in the article page.

hmmmm

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Memristor

Memristors /memˈrɪstɚ/ ("memory resistors") are a class of passive two-terminal circuit elements that maintain a functional relationship between the time integrals of current and voltage. This results in resistance varying according to the device's memristance function. Specifically engineered memristors provide controllable resistance useful for switching current. The memristor is a special case in so-called "memristive systems", a class of mathematical models useful for certain empirically observed phenomena, such as the firing of neurons.[3] The definition of the memristor is based solely on fundamental circuit variables, similar to the resistor, capacitor, and inductor. Unlike those more familiar elements, the necessarily nonlinear memristors may be described by any of a variety of time-varying functions. As a result, memristors do not belong to linear time-invariant (LTI) circuit models. A linear time-invariant memristor is simply a conventional resistor.[4]

Memristor theory was formulated and named by Leon Chua in a 1971 paper. Chua strongly believed that a fourth device existed to provide conceptual symmetry with the resistor, inductor, and capacitor. This symmetry follows from the description of basic passive circuit elements as defined by a relation between two of the four fundamental circuit variables, namely voltage, current, charge and flux.[5] A device linking charge and flux (themselves defined as time integrals of current and voltage), which would be the memristor, was still hypothetical at the time. He did acknowledge that other scientists had already used fixed nonlinear flux-charge relationships.[6] However, it would not be until thirty-seven years later, on April 30, 2008, that a team at HP Labs led by the scientist R. Stanley Williams would announce the discovery of a switching memristor. Based on a thin film of titanium dioxide, it has been presented as an approximately ideal device.[7][8][9] Being much simpler than currently popular MOSFET switches and also able to implement one bit of non-volatile memory in a single device, memristors may enable nanoscale computer technology.[10] Chua also speculates that they may be useful in the construction of artificial neural networks.[11]

gyldenlove
10-23-2008, 10:12 AM
I'd just like to thank everyone who reads, participates, etc in this thread.

Thanks for looking at the world through a different set of lenses.

Keep it coming, I need my daily fix

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:18 AM
http://www.guardian.co.uk/music/2008/oct/16/radiohead-album-sales

Sean Michaels, The Guardian: Despite being downloaded free of charge to hard drives and iPods all over the world, In Rainbows has sold more CD copies than their previous two albums. And we're not counting free or cheap downloads as equal to a full-value CD purchase. No, even after In Rainbows was sitting on hard drives and iPods across the land, it still sold more CD copies than their previous two recent releases.

Warner Chappell, Radiohead's publishers, made the announcement in a keynote presentation at the You Are In Control conference in Iceland, as reported by Music Ally magazine. In some of the first official figures to be released, Warner Chappell said that the CD version of In Rainbows has racked up 1.75m sales to date. Contrast this with sales figures from 2001's Amnesiac and 2003's Hail to the Thief, which as of late last year had sold 900,000 and 990,000 copies respectively, according to Hits Daily Double.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:20 AM
http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2868

Elephant sends sms messages to rangers

In the Kenyan wildlife conservancy Ol Pejeta elephants are tagged with a GPS-triggered text messaging device. Before the elephants start raiding the nearby villagers’ harvest they send a text message to the rangers. The rangers respond by chasing the elephants off again. The tag also enables online elephant tracking through Google Earth for preservation concerns. How long will it take until the wildlife online identity will walk around in second life for safari tours? And people get killed on the internet by grumpy elephant bulls?

Not only elephants are tagged with GPS coordinates, also other wild animals can be tracked easily. So the safari experience comes with ‘wildlife guarantee’ these days. It seems that even Africa looses its adventurous nature. When will we drive with our landrovers through the stock-market hunting for broke speculators?

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:20 AM
http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2842

The RepRap is a selfreproducing 3D printer. The 3D printer ‘prints’ his own components by melting tiny plastic particles together.

Imagine what would happen if this 3D printer wouldn’t stop reproducing. At a certain point, the 3D printers will reproduce faster than we could destroy them. The RepRap will populate the world, the human race will die out and eventually the RepRap will evolve into smarter and better devices.

Happily the RepRap is still dependent on the human race

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:21 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2008/10/17/scidream117.xml


Black and white TV generation have monochrome dreamsScience



Do you dream in black and white? If so, the chances are you are over 55 and were brought up watching a monochrome television set. New research suggests that the type of television you watched as a child has a profound effect on the colour of your dreams. While almost all under 25s dream in colour, thousands of over 55s, all of whom were brought up with black and white sets, often dream in monchrome - even now.

The findings suggest that the moment when Dorothy passes out of monochrome Kansas and awakes in Technicolor Oz may have had more significance for our subconscious than we literally ever dreamed of. Eva Murzyn, a psychology student at Dundee University who carried out the study, said: "It is a fascinating hypothesis.

"It suggests there could be a critical period in our childhood when watching films has a big impact on the way dreams are formed. "What is even more interesting is that before the advent of black and white television all the evidence suggests we were dreaming in colour."

Research from 1915 through to the 1950s suggested that the vast majority of dreams are in black and white but the tide turned in the sixties, and later results suggested that up to 83 per cent of dreams contain some colour.

Since this period also marked the transition between black-and-white film and TV and widespread Technicolor, an obvious explanation was that the media had been priming the subjects' dreams.

However it was always controversial and differences between the studies prevented the researchers from drawing any firm conclusions.

But now Miss Murzyn believes she has proved the link. She re-looked at the old studies and combined them with a survey of her own of more 60 people, half of which were over 55 and half of which were under 25.

She asked the volunteers to answer a questionnaire on the colour of their dreams and their childhood exposure to film and TV.

The subjects then recorded different aspects of their dreams in a diary every morning.

Miss Murzyn found there was no significant difference between results drawn from the questionnaires and the dream diaries - thus proving that the previous studies were comparable.

She then analysed her own data to find out whether an early exposure to black-and-white TV could still have a lasting effect on her subjects' dreams, 40 years later.

Only 4.4 per cent of the under-25s' dreams were black and white. The over-55s who had had access to colour TV and film during their childhood also reported a very low proportion of just 7.3 per cent.

But the over-55s who had only had access to black-and-white media reported dreaming in black and white roughly a quarter of the time.

Even though they would have spent only a few hours a day watching TV or films, their attention and emotional engagement would have been heightened during this time, leaving a deeper imprint on their mind, Miss Murzyn told the New Scientist.

"The crucial time is between three and 10 when we all begin to have the ability to dream," she said.

"Television and films which by their very nature are interesting and emotionally engaging and even dreamlike. So when you dream you may copy what you have seen on the screen.

"I have even had a computer game player who dreams as if he is in front of a computer screen."

Miss Murzyn concedes it's still impossible to verify whether the dreams are actually in black-and-white, or whether media exposure somehow alters the way the mind reconstructs the dreams once we wake.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:24 AM
http://www.thecoolhunter.net/art/Tara-Donovan---From-Paper-Cups-To-Genius/

http://www.thecoolhunter.net/images/stories/2007pics/storiesnew2007pics/marchpics/cupart.jpg

New York artist Tara Donovan is a master of seeing. Not just looking, but actually seeing. Her sculptural, one-of-a-kind art is based on her ability to see, imagine and create forms, shapes and textures from ordinary objects that most of us don’t even notice. She creates art from rolls of tape, pieces of pencil, Styrofoam cups, paper plates, napkins. Her sculptural works evoke thoughts of nature. A perfect example is the “Untitled” cloud formation she created in 2003 from Styrofoam cups and glue.

The 38-year-old Donovan has recently accomplished several things many artists never achieve. This September, the first monograph of her work was published by visual book press, Monacelli Press (now owned by Random House). A couple of weeks later, on October 10, a traveling retrospective of her work opened at the Institute of Contemporary Art in Boston.

But perhaps the biggest deal is the extra half-a-million dollars that she will have to work with in the next few years. In late September, she received a phone call from the John D. and Catherine T MacArthur Foundation. She was informed that she had been made a Fellow of the Foundation and that she will receive a $500,000 MacArthur Foundation “genius” grant. It is a no-strings-attached support of her work over five years. She was selected as one of 25 recipients in 2008. Others include a physician, an astrophysicist, a violinist, a computer scientist and representatives of many other endeavours who were selected for their creativity, originality and potential to make important contributions in the future. - Tuija Seipell

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:31 AM
http://technology.newscientist.com/channel/tech/dn14898-newlydiscovered-fungus-strips-pollutants-from-oil.html?feedId=online-news_rss20

Newly-discovered fungus strips pollutants from oil

A humble fungus could help oil companies clean up their fuel to meet tightening emissions standards. The fungus, recently discovered in Iran, grows naturally in crude oil and removes the sulphur and nitrogen compounds that lead to acid rain and air pollution.

Worldwide, government are imposing increasingly severe limits on how much of those compounds fuels can contain. Oil producers are searching for more efficient ways to strip sulphur and nitrogen from their products.

The standard way to "desulphurise" crude oil involves reacting it with hydrogen at temperatures of 455 °C and up to 204 times atmospheric pressure (roughly 21 million pascals or 3000 psi). It achieves less than perfect results.

Micro-organisms able to metabolise sulphur and nitrogen have the potential to achieve the same endpoint under more normal conditions. In recent years a number of researchers have isolated desulphurising bacteria.

But Jalal Shayegan and his team at the Sharif University of Technology in Tehran, Iran, have now discovered and isolated a fungus that appears able to remove sulphur from oil with greater efficiency.
Fungus hunting

Shayegan's team went looking for fungus in oil-contaminated soil from Tehran oil refinery and the Kuhemond oil field in Iran, and isolated a number of new desulphurising micro-organisms.

Tests revealed that one strain of Stachybotrys fungus was particularly efficient at sulphur removal – the first fungus found to have this ability.

Shayegan's team pitted their new find against several known desulphurising bacteria. They grew them all for 6 days on heavy crude oil samples from the Kuhemond and Soroush oil fields, mixed with a water-based growth medium.
Clear winner

The fungus achieved the best results by far. In one sample it removed 76% of sulphur compounds in just 3 days, a figure only one bacteria could match over the full 6 days.

Robin van Leerdam at Wageningen University in Bomenweg, Netherlands, says biodesulphurisation holds promise as a method to refine oil and that the new contender is a welcome addition.

But he says rematches are required to properly test it against the known bacteria. "The sulphur removal efficiency of the fungus is higher than of the bacterium, but the comparison is not completely fair," he told New Scientist.

The desulphurising bacteria pitted against the fungus were previously grown on Dibenzothiophene, commonly used to simulate the sulphur compounds in crude oil. But they had not been grown before on crude oil itself. Leerdam thinks bacteria more used to crude oil would run the fungus closer for efficiency.
A better bet?

Other researchers are still advancing non-biological approaches to stripping sulphur from oil.

"If you want to invest in desulphurisation technologies then put your money on the chemical route," Michiel Makkee at Delft University of Technology in Julianalaan, Netherlands told New Scientist.

His team recently designed a simple ester capable of removing sulphur from diesel. It works 10 or 20 times faster than a fungus or bacteria, and could be squeezed into much more compact reactors than a biological process, Makkee says.

But he concedes that his new method still requires heat – working at 140 °C compared to the fungus' room temperature.

Journal references: Industrial & Engineering Chemistry Research (DOI: 10.1021/ie800494p); ChemSusChem (DOI: 10.1002/cssc.200800109)

Energy and Fuels - Learn more about the looming energy crisis in our comprehensive special report.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:32 AM
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/10/08/testicle-stem-cell.html

Testicle-Harvested Stem Cells Prove Versatile

snowspot66
10-23-2008, 10:35 AM
After seeing the styrofoam cup art I figured you might like this one.

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=43&t=672290&page=1&pp=15

It's an industry website. A lot of digital artists post there. One guy is doing experimental shaders based entirely upon math. It's pretty crazy and I don't even have half a clue what he's doing but this is an example of the results. It's taking him around 20 hours to render each of those as a still frame. It's really impressive. He said he might post a tutorial sometime in the future then maybe I can try to understand exactly what he's doing.

TheReverend
10-23-2008, 10:36 AM
http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2008/10/08/testicle-stem-cell.html

Testicle-Harvested Stem Cells Prove Versatile

Ahhh... the many wonders of my balls.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:37 AM
http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2867

This gun style camera projects messages on the objects of which people take pictures. It can not be seen by the naked eye, but is only visible on the pictures strangers take of the objects on the streets. The device is a camera triggered by the flash of other camera’s. As soon as a flash is registered the fulgurator beams a projection on the object. Created the German artist Julius von Bismarck. It is The effect can be seen in the video.

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/EAX_3Bgel7M&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/EAX_3Bgel7M&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:38 AM
After seeing the styrofoam cup art I figured you might like this one.

http://forums.cgsociety.org/showthread.php?f=43&t=672290&page=1&pp=15

It's an industry website. A lot of digital artists post there. One guy is doing experimental shaders based entirely upon math. It's pretty crazy and I don't even have half a clue what he's doing but this is an example of the results. It's taking him around 20 hours to render each of those as a still frame. It's really impressive. He said he might post a tutorial sometime in the future then maybe I can try to understand exactly what he's doing.

Thanks for the link man...i'll check it out then...some of the stuff i glanced through is pretty cool.

I like fractals, and those are all math based...it's pretty interesting.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:42 AM
http://www.kitchin.org/atlas/index.html

he Atlas of Cyberspace, by Martin Dodge and Rob Kitchin, is the first comprehensive book to explore the spatial and visual nature of cyberspace and its infrastructure.

It uses a user-friendly, approachable style to examine why cyberspace is being mapped and what new cartographic and visualisation techniques have been employed.

Richly illustrated with over 300 full colour images, it comprehensively catalogues 30 years worth of maps that reveal the rich and varied landscapes of cyberspace.

The book includes chapters detailing:
- mapping Internet infrastructure and traffic flows
- mapping the Web
- mapping online conversation and community
- imagining cyberspace in art, literature, and film

Update: October 2008 - The full content of the book now available for free download as a pdf.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:42 AM
http://cryptome.info/0001/palin-search.htm

22 October 2008

Date: Wed, 22 Oct 2008 16:48:31 -0400
Subject: US Search.com
From: Alan Chapell <achapell@chapellassociates.com>
To: <jya[at]pipeline.com>

Dear Mr. Young:

I m an attorney, and I represent USSearch.com, Inc. Please contact me at your earliest convenience at the number below.

Sincerely,

Alan Chapell, Esq.
Privacy Officer
US Search
917 318 8440

___________________

Cryptome spoke with Mr. Chapell who said US Search material had been posted on "one or more sites of which you are listed as the administrator." He asked that the unidentified material be removed. We said no, that is against our policy. He said you don't want trouble do you. We said our purpose is to make trouble. He hung up.

Cryptome has bought 35 orders of of US Search material since 2003 and published most without complaint by US Search. Today's threat probably relates to material on Sarah and Todd Palin:

http://cryptome.info/0001/sarah-palin.htm
http://cryptome.info/0001/todd-palin.htm

alkemical
10-23-2008, 10:50 AM
http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20081022/democracy_gnr_081022/20081022?hub=TopStories

Guns N' Roses to release 'Chinese Democracy'

Updated Wed. Oct. 22 2008 9:13 PM ET

CTV.ca News Staff

Check the temperatures in hell, and crack open the Dr. Pepper -- Guns N' Roses' "Chinese Democracy" will be hitting Canadian stores this November 23.

snowspot66
10-23-2008, 10:58 AM
I read a Slate review of Chinese Democracy. Guy got a hold of some less than honorable copies and said it was actually pretty good. I might actually look into it now.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:31 AM
http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/archive/2008/10/20/1572183.aspx

FUSION PROJECTS HANG IN LIMBO

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:32 AM
http://discovermagazine.com/2008/nov/13-the-monkey-whisperer-learns-the-secrets-of-primate-economics

Discover Interview The "Monkey Whisperer" Learns the Secrets of Primate Economics

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:32 AM
http://www.livescience.com/blogs/2008/10/20/power-beaming-satellite-one-lightbulb-experiment/

Power Beaming Satellite: “One Lightbulb” Experiment

Space-based solar power has been mostly all-talk - now it’s time to energize the idea with some electrifying experiments!

And that’s the goal of the “One Lightbulb” project.

In December, the Eisenhower Center for Space and Defense Studies at the U.S. Air Force Academy will begin the process of building two small satellites.

The bright idea here is demonstrate by doing - that is, power beam between low Earth orbit and the Earth to illuminate a single one-tenth of a watt LED lightbulb.

The project as now blueprinted involves the building of two satellite systems concurrently, one “heavy” and one “light.” This dual approach using different methods provides a measure of assurance that success can be attained given technical, legal, financial, or other challenges that might bog down one of the two satellite designs.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:33 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?MLC=/earth/science&view=DETAILS&xml=/earth/2008/10/15/scialien115.xml&CMP=ILC-mostviewedbox

Scientist develops programme to understand alien languages


___

how do you do the Q/A?

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:35 AM
http://www.livescience.com/blogs/2008/10/22/spaceliner-mothership-readied-for-takeoff/

The WhiteKnightTwo — the mega mothership that will tote skyward the passenger-carrying SpaceShipTwo — is picking up speed - literally. The plane is being built by Scaled Composites in Mojave, California and is expected to be airborne in the next two to three weeks.

That’s the word today here at the International Symposium for Personal and Commercial Spaceflight in Las Cruces, New Mexico. One of the future passengers on SpaceShipTwo has received a recent briefing regarding the test program for WhiteKnightTwo from spaceline operator, Virgin Galactic.

Michael Blum said today that extensive ground testing of WhiteKnightTwo systems is underway at the Mojave Air and Space Port. Those tests have culminated in a recent high-speed taxi evaluation, Blum said.

Blum added that WhiteKnightTwo is some two to three weeks away from the craft taking to the skies for the first time - all in hush-hush status.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:36 AM
http://www.space.com/news/sn-081021-congress-spysat-plan.html

Congress Withholds Funding for Spysat Program


WASHINGTON - Congressional appropriators have canceled funding for a joint U.S. military-intelligence program to field two commercial-class satellites to collect medium-resolution imagery, government and industry sources confirmed today.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:39 AM
http://www.livescience.com/environment/081021-antarctic-mountains.html

Huge Mountain Range Should Not Be There

An Antarctic mountain range that rivals the Alps in elevation will be probed this month by an expedition of scientists using airborne radar and other Information Age tools to virtually "peel away" more than 2.5 miles (4 kilometers) of ice covering the peaks.

One of the mysteries of the mountain range is that current evidence suggests that it "shouldn't be there" at all.

See here:

http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showthread.php?t=53183

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:39 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/3242724/Britains-most-important-archeological-discovery-found-in-desk-drawer.html


Britain's 'most important archeological' discovery found in desk drawer
Thousands of tiny gold pins which lay hidden in a desk drawer for 40 years have been described as one of Britian's most important archeological finds.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:40 AM
Tiwanaku, Photo Gallery and Articles
Tiwanaku, an ancient city near the south shore of Lake Titicaca, once thrived as
the most important center/polity in Andean South America.
(http://www.jqjacobs.net/andes/tiwanaku.html)

http://www.jqjacobs.net/andes/images/tiwanaku_desktop.jpg

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:41 AM
http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/10/081022-drug-mummies.html

Drugs Found in Hair of Ancient Andean Mummies
Charles Q. Choi
for National Geographic News
October 22, 2008

The first hard evidence of psychoactive drug use in the ancient Andes has been discovered in mummies' hair, a new study says.

The finding confirms that predecessors of the Inca known as the Tiwanaku used mind-altering substances, and hints that the civilization relied on far-reaching trade networks to obtain the drugs.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:42 AM
http://www.boston.com/news/local/articles/2008/10/18/the_soul_it_may_all_be_in_your_mind/

The soul? It may all be in your mind

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:44 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081021/ap_on_he_me/med_healthbeat_depression_magnet

Magnet device aims to treat depression patients

http://d.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20081020/capt.6e70f6dcefa94944a1028f8426914b5e.depression_m agnet_gfx409.jpg?x=390&y=345&q=85&sig=3t3KoSG0zTQzx5RGFYu3SQ--

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:45 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/comment/columnists/guest_contributors/article4995146.ece

Autism speaks. It's time for the world to listen
This bewildering disorder is on the increase in Britain. A three-pronged approach can help both sufferers and carers

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:46 AM
http://www.ananova.com/news/story/sm_3057859.html

Kung fu fan blows out candles with eyes

A Chinese martial arts enthusiast says he can blow out candles with only his eyes.

Wearing specially made goggles, Ling Chunjiang, 35, of Kaifeng, blows air from his eyes through a hose and can put out 12 candles in one minute.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:50 AM
http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1572-Extraterrestrials-declare-their-support-for-Obama.html

Friday, October 17. 2008
Extraterrestrials declare their support for Obama

Thank goodness for the UFO-summoning Prophet Yahweh, because, although the US election was already pretty strange, I did feel it could still get odder, and now it has:

MEDIA ALERT: Prophet Yahweh Predicts Spaceships Will Appear Oct. 31st in Support of Senator Obama

Prophet Yahweh, Seer of Yahweh, Master UFO Caller says that on October 31, 2008, superhuman black men, from other planets, will appear in their spaceships and hover over his UFO Summoning School for three days as a sign that all Americans should vote for Obama as President.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 11:54 AM
http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1573-Gnome-terror-returns-to-the-streets-of-Argentina.html

<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/W3vBSiDqX2Y&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xcfcfcf&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/W3vBSiDqX2Y&color1=0xb1b1b1&color2=0xcfcfcf&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

Gnome terror returns to the streets of Argentina

A new sighting of South America’s ‘creepy gnome’ has caused panic among locals after a group of youngsters claimed a ‘midget monster’ ran towards them at night.

The teens – who recorded footage of the freaky being on their mobile phone – said they are now “too terrified” to go out at night.

Experts who examined the latest footage, taken in the town of Clodomira, province of Santiago del Estero, Argentina, last week, say it is ‘credible’.

But sceptics say the sidestepping ‘gnome’ could be a speedy child or even a small animal.

Last week’s footage was taken by Juan Carlos Roldan, his brother Javier and five friends, who were larking around by the water fountain in Clodomira.

Juan, who filmed the creature, referred to it as “something that looked like a dwarf”.

He said: “It was walking sideways and was wearing dark clothes. But it was impossible to see its face because its face was covered in shadows.”

One of the lads, who were aged 15-22, yesterday told Argentinean reporters: “We were messing about - singing and dancing - when we heard a loud rustling noise from behind us.

“This tiny thing started running down Avenue San Martin at us. It had a pointy head and dark clothes.

“It was a person of incredibly low stature. We filmed it then got scared and ran off.

“This little thing was barking like a dog - but running sideways on two legs. It headed off towards the football stadium.”

...

Photographic expert Aldegonda Alvarz, of Universidad Nacional de Santiago del Estero, yesterday said: “This video footage seems credible. We could be looking at another ‘petido orejudo’ - small being.

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alkemical
10-23-2008, 12:16 PM
<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/VYSGVvA4ojE&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/VYSGVvA4ojE&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

alkemical
10-23-2008, 12:19 PM
CB’s Nowotny Sees Global ‘Tri-Polar’ Currency System Evolving
(http://www.conspiracyarchive.com/Blog/?p=798)
Jonathan Tirone - Oct. 19

European Central Bank council member Ewald Nowotny said a “tri-polar” global currency system is developing between Asia, Europe and the U.S. and that he’s skeptical the U.S. dollar’s centrality can be revived.

“What I see is a system where we have more centers of gravity” Nowotny said today in an interview with Austrian state broadcaster ORF-TV. “I see for the future a tri-polar development, and I don’t think that there will be fixed exchange rates between these poles.”

The leaders of the U.S., France and the European Commission will ask other world leaders to join in a series of summits on the global financial crisis beginning in the U.S. soon after the Nov. 4 presidential election, President George W. Bush, French President Nicolas Sarkozy and European Commission President Jose Barroso said in a joint statement yesterday.

alkemical
10-23-2008, 12:26 PM
http://thehiddenagendas.blogspot.com/2008/10/playing-with-universe-hubble-fractals.html

Monday, October 20, 2008
Playing With The Universe: Hubble & Fractals
This is going to be a bit of an "off post" here, but I wanted to point out some of the creative fun I had with playing with images from the Hubble telescope. Now you may remember in another post I had done this with images from an R.P.G. book, and this turned out to be a thought provoking venture! Let's see what the Universe has in store when we point our brains at fractals!

“I wonder whether fractal images are not touching the very structure of our brains. Is there a clue in the infinitely regressing character of such images that illuminates our perception of art? Could it be that a fractal image is of such extraordinary richness, that it is bound to resonate with our neuronal circuits and stimulate the pleasure I infer we all feel” (Professor Peter W. Atkins, Lincoln College, Oxford University, “Art as Science,” The Daily Telegraph, 1990).




http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_YT5lMzCouRo/SPz4hc6DpoI/AAAAAAAADG8/hmfwzeMRaBs/s1600-h/NGC1309_1280_wallpaper.jpg

[Above] Spiral Galaxy NGC1309 from Hubblesite.org

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_YT5lMzCouRo/SPwYJSJ2ywI/AAAAAAAADF8/vvBtiTzk0bg/s400/NGC1309_M1.jpg

Spiral Galaxy NGC1309 with Mirror Filter Applied

alkemical
10-23-2008, 12:31 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/channel/being-human/dn15025-eternal-sunshine-drug-selectively-erases-memories.html?feedId=online-news_rss20

'Eternal Sunshine' drug selectively erases memories

For those haunted by thoughts of an old flame or a tragic accident, the chance to selectively erase memories might be tempting.

Now scientists have moved a step closer to that possibility by wiping away a month-old memory in genetically engineered laboratory mice, while leaving other memories unchanged.

The researchers boosted levels of a protein called α-CaMKII involved in memory storage and retrieval, just as mice recalled the pain of receiving a light shock. This had the effect of dispelling the memory.

"I don't think it's possible to use our method in humans, whether it's now or in the future," says Joe Tsien, a neuroscientist at the Medical College of Georgia in Augusta. "But it does suggest that perhaps you can look into downstream targets [of α-CaMKII]. Maybe some pharmaceutical company is looking at that."

alkemical
10-23-2008, 12:32 PM
http://technology.newscientist.com/channel/tech/dn15019-computer-circuit-built-from-brain-cells.html?feedId=online-news_rss20


Computer circuit built from brain cells

alkemical
10-23-2008, 12:34 PM
http://technology.newscientist.com/channel/tech/dn15016-humble-sticky-tape-emits-powerful-xrays.html?feedId=tech_rss20

Humble sticky tape emits powerful X-rays

Peeling ordinary sticky tape can generate bursts of X-rays intense enough to produce an image of the bones in your fingers.

Seth Putterman and colleagues from the University of California, Los Angeles used a motor to unwind a roll of sticky tape and recorded the electromagnetic emissions. Ripping the tape from its roll at 3 centimetres per second generated X-ray bursts of 15 kiloelectronvolts – each lasting one-billionth of a second, and containing over a million photons.

Putterman admits he is not sure exactly what is going on. "My attitude is to marvel at the phenomenon – all we are doing is peeling tape, and nature sets up a process that gives you nanosecond X-ray bursts."

alkemical
10-24-2008, 07:39 AM
http://women.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/women/body_and_soul/article4582490.ece

Can illegal drugs help depression?
Ketamine for depression and LSD for improving brain power; meet the lady who funds the science that no-one else will do, Amanda Feilding is on a mission to unlock the secrets of the mind

alkemical
10-24-2008, 07:40 AM
http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5i4hpnz5eOMpxfld81tEZYsC23teg

'Flying syringe' mosquitos, other ideas get Gates funding

1 day ago

WASHINGTON (AFP) — The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation awarded 100,000 dollars each on Wednesday to scientists in 22 countries including funding for a Japanese proposal to turn mosquitos into "flying syringes" delivering vaccines.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 07:40 AM
http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-sci-hot24-2008oct24,0,6223548.story


Link found between physical and emotional warmth
In a study with interesting implications, people who held a cup of hot coffee for 10 to 25 seconds warmed to a perfect stranger. Holding a cup of iced coffee had the opposite effect.



http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/10/081023-warmth-coffee.html

People keen to make a positive impression on a new acquaintance might want to meet over a hot drink, a new study suggests.

In a new experiment, people who held steaming cups of coffee for a few seconds judged another person as more generous, caring, and happy than people who held a cup of iced coffee did.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 07:46 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/7687286.stm

Team records 'music' from stars

Scientists have recorded the sound of three stars similar to our Sun using France's Corot space telescope.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 07:51 AM
http://www.cosmosmagazine.com/news/2266/corals-hybridising-survive

SYDNEY: Rare species of corals are cross breeding with one another in a bid to prevent extinction, researchers have found.

The findings hint at a new way that threatened reefs may be able to adapt to changing environmental conditions, particularly climate change.

Marine biologists at James Cook University in Townsville, Queensland, discovered that when faced with low population levels, the eggs of some rare species of Acropora corals allow themselves to be fertilised by the sperm of other species, generating previously unknown hybrids.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 07:52 AM
http://ufodisclosurecountdownclock.blogspot.com/2008/10/could-some-rods-grow-into-orbs-could.html

Tuesday, October 21, 2008
Could Some `Rods' Grow Into `Orbs' - Could Some `Orbs' Grow Into Some `Ufo's'?

alkemical
10-24-2008, 07:54 AM
http://www.monstersandcritics.com/news/southasia/news/article_1437747.php/Ancient_artwork_relic_discovered_in_Bangladesh_

Dhaka - Archaeologists in Bangladesh have discovered an ancient engraved stone, believed to be of the Gupta era nearly 2,000 years ago, in northern part of the country, a media report said on Saturday.

The sandstone, found on the bank of a pond near Sura Masjid at Ghoraghat sub-district of Dinajpur, has been put on display at an archaeological museum in Bogra, the Daily Start newspaper reported quoting museum officials. Sponsored Links: Car Insurance - Rates and Other Resources

The stonework depicts three figures dancing and holding ancient musical instruments. It escaped earlier excavations in Sura Masjid, one of the important archaeological sites of the country.

'The figures seem not be of human beings - the artwork represents dancing figures of some animals,' archaeologist Nahid Sultana, who excavated a number of archaeological sites, told Deutsche Presse-Agentur dpa Saturday. He said the artwork might have been brought to the Sura Masjid site from elsewhere. Sponsored Links: Send a Corporate Holiday Gift

Officials of the archaeological department recovered the sandstone a month ago from Sura Masjid, which was built using stones between 1450 and 1500 AD, during the reign of Sultan Alauddin Hussain Shah, said archaeologist Badrul Alam.

He said such stones were used in Hindu or Buddhist constructions in the area during the Gupta period between 300 AD and 500 AD, an era that saw the emergence of the classical art forms and development of various aspects of Indian culture and civilization. Sponsored Links: Form an LLC


<img src="http://www.razorsedgecollectibles.com/catalog/images/Cantina%20Band%20Bust%20Ups%20Set.jpg">

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:00 AM
http://www.mindhacks.com/blog/2008/10/the_lazarus_sign_a_.html

The Lazarus sign: a slight return:

Occasionally, brain-dead patients make movements, owing to the fact that the spinal reflexes are still intact. The most complex, and presumably the most terrifying, is called the Lazarus Sign. It is where the brain-dead patient extends their arms and crosses them over their chest - Egyptian mummy style.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:13 AM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/7669056.stm

A US patient left in a coma-like state after a road accident recovered the ability to speak after repeated exposure to a magnetic field.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:14 AM
http://www.physorg.com/news143465448.html
Researchers at the University of Delaware have discovered that when the leaf of a plant is under attack by a pathogen, it can send out an S.O.S. to the roots for help, and the roots will respond by secreting an acid that brings beneficial bacteria to the rescue.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:15 AM
http://www.boingboing.net/2008/10/23/howto-read-the-secre.html

The Electronic Frontier Foundation's posted a nifty Instructable video demonstrating the technique for spotting the secret spy-codes that many color laser-printers and copiers embed in their output. These dots were long-rumoured, but it wasn't until EFF discovered them that their existence was verified and their code was cracked. EFF's working on Freedom of Information Act requests to uncover which government agencies requested these dots, and what they do with them, but in the meantime, you can use the techniques in this video to spy on your friends and neighbours, just like the Feds! Yellow Dots of Mystery: Is Your Printer Spying on You? (via Make)

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:19 AM
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=jacking-into-the-brain

Jacking into the Brain--Is the Brain the Ultimate Computer Interface?
How far can science advance brain-machine interface technology? Will we one day pipe the latest blog entry or NASCAR highlights directly into the human brain as if the organ were an outsize flash drive?

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:21 AM
<embed src="http://www.metacafe.com/fplayer/315818/the_time_traveller.swf" width="400" height="345" wmode="transparent" pluginspage="http://www.macromedia.com/go/getflashplayer" type="application/x-shockwave-flash"> </embed><br><font size = 1><a href="http://www.metacafe.com/watch/315818/the_time_traveller/">The Time Traveller</a> - <a href="http://www.metacafe.com/">The best free videos are right here</a></font>

Swedish Man Discovers Time Travel Portal....Under His Kitchen Sink

:)

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:22 AM
http://blog.wired.com/cars/2008/10/supersonic-jet.html

Supersonic Rocket Car Aims For 1,000 MPH

TheReverend
10-24-2008, 08:34 AM
http://ufodisclosurecountdownclock.blogspot.com/2008/10/could-some-rods-grow-into-orbs-could.html

Tuesday, October 21, 2008
Could Some `Rods' Grow Into `Orbs' - Could Some `Orbs' Grow Into Some `Ufo's'?

Rods were disproved as a biproduct of modern camera speeds.

alkemical
10-24-2008, 08:50 AM
Rods were disproved as a biproduct of modern camera speeds.

I don't care...lol

:)

alkemical
10-27-2008, 06:50 AM
http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3611112,00.html

ran exposes pigeon-brained espionage plot, literally

Security forces arrest suspected 'spy pigeons,' near Natanz reactor. Last year 14 squirrels were seized on espionage claims. Fate of captive birds unknown

alkemical
10-27-2008, 06:51 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/asia/japan/3248106/Japanese-woman-arrested-after-murdering-virtual-husband-in-online-computer-game.html


Japanese woman arrested after 'murdering' virtual husband in online computer game
A Japanese woman who murdered her virtual husband after the couple got divorced in an online computer game has been arrested and faces a possible jail sentence.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 06:57 AM
http://jfcshow.com/?p=222

JFC Election spectacular!

In a world gone mad, does Jesus F. Christ stand a chance of winning history’s most over-hyped election?
Tune in and watch as Jesus takes on the old ****er and the smooth-talker.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 07:49 AM
http://www.worldnetdaily.com/index.php?fa=PAGE.view&amp;pageId=64168

Citizens uniting against fluoride
Large-scale lawsuit seeks to ban chemical poisoning of water supply

alkemical
10-27-2008, 08:03 AM
http://www.technoccult.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/palin_love_doll_c.jpg
(http://www.thefrisky.com/site/post/246-sarah-palin-sex-doll-now-on-sale/)

snowspot66
10-27-2008, 08:28 AM
Those will sell well.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 08:35 AM
LOL no doubt!

alkemical
10-27-2008, 08:36 AM
http://www.abc.net.au/rn/lawreport/stories/2008/2376933.htm

The Psychology of Conmen
October 26th, 2008 by TiamatsVision

“How do conmen convince you to part with your money? Who are they? And how do they choose their victims? Learn their secrets from someone who has studied their dark arts. Magician Nick Johnson has some interesting insights into psychology of scams…and some suggestions on how to stop your money from going up in smoke!

Damien Carrick: Now from secrets that get lifted from government, to how you and I sometimes inadvertently hand over information or money to con men. How do scammers manage to convince people to hand over their hard-earned cash? To find the answer, perhaps we could talk to a police officer or a criminologist. But someone with a lateral take is magician Nicholas Johnson. He reckons that both magicians and scammers use the same box of tools: psychology and sleight of hand. In fact he’s studied the dark arts of the scamster, and has some suggestions on how to stop your money from going up in smoke.

Nicholas Johnson: I think what I love most about con artists and the world of scammers is that they’re criminals who manage to get their victims to hand over their possessions freely. Most thieves and robbers and the like, tend to use force, or deception, in order for them to take things, whereas a con artist manages to get their victim to freely give up their stuff. And I think that’s what really fascinates me the most.”

alkemical
10-27-2008, 08:37 AM
http://miscellanea.wellingtongrey.net/comics/2008-10-12-warning-in-case-of-terrorist-attack.png

alkemical
10-27-2008, 08:38 AM
http://www.tricycle.com/interview/interview-investigating-buddhas-world

http://hokai.info/2008/09/no-self-fallacy.html

Interview: Investigating the Buddha’s World
October 26th, 2008 by TiamatsVision

“The teachings of the Buddha have been variously understood by scholars, monks, and laypeople over the centuries. But what was it that the Buddha actually taught? While this remains an open and oft-debated question, scholar John Peacocke—in his work as both an academic and a dharma teacher—asserts that by looking to the history, language, and rich philosophical environment of the Buddha’s day we can uncover what is most distinctive and revolutionary about his teachings. Peacocke, who does not shy away from controversy, argues that in some very important ways, later Buddhist schools depart from early core teachings.

Peacocke has been practicing Buddhism since 1970. He was first exposed to Buddhism at monasteries in South India, where he ordained as a monk in the Tibetan tradition. He later studied in Sri Lanka, where Theravada Buddhism has flourished for centuries. Returning to lay life and his native England, Peacocke went on to receive his Ph.D. in Buddhist studies at the University of Warwick. He currently lectures on Buddhist and Hindu thought at the University of Bristol and next year will begin teaching at the Mindfulness-based Cognitive Therapy Master of Studies program at Oxford University. A former director of the Sharpham Centre for Buddhist Studies in Devon, England, Peacocke also serves on the teaching council at nearby Gaia House, a retreat center offering instruction in a variety of Buddhist traditions. He now teaches and practices in the Vipassana tradition. Tricycle editor James Shaheen visited with Peacocke near Bristol University in April to discuss what the language of the early Pali and Sanskrit texts tells us about Buddhism today.”

alkemical
10-27-2008, 08:39 AM
http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/10/26/documentary-off-the-grid-life-on-the-mesa/

The current economic crisis has some people showing an an interest in survivalism, frugal lifestyles, etc. This fascinating documentary focuses on one particular group of people who live according to their own rules.

“Twenty-Five miles from town, a million miles from mainstream society, a loose-knit community of eco-pioneers, teenage runaways, war veterans and drop-outs, live on the fringe and off the grid, struggling to survive with little food, less water and no electricity, as they cling to their unique vision of the American dream…”

alkemical
10-27-2008, 09:44 AM
http://www.noonehastodietomorrow.com/eugenics/population/351?task=view

British NGO Forecasts Five Brave New World Scenarios Set In 2030

alkemical
10-27-2008, 09:47 AM
http://www.deccanherald.com/Content/Sep232008/snt2008092291448.asp

Mystery of the Mind
From rose-tinted views of childhood to clear recollections of events that never happened, research shows that memories are both suggestible and inherently idealised. Kate Hilpern finds out just how unreliable our powers of recall are.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:37 AM
http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3611112,00.html

ran exposes pigeon-brained espionage plot, literally

Security forces arrest suspected 'spy pigeons,' near Natanz reactor. Last year 14 squirrels were seized on espionage claims. Fate of captive birds unknown

http://blog.wired.com/defense/2008/10/stop-that-spy-p.html

This week's report that Iran had found "spy pigeons" near one of its nuclear faculties looked ridiculous. The very idea of using pigeons for intelligence gathering is obviously crazy. But is it crazy enough to be true?

Attaching instrumentation to pigeons easier than you might think. Beatriz de Costa attracted attention in 2006 when she started using instrumented pigeons for air quality monitoring in California. The birds are equipped with GPS and a stripped-down mobile phone and camera as well as a device to measure air pollution, and send back data via SMS texting – they have their own blog. (Da Costa is an Associate Professor at the University of California, Irvine "Departments of Studio Art, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science" and described as an "interdisciplinary researcher and artist.")

De Costa is using commercially available hardware; intelligence agencies can probably get the same capability in a much smaller package. Pigeons have long been used by intelligence agencies because they can get a message through when no other means will work. The Iraqis reportedly used pigeons in the 1991 Gulf War as a means of circumventing radio jamming ; the Swiss Army did not terminate their carrier pigeon program until 1994.

Da Costa was actually inspired by German engineer Julius Neubronner who experimented with camera carrying pigeons in 1903 -- an idea apparently later taken up by German Military Intelligence.

(The U.S. military used pigeons until 1957, long enough for pigeon-based equipment to be given its own communications system designation, such as AN/CBQ-1 for the "Air-transportable Pigeon Loft & Message Center." Some pigeons won medals for their services; the bird Cher Ami earned the Croix de Guerre for saving the lives of many U.S. soldiers during World War I. Britain's PDSA animal welfare organization awarded the Dickin medal "for conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty" to 32 pigeons over the years.)

Pigeons are still useful in the modern age. Earlier this year, criminals were found to be using carrier pigeons to smuggle drugs and mobile phones into a prison in Marilia in Brazil. Kidnap gangs in Iraq reportedly used pigeons to collect ransom.

What about intelligence agencies? Back in the 1960's, the CIA experimented with "Acoustic Kitty," a cat wired up to record conversations. And just last year, Chinese scientists reported having implanted electrodes in a pigeon's brain "so they can command it to fly right or left or up or down." Darpa has performed similar experiments with sharks. So perhaps a GPS-enabled pigeon might be guided to a specific location.

Though bizarre, expensive and not very practical, pigeon spies may well be possible. But you have to look at more prosaic explanations, too.

Racing pigeons are popular in Iran. There are several native breeds, collectively known as Iranian Highflying Tumblers, that are bred for endurance and aerobatic somersaulting. So a pigeon with a metal ring on its leg -- like this week's alleged spy bird -- should not just be such an extraordinary sight.

Perhaps the Iranians will copy the approach used by British counterintelligence during WWII. The Army Pigeon Service Special Section employed two peregrine falcons to intercept pigeons released by German spies with some success.

And you thought the spy pigeons were fiction…

[Photo: NASM]

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:49 AM
http://www.ajc.com/services/content/printedition/2008/10/27/breakthrough.html?cxntlid=inform_artr

Lonnie Johnson has some impressive hard science credentials.

He’s worked for the Strategic Air Command and for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, outfitting missions to Mars, Jupiter and Saturn. He holds about 100 patents, many of them in that arcane spot where chemistry, electricity and physics cross into the marketplace. And his latest invention appears to do the impossible: generating electricity with no fuel and no moving parts.

But he’s still known as Mr. Squirt Gun.

Even among the geniuses who gathered to honor him and his new thermo-electrochemical converter at a “Breakthrough Awards” banquet in Manhattan this month, the Atlanta scientist’s new invention was ignored when his most famous device was revealed.

“What?” they cried. “You invented the Super Soaker?”

Johnson, 59, doesn’t mind if he’s better known for watery mayhem than rocket science. Perhaps that’s because $1 billion worth of Super Soakers have sold since 1990. A billion dollars could buy most of a Galileo mission.

Johnson’s share (he licensed the Soaker’s design to Larami, later bought by Hasbro) won him the financial independence to pursue his own ideas, which is how the Johnson Thermo-electrochemical Converter system —- JTEC for short —- was born.

Using heat to force ions out of a hydrogen cell, the JTEC “is just a stunning insight,” said Jerry Beilinson, deputy editor of Popular Mechanics magazine, which honors innovators in its current issue and sponsors the Breakthrough Awards. “I kind of thought we were finished; I didn’t think there was a new way.”

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:50 AM
http://www.gizmodo.com.au/2008/10/solar_furnace_melts_steel_our_minds-2.html

Solar Furnace Melts Steel, Our Minds

the best way to feed the world's hunger for energy, James May visited a solar furnace to see how powerful they really are. Usually, solar furnaces are used to boil water into steam to generate electricity or make hydrogen fuel. But May thought that the best way to make people understand their insane power is to do something equally as insane: Melt steel almost instantly.




A solar furnace is a mirror structure used to concentrate sun rays into a small area called the focal point. As you can expect, the concentrated rays produce extremely high temperatures: At the focal point, solar furnaces can achieve temperatures of 5,430 ºF (3,000 ºC). The idea is not new--coming from ancient Greece--but their potential is starting to become more relevant now as we try to cut dependency on fossil fuels.

While this furnace is not as big as the largest solar furnace in the world at Odeillo, in the French Pyrenees, it's capable of achieving 4,352 ºF (2,400 ºC)--which, as you can see, it's enough to melt steel in a few seconds and almost disintegrate hot dogs. [Dark Roasted Blend]

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:51 AM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/earth/main.jhtml?view=DETAILS&grid=&xml=/earth/2008/10/27/sv_deankamen.xml

Dean Kamen: part man, part machine

Last Updated: 12:01am GMT 27/10/2008
Page 1 of 3

Some see Dean Kamen as a Willy Wonka character whose most famous invention - the Segway personal transporter - is still the butt of jokes. Others compare him to Henry Ford. His next project, after perfecting an electric car, is to 'to fix the world' - using a 200-year-old engine nobody else thinks can work.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:52 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2008/10/26/business/26proto.html?_r=2&em&oref=slogin&oref=slogin

If No One Sees It, Is It an Invention?

To share his innovation, Johnny Chung Lee posted a video on YouTube. In it, he uses a Wii remote controller and “head tracking” glasses to make a screen image come alive.
Johnny Lee

Mr. Lee's “Poor Man’s Steadycam.”

The video showed how, in a few easy steps, the Nintendo Wii remote controller — or “Wiimote” — could transform a normal video screen into a virtual reality display, with graphics that seemed to pop through the screen and into the living room. So far, the video has been seen more than six million times.

That video, together with others that Mr. Lee, now 28, posted on YouTube, have drawn people to the innovator as well as his innovations. Video game companies have contacted him and, in September, M.I.T.’s Technology Review named him as one of its top innovators under 35.

When he completed his degree this year at the Human-Computer Interaction Institute of Carnegie Mellon, he received “lots of offers from all the big places,” according to Paul Dietz, who convinced Mr. Lee to join him in the applied sciences group of Microsoft’s entertainment and devices division. “When we told Bill Gates we were trying to recruit Johnny, he already knew about his work and was anxious to bring him to Microsoft,” adds Mr. Dietz, a research and development program manager.

Contrast this with what might have followed from other options Mr. Lee considered for communicating his ideas. He might have published a paper that only a few dozen specialists would have read. A talk at a conference would have brought a slightly larger audience. In either case, it would have taken months for his ideas to reach others.

Small wonder, then, that he maintains that posting to YouTube has been an essential part of his success as an inventor. “Sharing an idea the right way is just as important as doing the work itself,” he says. “If you create something but nobody knows, it’s as if it never happened.”

Before posting his own ideas, Mr. Lee watched other people’s videos about the Wiimote. An online community of electronics hobbyists share ideas in video form not only on YouTube, but also at sites like instructables.com and makezine.com.

Thirty years ago, pioneers of the personal computer industry swapped ideas and tried to outdo one another at meetings of the Homebrew Computer Club in an auditorium at Stanford. Today, these “meetings” happen virtually and globally, with people modifying, improving and otherwise riffing on one another’s ideas — then posting the results in video form. This wide-scale collaboration, Mr. Lee says, lets the hobbyists “take advantage of economies of scale of innovation.”

In late 2002, Mr. Lee started a small company to build and sell an invention that helps filmmakers minimize camera-shaking. He sells this “Poor Man’s Steadycam” for $39.95 online — commercial versions start at five times that price — though he encourages people to download free instructions from his Web site and to build the device themselves for $14 in parts.

Mr. Lee says that the company is profitable, with revenue of about $250,000 in its first five years, but he adds that he is not much of a businessman. He has been out of inventory for over a year.

The steadycam company is his only foray into business. His decision to share, rather than sell, most of his ideas is linked to his definition of success, which he measures in terms of impact, not dollars. This, he says, is a reason he chose to join Microsoft: the company’s enormous customer base represents “real potential to help other people.”

He chooses his personal projects based on what he calls their “work-to-wow” ratio. “I want to get the biggest wow for the smallest amount of work,” he explains, adding that for him, wow is synonymous with impact.

The ratio of the Wiimote projects was fantastic: each idea that has reached millions of people took only three to four days to conceive, build, film and post.

Mr. Lee encourages innovators to ask themselves, “Would providing 80 percent of the capability at 1 percent of the cost be valuable to someone?” If the answer is yes, he says, pay attention. Trading relatively little performance for substantial cost savings can generate what Mr. Lee calls “surprising and often powerful results both scientifically and socially.”

As evidence, he might point to a do-it-yourself interactive whiteboard, another of his Wiimote innovations. Interactive whiteboards, which in commercial form generally sell for more than $1,000, make it possible to control a computer by tapping, writing or drawing on an image of the desktop that has been projected onto a screen. Mr. Lee’s version can be built with roughly $60 in parts and free open-source software downloadable from his Web site.

Some 700,000 people, many of them teachers, have downloaded the software, Mr. Lee says. Much more expensive whiteboards may offer more features and better image resolution, but Mr. Lee’s version is adequate for most classroom applications.

It is also easy to build. An after-school Lego robotics club for fifth graders at Clara Byrd Baker Elementary School in Williamsburg, Va., built a Wiimote whiteboard in four one-hour sessions. “Once it was done, the kids were so excited,” recalls Kofi Merritt, then the school’s computer resource specialist, who suggested and advised the project. “They recognized themselves as innovators and demonstrated the whiteboard in classroom after classroom.”

MR. LEE’S ideas have acquired a momentum independent of Mr. Lee himself. At educational conferences, teachers have presented how-to tutorials for their colleagues. And at Microsoft, his appreciation for online video has rubbed off on others. The company recently gave Mr. Dietz permission to go public with a new invention of his own: a drinking glass that, when placed on the Microsoft Surface table — a table with an interactive, multitouch display built into the top — alerts a waiter to offer a refill.

After writing a paper on his invention, Mr. Dietz wanted to test the concept in the market. His first step? He posted a video on YouTube.

Leslie Berlin is project historian for the Silicon Valley Archives at Stanford. E-mail: prototype@nytimes.com.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:53 AM
http://www.newsweek.com/id/165678

Why We Believe

Belief in the paranormal reflects normal brain activity carried to an extreme.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:53 AM
http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/10/hypnosis-lets-r.html

Hypnosis Lets Regular People See Numbers as Colors

alkemical
10-27-2008, 11:56 AM
http://www.news.com.au/couriermail/story/0,23739,24556679-3102,00.html

DESPITE posessing a tiny brain the size of a sesame seed, honey bees can be trained to count up to four, according to Queensland researchers.

alkemical
10-27-2008, 12:01 PM
<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/oOJJCxbN6Ig&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/oOJJCxbN6Ig&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

alkemical
10-27-2008, 12:03 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/2664373.stm

Edible bananas may disappear within a decade if urgent action is not taken to develop new varieties resistant to blight.

A Belgian scientist leading research into the fruit loved by millions, and a staple for much of the world's poor, has warned that diseases and pests are steadily encroaching upon crops.

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:12 PM
Technoccult interviews Alex CF, cryptozoological pseudoscientific artist (http://www.technoccult.com/archives/2008/10/28/technoccult-interviews-alex-cf-cryptozoological-pseudoscientific-artist/)

http://www.technoccult.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/cabinetofwonders5.jpg

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:15 PM
<object width="425" height="344"><param name="movie" value="http://www.youtube.com/v/_AI8mC8XucY&hl=en&fs=1"></param><param name="allowFullScreen" value="true"></param><embed src="http://www.youtube.com/v/_AI8mC8XucY&hl=en&fs=1" type="application/x-shockwave-flash" allowfullscreen="true" width="425" height="344"></embed></object>

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:29 PM
http://www.kk.org/thetechnium/archives/2008/10/evidence_of_a_g.php

Evidence of a Global SuperOrganism

I am not the first, nor the only one, to believe a superorganism is emerging from the cloak of wires, radio waves, and electronic nodes wrapping the surface of our planet. No one can dispute the scale or reality of this vast connectivity. What's uncertain is, what is it? Is this global web of computers, servers and trunk lines a mere mechanical circuit, a very large tool, or does it reach a threshold where something, well, different happens?

So far the proposition that a global superorganism is forming along the internet power lines has been treated as a lyrical metaphor at best, and as a mystical illusion at worst. I've decided to treat the idea of a global superorganism seriously, and to see if I could muster a falsifiable claim and evidence for its emergence.

My hypothesis is this: The rapidly increasing sum of all computational devices in the world connected online, including wirelessly, forms a superorganism of computation with its own emergent behaviors.

Superorganisms are a different type of organism. Large things are made from smaller things. Big machines are made from small parts, and visible living organisms from invisible cells. But these parts don't usually stand on their own. In a slightly fractal recursion, the parts of a superorganism lead fairly autonomous existences on their own. A superorganism such as an insect or mole rat colony contains many sub-individuals. These individual organisms eat, move about, get things done on their own. From most perspectives they appear complete. But in the case of the social insects and the naked mole rat these autonomous sub individuals need the super colony to reproduce themselves. In this way reproduction is a phenomenon that occurs at the level of the superorganism.

I define the One Machine as the emerging superorganism of computers. It is a megasupercomputer composed of billions of sub computers. The sub computers can compute individually on their own, and from most perspectives these units are distinct complete pieces of gear. But there is an emerging smartness in their collective that is smarter than any individual computer. We could say learning (or smartness) occurs at the level of the superorganism.

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:30 PM
http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-1079297/Pictured-The-mystery-pink-light-appeared-London.html

http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2008/10/21/article-1079297-02302EC7000005DC-225_468x715.jpg

While a pink sky at night might be a shepherd's delight, London residents were left scratching their heads last night as a mysterious pink cloud drifted over the city.

Bemused bystanders in Mayfair craned their necks to witness the strange alien-like cloud that appeared for just under an hour at around 8:30pm.

It hovered over buildings before breaking up and slowly disappearing

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:32 PM
http://www.philipcoppens.com/ripper.html



Ripper magic

Long before Hannibal Lecter, Jack the Ripper was the first serial killer that attained worldwide notoriety. But could he have been a murderer that was performing a magical ritual?

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:35 PM
http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/uk_news/7687346.stm

A former British Army interpreter who is accused of spying for Iran was a Cuban black magic priest, he has told the Old Bailey.

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:42 PM
http://www.nextnature.net/research/wp-content/uploads/2008/09/realistic_airplane_escape_instructions_1.jpg


http://www.nextnature.net/?p=2760

More realistic airplane safety instructions

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:46 PM
Solar Material Absorbs Entire Spectrum (http://cryptogon.com/?p=4709)


Solar Material Absorbs Entire Spectrum
October 28th, 2008

Via: EETimes:

Current solar materials must be chosen to match a specific wavelength of sunlight, but a new hybrid inorganic/organic material could usher in solar cells that absorb all solar wavelengths.

The new polymer could also enable much more efficient charge separation since electrons dislodged by light in the material remain free much longer than in conventional solar cells.

The inorganic/organic hybrid polymer material can be made into polymer blends that can “absorb essentially across the entire solar spectrum–they go from about 300 nanometers down to about 10,000 nanometers,” said professor Malcolm Chisholm of Ohio State University.

Solar materials work by using incident light to boost the energy of electrons, thereby separating then from the hull of atoms in the material. They can then be harvested to generate electricity.

However, separated electrons fall back into their host atoms if not collected quickly. Usually, solar materials either fluoresce (called singlet emisson) or phosphoresce (triplet emission). The new hybrid material does both, further increasing potential efficiency.

“The materials we have made show both singlet and triplet emissions,” said Chisholm. “The singlet state lasts a relatively long time, in the region of about 10 pico seconds; the triplet lasts a lot longer–up to a 100 or so microseconds, which should be good for separating the electrons and the hull.”

The new material was designed at the Ohio Supercomputer Center and synthesized at the National Taiwan University. Funding was provided by the National Science Foundation and Ohio State’s Institute for Materials Research.

A detailed description of the new material was recently published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

More: OSU Research News

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:47 PM
http://cryptogon.com/?p=4705

‘Constitution-Free’ Zones Extend 100 Miles from the Border


I didn't know that....

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:48 PM
Toy Car Company Worth More Than GM (http://cryptogon.com/?p=4701)
October 28th, 2008

Via: Newsweek:

In the fad-driven fantasyland of toys, Hot Wheels has had an incredible ride. Those pocket rockets have been racing down their familiar orange tracks for four decades now and, unlike the real car market, show no signs of slowing down. Last year Hot Wheels set a record, as sales surged by 16 percent, and they continue to accelerate in 2008 even as the economy tanks. In fact, as Motown melts down, Hot Wheels is heating up. The tiny toy cars’ parent company, Mattel, now has a market capitalization that surpasses General Motors. That’s right—Wall Street thinks the maker of toy cars is worth more than the largest real carmaker in America.

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:49 PM
http://cryptogon.com/?p=4694

Fluoride Added to Children’s Milk in Schools Throughout UK City
October 28th, 2008

Via: PrisonPlanet:

Fluoride is being added to children’s milk in 42 schools throughout the city of Sheffield in the UK, despite the chemical’s proven link to liver and kidney damage, cancer and the lowering of IQ.

“A new strategy with the focus of preventing dental problems among children is be introduced in Sheffield,” reports the Yorkshire Post.

The move comes in response to figures showing that the state of children’s teeth in the city is slightly higher than the national average.

“At present, fluoride is added to children’s milk in 42 primary schools in the city. This will continue, and the local NHS is also planning to begin talks on the possibility of adding fluoride to water.” the report continues.

While Fluoride has been proven to have a minimal effect in the prevention of tooth decay, the negative effects of the chemical are legion according to several medical studies, far outweighing any positive aspects.

A recent Scientific American study “Concluded that fluoride can subtly alter endocrine function, especially in the thyroid — the gland that produces hormones regulating growth and metabolism.”

The report also notes that “a series of epidemiological studies in China have associated high fluoride exposures with lower IQ.”

50 per cent of the fluoride taken in on a daily basis remains in the body for life, accumulating in the skeleton. This can cause, skeletal fluorosis, a crippling and painful condition.

“Epidemiological studies and tests on lab animals suggest that high fluoride exposure increases the risk of bone fracture, especially in vulnerable populations such as the elderly and diabetics,” writes Dan Fagin.

Fagin interviewed Steven Levy, director of the Iowa Fluoride Study which tracked about 700 Iowa children for sixteen years. Nine-year-old “Iowa children who lived in communities where the water was fluoridated were 50 percent more likely to have mild fluorosis… than [nine-year-old] children living in nonfluoridated areas of the state,” writes Fagin.

The study adds to a growing literature of shocking scientific studies proving fluoride’s link with all manner of health defects, even as governments in the west, including recently the UK, make plans to mass medicate the population against their will with this deadly toxin.

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:55 PM
http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/Cassini-Huygens/SEMEM5T4LZE_0.html

Cassini images bizarre hexagon on Saturn

<img src="http://www.esa.int/images/PIA09188_reduced_L.jpg">

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:56 PM
http://www.sciencenews.org/view/generic/id/37612/title/Huge_cyclone_churns_at_Saturn%E2%80%99s_north_pole

Huge cyclone churns at Saturn’s north pole

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:57 PM
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/3252103/Nazis-hoped-to-found-empire-in-Amazonian-rainforest.html


Nazis hoped to found empire in Amazonian rainforest
Nazis travelled into the Amazon rainforest to scout suitable sites for a South American colony, according to a new book.

alkemical
10-28-2008, 12:58 PM
http://www.sciam.com/article.cfm?id=ghost-lusters-if-you-want

Ghost Lusters: If You Want to See a Specter Badly Enough, Will You?
Researchers set up "haunted" room to prove an electromagnetic theory of ghost sightings

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:02 PM
http://www.thunderbolts.info/thunderblogs/thornhill.htm


Assembling the Solar System

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:03 PM
http://environment.newscientist.com/article/dn15049-biblical-solomons-mines-confirmed-by-dating.html

Biblical 'Solomon's mines' confirmed by dating

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:03 PM
http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/10/28/vasimr_plasma_first_stage_test/

The VASIMR "helicon first stage" - which generates the plasma for acceleration by the rest of the drive - has achieved its full rated power of 30 kilowatts using Argon propellant, according to the company. This paves the way for further trials in which in which the ion-cyclotron second stage will get to strut its stuff, boosting the helicon plasma stream to the target power of 200 kW.

The successful first-stage fire-up was a collaborative effort between Ad Astra and Nautel of Canada.

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:04 PM
http://news.softpedia.com/news/The-Most-Ancient-Temple-In-the-World-So-Far-96609.shtml

The Most Ancient Temple in the World so Far
The Turkish Gobekli Tepe is six millennia older than Stonehenge

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:05 PM
http://technology.newscientist.com/channel/tech/mg20026796.100-red-light-may-rejuvenate-wrinkled-skin.html?DCMP=ILC-hmts&nsref=top1_head_Red%20LEDs%20could%20make%20anti-ageing%20device

unlight causes wrinkles, among other kinds of skin damage, but a different kind of light - specifically the red glow from LEDs - may help to smooth them out by altering the interactions between water and elastic proteins in the skin.

Andrei Sommer and Dan Zhu of the University of Ulm in Germany have been investigating how water molecules in the skin interact with different substances. They found that water molecules close to a hydrophobic, or "water-hating", substance formed a slippery crystalline layer, while those surrounding a hydrophilic, or water-loving, substance were glue-like.

Elastin, the fibrous protein that gives skin its elasticity and so counteracts wrinkling, is hydrophobic. But as we age, fatty acids, amino acids and calcium salts build up on the elastin fibres, making them hydrophilic. So the water film around the fibres becomes increasingly glue-like, causing them to stick to the surrounding tissue and reducing their elasticity.

Previous studies have suggested that red light with a wavelength of around 670 nanometres can make water molecules close to hydrophilic substances more mobile. So Sommer and Zhu aimed powerful red LEDs at the skin around the eyes for 90 seconds daily for 10 months, and found that it significantly reduced wrinkles (Crystal Growth and Design, DOI: 10.1021/cg8000703). "The result was rejuvenated skin," says Sommer.

Such LEDs have previously also been used to reverse eye damage and promote wound healing (New Scientist, 13 July 2002, p 16).

From issue 2679 of New Scientist magazine, 28 October 2008, page 21

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:06 PM
http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1579-Russian-holes-and-Hollow-Earth-Hassles.html

Friday, October 24. 2008
Russian holes and Hollow Earth Hassles

A year and a half ago we looked at odd holes that had been found in Russia and now reports suggest people have been stumbling on more.

Siberian residents have discovered about ten tunnels of unknown origin in a field near a highway connecting the cities of Krasnoyarsk and Abakan, near the village of Kurgany. According to news sources, each hole has an entrance to a cave-like hollow spot in the earth. Some of the tunnels are big enough for a medium-sized person to stand upright and some speculate that all of the underground passages are interconnected. This has not been proven beyond the shadow of a doubt, although a few intrepid souls equipped with flashlights have attempted to walk across all the tunnels.

...

Local residents have no shortage of theories concerning these strange formations. Some believe the tunnels to be the handiwork of unidentified pranksters, while others point fingers at mysterious (and unseen) animals that dig holes in the ground. Still another theory purports a connection to the tunnels with an earthquake that occurred in the area some three years ago.


Worth bearing in mind that Shamballah is sometimes said to be somewhere in southern Siberia or Mongolia (usually the Siberians say Mongolia and the Mongolians say Siberia - as with all lost mstical places it is often somewhere "not here" otherwise you'd have found it naturally).

Source

Hat tip

Of course, is someone digging down or digging out from... below. There is a book out that looks at Hollow Earth business:

Long before there was the Internet with which to propound alternate theories of reality, there was the small circulation newsletter. A labor of love for devotees of fringe and "out there" topics, some of these tiny "zines" developed a devoted following of readers eager to learn more about such topics as UFOs and occult subjects usually given short shrift by the mainstream print media.

One such publication was "The Hollow Hassle," a subscription newsletter that focused on the famous "Shaver Mysteries" and other subterranean subject matters.

...

But by the 1960s, interest in Shaver had begun to fade, and it was left to believers like Mary J. Martin to take up the task of keeping the subject alive and relevant.

Martin started a newsletter called "The Hollow Hassle," which ran for several years off and on, finally petering out completely in the mid-1980s. Martin's newsletter featured the writings of well-known Hollow Earth believers like Charles A. Marcoux and his wife Lorene, Tal Lavesque, and Bruce Walton, who now goes by the name Branton. In the new book's introduction, Martin said it would inevitably be a "hassle" to prove the group's beliefs, thus the newsletter's title.

Along with journalist Tim R. Swartz, Martin has recently compiled a "Best Of" collection of articles and essays from the newsletter that provides an excellent history of this grassroots newsletter approach to the mysteries Richard Shaver helped introduce to the world.


The beauty of it is that they don't just follow Shaver's ideas but go off into all sorts of strange areas: finding the Garden of Eden, meeting inner Earth giants and beyond. There is even a section from Shaver himself about the connection with UFOs (and throwing in the JFK assassinations for good measure). I suspect books like this are beyond simple notions of "good" and "bad" and may depend on what you are looking for: reinforcing your beliefs or some Fortean tourism into some of the stranger lands at the edge of the map (or under it).

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:08 PM
http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/damndata/index.php?/archives/1581-Ganesh-grows-in-New-York-and-spreads-miracles.html

Sunday, October 26. 2008
Ganesh grows in New York and spreads miracles

Another nice piece of religious simulacra has already started accumulating claims about its purported healing powers. It is also a return of our old friend Ganesh:

To most people, the purple flower that sprouted between two concrete slabs in a Queens backyard would be just a hardy vestige of summer.

Sam Lal sees something more.

The Jamaica man is convinced the mysterious blossom is an incarnation of the elephant-headed Hindu god Ganesh - and neighbors and friends are flocking to see it.

The nearly 4-foot-tall flower grew in June and began to resemble an elephant's head and trunk in August. Lal said that the ailments that had plagued him for months disappeared.


The strange part of our tale is that the plant is alien to the US and doesn't grow into that shape:

Experts at the Queens Botanical Garden identified the plant as a member of the amaranth family, which is native to Africa, India and southern Central America but not the U.S. Horticulturalists at the garden have never seen an amaranth take an elephant-like shape, garden spokesman Tim Heimerle said.


"For it to have that long trunk like this is not a natural thing," he said.

Source

The story is spreading far and wide:

Since The News broke the story yesterday, everyone on Lal's block in Jamaica wanted to get a peek at the incredible flower.

"I'll never see anything like this in my lifetime," said Deepesh Patel, 25. His cousin, Uddit Patel, 17, says the flower definitely made a believer of him.

"I was astounded," Uddit Patel said. "It's proof there is a God."

The amazing plant story has been picked up by news media around the world, particularly in India, home to 1 billion Hindus.


<img src="http://www.wunderkabinett.co.uk/gallery/albums/userpics/10003/ganesh_flower.jpg">

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:12 PM
http://www.skilluminati.com/Research/entry/newt_gingrich_on_using_language_for_social_control

Newt Gingrich on Using Language for Social Control

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:14 PM
http://www.newscientist.com/channel/being-human/dn15060-brain-scans-show-the-difference-between-love-and-hate.html?feedId=online-news_rss20

Brain scans show the difference between love and hate

alkemical
10-28-2008, 01:15 PM
http://technology.newscientist.com/channel/tech/dn15052-magnet-triggers-colours-in-blind-mans-brain.html?feedId=tech_rss20

Magnet triggers colours in 'blind' man's brain

alkemical
10-29-2008, 06:10 AM
http://www.monbiot.com/archives/2008/10/28/the-triumph-of-ignorance/

The Triumph of Ignorance
Posted October 28, 2008

Why morons succeed in US politics.

By George Monbiot. Published in the Guardian 28th October 2008

How was it allowed to happen? How did politics in the US come to be dominated by people who make a virtue out of ignorance? Was it charity that has permitted mankind’s closest living relative to spend two terms as president? How did Sarah Palin, Dan Quayle and other such gibbering numbskulls get to where they are? How could Republican rallies in 2008 be drowned out by screaming ignoramuses insisting that Barack Obama is a Muslim and a terrorist?(1)

Like most people on this side of the Atlantic I have spent my adult life mystified by American politics. The US has the world’s best universities and attracts the world’s finest minds. It dominates discoveries in science and medicine. Its wealth and power depend on the application of knowledge. Yet, uniquely among the developed nations (with the possible exception of Australia), learning is a grave political disadvantage.

There have been exceptions over the past century: Franklin Roosevelt, Kennedy and Clinton tempered their intellectualism with the common touch and survived; but Adlai Stevenson, Al Gore and John Kerry were successfully tarred by their opponents as members of a cerebral elite (as if this were not a qualification for the presidency). Perhaps the defining moment in the collapse of intelligent politics was Ronald Reagan’s response to Jimmy Carter during the 1980 presidential debate. Carter - stumbling a little, using long words - carefully enumerated the benefits of national health insurance. Reagan smiled and said “there you go again”(2). His own health programme would have appalled most Americans, had he explained it as carefully as Carter had done, but he had found a formula for avoiding tough political issues and making his opponents look like wonks.

It wasn’t always like this. The founding fathers of the republic - men like Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, James Madison, John Adams and Alexander Hamilton - were among the greatest thinkers of their age. They felt no need to make a secret of it. How did the project they launched degenerate into George W Bush and Sarah Palin?

On one level this is easy to answer. Ignorant politicians are elected by ignorant people. US education, like the US health system, is notorious for its failures. In the most powerful nation on earth, one adult in five believes the sun revolves around the earth; only 26% accept that evolution takes place by means of natural selection; two-thirds of young adults are unable to find Iraq on a map; two-thirds of US voters cannot name the three branches of government; the maths skills of 15 year-olds in the US are ranked 24th out of the 29 countries of the OECD(3).

But this merely extends the mystery: how did so many US citizens become so dumb, and so suspicious of intelligence? Susan Jacoby’s book The Age of American Unreason provides the fullest explanation I have read so far. She shows that the degradation of US politics results from a series of interlocking tragedies.

One theme is both familiar and clear: religion - in particular fundamentalist religion - makes you stupid. The US is the only rich country in which Christian fundamentalism is vast and growing.

Jacoby shows that there was once a certain logic to its anti-rationalism. During the first few decades after the publication of The Origin of Species, for example, Americans had good reason to reject the theory of natural selection and to treat public intellectuals with suspicion. From the beginning, Darwin’s theory was mixed up in the US with the brutal philosophy - now known as Social Darwinism - of the British writer Herbert Spencer. Spencer’s doctrine, promoted in the popular press with the help of funding from Andrew Carnegie, John D. Rockefeller and Thomas Edison, suggested that millionaires stood at the top of a scala natura established by evolution. By preventing unfit people from being weeded out, government intervention weakened the nation. Gross economic inequalities were both justifiable and necessary(4).

Darwinism, in other words, became indistinguishable to the public from the most bestial form of laissez-faire economics. Many Christians responded with revulsion. It is profoundly ironic that the doctrine rejected a century ago by such prominent fundamentalists as William Jennings Bryan is now central to the economic thinking of the Christian right. Modern fundamentalists reject the science of Darwinian evolution and accept the pseudoscience of Social Darwinism.

But there were other, more powerful, reasons for the intellectual isolation of the fundamentalists. The US is peculiar in devolving the control of education to local authorities. Teaching in the southern states was dominated by the views of an ignorant aristocracy of planters, and a great educational gulf opened up. “In the South”, Jacoby writes, “what can only be described as an intellectual blockade was imposed in order to keep out any ideas that might threaten the social order.”(5)

The Southern Baptist Convention, now the biggest Protestant denomination in the US, was to slavery and segregation what the Dutch Reformed Church was to apartheid in South Africa. It has done more than any other force to keep the South stupid. In the 1960s it tried to stave off desegregation by establishing a system of private Christian schools and universities. A student can now progress from kindergarten to a higher degree without any exposure to secular teaching. Southern Baptist beliefs pass intact through the public school system as well. A survey by researchers at the University of Texas in 1998 found that one in four of the state’s public school biology teachers believed that humans and dinosaurs lived on earth at the same time(6).

This tragedy has been assisted by the American fetishisation of self-education. Though he greatly regretted his lack of formal teaching, Abraham Lincoln’s career is repeatedly cited as evidence that good education, provided by the state, is unnecessary: all that is required to succeed is determination and rugged individualism. This might have served people well when genuine self-education movements, like the one built around the Little Blue Books in the first half of the 20th century, were in vogue. In the age of infotainment it is a recipe for confusion.

Besides fundamentalist religion, perhaps the most potent reason why intellectuals struggle in elections is that intellectualism has been equated with subversion. The brief flirtation of some thinkers with communism a long time ago has been used to create an impression in the public mind that all intellectuals are communists. Almost every day men like Rush Limbaugh and Bill O’Reilly rage against the “liberal elites” destroying America.

The spectre of pointy-headed alien subversives was crucial to the election of Reagan and Bush. A genuine intellectual elite - like the neocons (some of them former communists) surrounding Bush - has managed to pitch the political conflict as a battle between ordinary Americans and an over-educated pinko establishment. Any attempt to challenge the ideas of the rightwing elite has been successfully branded as elitism.

Obama has a good deal to offer America, but none of this will come to an end if he wins. Until the great failures of the US education system are reversed or religious fundamentalism withers there will be political opportunities for people, like Bush and Palin, who flaunt their ignorance.

www.monbiot.com

alkemical
10-29-2008, 08:16 AM
FBI Counter Terrorism Manual:

http://cryptome.org/fbi-ct-lexicon.pdf

alkemical
10-29-2008, 08:19 AM
http://www.networkworld.com/community/node/34597

NSA and Army on quest for quantum physics jackpot
By Layer 8 on Tue, 10/28/2008 - 1:35pm.

Sounds like a dangerous combination. The US Army Research Office and the National Security Agency (NSA) are together looking for some answers to their quantum physics questions.

Specifically the scary couple is soliciting proposals to achieve three broad goals:

-develop new quantum computing algorithms for hard computational problems;

-characterize the efficiency of candidate quantum algorithms;

-develop insights into the power of quantum computation and consider issues of quantum complexity and computability.

The announcement went on to say proposals for research should devise specific quantum algorithms to solve mathematically and computationally hard problems from such diverse fields as algebra, number theory, geometry, analysis, optimization, graph theory, differential equations, combinatorics, topology, logic, and simulation.

The Army said quantum algorithms that are developed should focus on constructive solutions for specific tasks, and on general methodologies for expressing and analyzing algorithms tailored to specific problems- though they didn't say what those specific tasks were or problems exactly were.

Other specifics of that the NSA and Army are looking for are as follows:

"To characterize the efficiency of candidate quantum algorithms, metrics must be developed to quantify the performance of quantum algorithms relative to their classical analogs. The problems to which they are being applied must have well-defined inputs, and well-defined outputs, along with a well-defined statement of what exactly is being computed. A full accounting of all computational resources must be made including such things as numbers of qubits, numbers of quantum gates, amount of memory being used, amounts of classical pre-computation and post-computation, probability of success, and number of times the algorithm must be run.

Investigators should presuppose the existence of a fully functional quantum computer and consider what algorithmic tasks are particularly well suited to such a machine. A necessary component of this research will be to compare the efficiency of the quantum algorithm to the best existing classical algorithm for the same problem."

The agencies went on to say they expect to award in March 2009 multiple, one to three year awards of less than $200K per year.

Quantum physics has long been an area of enormous government interest. In March, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency said it was looking for innovative research proposals in the intriguing area of quantum entanglement -- a developing component of quantum physics that looks at the behavior between atoms and photons that could ultimately play a key role in developing security, unbelievably fast networks and even teleportation. DARPA's program, called Quantum Entanglement Science and Technology (QuEST) has the lofty goal of developing revolutionary advances in the fundamental understanding of quantum information science, DARPA said.

DARPA last month put out a research request it calls Mathematical Challenges, that has the mighty goal of "dramatically revolutionizing mathematics and thereby strengthening DoD's scientific and technological capabilities." The challenges are in fact 23 questions that if answered, would offer a high potential for major mathematical breakthroughs, DARPA said.

And just this month researchers at the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) have demonstrated a technique that could make quantum cryptography significantly cheaper to implement, moving it nearer to possible commercial acceptance. The technique is aimed at cutting the cost of equipment needed for quantum key distribution (QKD), designed to distribute cryptographic keys using a secure system based on the principles of quantum mechanics.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 08:21 AM
http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=7,444,128.PN.&OS=PN/7,444,128&RS=PN/7,444,128

Method of estimating a high frequency carrier signal

Abstract

A method of estimating the carrier frequency of a signal is disclosed. The method comprising the steps of initializing a time average vector to zero, selecting a user-selectable time segment to divide a received signal into. A signal is received, and divided into the user-selectable time segments. A spectral peak vector is calculated by performing a spectral estimation process on the user-selectable time segment divided signal. A first correlation vector is calculated on the spectral peak vector, and a second correlation vector is calculated from the spectral peak vector and the first correlation vector. The time average vector is appended with the result from the second correlation vector, and the process repeats for each time segment the received signal was broken into. The carrier is estimated using the most commonly occurring frequency in the time average vector.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 08:22 AM
http://patft.uspto.gov/netacgi/nph-Parser?Sect1=PTO1&Sect2=HITOFF&d=PALL&p=1&u=%2Fnetahtml%2FPTO%2Fsrchnum.htm&r=1&f=G&l=50&s1=7,442,577.PN.&OS=PN/7,442,577&RS=PN/7,442,577

Method of fabricating a patterned device using sacrificial spacer layer

Abstract

The present invention is a method of fabricating a patterned device using a sacrificial spacer layer. The first step in this process is to select an appropriate substrate and form a step thereon. The sacrificial layer is then applied to the substrate and a blocking layer is deposited on the sacrificial layer. The blocking layer is etched back to define the mask for the semiconductor structure and the sacrificial layer is removed. The substrate is then etched using the gap created by removal of the sacrificial layer.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 08:24 AM
http://www.bloomberg.com/apps/news?pid=20601087&sid=aox4ZwDlWkvQ&refer=home

Oct. 27 (Bloomberg) -- The credit crunch is compounding a profit squeeze for farmers that may curb global harvests and worsen a food crisis for developing countries.

Global production of wheat, the most-consumed food crop, may drop 4.4 percent next year, said Dan Basse, president of AgResource Co. in Chicago, who has advised farmers, food companies and investors for 29 years. Harvests of corn and soybeans also are likely to fall, Basse said.

Smaller crops risk reviving prices of farm commodities that sank from records in 2008 after a six-year rally that spurred inflation and sparked riots from Asia to the Caribbean. Futures contracts on the Chicago Board of Trade show wheat will jump 16 percent by the end of 2009, corn will rise 15 percent and soybeans will gain 3 percent.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 08:26 AM
http://cryptome.org/tsa-fire-iid.pdf

TSA documentation on Incendiary devices.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 10:12 AM
http://www.lancastereaglegazette.com/article/20081027/NEWS01/810270323/1002

Coleman is probably the most well-known current cryptozoologist. He has made many field expeditions, done extensive research and written several books.

The Buru is a large, unknown lizard thought by some to have lived in the remote valleys of the Himalayas of Assam in the northeast corner of India. Coleman further mentioned that the reptile was approximately 15 to 20 feet in length, aquatic by nature, and emitted hoarse bellowing calls. He mentioned that the journalist, Ralph Izzard, among others, had led an expedition in 1948 in search of the Buru.

Izzard's journal was later published as "The Hunt for the Buru" in 1951. Coleman also stated that they had failed to uncover any solid evidence of the creature. However, there was enough testimony from earlier encounters to persuade the father of cryptozoology, Bernard Heuvelman, that these lizards might be only recently extinct.

After reading about the Buru, I was excited to learn more, so I Googled the term. Wikipedia identified the Buru as an aquatic reptile living in the Ziro Valley of Arunachal Peradesh in Northeastern India. Professor Christopher Von Furer-Haimendorf was the first Westerner to be told about this reptile. It was thought at the time that Buru might have already gone extinct in the valley.

According to the Apatani elders, when their forefathers migrated from Tibet to the Ziro Valley, the valley was primarily a marsh that was populated by many Burus. The Apatani people decided to settle in the valley because of its fertility and good climate. However, on occasion, confrontations with the Burus presented a problem. As a result, the Apatani Indian tribe drained the marsh of its water and apparently might have eliminated the Burus. Most of the Burus died because of the drainage and many supposedly went underground into the springs.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 10:15 AM
http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/news/uk/scotland/article5019976.ece

The average Viking lived a life in which spirituality and thoughts of immortality played a far more important part than the rape and pillage more usually associated with his violent race, according to new research. A study of thousands of excavated Viking graves suggests that rituals were performed at the graveside in which stories about life and death were presented as theatre, with live performances designed to help the passage of the deceased from this world into the next.

Neil Price, Chair of Archaeology at the University of Aberdeen, who will be presenting his findings at a lecture at the university tonight, believes that these rituals may have been the early beginnings of the Norse sagas, which told stories about men and gods in the pagan world. He said that close study of the graves and the artefacts they contained, as well as contemporary accounts of Viking funerals, presented a far more complex picture of their lives than the simple myth of the Viking raider.

Detailed analysis of the burials revealed a remarkable variety of objects found alongside the bodies - from everyday items to great longships, wagons and sledges, together with animals of many different species and even human sacrifices.

Professor Price said: “Close analysis of Viking burials not only gives us an insight into the workings of their minds, but most importantly how slim they perceived the boundaries to be between life and death, and between humans and animals.”

He said that the burial rituals suggested the Vikings had no defined religion, but instead made up a set of spiritual beliefs, which were then acted out at the graveside. These became a form of theatre that predates the sagas and may have contained the origins of Norse mythology - the inspiration for Wagner's operas.

Professor Price said: “There seem to have been something like stage directions dictating how these rituals were to be enacted. Eyewitness accounts suggest that there were as many as ten days of ritual, with enormous time and effort put into the performances.”

The artefacts buried with the dead varied enormously. “No two graves were the same,” he said. Some bore evidence of a military career, with whole ships containing the corpse left open. Other graves were found to have had animal remains - one had no fewer than 20 decapitated horses - and occasionally there were human remains as well. Some Vikings were buried with their wives and families, others were laid to rest in more simple single graves.


http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/3256539/Vikings-preferred-male-grooming-to-pillaging.html

But Cambridge University has launched a campaign to recast them as "new men" with an interest in grooming, fashion and poetry.

Academics claim that the old stereotype is damaging, and want teenagers to be more appreciative of the Vikings' social and cultural impact on Britain.

They say that the Norse explorers, far from being obsessed with fighting and drinking, were a largely-peaceful race who were even criticised for being too hygienic.

The university's department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic has published a guide revealing how much of the Vikings' history has been misrepresented.

They did not, in fact, wear horned or winged helmets. And they appear to have been a vain race who were concerned about their appearance.

"It seems that the Vikings may not have been as hairy and dirty as is commonly imagined," the guide says.

"A medieval chronicler, John of Wallingford, talking about the eleventh century, complained that the Danes were too clean - they combed their hair every day, washed every Saturday, and changed their clothes regularly."

The guide reveals that Norsemen were also stylish trend-setters: "Contemporaries who met individual Vikings were struck by the extreme bagginess of their trousers.

"A tenth-century Persian explorer described trousers (of Vikings in Russia) that were made of one hundred cubits of material, and a number of runestones depict warriors with flared breeches."

The traditional view of the Vikings as "illiterate warring thugs" exaggerates considerably the reality of their life, the academics argue.

"Although Norse men and women may have sometimes liked fighting and drinking, and were sometimes buried with weapons, they also spent much of their time in peaceful activities such as farming, building, writing and illustrating."

The guide points out that the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, a contemporary list of notable events beginning in the ninth century and running through to the twelfth, records some battles, but not for every year.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 10:16 AM
http://www.astigan.com/2008/10/29/alien-fish-in-swedish-waters/


<img src="http://www.astigan.com/wp-content/uploads/2008/10/roundgoby.jpg">
(Astigan.com) — A round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) was caught in late July off the Swedish coast near Karlskrona. This is the first find of its kind in Sweden.

The species, which originates from the Black Sea and probably spread to the Baltic via ballast water, has been found in the Gulf of Gdansk since 1990, in the southern Baltic. Today it is one of the most common coastal fishes there, so it was expected that it would show up in Swedish waters sooner or later, according to researcher Gustaf Almqvist of Stockholm University.

Göran Pettersson is the man behind the sensational catch, which he made as he was bottom angling for perch in Saltsösund outside Karlskrona. Göran, who is from Sibbehult in Scania, has experienced many fish catches in the waters surrounding Karlskrona, but he had never seen this species before. He was even more surprised when, later that day, he caught three more of them.

“I’m interested in fishing, and after having compared them with pictures on the Internet and from an account in the magazine Svensk Fiske (Swedish Fishing), I immediately understood that what I had pulled in were round gobies,” says Göran Pettersson.

Göran alertly froze one of the fish and reported the find to the Swedish Board of Fisheries Coastal Laboratory, which then conveyed the find to Gustaf Almqvist at Stockholm University, who, together with Sven Kullander of the Swedish Museum of Natural History, was able to confirm that it was indeed a round goby. It was a 96 mm long male that was estimated to be two, or at most three, years old.

“It was only to be expected that it would become established in Swedish waters sooner or later. Roe and fry can be spread via ballast water. It’s logical that the first specimen was found in Karlskrona considering the intensive boat traffic between Karlskrona and Polish waters,” says Gustaf Almqvist, who defended his doctoral dissertation on the round goby at Stockholm University earlier this year.

In his dissertation he showed how the round goby has become one of the most colorful features of the southern Baltic in less than three decades. The fish primarily feeds on mussels. It can be 30 cm long and is a popular food fish in its original home region. The species has rapidly adapted to Baltic conditions and locally can dominate coastal fish populations. This has also meant that they compete with domestic bottom-dwelling fishes, and studies have shown that it can edge out the European flounder from certain areas. It has also become an important component in the diet of key predatory fishes such as cod and perch, and during some part of the year can constitute the most important prey for these fishes. Since the other prey of these predators do not feed on sea mussels to any great extent, the round goby is a new link between mussels and predatory fishes.

It is too early to determine whether these are merely a few stray specimens or whether the species has truly become established in Blekinge.

“Since the round goby winters in deeper waters, where they are harder to catch, targeted survey fishing probably can’t get underway until spring. The fish may very well already exist in other areas along the Swedish coast, especially in harbor areas with especially intensive trade relations with the southern Baltic,” says Gustaf Almqvist.

alkemical
10-29-2008, 10:20 AM
Cyprus officials search for mystery 'monster' (http://www.famagusta-gazette.com/default.asp?sourceid=&smenu=69&twindow=Default&mad=No&sdetail=6085&wpage=&skeyword=&sidate=&ccat=&ccatm=&restate=&restatus=&reoption=&retype=&repmin=&repmax=&rebed=&rebath=&subname=&pform=&sc=2350&hn=famagusta-gazette&he=.)