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Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 07:27 AM
I've started this thread for a few years now, so I figure I'll start it again. It's time to get the earth turned over and get ready to seed and plant. Same old deal with me - pole beans, squash, radish, green leaf, cukes, onions, tomatoes. Strawberries I get plenty every year, raspberries the birds get them too fast. I'll get the grapes, apples later in the year. Wild plums I'll get plenty of them come late August.

So, what are your gardening plans?

400HZ
04-19-2008, 08:52 AM
I'm going to grow some goddamn tomatoes this year.

broncofan2438
04-19-2008, 10:30 AM
Im going to grow some Charger haiter fans

Paladin
04-19-2008, 10:35 AM
I had six tomato plants out last year, and a damm deer ate them up. The SOBs just don't fear anything when food is out there, do they? This year, I am gonna build a 10 foot fence around the plants, and put in a security system......

Or invite someone to sit on my patio and plink the damm things......

baja
04-19-2008, 10:46 AM
My garden season is coming to an end but I want to figure a way to grow in the heat of the summer. I want to try a green house with evaporative coolers and natural shade.

Normally I grow a lot of sprouts and wheat grass and make a higher % of my diet in season fruit.

BowlenBall
04-19-2008, 11:51 AM
Gardening thread?

A FREAKING GARDENING THREAD?

What's next -- a sewing circle thread? Are we football fans, or are we a bunch of Nancy boys?

Dagmar
04-19-2008, 11:54 AM
http://www.buymarijuanaforsale.com/marijuana.jpg

How does my garden grow?

Dagmar
04-19-2008, 11:57 AM
Gardening thread?

A FREAKING GARDENING THREAD?

What's next -- a sewing circle thread? Are we football fans, or are we a bunch of Nancy boys?

I think we all know the answer to that...






















http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/MMPH/263463~Boy-George-Posters.jpg

We like to prance, in the land of the nance...

~Crash~
04-19-2008, 12:28 PM
My garden season is coming to an end but I want to figure a way to grow in the heat of the summer. I want to try a green house with evaporative coolers and natural shade.

Normally I grow a lot of sprouts and wheat grass and make a higher % of my diet in season fruit.

I have to grow in the heat I do have problems setting after 103 * will this help you if not I could see evaporative coolers .... let me know I got a tomato cultvar that sets up to 103*

last year I was setting veggies all season long first time ever:strong:

Sassy
04-19-2008, 12:29 PM
Gardening thread?

A FREAKING GARDENING THREAD?

What's next -- a sewing circle thread? Are we football fans, or are we a bunch of Nancy boys?

...and just what is wrong with that.
We have some serious gardeners on here.

...and it is still the off-season!

Sassy
04-19-2008, 12:30 PM
I've started this thread for a few years now, so I figure I'll start it again. It's time to get the earth turned over and get ready to seed and plant. Same old deal with me - pole beans, squash, radish, green leaf, cukes, onions, tomatoes. Strawberries I get plenty every year, raspberries the birds get them too fast. I'll get the grapes, apples later in the year. Wild plums I'll get plenty of them come late August.

So, what are your gardening plans?

I have strawberries coming up all over...but still need to my garden cleaned out...will do it this weekend! It's gorgeous out today and tomorrow!

I have a really small space...but I'll throw in the usual peppers, a couple of grape/cherry tomatoes and some spices...Oh yeah...and the usual ton of daisies, lilies, hydrangeas, lavendar, etc.

~Crash~
04-19-2008, 12:32 PM
Gardening thread?

A FREAKING GARDENING THREAD?

What's next -- a sewing circle thread? Are we football fans, or are we a bunch of Nancy boys?


I never seen a farmer called a Nancy boy but if you think growing food a bad thing you need some hunger pains lol

BowlenBall
04-19-2008, 12:40 PM
...and just what is wrong with that.
We have some serious gardeners on here.

...and it is still the off-season!

I know -- I'm not trying to denigrate gardeners. It's just a little.... well... effete for a football message board.

Check out the Raiders message boards -- they've got offseason topics like "OT: need advice on how to decline my cellmate's unwanted advances". Chiefs fans have threads titled "OT: what states allow first-cousin marriages?"

And then there's the Chargers message board thread: "How can we remain loyal to a team chock-full of dorkwads like Phillip Rivers and Shawne 'lights-off' Merriman"? (this one is actually on-topic)

Now THOSE are some appropriate off-season threads!

~Crash~
04-19-2008, 12:40 PM
I have strawberries coming up all over...but still need to my garden cleaned out...will do it this weekend! It's gorgeous out today and tomorrow!


I wish I could grow strawberrys I love them I keep trying ... no luck !!! I always get bussy late august and foget to watter not good here in Arkansas .... in Idaho no biggie they would some how make it though the year ...

I gues I sould put in a watter sytsem I am to busssy this year but maybe next year I will do my whole place


My black berries are going to be a bumper crop for the fist time in 3 years the late frost did not get to them this year !!!!!!!!!!!!!Booya! !Booya! !Booya!

Sassy
04-19-2008, 12:54 PM
I had 3 strawberry plants is all...now it's going to be a pain to rake out the leaves around them...hopefully, I don't have the deer/rabbits get them.

Sassy
04-19-2008, 12:56 PM
I know -- I'm not trying to denigrate gardeners. It's just a little.... well... effete for a football message board.

Check out the Raiders message boards -- they've got offseason topics like "OT: need advice on how to decline my cellmate's unwanted advances". Chiefs fans have threads titled "OT: what states allow first-cousin marriages?"

And then there's the Chargers message board thread: "How can we remain loyal to a team chock-full of dorkwads like Phillip Rivers and Shawne 'lights-off' Merriman"? (this one is actually on-topic)

Now THOSE are some appropriate off-season threads!

This board discusses everything in the off-season...and during the season in the off-topics/political. It's a football board...but we do talk about other things...what else is there to do when there is not much football talk.
My guess is that every sports board will have off-topics especially during the summer. Besides, most of the regulars here have been meeting for games and chatting for the last 7 years...so we do know a lot about each other.

Citi..now you have me all excited...I need to go to the nursery and see what they've got out today! LOL!....it's early here yet...so I'm guessing it might be a couple of weeks before everything is out.

Bronco Billy
04-19-2008, 01:00 PM
I can see Expatfan's point about a gardening thread on a football site, but it's been on here in the past and it doesn't even come close to the worst OT threads in the off-season.

OABB
04-19-2008, 01:10 PM
I know -- I'm not trying to denigrate gardeners. It's just a little.... well... effete for a football message board.

Check out the Raiders message boards -- they've got offseason topics like "OT: need advice on how to decline my cellmate's unwanted advances". Chiefs fans have threads titled "OT: what states allow first-cousin marriages?"

And then there's the Chargers message board thread: "How can we remain loyal to a team chock-full of dorkwads like Phillip Rivers and Shawne 'lights-off' Merriman"? (this one is actually on-topic)

Now THOSE are some appropriate off-season threads!

lol!

as far as the nature of nancy boys here, don't get me started.

however, i don't think gardening qualifies as effete...

and, as sassy said, it's the offseason...

at least no one's asking where to find a certain soft drink....

Los Broncos
04-19-2008, 01:13 PM
Dam, wish I had a garden.

Did a lot of it when I was younger.

Sassy
04-19-2008, 01:19 PM
Gardening thread?

A FREAKING GARDENING THREAD?

What's next -- a sewing circle thread? Are we football fans, or are we a bunch of Nancy boys?

The main board will go back to all football once the season starts...

BowlenBall
04-19-2008, 01:22 PM
The main board will go back to all football once the season starts...

Sorry Sassy, I was just poking a little fun, that's all. The "OT:Gardening Thread" title just struck me as funny.

Besides, I actually DID find a gardening thread on the Raiders message boards. Here's a picture::thanku:

http://www.planet-wissen.de/pics/IEPics/stimmtes_cannabis.jpg

Los Broncos
04-19-2008, 01:23 PM
http://www.buymarijuanaforsale.com/marijuana.jpg

How does my garden grow?

Legalize it, save some sensimilla for me.

Sassy
04-19-2008, 01:24 PM
Sorry Sassy, I was just poking a little fun, that's all. The "OT:Gardening Thread" title just struck me as funny.

Besides, I actually DID find a gardening thread on the Raiders message boards. Here's a picture::thanku:

http://www.planet-wissen.de/pics/IEPics/stimmtes_cannabis.jpg

Ha! Well, the Raider fans don't typically have ANY football to talk about all season :devil: ;D

~Crash~
04-19-2008, 01:36 PM
Dam, wish I had a garden.

Did a lot of it when I was younger.

Make one you can garden any were !

Sodak
04-19-2008, 03:44 PM
I like to grow bananas!

Sassy
04-19-2008, 03:48 PM
I like to grow bananas!

One Giant Slip for Mankind

Believed by some religious historians to be the original Forbidden Fruit, bananas are said to have provided Adam and Eve with not only the first temptation but, once they had slipped, the green leaves that became the first human apparel.


World Gone Bananas

Americans eat an average of 30 pounds of bananas per year, making this the leading fresh fruit we consume. Bananas are an all-important staple in countries like Uganda, where annual consumption adds up to 475 pounds per person—about 3.5 medium bananas per day. Starchy plantains (cooking bananas) account for some 80 percent of the world's banana crop.


Herb of Plenty

Botanists know bananas as berries, the fruits of some 300 species of giant perennial herb plants in the genus Musa that grow up to 30 feet tall and are cultivated worldwide in moist tropical zones. Each treelike stalk produces just one mammoth flower, which yields 10 to 14 clusters (hands), each with 10 to 14 bananas (fingers).


Alexander to Elvis

While marching through India in 327 B.C., Alexander the Great is credited by some with discovering bananas for the Western world. Many horticulturists believe that bananas were the first cultivated plant, probably originating in Malaysia and spread by merchants and travelers making their way throughout Asia, then on to the Middle East, Europe, Africa and the Americas. In Memphis, Tennessee, at the other end of the timeline, Elvis Presley grew corpulent and died in 1977 on a diet that included mashed bananas in fried "Peanut Butter & Nanner Sammiches."


Cheap bananas, si. Pricy chinos, no.

Banana Republic: def. "Term for a small, often Latin American country, politically unstable, dependent on limited agriculture, and ruled by a small, wealthy and corrupt clique. Coined by O. Henry, American humorist and short-story writer, in reference to Honduras." (www.en.wikipedia.org)


Judging a Banana by Its Cover

Unlike most other fruits, bananas are able to be picked while still very green. Shipped as refrigerated cargo, they are best for eating when their skin ripens to yellow and starches convert rapidly to sugars. Even in their tropical homelands, bananas are cut green and allowed to yellow slowly in a cool, shady place. Ripe bananas can be refrigerated, although this blackens the skins. A yellowing banana emits generous amounts of ethylene gas, which can help hasten the ripening of tomatoes, avocados, green bananas and other fruits when enclosed together in a paper or plastic bag.


Hangover Shake

Banana milkshakes are widely reputed to be effective morning-after restoratives, calming the stomach and rehydrating the system. (Blend 1-2 cups cold milk or soymilk, 1 large ripe banana, 2-4 Tbsp. honey. Optional: Add 1 Tbsp. cream, dash nutmeg, dash salt.)


Chimps Prefer Organic

When given a choice of conventional or organic bananas, animals at the Copenhagen Zoo opt for organic. According to their keepers, chimpanzees and tapirs devour organic bananas, skin and all, while the dexterous primates peel conventionally grown bananas before consumption.


Splitsville, USA

Two towns lay claim to having created the banana split. David E. "Doc" Strickler, a Latrobe, Pennsylvania, pharmacist and optometrist, is believed by food historians to have composed the first banana split in 1904, selling it for a hefty 10 cents, twice the price of a standard sundae. "Years ago, when a guy took his best girl out," says Strickler's son William, "he bought her a banana split. Other girls just got ice cream cones." Today, Wilmington, Ohio, holds a local festival, making its own claim to having originated the three-scoop classic.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 04:19 PM
Gardening thread?

A FREAKING GARDENING THREAD?

What's next -- a sewing circle thread? Are we football fans, or are we a bunch of Nancy boys?

Hey, I'm one tough gardener, asshole. I don't even wear gloves when I prune.

baja
04-19-2008, 04:28 PM
Gardening thread?

A FREAKING GARDENING THREAD?

What's next -- a sewing circle thread? Are we football fans, or are we a bunch of Nancy boys?

You should just go out and find a dick to suck and get over your homophobia and these things will cease to bother you.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 04:32 PM
I know -- I'm not trying to denigrate gardeners. It's just a little.... well... effete for a football message board.

Check out the Raiders message boards -- they've got offseason topics like "OT: need advice on how to decline my cellmate's unwanted advances". Chiefs fans have threads titled "OT: what states allow first-cousin marriages?"

And then there's the Chargers message board thread: "How can we remain loyal to a team chock-full of dorkwads like Phillip Rivers and Shawne 'lights-off' Merriman"? (this one is actually on-topic)

Now THOSE are some appropriate off-season threads!

Well, appropriate for those fans. How about if I title the thread next year: "Take that dirt, I'll show you who's boss"?

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 05:14 PM
I wish I could grow strawberrys I love them I keep trying ... no luck !!! I always get bussy late august and foget to watter not good here in Arkansas .... in Idaho no biggie they would some how make it though the year ...

I gues I sould put in a watter sytsem I am to busssy this year but maybe next year I will do my whole place


My black berries are going to be a bumper crop for the fist time in 3 years the late frost did not get to them this year !!!!!!!!!!!!!Booya! !Booya! !Booya!

It's always interesting how people just don't have luck with some crops, yet have good luck with something else.

Dagmar
04-19-2008, 05:14 PM
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j1/detpulsar/this-thread-is-gay1.jpg

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 05:31 PM
I had 3 strawberry plants is all...now it's going to be a pain to rake out the leaves around them...hopefully, I don't have the deer/rabbits get them.

I don't have much problem with deer or rabbits. It's the birds,raccoons and squirrels that nail my apples, grapes, raspberries. Back in 2002 there was some birds I'd never seen before or since would pick every ripe grape at the crack of dawn. I'd see them through the kitchen window and tried to chase them away, but what can you do? I actually started to feel sorry for them since they were clearly way out of their natural habitat. 2002 was the midst of a bad drought, and these were birds from way East and South, their natural range was Oklahoma/Texas. How they got here, I don't know. Like I said, I haven't seen them since, just that one summer they ate every ripe grape.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 06:03 PM
Dam, wish I had a garden.

Did a lot of it when I was younger.

I get a lot of enjoyment from gardening. I like to go out there in the morning when it's quiet and cool and do some weeding. It sure is nice to be able to go into the back yard and pick some radish, lettuce, tomatoes, cukes, onions, squash, pole beans every day. I usually have enough surplus to provide three neighbor families with fresh produce a couple days a week. My neighbors love me to death for that. Hell, one neighbor we had years ago still comes around once a week in late summer and fall to get the squirrel ruined apples for her horses. If it wasn't for that, we'd never see her.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 06:26 PM
http://i76.photobucket.com/albums/j1/detpulsar/this-thread-is-gay1.jpg

You're drinking his milkshake? I don't think you should be bragging about that.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 06:45 PM
You should just go out and find a dick to suck and get over your homophobia and these things will cease to bother you.

Tough love for the gay kid?

OABB
04-19-2008, 06:55 PM
You should just go out and find a dick to suck and get over your homophobia and these things will cease to bother you.

I suppose this isn't one of those high school level posts, right baja?

Raiders Rock
04-19-2008, 06:58 PM
http://img186.imageshack.us/img186/2254/lovetomatoesad1.jpg

baja
04-19-2008, 07:01 PM
I suppose this isn't one of those high school level posts, right baja?

No actually it's called a funny post something you clearly don't have a knack for. Are you going to follow me around from thread to thread, I can save you some time I don't swing that way sweetheart.

OABB
04-19-2008, 07:12 PM
No actually it's called a funny post something you clearly don't have a knack for. Are you going to follow me around from thread to thread, I can save you some time I don't swing that way sweetheart.

I have a knack for it... for instance, pointing out blatant hypocrisy is funny.

but I can see I got you wound up so tight that your man might even feel you this time so I will leave you alone for awhile....

Arkansas Bronco
04-19-2008, 07:32 PM
I freakin hate having to help my wife on the flower garden.

baja
04-19-2008, 07:53 PM
I have a knack for it... for instance, pointing out blatant hypocrisy is funny.

but I can see I got you wound up so tight that your man might even feel you this time so I will leave you alone for awhile....

The only reason I indulged you by answering your posts on the "hero" thread was to lure you to display for all to see your inability to follow a simple line of reasoning because of your preconditioning and you did that in spades. God you even managed to turn my fictitious example into 4 sailors with 1 of them brave enough to jump on a explosive when he had the opportunity to run away (out run a point blank blast no less) and then work yourself up to indignation that I had the audacity to compare the now real life hero to a, what did you call her, attention whore yet another characterization born of your imagination. You see you unwittingly proved my point about conditioning with your created characters complete with values that you imposed and then passed judgment on. Nice Job and thanks.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 07:54 PM
I freakin hate having to help my wife on the flower garden.

Now that's wimpy. You have to be manual labor at her direction? Be a man, grow some vegetables. ;D

Dagmar
04-19-2008, 07:58 PM
Some people on this place are too sensitive.


They make it so easy. :)

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 08:17 PM
The only reason I indulged you by answering your posts on the "hero" thread was to lure you to display for all to see your inability to follow a simple line of reasoning because of your preconditioning and you did that in spades. God you even made the fictitious example into 4 sailors and 1 of them brave enough to jump on a explosive when he had the opportunity to run away (out run a point blank blast no less) and then work yourself up to indignation that I had the audacity to compare the now real life hero to a, what did you call her, attention whore yet another characterization born of your imagination. You see you unwittingly proved my point about conditioning with your created characters complete with values that you imposed and then passed judgment on. Nice Job and thanks.

Wow, someone's "growing a banana" for you Baja. Yeah, you better squash his advances, it's a little creepy. Dude is vining for you, wants to make you his tomato. You must be the apple of his eye. Wants to be with you like two peas in a pod.

Vegas_Bronco
04-19-2008, 08:25 PM
I like to plant the pumpkins each year and some other immodest veggies

go gardening!
http://criticallyacclaimed.files.wordpress.com/2007/02/vegetable-invasion.jpg

Vegas_Bronco
04-19-2008, 08:25 PM
http://drx.typepad.com/psychotherapyblog/images/2007/06/03/tomato.jpg

This one looks like he's got a weird nose or something...

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 08:32 PM
Some people on this place are too sensitive.


They make it so easy. :)

Hey, Marlboro man, I'm not easy. I'm the baddest gardener you'll ever meet. My callouses have names. My delts and pecs are sculpted by pruning. My thighs and buttocks are sculpted by shoveling and turning soil. I also have nimble and sensitive fingers because of my work squeezing and picking the ripest fruits.

baja
04-19-2008, 08:33 PM
Wow, someone's "growing a banana" for you Baja. Yeah, you better squash his advances, it's a little creepy. Dude is vining for you, wants to make you his tomato. You must be the apple of his eye. Wants to be with you like two peas in a pod.

Yes I seem to offer an attraction for weeds and dupes.

At least when you and I do battle it is intelligent and witty and provides entertainment for ourselves and others. These new guys are a big drop off from Slap,13, quiettiger jake and others. Seems we have traded first quality vegetables for a bunch of green fruit.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2008, 10:40 PM
Gardeners are the best people.

Sodak
04-20-2008, 12:07 AM
Amazing. Somehow this was turned into homoerotic gardening? I grow bananas because they're a challenge, and they are obnoxious. A natural progression when an old punk rocker goes to gardening in the off season.

Sassy
04-20-2008, 05:58 PM
Bump....because I'm a "Lil' Troublemaker" ;D

Meck77
04-20-2008, 06:54 PM
Just got my seeds going today. Tomatoes, onions, corn, squash, cucumbers, lettuce etc.

Going to be planting a bunch of trees this summer. In Colorado the forest service has a tree program where you can get 50 pines for 36 bucks. I have 400 trees on order. Should be fun. http://csfs.colostate.edu/nursery.htm

The only requirement is that you have to own 2 acres or more of land and you cannot sell the trees later.

Should have a good hay crop this year with all the snow we've had in the mountains. Going to experiment with wildflowers also. We'll see how that goes.

Sign me up to the gay gardeners club. :peace:

Bronx33
04-20-2008, 07:06 PM
Yep i got my dirt ready i will plant next weekend.

Malcontent
04-20-2008, 07:29 PM
Serious bizz here...my lawn is burning up and its only mid to upper 80s here in PHX. Does anyone have a secret product that helps green the lawn? My Great Dane loves grass, so I want to feed the big boy!

Bronx33
04-20-2008, 09:08 PM
Serious bizz here...my lawn is burning up and its only mid to upper 80s here in PHX. Does anyone have a secret product that helps green the lawn? My Great Dane loves grass, so I want to feed the big boy!


Raise your cut length up ( run it long) airiate* and fertilize (you just have to make sure your soil below your grass is retaining some moisture) sometimes just adjusting your lawn mower cut will fix the problem.Also pay attention to your hot spots and adjust your sprinklers to water a bit more in that area. (Water late in the evening)

~Crash~
04-20-2008, 10:12 PM
Serious bizz here...my lawn is burning up and its only mid to upper 80s here in PHX. Does anyone have a secret product that helps green the lawn? My Great Dane loves grass, so I want to feed the big boy!


everything in the last post ...and if you have a bald spot run watter on it as long as you can then go to the barber shop and get hair to put over your new seed then put straw on like always . this will solve even the most stubbern bald spot:thanku:

~Crash~
04-20-2008, 10:13 PM
Baja you got a PM

Sassy
04-20-2008, 10:46 PM
I just got done digging up two day lily plants...suckers have huge roots...what a pain!

broncosteven
04-20-2008, 11:31 PM
I moved a bunch of big stuff today.

I only do ornamental gardening.

Moved a 12' maple, only 3 years old and about 2-3" dia.

Moved 2 3-4' Lialac's from my cutting/rooting bed into their intended place. Would have cost me about $50 each for that size bush up here. I dug the shoots out of our original bush that came with the house. It has spawned about 8 other bushes along my back fence.

I also mended the soil with some sand and compost. And pulled out 2 trees that I raised from shoots that were damaged in a wind storm.

oh and planted some tulips the wife got.

My back is hurting, felt like I did a stretch on a chain gang. It was still damp here so each shovel full was 4 times heavier!

I like getting free plants either from shoots or roots or dividing tubers.

Momof2littlebroncos
04-21-2008, 12:14 AM
i have never been into gardening much but with our new house came rose bushes so i have all of a sudden gotten really into it...i like flowers...although need some advice on what to plant in the southern weather....want to add some stuff...just dont know what

broncosteven
04-22-2008, 02:08 PM
i have never been into gardening much but with our new house came rose bushes so i have all of a sudden gotten really into it...i like flowers...although need some advice on what to plant in the southern weather....want to add some stuff...just dont know what

Google a Zone chart or go to a local nursery. Anything they sell local should be Ok though, catalogs (bare root or seeds/tubers) are more of challange as you need to know your zone.

Sassy
04-22-2008, 06:04 PM
Most of the plants that you buy from a nursery...at least here have zone charts on the back of the tag.

Broncochica
04-22-2008, 07:40 PM
i have never been into gardening much but with our new house came rose bushes so i have all of a sudden gotten really into it...i like flowers...although need some advice on what to plant in the southern weather....want to add some stuff...just dont know what

LOL I want to plant some roses in my front yard soon, they have the most beautiful roses here in Cali., they are in full bloom and are breathtaking! I just need to go do it! :sunshine:

cbs1177
04-22-2008, 09:11 PM
I really want to convert my yard to St Angustine grass from the fescue grass among other various weeds that are out of control. (The lady I brought the house from did no lawn or garden care for four years she lived here). I removed most of the dead limbs and pruned the cherry and oaks trees. I have pulled up several hedges and bushes on perimeter of the yard. If mom of 2 haven't had moved I would have stolen some of her hostas. But main thing I am working on is some landscaping around some of the trees and building up a swing area in the back yard. I have put of a purple martin house and already have had success with them this year. Working on getting more butterfly and hummering birds to come around. Already have robins, bluejays and cardinals around the area.

I want a veg garden but probably will have to be next year. Also my sunflower starter plants got raided by the squirrels seen all the shell broken open and the pots dug in. So hopefully will get the sunflowers going soon.

Only other thing is I got some petunia for hanging baskets and hopefully I will remember to water them during the busy season at work and not killed them like I did last year.

Sassy
04-22-2008, 09:18 PM
Buy some sunflower seeds...they comeup within a week...we just planted them in plastic cups and put them in the window (with my toddler group a few weeks ago ) and they came up really fast.

cbs1177
04-22-2008, 10:46 PM
Buy some sunflower seeds...they comeup within a week...we just planted them in plastic cups and put them in the window (with my toddler group a few weeks ago ) and they came up really fast.

I did but I made the mistake of putting the cups outside and the squirrels got them. I put out some bird seeds with sunflowers seeds in the mix so hopefully the squirrels go for the easy feed and leave my starters alone.

Also a thing I use is to plant lettuce or cabbage next to my tomato plants and the worms and insects much prefer the lettuce rather then the tomato thus they leave the tomato stalks alone.

broncosteven
04-23-2008, 10:43 AM
If mom of 2 haven't had moved I would have stolen some of her hostas. But main thing I am working on is some landscaping around some of the trees...


Hosta's Divide well, Ask the owner if you can split one or 2 and share with them other divisions that you might have. I did this with one of our neighboors and filled up a lot of space over the years.

I spend $ like water but when it comes to plants that I can divide or bareroot and get free I hate to spend $ on those types of plants.

Broncochica
04-27-2008, 08:10 PM
I planted two of these rose bushes "Fragrant Clouds" in my front yard today! :yayaya: I hope they bloom soon, I love roses!! :sunshine:

<a href="http://s40.photobucket.com/albums/e240/myrhiann/?action=view&current=0162JPEGlj.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e240/myrhiann/0162JPEGlj.jpg" border="0" alt="rose \'Fragrant Cloud\'"></a>

Sassy
04-27-2008, 08:13 PM
Those are gorgeous!
I can't plant anything...we got 7 inches of snow this weekend! LOL!
Almost all gone though...

Broncochica
04-28-2008, 12:25 AM
Those are gorgeous!
I can't plant anything...we got 7 inches of snow this weekend! LOL!
Almost all gone though...

LOL Thanks Sassy, you should smell them, ahh so good! I think I'm gonna pick up some more rose bushes & annuals for color! :yayaya:

Broncochica
04-28-2008, 03:00 PM
Meck, You are going to love your Fragrant Cloud roses, this morning one of mine bloomed and I can't even describe the aroma! :flower: <a href="http://s190.photobucket.com/albums/z312/Paul_Narramore/The%20Salutation%20Garden%202007/?action=view&current=DSCF1030.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i190.photobucket.com/albums/z312/Paul_Narramore/The%20Salutation%20Garden%202007/DSCF1030.jpg" border="0" alt="Probably Rosa 'Fragrant Cloud'"></a>

Sassy
06-01-2008, 06:27 PM
Ok...so I went to my Grandma's over memorial day weekend and we ended up at the Garden Shops...I bought even more! It's Sass' own little jungle!!!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6128.jpg
Nicole Blush Rose

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6129.jpg
Candy Corn Flower (I thought these were awesome!)

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6134.jpg
Sass' Jungle

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6135.jpg
Sass' Jungle 2

Overrun by strawberries~
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6137.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6140.jpg
My pots...I have two sets...one on each side of the steps. Melon Symphony on top,
peach verbena on bottom and the pot behind is orange gerbera daisies...but they flowered already...
they should bloom again though.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6136.jpg
Can't remember for sure...

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6139.jpg
Purple Columbine

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6138.jpg
Palest pink painted Daisies...

broncocalijohn
06-01-2008, 06:44 PM
Just got into gardening a few weeks ago. Planted some squash and have the tomato plant growing. Carrots also. Today the kids and I will finish mulching the 2nd of 3 sections. Going in there will be some lima beans (though my wife says she hates them and wont cook them). Strawberries and more tomatoes will go in there also once they grow for a few weeks inside. Our last section will hopefully have the weeds pulled in the next few weeks to plant the kids watermelons and pumpkins. Corn against the wall is coming soon also. Ornage tree has a few more years to go before it fruits. I saw an avocado plant at the nursery yesterday for $89. Ready to fruit this crop or next and we love our avacodoes on our sandwiches so if Dads doesnt produce, I will invest in this tree. At $1.49 an avacado, it can produce in two years at least 75 to 100 so well worth it.
Spinach and lettuce come later in September when California has its best growth. I hope this all works cause it is cheaper, organic and it feels great to accomplish something that you normally just buy at the grocery store. I am becoming a commie pinko in front of your eyes. I recycle, drive a small toyota and grow my own healthy food.

Sassy
06-01-2008, 06:49 PM
Watch the strawberries...I put in 2 plants in this space and it's taken over half the garden...I dug some of it up! LOL! Just because of space issues.

broncocalijohn
06-01-2008, 06:52 PM
Watch the strawberries...I put in 2 plants in this space and it's taken over half the garden...I dug some of it up! LOL! Just because of space issues.

I hear ya. I might just use raised flower bins/beds to grow separate. That way you can move them anywhere you like. My concern on this garden is possums and an occasional raccoon. Not sure what they eat but it might be my veggies. I am planning on chicken wire if they start to attack.

Broncochica
06-01-2008, 06:52 PM
Ok...so I went to my Grandma's over memorial day weekend and we ended up at the Garden Shops...I bought even more! It's Sass' own little jungle!!!

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6128.jpg
Nicole Blush Rose

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6129.jpg
Candy Corn Flower (I thought these were awesome!)

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6134.jpg
Sass' Jungle

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6135.jpg
Sass' Jungle 2

Overrun by strawberries~
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6137.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6140.jpg
My pots...I have two sets...one on each side of the steps. Melon Symphony on top,
peach verbena on bottom and the pot behind is orange gerbera daisies...but they flowered already...
they should bloom again though.

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6136.jpg
Can't remember for sure...

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6139.jpg
Purple Columbine

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6138.jpg
Palest pink painted Daisies...

Nice pics Sassy, love the candy corn flowers! :yayaya:

Sassy
06-01-2008, 06:54 PM
Thanks Chica...it's going to be a jungle in a few weeks! But I couldn't resist! I'll just cut some back when I have too! Ha!

Sassy
06-01-2008, 11:22 PM
Nice pics Sassy, love the candy corn flowers! :yayaya:

The candy corn flowers are vines...if I can't get them to go up the fence, I'll have to get something for them to climb on. I have 3 of them on my little side garden.

Blueflame
06-02-2008, 12:10 AM
In another 3 weeks or so, our whole yard is gonna be a sea of pale pink wild roses....they bloom soon after the lilacs start to fade. The lilacs were a couple of weeks later to bloom than usual this year, though. Normally I have some impressive bouquets for Memorial Day, but this year, none were ready. :(

TailgateNut
06-02-2008, 11:34 AM
I "played a good one" on my daughter yesterday. She had helped me plant the strawberries a few week ago and they are just starting to show the first signs on growth. So, when my wife brought out a few large "over-ripe" strawberries (store bought) to toss in the compost pile I took them, and stategically layed them in in the patch. I called my daughter who was suprised to see these "large berries" until she figured out I had played a late "april fools joke" on her.

Not a happy camper when dad "Gets Ya"!:spit:

broncocalijohn
06-05-2008, 03:41 AM
BUMP>>>>>

Three plants of Squash popping up on the mound I made. Other three mounds arent showing squat or is that squash. Once carrots and corn start to show some life, pixs will follow. Then I can say that the $10 for the tailgate party in San Diego will be nice, healthy, organic spread of veggies. Yummmy!

Sassy
06-05-2008, 07:05 AM
BUMP>>>>>

Three plants of Squash popping up on the mound I made. Other three mounds arent showing squat or is that squash. Once carrots and corn start to show some life, pixs will follow. Then I can say that the $10 for the tailgate party in San Diego will be nice, healthy, organic spread of veggies. Yummmy!

Cut them up, throw them in some foil, throw them on the grill...yum!

TailgateNut
06-05-2008, 09:22 AM
My cukes and beans must be of some sort of "bionic" strain. These things went from seed to seedling in record time. I'm envisioning a "TailgateNut and the beanstalk" story in the making.:~ohyah!:

Disclaimer: that's if it stops raining. I saw some of the worms doing the backstroke between the rows this morning.ROFL!

SleepingTiger
06-05-2008, 10:32 AM
The candy corn flowers are vines...if I can't get them to go up the fence, I'll have to get something for them to climb on. I have 3 of them on my little side garden.

For all those living in the north, consider yourself lucky. Here in Texas, the ground is horrible to plant anything. Its nothing but clay, rocks and the ground is too alkaline to really grow anything decent without tons of topsoil.

I am in the process of building a raised stone garden bed in front of my house right now. Its more work than I thought it would be. I want to plant some japanese maples like bloodgood, crimson queen and maybe a fireglow. I also want to plant some shade trees like red maple or shantung maple.

TailgateNut
06-05-2008, 10:40 AM
For all those living in the north, consider yourself lucky. Here in Texas, the ground is horrible to plant anything. Its nothing but clay, rocks and the ground is too alkaline to really grow anything decent without tons of topsoil.

I am in the process of building a raised stone garden bed in front of my house right now. Its more work than I thought it would be. I want to plant some japanese maples like bloodgood, crimson queen and maybe a fireglow. I also want to plant some shade trees like red maple or shantung maple.

In the north? (ok, i guess everthing is north of texas):spit:


I had to haul in 5 tons of soil to build my raised garden. The soil in my neck of the woods is nothing but clay. It took a few years of composting and conditioning to get my garden to produce.

Cito Pelon
06-21-2008, 02:34 AM
Time for the summer solstice update.

For fruit, I'll have grapes and apples galore this year and the strawberries have been producing well. The raspberries don't berry worth a damn.

The vegetables are coming along ok. The green onions planted last year and the radish this year have been fine. The green leaf and red leaf will be producing fine from next week on. The pole beans will climb and produce soon. The squash is getting there, the cukes aren't keeping up with the squash for some reason.

Sassy
06-21-2008, 08:03 AM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6315.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6310.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6307.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6306.jpg

Sassy
06-21-2008, 08:12 AM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6316.jpg

mhgaffney
06-21-2008, 01:34 PM
Wish you could see my greenhouse. I grow food all year. More produce than I can possibly eat. I give a lot away.

At the moment I am picking seven different salad greens. Tomatoes, beans, peppers, cucumbers and squash are on the way.

I'd post a picture but it's too many kilobytes for this board.

TheReverend
06-21-2008, 05:25 PM
I planted a little garden with my daughter in my back patio area last weekend... the ground ended up being mostly clay so I didn't think it work out with just the 40lbs of top soil I mixed in, but I'll be damned if they aren't sprouting already.

Resilient little fruits and vegetables.

broncocalijohn
06-21-2008, 08:45 PM
I started a month ago and my crazy squash is going to bring me a ton. Hope wife is ready to add some to our spaghetti sauce (hopefully later we have home grown tomatoes ready). It is great to put a seed in the ground and 7 to 10 days later , you see a little green popping up. Got excited when my cantaloupe did this today after 7 days. My kids are growing their first (mine too) pumpkin patch with watermelon and corn wrapped around two of the four sides. Pixs will follow when they start to grow. I also grew 4 Lima Beans plants for some reason. No one likes them so I am thinking i dont either. Do they taste good in soup? Any suggestions would be nice. BTW: They are saying that Corn prices will be going up because of the floods, it might be a good time to stock up on meat and grow your corn stocks for the fall.

Cito Pelon
06-22-2008, 04:10 PM
I planted a little garden with my daughter in my back patio area last weekend... the ground ended up being mostly clay so I didn't think it work out with just the 40lbs of top soil I mixed in, but I'll be damned if they aren't sprouting already.

Resilient little fruits and vegetables.

Clay produces well. I figure if there's something growing on the soil, and there's worms in the soil, it's good soil. Pure topsoil isn't a panacea for good crops. I'm not a soil guru, I have one object in mind for my soil, and that's to have a lot of worms. I figure if the worms are happy, I'll have good crops. I thatch my grass, take the dead grass and work that into the garden soil in spring and fall, that gives the worms something to eat and the more worms the better I think.

Clay as well as any soil will get depleted if it's not replenished with compost, woodash, dead grass as I do, or fertilizer as some gardeners do. I spread my ash from the fireplace also on my garden, and fish pellets.

Congrats on your garden, it's good for the kids to experience gardening.

cbs1177
07-07-2008, 10:04 PM
http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/flower%20bed/010-1.jpg

a bee in there

cbs1177
07-07-2008, 10:05 PM
http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/flower%20bed/012-1.jpg

any one know what plant this is

Broncochica
07-07-2008, 10:18 PM
I'm not sure but it looks like part hibiscus, anyways it's a gorgeous plant! :sunshine:

cbs1177
07-07-2008, 10:28 PM
I'm not sure but it looks like part hibiscus, anyways it's a gorgeous plant! :sunshine:

it looked like a hydrangea when I first saved it from the the monkey grass I thought I had three of them hydrangea. But this one is becoming its own. !Booya! that bee was up at 6:30 am. Glad I got up that early b/c that bloom fell by that afternoon.

Sassy
07-10-2008, 09:39 PM
Awesome plant!

Broncochica
07-10-2008, 10:54 PM
Awesome plant!

LOL How's your garden coming along Sass?

Sassy
07-10-2008, 11:56 PM
LOL How's your garden coming along Sass?

Looking good...waiting on my lilies to bloom for some pics. I did take some of my Shasta daisies tonight...I'll try and post them tomorrow. I have strawberries this year....and my peppers are almost ready to be picked!

Broncochica
07-11-2008, 12:02 AM
Looking good...waiting on my lilies to bloom for some pics. I did take some of my Shasta daisies tonight...I'll try and post them tomorrow. I have strawberries this year....and my peppers are almost ready to be picked!

Awesome, look foward to the pics! :thumbsup:

400HZ
07-11-2008, 02:35 AM
I had some of my leaf lettuve today and it way awesome. The tomatoes aremm gpmma be red gold gere in a couple months.

400HZ
07-11-2008, 02:35 AM
I have some badass camera phone pictures.x

broncocalijohn
07-11-2008, 04:08 AM
I had some of my leaf lettuve today and it way awesome. The tomatoes aremm gpmma be red gold gere in a couple months.

Ive read a couple of your posts tonight. You are toasted, correct?

Cito Pelon
07-11-2008, 05:56 PM
Let's hope 400 didn't impale himself on a bean pole taking those pics!

My squash and pole beans finally bloomed, the cukes are way behind for some reason. But early July is a good time for the squash, pole beans, to get into their stride and hopefully the cukes. No doubt they'll be producing well soon. I'm on my second radish crop now, the green leaf and red leaf have been producing well for a couple weeks now.

I'll have grapes and apples galore this year. I started a Concord grape seedling last year that I expect to do well in a couple years, that should be a treat.

cbs1177
07-11-2008, 11:08 PM
<a href="http://s169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/?action=view&current=012-1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/012-1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

cbs1177
07-11-2008, 11:10 PM
<a href="http://s169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/?action=view&current=013-1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/013-1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

transplants so would look better next year.

cbs1177
07-11-2008, 11:16 PM
<a href="http://s169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/?action=view&current=011-1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/011-1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

Having trouble what to do with this bed. has many early early spring time flowers blooms. can you plant on top of the bulbs of the early spring blooms and what can you do besides what is there.

cbs1177
07-11-2008, 11:18 PM
<a href="http://s169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/?action=view&current=014-1.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i169.photobucket.com/albums/u209/cbs1177/014-1.jpg" border="0" alt="Photobucket"></a>

my square winnings from the super bowl won 250

Sassy
07-13-2008, 07:39 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6479.jpg

Sassy
07-13-2008, 07:40 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6476.jpg

Sassy
07-13-2008, 07:57 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6571.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6562.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6572.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6568.jpg

Here's what's bloomin' today ;D

cbs1177
07-14-2008, 12:17 AM
your garden is awesome cuz if you let the light in the whole world is a garden

Sassy
07-14-2008, 12:26 AM
your garden is awesome cuz if you let the light in the whole world is a garden

Are you drinking? :spit: :spit:

Sassy
07-14-2008, 11:28 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6121.jpg

Sassy
07-14-2008, 11:28 PM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6117.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6116.jpg

Broncochica
07-14-2008, 11:52 PM
your garden is awesome cuz if you let the light in the whole world is a garden

LOL :giggle:

Broncochica
07-14-2008, 11:54 PM
Sassy I swear that one plant looks like it has candy corn growing on it, very nice! I luv all the flowers too! :thumbsup:

Sassy
07-26-2008, 12:00 AM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6853.jpg

Sassy
07-26-2008, 12:01 AM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6850.jpg

Sassy
07-26-2008, 12:02 AM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6851.jpg

Rausch 2.0
07-26-2008, 07:53 AM
http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_6853.jpg

I'm growing 3 different types of hot peppers. All are doing fine but the habinero (sp?) I think. It's growing the peppers just fine but the plant keeps drooping down and won't stay up.

Is there a problem with the plant or do I just need to provide some frame to support it?...

Raiders Rock
07-26-2008, 08:48 PM
I crush Viagra pills and put them around my tomato plants so I don't have to stake them up

broncocalijohn
07-26-2008, 09:07 PM
Well my update cant have pics since it is too big I guess for the site. I am sure the Saints site can accomodate though. Anyways, looks like a few zucchini will be ready in the next 5 days. Pumpkin has just overtaken the Watermelon mound and heading for the corn. Corn is growing very nice since being planted on Father's day. Broccoli was planted a few weeks back and hanging in very nicely. Hopefully, I will start eating a meal from the garden in a month to month and a half. I am thinking these pumpkins will be bigger than my 4 and 5 year old!

Sassy
07-26-2008, 09:09 PM
Well my update cant have pics since it is too big I guess for the site. I am sure the Saints site can accomodate though. Anyways, looks like a few zucchini will be ready in the next 5 days. Pumpkin has just overtaken the Watermelon mound and heading for the corn. Corn is growing very nice since being planted on Father's day. Broccoli was planted a few weeks back and hanging in very nicely. Hopefully, I will start eating a meal from the garden in a month to month and a half. I am thinking these pumpkins will be bigger than my 4 and 5 year old!

Nice dig there! LOL!

Hey...we doing fresh grilled veggies in Denver? ;D

broncocalijohn
07-27-2008, 03:18 PM
If I got some corn to grill, I will bring a few husks. With charges for more than carry on, I limit my clothes to a big Broncos bag. Maybe 3 husks. BBQ corn is the best. That should be on our list regardless.

Cito Pelon
08-26-2008, 09:48 PM
How's the gardens going? I'm reaping good squash, beans, radish, lettuce. The raccoons have eaten almost all my grapes. The drought is bringing them, the grapes aren't even ripe, but that's the best food they can get I guess.

Malcontent
08-26-2008, 09:50 PM
Whats the best weed killer?? All the rain here in PHX has devastated my yard!

Cito Pelon
08-26-2008, 09:57 PM
Whats the best weed killer?? All the rain here in PHX has devastated my yard!

The best weed killer is pulling the weeds, you lazy ass.

Sassy
09-15-2008, 06:19 PM
Found this critter in my garden about an hour ago...

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_7449.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_7448.jpg

Cito Pelon
09-15-2008, 07:15 PM
Dang. Is there some kind of potion to make out of a toad? I had snakes galore - garter snakes - this year. No big deal. The raccoons ate all my grapes, the sneaky bastards, and I had a good crop going. My apples are still looking good, the peaches took a beating from the birds, but delicious nonetheless. Pretty much the end of the season for me. The pole beans will keep up for another couple weeks, but the rest of the vegetables are done, except the onions.

broncosteven
09-15-2008, 07:35 PM
The best weed killer is pulling the weeds, you lazy ass.

Cito is right.

I tried a couple of products even resorting to spraying each weed in the lawn with a killer product and I had weeds everywhere.

I went to my neighbors house for a party and he had No weeds at all. I asked him what he used on his lawn and he looks at me and say's: "An old Screwdriver". I laughed, apparently he just keeps an old driver in his pocket and pulls the weeds as he finds them, garden or grass!

Lot of work but best lawn I have seen.

Meck77
04-16-2009, 12:26 PM
Check this out! Some good ole boys in Pagosa Springs Colorado have come up with a real high tech greenhouse. They've found a way to grow food in the mountains of Colorado all year long at 8,000 feet! Best part of all they are totally off the grid/solar powered. I'm heading there next week to see them first hand.

You cold weather growers may want to look into this.

http://www.geodesic-greenhouse-kits.com/

broncosteven
04-16-2009, 12:36 PM
Check this out! Some good ole boys in Pagosa Springs Colorado have come up with a real high tech greenhouse. They've found a way to grow food in the mountains of Colorado all year long at 8,000 feet! Best part of all they are totally off the grid/solar powered. I'm heading there next week to see them first hand.

You cold weather growers may want to look into this.

http://www.geodesic-greenhouse-kits.com/

If I had one of those I would build robots and pretend I was Bruce Dern in Slient Running.

TailgateNut
04-16-2009, 12:42 PM
If I had one of those I would build robots and pretend I was Bruce Dern in Slient Running.


If you had one of those you would'nt have to move to Montana to become a "Dental Floss Tycoon".;)

cbs1177
04-19-2009, 12:00 AM
Ugh Spring in the Mid South has been unusually cold lows even now after a late Easter. Summer and humidity should be around the corner soon enough. But all my seeds I started have died b/c couldn't plant them on a normal mid-south weather pattern.

SouthStndJunkie
04-19-2009, 12:20 AM
Not a garden, but I planted a few hundred more trees on my property today.

75 Colorado Blue Spruce, 50 Red Pine, 50 Pin Oak, 10 Pink Flowering Dogwood, 10 Sweet Gum, and 10 Red Maples.

I am tired tonight.

SouthStndJunkie
04-19-2009, 12:22 AM
Found this critter in my garden about an hour ago...

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_7449.jpg

http://i10.photobucket.com/albums/a128/SSundheim/100_7448.jpg

Nice looking Northern Leopard Frog.

Cito Pelon
04-19-2009, 12:50 AM
I'm still about 2 weeks away from seeding. However, the green onions from last year are just about ready to be pulled. I always like this time of year for that reason - the onions from last year give us a taste of what's to come.

The apple tree has barely budded, the grape vines haven't budded yet, the strawberries will be blooming soon, the raspberries have leafed.

Sodak
04-19-2009, 09:11 AM
No bananas here yet. The bamboo is still dormant...

maher_tyler
04-19-2009, 10:35 AM
Anyone have any advice on growing watermellon?? Would i be able to grow it specifically indoors in some sort of a big container?? I live in base housing and cant turn my yard into a garden..any sugestions??

Meck77
04-19-2009, 04:14 PM
Anyone have any advice on growing watermellon?? Would i be able to grow it specifically indoors in some sort of a big container?? I live in base housing and cant turn my yard into a garden..any sugestions??

Hmm that sounds kinda tricky. Mellon plants need quite a bit of room to spread out. You'd have much better luck with tomatoes, herbs etc

broncosteven
04-19-2009, 07:29 PM
Not a garden, but I planted a few hundred more trees on my property today.

75 Colorado Blue Spruce, 50 Red Pine, 50 Pin Oak, 10 Pink Flowering Dogwood, 10 Sweet Gum, and 10 Red Maples.

I am tired tonight.

Did you let AX men log your front yard and now have to reforest?


I take it those are bareroot?

I planted 10 or 12 free colorado spruces from the Arbor society and 4 actualy lived, they are about 2' tall now but one is really going to turn out well.

I may have to move 2 of them though they are too close to other things.

SouthStndJunkie
04-19-2009, 07:47 PM
Did you let AX men log your front yard and now have to reforest?


I take it those are bareroot?

I planted 10 or 12 free colorado spruces from the Arbor society and 4 actualy lived, they are about 2' tall now but one is really going to turn out well.

I may have to move 2 of them though they are too close to other things.

I own a little over 10 acres across the road from my house that I bought and eventually want to build on and dig a pond, but have dedicated about 5 acres of it to building a little tree farm. Save a lot on taxes and I really enjoy it. I have been planting a few hundred trees for each of the last 4 or 5 years. Most of the trees I am planting are 10 to 12 inch saplings with a nice little root system. The Colorado Blue Spruce looked especially healthy this year.

broncosteven
04-19-2009, 08:01 PM
I own a little over 10 acres across the road from my house that I bought and eventually want to build on and dig a pond, but have dedicated about 5 acres of it to building a little tree farm. Save a lot on taxes and I really enjoy it. I have been planting a few hundred trees for each of the last 4 or 5 years. Most of the trees I am planting are 10 to 12 inch saplings with a nice little root system. The Colorado Blue Spruce looked especially healthy this year.

Xmas trees or do you sell to nursery's after they get bigger?

I thought about getting some land and raising x-mas trees but we sat next to a couple at a wedding once who complained about all the work and prunning it took.

They thought they could just plant and let them grow and then cut and sell. Aparently there is a lot of prunning and **** needed to get them to look good enough to sell.

That or they didn't want any competition.

Meck77
04-19-2009, 08:11 PM
Not sure about your state Steven but in Colorado you can get saplings really cheap. Every year these guys produce millions of trees and they ship them all over the state via local agricultural depts in various cities. You can get 30 trees for like 50 bucks. The only requirement for the state trees is that you have to own 2 or more acres and you can't resell them.

There are private companies that can ship as well.

http://csfs.colostate.edu/pages/nursery-tour.html

SouthStndJunkie
04-19-2009, 08:23 PM
Xmas trees or do you sell to nursery's after they get bigger?

I thought about getting some land and raising x-mas trees but we sat next to a couple at a wedding once who complained about all the work and prunning it took.

They thought they could just plant and let them grow and then cut and sell. Aparently there is a lot of prunning and **** needed to get them to look good enough to sell.

That or they didn't want any competition.

I plan to sell them to landscape companies, or I will dig and ball them up and sell them to individual consumers as well. I have a tractor and will buy a tree spade in a few years.

I don't want to sell them as x-mas trees....I would have a hard time watching them grow for 7 years just to hack them down for a few bucks.

Cito Pelon
04-20-2009, 07:26 AM
I plan to sell them to landscape companies, or I will dig and ball them up and sell them to individual consumers as well. I have a tractor and will buy a tree spade in a few years.

I don't want to sell them as x-mas trees....I would have a hard time watching them grow for 7 years just to hack them down for a few bucks.

Maybe you should start a tree-farming thread. Your tree-farming doesn't qualify as gardening, sorry.

SouthStndJunkie
04-20-2009, 08:51 AM
Maybe you should start a tree-farming thread. Your tree-farming doesn't qualify as gardening, sorry.

Maybe you should quit being so cantankerous.

Cito Pelon
04-20-2009, 11:10 AM
Maybe you should quit being so cantankerous.

Maybe I should, maybe I should. I'll consider it.

While I'm considering it, are you planting anything that is a garden? Sounds like you're just a tree farmer. ;D

Seems to me that a garden feeds the family, that's what most gardens do. Or lend some color and scent to the neighborhood.

Cito Pelon
03-29-2010, 05:14 PM
Time to get the soil turned over for the vegetable garden. I'm looking forward to it. I love the smell when I fork the soil over in the spring. Having just shoveled out of two 12" wet spring snow storms, I'm ready to do the forking. I'll fork up the soil and might add some more topsoil this year since I moved the whole vegetable garden to a new location a couple years ago. I've been struggling with my yields since I moved it, though. I'm thinking about moving it right back to where it was, it was a mistake in retrospect, but seemed a good idea at the time.

My strawberries are already poking up ready for a new season, and I'll probably add a few more nursery plants this year. I trimmed the apple tree extensively in February. The grapevines haven't budded yet, that won't happen for another few weeks.

I have my vegetable seeds already, and I'm looking forward to getting them planted. So how are you other gardeners doing?

OABB
03-29-2010, 05:53 PM
god the offseason sucks.

Cito Pelon
03-29-2010, 06:05 PM
god the offseason sucks.

Now, was that necessary? Maybe you need an offseason hobby. I recommend gardening. It's always been good for a volatile guy like myself, calms me down. Maybe you should try it.

alkemical
03-21-2011, 09:08 AM
Gardening!!!

Yay! hey guys, i'm "new" to gardening but have caught the bug. I'm going to try to reread this thread, but i'm hoping to learn from you guys and maybe if I can share some things that are going on here.

:)

oubronco
03-21-2011, 09:12 AM
Birds are a total menace to your tomatoes

Rohirrim
03-21-2011, 09:16 AM
I think I'll give up trying to garden in Colorado. Just too tough. Climate is too severe. Soil sucks. You've got to work like a dog to squeeze out a couple of tomatoes, and then just hope you don't get a hailstorm that takes out everything in ten minutes. I'll save it until I can move back to California.

alkemical
03-21-2011, 09:19 AM
I think I'll give up trying to garden in Colorado. Just too tough. Climate is too severe. Soil sucks. You've got to work like a dog to squeeze out a couple of tomatoes, and then just hope you don't get a hailstorm that takes out everything in ten minutes. I'll save it until I can move back to California.

You doing land gardening, not potted gardening I assume?

Are you using raised beds, or just tilled right into the earth. My mom and dad had a nice garden when we lived in Pueblo. they had to work at it, water of course is a premium.

I will say that the south central area of PA is a gold mine to farm/garden. We have more clay based soil, but it's easy to work with. If you compost and build your soil up, it really mixes well.

alkemical
03-21-2011, 09:20 AM
Birds are a total menace to your tomatoes

do you have any cover on them, does it matter?

I'm trying to learn too. :)

alkemical
03-21-2011, 09:22 AM
I got into gardening because I started doing business development for my friend's garden shop.

He created a product called "Recycler" that breaks down Petrol based fertilizers in soil, as well as salts into bio available forms of N/P/K & Amino acids. In a water/hydro based solution this works even better.

We have had some orchid growers really like it, and this year i'm doing a massive test in soil garens to check for root zone size, etc.

Drunk Monkey
03-21-2011, 09:41 AM
Spent all day yesterday tilling the front yard. I had a old bradford pear tree break during a storm and finally got around to replacing it. It made a mess of my yard with roots and bare spots all over the place. Now I need to learn to lay sod. Not sure if grass growing counts as gardening but I was outside in the dirt.

oubronco
03-21-2011, 09:48 AM
do you have any cover on them, does it matter?

I'm trying to learn too. :)

It doesn't here in Okla them pesky suckers will just fly under the netting

Cito Pelon
03-21-2011, 10:01 AM
Gardening!!!

Yay! hey guys, i'm "new" to gardening but have caught the bug. I'm going to try to reread this thread, but i'm hoping to learn from you guys and maybe if I can share some things that are going on here.

:)

Welcome. I love vegetable gardening, so nice to go pick some lettuce, pole beans, radish, spinach, cukes, green onions, squash that you grew yourself. I like going out first thing in the morning after a cup of coffee, do a little weeding, eat a radish, a green onion, a pole bean, some spinach as I'm weeding.

I recommend grapevines, peach, plum, apple trees also. They involve a lot of trimming, but the reward is nice. You'll make a lot of friends among your neighbors when you go over to their house with a couple bags of fresh fruit and produce from your surplus.

Chilies and peppers are always very popular, but they need a long growing season, broccoli is nice but those are big plants, require a lot of room.

Strawberries are dynamite, require no care at all, plant a lot of them. The difference between a homegrown strawberry and a storebought is amazing. The burst of flavor from homegrown is so much better than storebought.

So good luck, I hope you enjoy it.

Cito Pelon
03-21-2011, 10:39 AM
I think I'll give up trying to garden in Colorado. Just too tough. Climate is too severe. Soil sucks. You've got to work like a dog to squeeze out a couple of tomatoes, and then just hope you don't get a hailstorm that takes out everything in ten minutes. I'll save it until I can move back to California.

Aw, come on dude, don't make me laugh. I get tremendous yields.

You want to know how you improve the soil? It's simple, first you thatch your lawn in the spring, and take the dead grass to your garden.

Then, you throw that thatch on the garden before you fork/till the soil so the dead grass is worked into the soil.

Next, you add worms and nightcrawlers. You buy them as fishing bait for $1.50 (or, simply pick them off the sidewalk and street after a rain), throw them in the garden and let them burrow in and feed on the thatched grass.

It works.

The next spring you work the thatched grass into the soil again as you till or fork it, and the system perpetuates itself. No need for fertilizer. It works.

The worms & crawlers add their waste to the soil, further enriching it, and also break up the soil for you during the growing season.

tsiguy96
03-21-2011, 10:50 AM
talked about this in the other thread, what is your guys best method for growing plants from seeds? i live in FL, weather or sun isnt a huge issue.

Cito Pelon
03-21-2011, 10:52 AM
You doing land gardening, not potted gardening I assume?

Are you using raised beds, or just tilled right into the earth. My mom and dad had a nice garden when we lived in Pueblo. they had to work at it, water of course is a premium.

I will say that the south central area of PA is a gold mine to farm/garden. We have more clay based soil, but it's easy to work with. If you compost and build your soil up, it really mixes well.

Absolutely composting is a great method for a productive garden. I don't have room for a compost pile, which is why I go with the thatched grass method to enrich the soil and feed the worm population.

Some people use barrells cut in half to compost instead of just throwing it on the ground and turning it over, and that works.

alkemical
03-21-2011, 10:55 AM
Welcome. I love vegetable gardening, so nice to go pick some lettuce, pole beans, radish, spinach, cukes, green onions, squash that you grew yourself. I like going out first thing in the morning after a cup of coffee, do a little weeding, eat a radish, a green onion, a pole bean, some spinach as I'm weeding.

I recommend grapevines, peach, plum, apple trees also. They involve a lot of trimming, but the reward is nice. You'll make a lot of friends among your neighbors when you go over to their house with a couple bags of fresh fruit and produce from your surplus.

Chilies and peppers are always very popular, but they need a long growing season, broccoli is nice but those are big plants, require a lot of room.

Strawberries are dynamite, require no care at all, plant a lot of them. The difference between a homegrown strawberry and a storebought is amazing. The burst of flavor from homegrown is so much better than storebought.

So good luck, I hope you enjoy it.

thanks. I'm doing indoor and outdoor gardening. i have a counter top herb garden, and have a few container plants (I rent and don't have much space). But have helped people that should get amazing yeilds here.

I can't wait to make some wine. We got a ton of strawberries and other fruits as well, even grapes!

Should be a fun summer.

alkemical
03-21-2011, 10:59 AM
talked about this in the other thread, what is your guys best method for growing plants from seeds? i live in FL, weather or sun isnt a huge issue.

Start from seed indoors, i used a seed starting pod (not the peat pellets that don't work) - and started them off indoors. I have a few lights to keep them going. then i move them to the garden. i have had a much higher % of success this way, than just seed to earth.

alkemical
03-21-2011, 11:00 AM
Absolutely composting is a great method for a productive garden. I don't have room for a compost pile, which is why I go with the thatched grass method to enrich the soil and feed the worm population.

Some people use barrells cut in half to compost instead of just throwing it on the ground and turning it over, and that works.

yep.

I have friends up the road that have 3 chicken coops, so I even have access to waste to help with the gardens.

Not to mention, I get a dozen big assed fresh eggs for about $2/doz.

Cleo McDowell
03-21-2011, 11:05 AM
all this talk of gardening and im surprised no one has asked "WHERE DA HOES AT"?

prepping my "crops" for the spring..

Pony Boy
03-21-2011, 11:14 AM
My garden is looking great this year

Cito Pelon
03-21-2011, 12:14 PM
talked about this in the other thread, what is your guys best method for growing plants from seeds? i live in FL, weather or sun isnt a huge issue.

You have to follow the instructions on the seed package. Some seeds require a certain depth to plant and it's important.

If you're serious about gardening you'll also keep track of what is working in your particular neck of the woods, when is the best time to plant a particular crop, what moths lay their eggs in certain plants, what insects to pinch dead, what insects to let live, etc.

It's a lot about knowing the ropes with gardening. Once you know the ropes (like with any profession), you'll get a great yield and that's where the satisfaction kicks in.

Cito Pelon
03-21-2011, 12:22 PM
thanks. I'm doing indoor and outdoor gardening. i have a counter top herb garden, and have a few container plants (I rent and don't have much space). But have helped people that should get amazing yeilds here.

I can't wait to make some wine. We got a ton of strawberries and other fruits as well, even grapes!

Should be a fun summer.

Grapes, plums, peaches, apples are the icing on the cake after a spring and summer of vegetables.

mkporter
03-21-2011, 01:06 PM
Gardening thread, nice. I just bought a house that has a pretty sizable terraced, south facing slope that is ideal for a garden. The house came with a few fruit trees including: meyer lemon, mexican lime (key lime), valencia orange, a couple of peach trees, a pear tree, a couple of tangerine trees, and two concord grape vines. They haven't really been tended to for a couple of years, so there are some issues. The lemon tree was starting to fall over because it was so laden with fruit, and hadn't been pruned in ages, for example. The rest of the garden area is covered in weeds, so I've got my work cut out for me, but I'm pretty excited. The place was a rental for a few years, but apparently when the owner lived there, he had a vegetable garden that the neighbors say was amazing. I'm planning to start planting just one bed this year. I'm thinking some strawberries, cucumbers, maybe some peas or something. Gonna try and weed the other beds and plant some cover crops to get the soil going again. Nice thing about living in San Diego, is that you can get a yard of compost for $6 at the landfill. It's actually free if you hand load it.

Cito Pelon
03-21-2011, 01:48 PM
Gardening thread, nice. I just bought a house that has a pretty sizable terraced, south facing slope that is ideal for a garden. The house came with a few fruit trees including: meyer lemon, mexican lime (key lime), valencia orange, a couple of peach trees, a pear tree, a couple of tangerine trees, and two concord grape vines. They haven't really been tended to for a couple of years, so there are some issues. The lemon tree was starting to fall over because it was so laden with fruit, and hadn't been pruned in ages, for example. The rest of the garden area is covered in weeds, so I've got my work cut out for me, but I'm pretty excited. The place was a rental for a few years, but apparently when the owner lived there, he had a vegetable garden that the neighbors say was amazing. I'm planning to start planting just one bed this year. I'm thinking some strawberries, cucumbers, maybe some peas or something. Gonna try and weed the other beds and plant some cover crops to get the soil going again. Nice thing about living in San Diego, is that you can get a yard of compost for $6 at the landfill. It's actually free if you hand load it.


Sounds like you're pretty well set. Enjoy. Long growing season, you can grow anything from seed which is the cheapest and easiest way. Chilies, tomatoes, squash, cantloupe, they like the long growing season from seed and make good meals.

It's hard to get rid of citrus crops, it's a shame to see them go to waste, but there it is. The only way I get rid of my apples is give them to horse owners.

alkemical
03-22-2011, 10:10 AM
http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/06/us/06farmers.html?_r=4&scp=1&sq=grange&st=cse

In New Food Culture, a Young Generation of Farmers Emerges

Now, Mr. Jones, 30, and his wife, Alicia, 27, are among an emerging group of people in their 20s and 30s who have chosen farming as a career. Many shun industrial, mechanized farming and list punk rock, Karl Marx and the food journalist Michael Pollan as their influences. The Joneses say they and their peers are succeeding because of Oregon’s farmer-foodie culture, which demands grass-fed and pasture-raised meats.

“People want to connect more than they can at their grocery store,” Ms. Jones said. “We had a couple who came down from Portland and asked if they could collect their own eggs. We said, ‘O.K., sure.’ They want to trust their producer, because there’s so little trust in food these days.”

Garry Stephenson, coordinator of the Small Farms Program at Oregon State University, said he had not seen so much interest among young people in decades. “It’s kind of exciting,” Mr. Stephenson said. “They’re young, they’re energetic and idealist, and they’re willing to make the sacrifices.”

Though the number of young farmers is increasing, the average age of farmers nationwide continues to creep toward 60, according to the 2007 Census of Agriculture. That census, administered by the Department of Agriculture, found that farmers over 55 own more than half of the country’s farmland.

In response, the 2008 Farm Bill included a program for new farmers and ranchers. Last year, the department distributed $18 million to educate young growers across the country.

Tom Vilsack, the secretary of agriculture, said he hoped some beginning farmers would graduate to midsize and large farms as older farmers retired. “I think there needs to be more work in this area,” he said. “It’s great to invest $18 million to reach out to several thousand to get them interested, but the need here is pretty significant. We need to be even more creative than we’ve been to create strategies so that young people can access operations of all sizes.”

The problem, the young farmers say, is access to land and money to buy equipment. Many new to farming also struggle with the basics.

That One Guy
03-22-2011, 05:22 PM
I bought a house in Florida and despite never having grown anything successfully (the kid is a work in progress, he might be the first success), I want to look into some plants. Thought you guys might be a good place to look for ideas.

The deal: The house has a great screened in 30x10 patio for grilling and sitting outdoors. The problem: The yard is only like another 10 feet from the patio to the fence (it's wider so there's lawn but the patio takes up much of the lawn in that portion) and I'd like to put something nice there to look at so we're not just staring at privacy fence.

The fence that I'm dealing with is the approximately lateral 4x4 cross sections with alternating 2x6 vertical fence boards. My idea was to get some sort of netting to make a basket between the alternating boards to plant things in and once they blossom out, it could be quite pleasant. If it could be something like a fruit bearing plant for the kid, that'd be a huge plus.

Anyone ever tried something like that? Got ideas? To explain better, here's a photo that I had a professional graphic artist develop.

alkemical
03-23-2011, 11:25 AM
http://webecoist.com/2011/03/16/put-down-roots-4-unexpected-ways-to-grow-an-urban-garden/

http://cdn.webecoist.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/unique-gardens.jpg

Gardening is a skill and a hobby; it is a lifestyle and a talent. It is something that can either be bred into one’s soul or cultivated like a delicate flower, but once the love of growing things takes root it is impossible to dislodge. As addicting and love-inspiring as gardening is, it also defies all efforts to contain or restrain it. Those with the love of green things will find a way no matter what the circumstances. If we don’t have a flower bed we grow herbs and flowers in tiny containers on the kitchen windowsill. In the absence of a yard we grow tomatoes and peppers in buckets on the balcony. But these compromises are small in comparison to what some gardeners are willing to do in order to carve out their own little green spaces.

Cito Pelon
03-23-2011, 02:55 PM
I bought a house in Florida and despite never having grown anything successfully (the kid is a work in progress, he might be the first success), I want to look into some plants. Thought you guys might be a good place to look for ideas.

The deal: The house has a great screened in 30x10 patio for grilling and sitting outdoors. The problem: The yard is only like another 10 feet from the patio to the fence (it's wider so there's lawn but the patio takes up much of the lawn in that portion) and I'd like to put something nice there to look at so we're not just staring at privacy fence.

The fence that I'm dealing with is the approximately lateral 4x4 cross sections with alternating 2x6 vertical fence boards. My idea was to get some sort of netting to make a basket between the alternating boards to plant things in and once they blossom out, it could be quite pleasant. If it could be something like a fruit bearing plant for the kid, that'd be a huge plus.

Anyone ever tried something like that? Got ideas? To explain better, here's a photo that I had a professional graphic artist develop.

Dude, you better get a few local landscape experts in there to give you some ideas. You need professionals for your area. You have to get it right the first time.

mhgaffney
03-23-2011, 03:20 PM
I suggest you move your compost pile into a barn or garage -- or into a greenhouse to protect against radioactive rain.

I consider myself fortunate to grow food in a greenhouse. I water from a deep well -- so will have radiation free food.

It's much less of a problem if you keep it OUTSIDE the body.

Ugly Duck
03-24-2011, 12:34 PM
Put the first tomato seedlings in the ground yesterday - Big Beef & Better Boy. Never tried growing a hybrid so figured I'd see what they're like. Planting some Black Krim & Pink Brandywine today if it stops raining long enough...

Drunk Monkey
03-24-2011, 12:40 PM
I suggest you move your compost pile into a barn or garage -- or into a greenhouse to protect against radioactive rain.

I consider myself fortunate to grow food in a greenhouse. I water from a deep well -- so will have radiation free food.

It's much less of a problem if you keep it OUTSIDE the body.

Not sure if you are serious?

DomCasual
03-24-2011, 01:06 PM
Not sure if you are serious?

Oh, I'm pretty sure he's serious.

Beantown Bronco
03-24-2011, 01:27 PM
I suggest you move your compost pile into a barn or garage -- or into a greenhouse to protect against radioactive rain.

I consider myself fortunate to grow food in a greenhouse. I water from a deep well -- so will have radiation free food.

It's much less of a problem if you keep it OUTSIDE the body.

BS. I grow most of my veggies on a small farm in Japan. Recently, it's been popping out 50 lb tomatoes and my teeth have never been whiter.

Drunk Monkey
03-24-2011, 01:36 PM
Oh, I'm pretty sure he's serious.

Then he is a jack ass.

So far this year I have planted New Mexico green chilies (Hatch or Slim Jim), bell peppers, tomatoes, and assorted herbs. The asparagus came back from last year and is doing really well, surprising considering the beagles did their best to dig them up over the winter. I will probably get a few more in the ground over the weekend.

Ugly Duck
03-29-2011, 12:37 PM
Got those tomato seedlings in yesterday, putting down black plastic & mulch today. C'mon, people - put those maters in the ground... yer burning daylight!

Heirlooms
Brandywine (2)
Pink Brandywine
Red Beefsteak (2)
Belgium Giant
Mortgage Lifter
Marglobe
Mr. Stripey
Black Krim (2)
Black Prince

Hybrids
Husky Cherry Red
Big Beef (3)
Better Boy (4)

bendog
03-29-2011, 01:01 PM
I'm just doing one early girl, two grapes, and five or so Arkansas Traveler's this year. Had a bad harvest last year because it turned too hot and dry early on. I prefer the Cherokee Purple, but given that it's still pretty dry and water rates are going up, I'm doing them in containers this year, and don't have enough containers to take as many chances. Arkansas Travelers do pretty good here, usually. I'm not even putting peppers in. But in fall I might but some kale or even lettuce where the garden has been. If the rain's there.

tsiguy96
03-29-2011, 01:06 PM
ive got a weird project going on, my mini greenhouse seed starter finally had a sprout (cucumber) im gonna post a picture of it everyday around the same time, almost like a flipbook to see how it changes. should i post it here?

That One Guy
03-29-2011, 03:03 PM
ive got a weird project going on, my mini greenhouse seed starter finally had a sprout (cucumber) im gonna post a picture of it everyday around the same time, almost like a flipbook to see how it changes. should i post it here?

I would say make a photobucket or something.

tsiguy96
03-29-2011, 03:11 PM
I would say make a photobucket or something.

yea i thought of that later, gonna make something else but it will be interesting. have 1 cucumber plant coming up, but they all got flooded yesterday from rain even with the top on it so i hope it didnt kill em all.

Ugly Duck
03-29-2011, 04:03 PM
I prefer the Cherokee Purple, but given that it's still pretty dry and water rates are going up, I'm doing them in containers this year, I might but some kale or even lettuce where the garden has been. If the rain's there.

I'm guessing that you're not really from Folsom cuz this has been one rainy year in the Bay Area. Heck, we've had more rain than Seattle so far this season....

alkemical
04-04-2011, 07:04 AM
http://www.apartmenttherapy.com/dc/outdoor/container-gardening-starting-small-and-simple-143094?utm_source=feedburner&utm_medium=feed&utm_campaign=Feed%3A+apartmenttherapy%2Fmain+%28Ma in%29

Container Gardening: Starting Small and Simple

worm
04-04-2011, 07:25 AM
I'm guessing that you're not really from Folsom cuz this has been one rainy year in the Bay Area. Heck, we've had more rain than Seattle so far this season....

Naw. Bendog is from the Folsom block in Angola. Completely different place.

Cito Pelon
04-04-2011, 10:32 AM
Sheesh, it was 23 degrees F this morning here. Another month to go before I plant any seeds.

bendog
04-04-2011, 11:55 AM
I didn't get them in the containers this weekend. I was a. struggling with my st augistine which is flat out dead from heat and drought and b. waiting for the rain that is supposed to come tonight to wash out my salvaged containers and fill my waterbarrel. I think containers will save water in the long run, plus I steal a gallon at work every day.

Actually the Folsom prison line is from the Johnny Cash song that I put on whenever my kid's belted in the backseat on a long drive. It pisses her off. But it speaks to me.....

I bet there's rich folks eatin',
In a fancy dining car,
They're probably drinkin' coffee,
And smokin' big cigars,
But I know I had it comin',
I know I can't be free,
But those people keep a-movin',
And that's what tortures me.

worm
04-04-2011, 12:55 PM
and here I thought you were marginally incontinent in Angola all these years. :)

alkemical
04-13-2011, 12:01 PM
http://www.disinfo.com/2011/04/scientist-warns-that-roundup-ready-gm-seeds-could-cause-crop-collapse/

Scientist Warns That Roundup Ready GM Seeds Could Cause Crop Collapse

Posted by phunkychic666 on April 12, 2011

Roundup_herbicide_logo

The Institute of Science in Society’s Dr. Mae-Wan Ho reports that a USDA senior scientist has sent an “emergency” warning to US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack regarding a new plant pathogen in Roundup Ready GM soybean and corn that may be responsible for high rates of infertility and spontaneous abortions in livestock:

An open letter appeared on the Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance founded and run by Judith McGeary to save family farms in the US [1, 2]. The letter, written by Don Huber, professor emeritus at Purdue University, to Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, warns of a pathogen “new to science” discovered by “a team of senior plant and animal scientists”. Huber says it should be treated as an “emergency’’, as it could result in “a collapse of US soy and corn export markets and significant disruption of domestic food and feed supplies.”

The letter appeared to have been written before Vilsack announced his decision to authorize unrestricted commercial planting of GM alfalfa on 1 February, in the hope of convincing the Secretary of Agriculture to impose a moratorium instead on deregulation of Roundup Ready (RR) crops.

The new pathogen appears associated with serious pervasive diseases in plants – sudden death syndrome in soybean and Goss’ wilt in corn – but its suspected effects on livestock is alarming. Huber refers to “recent reports of infertility rates in dairy heifers of over 20%, and spontaneous abortions in cattle as high as 45%.”

This could be the worst nightmare of genetic engineering that some scientists including me have been warning for years [3] (see Genetic Engineering Dream or Nightmare, ISIS publication): the unintended creation of new pathogens through assisted horizontal gene transfer and recombination.

Huber writes in closing: “I have studied plant pathogens for more than 50 years. We are now seeing an unprecedented trend of increasing plant and animal diseases and disorders. This pathogen may be instrumental to understanding and solving this problem. It deserves immediate attention with significant resources to avoid a general collapse of our critical agricultural infrastructure.”

The complete letter is reproduced at the Institute of Science in Society’s site.

Monsanto has released the following statement in response:

In a January 17, 2011 letter to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, retired Purdue University professor Don Huber proclaims discovery of a plant pathogen “…that appears to significantly impact the health of plants, animals, and probably human beings.” The letter also alleges this pathogen is more prevalent on herbicide-tolerant genetically modified (GM) crops. No data was provided nor cited, and no collaborators were identified. When contacted, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) coordinator of the National Plant Disease Recovery System (NPDRS) was unfamiliar with information or research about the alleged pathogen and was not contacted by Huber regarding the alleged pathogen discovery. NPDRS is charged with mitigating threats to U.S. agriculture from severe plant disease outbreaks.

Huber has previously made allegations related to micronutrient uptake and diseases in connection with GM crops and glyphosate products. Independent field studies and lab tests by multiple U.S. universities and by Monsanto prior to, and in response to, these allegations do not corroborate his claims. Monsanto is not aware of any reliable studies that demonstrate Roundup Ready® crops are more susceptible to certain diseases or that the application of glyphosate to Roundup Ready crops increases a plant’s susceptibility to diseases.

Rohirrim
04-13-2011, 12:16 PM
I consider Monsanto one the most purely evil organizations that have ever existed.

Drunk Monkey
04-15-2011, 05:30 PM
Well, the hail got me last night. We had a drift 2 feet deep where it emptied from the roof onto the back porch. It Happened over a 6 min period. Crazy, it was mostly pea size so no structural damage but my garden really suffered. Hoping it will bounce back. Anyone from North Texas get caught up in that storm?

alkemical
04-26-2011, 09:26 AM
http://webecoist.com/2011/04/25/12-organic-fertilizers-natural-bug-repellants/

12 Organic Fertilizers & Natural Bug Repellants

Some good info.

~Crash~
04-27-2011, 12:24 AM
I'm going to grow some goddamn tomatoes this year.

LOL talk to like you are a bad ass that will work:giggle:

~Crash~
04-27-2011, 12:25 AM
http://webecoist.com/2011/04/25/12-organic-fertilizers-natural-bug-repellants/

12 Organic Fertilizers & Natural Bug Repellants

Some good info.

not really butthe bugs will like it..:flower:

~Crash~
04-27-2011, 12:35 AM
Well, the hail got me last night. We had a drift 2 feet deep where it emptied from the roof onto the back porch. It Happened over a 6 min period. Crazy, it was mostly pea size so no structural damage but my garden really suffered. Hoping it will bounce back. Anyone from North Texas get caught up in that storm?

If it did not kill it will make them bushy.. sorry to hear. It has rained so damn much here I went out and put dirt on 500 squash plants .. they were damn near unplanted..I have lost almost 500 feet of 1000 feet of cucumber seeds .. this will be the 3rd time I will have replanted them this year.. if does not stop raining I am going to lose all my tomatoes plants I planted them 5'' deep so that will not bother em but they have dirt all over them so I need to stake them and wash as much dirt as I can and get some anti fungus on em I got 400 plants so pulling them off the ground is going to be a b****

alkemical
05-19-2011, 08:56 AM
http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/apartmenttherapy/main/~3/BOVCqzTIUkc/build-your-own-salad-table-146997

http://s3.amazonaws.com/atimg/2562824/18_salad_table_rect540.jpg

Cito Pelon
05-21-2011, 10:36 AM
The strawberries are blooming nicely, I always look forward to this time of year. Fresh off the plant strawberries in the morning is a great treat.

The grapevines are leafing, the fruit from them is a long ways away, but always something to look forward to in the autumn.

The apple tree bloomed, didn't get frosted out and scented the yard nicely. Same with the peach tree.

The green onions from last year have been providing well for a few weeks, and this year's crop is popping up.

The spinach, radish are starting to produce. I'll seed the pole beans, squash, cantaloupe, lettuce, chard, cukes in the next couple days.

Meck77
05-21-2011, 10:32 PM
We're harvesting 1,000 lbs of beautiful tomatoes each week along with other product. Each plant is growing about 2 feet per week.

I've always been a dirt gardener but hydroponics is where the party is at. We're growing 125 heads of lettuce in the space of a full size bed. Takes just 5 weeks to mature.

http://img580.imageshack.us/img580/143/tomatoes.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/580/tomatoes.jpg/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

brncs_fan
05-22-2011, 08:18 PM
Finally got all my garden out for the year. The list includes: peppers, onions, carrots, lettuce, parsley, oregano (I couldn't kill it if I wanted to), rosemary, and thyme.

Taco John
05-22-2011, 10:01 PM
We're harvesting 1,000 lbs of beautiful tomatoes each week along with other product. Each plant is growing about 2 feet per week.

I've always been a dirt gardener but hydroponics is where the party is at. We're growing 125 heads of lettuce in the space of a full size bed. Takes just 5 weeks to mature.

http://img580.imageshack.us/img580/143/tomatoes.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/580/tomatoes.jpg/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)

That's awesome. I have no idea what I would do with 125 heads of lettuce. Do you go to a farmer's market or something?

Meck77
05-23-2011, 10:37 AM
That's awesome. I have no idea what I would do with 125 heads of lettuce. Do you go to a farmer's market or something?

You basically become a vegitarian is what happens. Ha!

We sell product to farmers markets, direct to restaurants, and other resellers. A percentage each week goes to charity.

Some people are building the perfect bomb. We're building the perfect tomatoe. :sunshine:

alkemical
05-23-2011, 10:47 AM
We're harvesting 1,000 lbs of beautiful tomatoes each week along with other product. Each plant is growing about 2 feet per week.

I've always been a dirt gardener but hydroponics is where the party is at. We're growing 125 heads of lettuce in the space of a full size bed. Takes just 5 weeks to mature.

http://img580.imageshack.us/img580/143/tomatoes.jpg (http://imageshack.us/photo/my-images/580/tomatoes.jpg/)

Uploaded with ImageShack.us (http://imageshack.us)



Very nice!!! We have a few places out here that tested "our" product and have claimed at least a 50% increase in biomass, bigger yields, they use less food no matter their media - but in the hydro the results are fast: decreased the salt build up in their systems, less food needed, larger plants and root zones, etc.

The Royal College of Ag tested it, and stated that they won't need to buy near the plant food due to our product and OMRI stated they've never seen an organic product with the complexity we have.

I'm very excited about these new ventures. I hope yours do well, and if you want to do better - hit me up.


****for anyone else - this product works in soil and water medias - and if anyone else is interested - hit me up. I can get you a sample @ cost. (16oz, 32oz, GAL)

http://hydroponics-inc.com/index.html

It's a new site, but it's going to be going live soon - (it's still beta) - if you are looking for something we can help - and we can ship anywhere. If you need more info - hit me up, or I can put you in touch with my partner and he can go into more detail if you need.

Meck77
05-23-2011, 11:13 AM
Very nice!!! We have a few places out here that tested "our" product and have claimed at least a 50% increase in biomass, bigger yields, they use less food no matter their media - but in the hydro the results are fast: decreased the salt build up in their systems, less food needed, larger plants and root zones, etc.

The Royal College of Ag tested it, and stated that they won't need to buy near the plant food due to our product and OMRI stated they've never seen an organic product with the complexity we have.

I'm very excited about these new ventures. I hope yours do well, and if you want to do better - hit me up.


****for anyone else - this product works in soil and water medias - and if anyone else is interested - hit me up. I can get you a sample @ cost. (16oz, 32oz, GAL)

http://hydroponics-inc.com/index.html

It's a new site, but it's going to be going live soon - (it's still beta) - if you are looking for something we can help - and we can ship anywhere. If you need more info - hit me up, or I can put you in touch with my partner and he can go into more detail if you need.

Alkemical...I have not forgotten about your offer. Just been real busy. Happy growing everyone. Tis the season!

alkemical
05-23-2011, 11:21 AM
Alkemical...I have not forgotten about your offer. Just been real busy. Happy growing everyone. Tis the season!

Well, we are going live - so i'm opening this up to everyone!!!

We have a golf course here testing it - and so far they are impressed.

I'm just excited about it, i've seen how much this has really helped - and not in that bull**** sales meaning of "help".

alkemical
06-06-2011, 07:21 AM
http://dornob.com/vertical-home-gardens-modular-stacking-green-wall-system/

http://cdn.dornob.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/mini-indoor-wall-garden.jpg

Dazzled by dangling gardens, but wish you could have one of your own? This neat and simple system of stackable modules makes it easy to create indoor or outdoor garden ‘plots’, hung from walls or built up from floors, window ledges and deck railings.

http://cdn.dornob.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/05/mini-deck-patio-gardening.jpg

MplsBronco
06-06-2011, 01:51 PM
http://www.disinfo.com/2011/04/scientist-warns-that-roundup-ready-gm-seeds-could-cause-crop-collapse/

Scientist Warns That Roundup Ready GM Seeds Could Cause Crop Collapse

Posted by phunkychic666 on April 12, 2011

Roundup_herbicide_logo

The Institute of Science in Society’s Dr. Mae-Wan Ho reports that a USDA senior scientist has sent an “emergency” warning to US Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack regarding a new plant pathogen in Roundup Ready GM soybean and corn that may be responsible for high rates of infertility and spontaneous abortions in livestock:

An open letter appeared on the Farm and Ranch Freedom Alliance founded and run by Judith McGeary to save family farms in the US [1, 2]. The letter, written by Don Huber, professor emeritus at Purdue University, to Secretary of Agriculture Tom Vilsack, warns of a pathogen “new to science” discovered by “a team of senior plant and animal scientists”. Huber says it should be treated as an “emergency’’, as it could result in “a collapse of US soy and corn export markets and significant disruption of domestic food and feed supplies.”

The letter appeared to have been written before Vilsack announced his decision to authorize unrestricted commercial planting of GM alfalfa on 1 February, in the hope of convincing the Secretary of Agriculture to impose a moratorium instead on deregulation of Roundup Ready (RR) crops.

The new pathogen appears associated with serious pervasive diseases in plants – sudden death syndrome in soybean and Goss’ wilt in corn – but its suspected effects on livestock is alarming. Huber refers to “recent reports of infertility rates in dairy heifers of over 20%, and spontaneous abortions in cattle as high as 45%.”

This could be the worst nightmare of genetic engineering that some scientists including me have been warning for years [3] (see Genetic Engineering Dream or Nightmare, ISIS publication): the unintended creation of new pathogens through assisted horizontal gene transfer and recombination.

Huber writes in closing: “I have studied plant pathogens for more than 50 years. We are now seeing an unprecedented trend of increasing plant and animal diseases and disorders. This pathogen may be instrumental to understanding and solving this problem. It deserves immediate attention with significant resources to avoid a general collapse of our critical agricultural infrastructure.”

The complete letter is reproduced at the Institute of Science in Society’s site.

Monsanto has released the following statement in response:

In a January 17, 2011 letter to the U.S. Secretary of Agriculture, retired Purdue University professor Don Huber proclaims discovery of a plant pathogen “…that appears to significantly impact the health of plants, animals, and probably human beings.” The letter also alleges this pathogen is more prevalent on herbicide-tolerant genetically modified (GM) crops. No data was provided nor cited, and no collaborators were identified. When contacted, the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) coordinator of the National Plant Disease Recovery System (NPDRS) was unfamiliar with information or research about the alleged pathogen and was not contacted by Huber regarding the alleged pathogen discovery. NPDRS is charged with mitigating threats to U.S. agriculture from severe plant disease outbreaks.

Huber has previously made allegations related to micronutrient uptake and diseases in connection with GM crops and glyphosate products. Independent field studies and lab tests by multiple U.S. universities and by Monsanto prior to, and in response to, these allegations do not corroborate his claims. Monsanto is not aware of any reliable studies that demonstrate Roundup Ready® crops are more susceptible to certain diseases or that the application of glyphosate to Roundup Ready crops increases a plant’s susceptibility to diseases.

Monsanto is the devil.

alkemical
06-06-2011, 01:57 PM
Monsanto is the devil.

You won't have me argue with you on that.

Have you run into any problems with them/products?

MplsBronco
06-06-2011, 02:00 PM
You won't have me argue with you on that.

Have you run into any problems with them/products?

No, just watched a documentary or 2 about them. Their genetically modified seeds and patents and the way they treat farmers is particularly appalling. Not to mention all their work with chemicals and the damage they done to land/communities.

alkemical
06-06-2011, 02:01 PM
No, just watched a documentary or 2 about them. Their genetically modified seeds and patents and the way they treat farmers is particularly appalling. Not to mention all their work with chemicals and the damage they done to land/communities.

I didn't know much about them before I started working in a garden shop and running into information as well.

I now try to stay away as much as possible from GMO.

MplsBronco
06-06-2011, 02:05 PM
The thing is, they go around looking for farms where their patented seeds have sprouted and then sue the farmers for growing their products. Thing is, their product ends on these farmers land from pollination from the wind or what have you. I guess you could blame the Supreme Court for allowing this crap to happen.

alkemical
06-06-2011, 02:08 PM
The thing is, they go around looking for farms where their patented seeds have sprouted and then sue the farmers for growing their products. Thing is, their product ends on these farmers land from pollination from the wind or what have you. I guess you could blame the Supreme Court for allowing this crap to happen.

I know, it's pretty nuts. Did you see that the GM alfalfa is being looked at for livestock "aborting" their young?

MplsBronco
06-06-2011, 02:13 PM
I know, it's pretty nuts. Did you see that the GM alfalfa is being looked at for livestock "aborting" their young?

The first I had heard of it was from your article. It's horrifying. A true Pandora's box.

alkemical
06-06-2011, 02:16 PM
The first I had heard of it was from your article. It's horrifying. A true Pandora's box.

It's pretty nuts, i agree. I also read about bees "walling off" pesticide laden pollen:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/environment/2011/apr/04/honeybees-entomb-hives

Honeybees 'entomb' hives to protect against pesticides, say scientists

By sealing up cells full of contaminated pollen, bees appear to be attempting to protect the rest of the hive


If bees are doing this...it's kinda nuts.

alkemical
06-17-2011, 10:51 AM
http://www.disinfo.com/2011/06/miracle-gro-expands-from-weed-killer-to-killer-weed/

Miracle-Gro Expands From Weed Killer To Killer Weed

Posted by majestic on June 14, 2011

I fear the worst … previously healthy cannabis plants being infused with chemicals that are then smoked and, well, you know the rest. Dana Mattioli reports for the Wall Street Journal:

Scotts Miracle-Gro Co. has long sold weed killer. Now, it’s hoping to help people grow killer weed.

In an unlikely move for the head of a major company, Scotts Chief Executive Jim Hagedorn said he is exploring targeting medical marijuana as well as other niches to help boost sales at his lawn and garden company.

“I want to target the pot market,” Mr. Hagedorn said in an interview. “There’s no good reason we haven’t.”

Sales at Scotts rose 5% last year to $2.9 billion. But the Marysville, Ohio, company relies on sales at three key retailers—Home Depot Inc., Lowe’s Cos. and Wal-Mart Stores Inc.—for nearly two-thirds of its revenue. With consumers still cautious about spending, the retailers aren’t building new stores as quickly as they used to, making growth for suppliers like Scotts harder to come by. Against that backdrop, Mr. Hagedorn has pushed his regional sales presidents to look for smaller pockets of growth, such as the marijuana market, that together could produce a noticeable bump in sales.

Sixteen states have legalized medical marijuana, the largest being California and Colorado. The market will reach $1.7 billion in sales this year, according to a report by See Change Strategy LLC, an information data services company.

While the report focuses on revenue from growers and dispensaries, Kris Lotlikar, president of See Change, said the market for companies selling hydroponic equipment and professional services is also thriving.

“We see very good growth for these types of companies as the medical-marijuana business grows,” he said…

[continues in the Wall Street Journal]

Cito Pelon
06-17-2011, 11:30 AM
You won't have me argue with you on that.

Have you run into any problems with them/products?

Trouble is, Monsanto makes the herbicides, then GM's seeds to resist their herbicides. It's like they're trying to corner the market on growing food.

Cito Pelon
06-17-2011, 11:49 AM
My garden is doing fine. Radish, green leaf, strawberries, spinach, all producing. Cukes, squash, pole beans, onions, they'll do fine once they hit their stride. Apples, grapes likewise. Carrots from last year's fall seeding are getting harvested for more radish and chard.

alkemical
06-17-2011, 11:52 AM
Trouble is, Monsanto makes the herbicides, then GM's seeds to resist their herbicides. It's like they're trying to corner the market on growing food.


http://news.change.org/stories/organic-farmers-sue-monsanto-over-genetically-modified-seeds

Monsanto has a history of suing farmers — even the little guys! — for patent infringement. The worst part is that oftentimes this "infringement" isn't even farmers' faults. GM seeds' DNA makes its way over to organic and conventional crops through processes like pollen transfer — through no fault of the small farmer — yet Monsanto holds these parties accountable for infringing upon the company's patented, GM technology.

“It seems quite perverse that an organic farmer contaminated by transgenic seed could be accused of patent infringement, but Monsanto has made such accusations before and is notorious for having sued hundreds of farmers for patent infringement, so we had to act to protect the interests of our clients," said Dan Ravicher, executive director of PUBPAT, in a press release.


http://www.truthout.org/obama-deregulates-gmo-crops-despite-supreme-court-injunction/1307023149

Obama Deregulates GMO Crops Despite Supreme Court Injunction

Early this spring, while the world was distracted by Egypt’s uprising, President Barack Obama pushed the Secretary of Agriculture and the U.S. Department of Agriculture to deregulate genetically engineered alfalfa and sugar beets in the United States. The USDA came through as he directed, totally deregulating these Monsanto-patented genes in early February.

In so doing, Obama and the USDA have chosen to override and ignore decisions and injunctions made by the U.S. Supreme Court that banned planting of genetically engineered alfalfa and sugar beets without consideration of the Environmental Impact Assessments, which showed high risks to organic and conventional (chemical) farmers.

So how does this affect you and me? Neither of us remembers seeing alfalfa or sugar beets on our breakfast table or even on our Seder table. Or do we?

Sugar beets provide over 50 percent of the sugar Americans use in their coffee, cereals, and desserts. For the moment, let’s not focus on the fact that sugar beets can cross-pollinate with red beets and make our borscht genetically modified.

Alfalfa reaches our tables within milk, cream, butter, and meat, as it is used as a major animal feed in the dairy industry. It is also used to enrich soils in organic farming.

At this time, no genetically engineered crops are permitted for sale in the European Union (though WikiLeaks has revealed that the U.S. government is exerting strong pressure on the EU to allow them). Thus this new deregulation will potentially close off present markets for organic farmers’ crops.

alkemical
06-17-2011, 11:54 AM
My garden is doing fine. Radish, green leaf, strawberries, spinach, all producing. Cukes, squash, pole beans, onions, they'll do fine once they hit their stride. Apples, grapes likewise. Carrots from last year's fall seeding are getting harvested for more radish and chard.

We've had some wet weather out here, but it's been hot and wet. Things here are growing well, but we've had some blight/mold issues on some crops.

Pretty good overall. Back in the 90's next week.

How big is your grapevine?

Odysseus
06-28-2011, 09:09 PM
I've started this thread for a few years now, so I figure I'll start it again. It's time to get the earth turned over and get ready to seed and plant. Same old deal with me - pole beans, squash, radish, green leaf, cukes, onions, tomatoes. Strawberries I get plenty every year, raspberries the birds get them too fast. I'll get the grapes, apples later in the year. Wild plums I'll get plenty of them come late August.

So, what are your gardening plans?

I need help identifying websites for plants shipped to my home in Colorado.

I need to identify cool gardening methods of composting that can be stored with minimal space.

I want to create an outdoor perennial garden that is somewhat portable. I am looking for a small hydroponic herb garden that can be ground indoors or outdoors.

PM me with whatever cool websites, ideas, or concepts you think can help me pull this off.

What is the link to your previously posted thread? Anything cool there?

worm
06-29-2011, 12:10 AM
I need help identifying websites for plants shipped to my home in Colorado.

I need to identify cool gardening methods of composting that can be stored with minimal space.

I want to create an outdoor perennial garden that is somewhat portable. I am looking for a small hydroponic herb garden that can be ground indoors or outdoors.

PM me with whatever cool websites, ideas, or concepts you think can help me pull this off.

What is the link to your previously posted thread? Anything cool there?

Did you have an epiphany?

alkemical
06-29-2011, 06:58 AM
I need help identifying websites for plants shipped to my home in Colorado.

I need to identify cool gardening methods of composting that can be stored with minimal space.

I want to create an outdoor perennial garden that is somewhat portable. I am looking for a small hydroponic herb garden that can be ground indoors or outdoors.

PM me with whatever cool websites, ideas, or concepts you think can help me pull this off.

What is the link to your previously posted thread? Anything cool there?

I'll help you with the indoor stuff, I can probably get it @ a good price.

Cito Pelon
06-29-2011, 10:02 AM
We've had some wet weather out here, but it's been hot and wet. Things here are growing well, but we've had some blight/mold issues on some crops.

Pretty good overall. Back in the 90's next week.

How big is your grapevine?

The one that's been around for 20 years is an absolute monster if it isn't pruned heavily. It literally grows 6" a day in all directions, throws shoots off galore.

I let it grow one season just to see how far it would go and still fruit, it got about 40 feet in circumference in one season, I kid you not. And it produced grapes throughout it's length the next season. I have no doubt it could have got bigger, but I cut it back since it brought in the raccoons with all the fruit it was producing. I keep it pruned to about 10' and just let it cling on the fence. Once it fruits I prune the new growth.

I planted a Concord seedling a few years ago and it's starting to hit it's stride now. It hasn't produced any fruit yet, but it's about 4' and I'll keep it that way.

Cito Pelon
06-29-2011, 10:26 AM
I need help identifying websites for plants shipped to my home in Colorado.

I need to identify cool gardening methods of composting that can be stored with minimal space.

I want to create an outdoor perennial garden that is somewhat portable. I am looking for a small hydroponic herb garden that can be ground indoors or outdoors.

PM me with whatever cool websites, ideas, or concepts you think can help me pull this off.

What is the link to your previously posted thread? Anything cool there?

I guess you need to check with your local nursery. Myself I don't compost, my method is to thatch my lawn, take that dead grass and work it into the garden soil when I fork it over in spring (tilling). That gives the worms and crawlers something to feed on and I'm a big believer in having a healthy garden is having a lot of worms and crawlers in your soil to keep the soil aerated and provide their waste to further enrich your garden soil.

Then I just buy seed packets each spring and plant the seeds according to the directions on the packets. It produces for me.

I buy a few cartons of fishing worms and crawlers every summer and toss them into the garden to make sure the population stays healthy. They really do keep your soil loose and aerated.

I also throw in some fish meal pellets while I'm tilling the soil in spring.

As for a portable perennial garden, I guess you'll have to get yourself some large containers and set them on casters. You can get them from Home Depot, what people use for moving furniture.

For hydroponics, I guess alkemical has some ideas.

alkemical
06-29-2011, 10:32 AM
The one that's been around for 20 years is an absolute monster if it isn't pruned heavily. It literally grows 6" a day in all directions, throws shoots off galore.

I let it grow one season just to see how far it would go and still fruit, it got about 40 feet in circumference in one season, I kid you not. And it produced grapes throughout it's length the next season. I have no doubt it could have got bigger, but I cut it back since it brought in the raccoons with all the fruit it was producing. I keep it pruned to about 10' and just let it cling on the fence. Once it fruits I prune the new growth.

I planted a Concord seedling a few years ago and it's starting to hit it's stride now. It hasn't produced any fruit yet, but it's about 4' and I'll keep it that way.

Very nice, are you having any problems with any diseases? We've had a super wet spring and one of my friend's vine is not doing so hot. But they aren't exactly attentive gardeners either.

alkemical
06-29-2011, 10:35 AM
I guess you need to check with your local nursery. Myself I don't compost, my method is to thatch my lawn, take that dead grass and work it into the garden soil when I fork it over in spring (tilling). That gives the worms and crawlers something to feed on and I'm a big believer in having a healthy garden is having a lot of worms and crawlers in your soil to keep the soil aerated and provide their waste to further enrich your garden soil.

Then I just buy seed packets each spring and plant the seeds according to the directions on the packets. It produces for me.

I buy a few cartons of fishing worms and crawlers every summer and toss them into the garden to make sure the population stays healthy. They really do keep your soil loose and aerated.

I also throw in some fish meal pellets while I'm tilling the soil in spring.

As for a portable perennial garden, I guess you'll have to get yourself some large containers and set them on casters. You can get them from Home Depot, what people use for moving furniture.

For hydroponics, I guess alkemical has some ideas.



Yep a large pot with some casters would be the way to go - I found some dwarf tree info and sent it his way.

My one buddy composts - and has a nice bin going. He built it up with 3 walls of cinder block - he had some leftover soil from some yard work - and we threw in some mulch that was old from the landscaping. Added some worm castings and now just compostable stuff from the garbage, etc. it's starting to break down real nice.

As for the hydroponics thinger - I just need some info to find out how much one is planning on doing.

I'm going to have a salad table done indoors this year via the fall/winter/early spring. So I hope to be able to share what i'm doing.

My projected crop:

Tomatoes, Cukes, leaf lettuce, peppers to start.

Cito Pelon
06-29-2011, 11:14 AM
Very nice, are you having any problems with any diseases? We've had a super wet spring and one of my friend's vine is not doing so hot. But they aren't exactly attentive gardeners either.

No, I've never had any problems with diseases of any kind, and the lack of wet springs probably has something to do with that. It's pretty hard for a fungus to grow when it's hot and dry, but I imagine if we had a prolonged wet spell there would be some fungus.

We had a wet first two weeks of May, but since then there has only been one day of wet weather, the other 40 days have been hot, sunny, and dry. I'm not a viniculturist, but hot, sunny and dry from the little I know is perfect for grape vines. I don't even water them. In fact, the Concord I planted might be suffering from over watering, since it's near where I water my grass. It's on the downslope from the grass area.

Odysseus
06-29-2011, 11:15 AM
Did you have an epiphany?

No.

I got married.

That One Guy
06-29-2011, 11:35 AM
I just noticed my limes are coming in. Not as exciting as some of yours but it'll sit great in a Corona when all is said and done. :)

Cito Pelon
06-29-2011, 12:32 PM
No.

I got married.

That's an epiphany. When you have to provide for a family a garden to lessen the food bills looks pretty good. It's not appealing to everybody, that's for sure though. You have to enjoy gardening, and it's not real popular. Many people don't like getting their hands dirty.

alkemical
06-29-2011, 12:45 PM
That's an epiphany. When you have to provide for a family a garden to lessen the food bills looks pretty good. It's not appealing to everybody, that's for sure though. You have to enjoy gardening, and it's not real popular. Many people don't like getting their hands dirty.

It's a hell of a lot of work as well.

Cito Pelon
06-29-2011, 01:47 PM
It's a hell of a lot of work as well.

Yeah, it's not for everybody. You have to enjoy it, that's for sure.

alkemical
06-29-2011, 01:54 PM
Yeah, it's not for everybody. You have to enjoy it, that's for sure.

I don't have the land to do the outdoor thing, but really enjoyed spending time out side.

I have done a ton of weeding in the gardens for my friends, and some of the "crap work" - but man - i got a ton of snap peas, some cukes - DELICIOUS!!!!

:D

Odysseus
06-29-2011, 08:37 PM
That's an epiphany. When you have to provide for a family a garden to lessen the food bills looks pretty good. It's not appealing to everybody, that's for sure though. You have to enjoy gardening, and it's not real popular. Many people don't like getting their hands dirty.

I enjoyed gardening long before I met her. She wants to impress me with her green thumb so consequently because we moved to a different type of setup and I don't have the land to do what I used to do I have figure out something else.

One of my gardens was a butterfly garden. I told her about this and she was fascinated. If you have never grown a butterfly garden it is fascinating. I have no idea how my butterflys were whipping around in my yard but to put a number on it let's say 1000. It was for only a brief time but it is one of the most amazing things you can ever see. Photography cannot not capture 360 degrees of beauty.

http://www.thebutterflysite.com/gardening.shtml

My wife is creating beauty in my life. She is my garden. The plants, to me, are just plants.

tsiguy96
06-29-2011, 08:52 PM
ive got 6 pepper plants, some sort of small white bug was overtaking them, and in addition they all seem to be dying now. the weird weather in florida right now isnt helping, but sucks to put the time in building the planters and buying 50 bucks worth of soil to only et a few peppers out of it!

Cito Pelon
07-02-2011, 08:13 AM
ive got 6 pepper plants, some sort of small white bug was overtaking them, and in addition they all seem to be dying now. the weird weather in florida right now isnt helping, but sucks to put the time in building the planters and buying 50 bucks worth of soil to only et a few peppers out of it!

Eh, try this web site for tips on getting rid of the bug, and for general gardening tips and tonics:

http://www.jerrybaker.com/garden/information/tipsandtonics.aspx

Cito Pelon
07-05-2011, 03:22 PM
Very nice, are you having any problems with any diseases? We've had a super wet spring and one of my friend's vine is not doing so hot. But they aren't exactly attentive gardeners either.

Dude, that monster grapevine of mine has expanded 36 inches since June 29th. I tell ya, it's a monster. It would take over the neighborhood if I didn't prune it constantly.

I'm guessing it's 20 years old, I didn't plant it so I'm assuming it was planted when the house was built. It's 10" in diameter at the root, and has six 2 - 4" diameter shoots off of the root.

It's an absolute monster. I seriously think that thing could reach 100 feet in diameter if I let it grow.

mkporter
07-05-2011, 04:45 PM
Harvested about 1/3 of my peach tree yesterday. This was my first experience with growing peaches, as the tree came with our new house, but so far, so good. Pretty tasty. Going to have to give a bunch of them away, though. Pulled off about 50, probably have another 50-100 left. We aren't really prepped for canning yet, maybe next year.

broncosteven
07-05-2011, 05:45 PM
Dude, that monster grapevine of mine has expanded 36 inches since June 29th. I tell ya, it's a monster. It would take over the neighborhood if I didn't prune it constantly.

I'm guessing it's 20 years old, I didn't plant it so I'm assuming it was planted when the house was built. It's 10" in diameter at the root, and has six 2 - 4" diameter shoots off of the root.

It's an absolute monster. I seriously think that thing could reach 100 feet in diameter if I let it grow.

Don't you get all kinds of big assed Spiders growing in that thing? I found a black widow in y dad's one year and never went near it again. His vine was like an apartment complex for Spiders.

Meck77
07-05-2011, 06:14 PM
but sucks to put the time in building the planters and buying 50 bucks worth of soil to only et a few peppers out of it!

Next time get the yellow bags of steer manure from Home Depot for $1.15.

It's the "same ****" as the $7 bags.

tsiguy96
07-05-2011, 06:38 PM
Next time get the yellow bags of steer manure from Home Depot for $1.15.

It's the "same ****" as the $7 bags.

i bought bags that were 2 bucks each, just took a lot of dirt to fill my plants. 4x1x1

alkemical
07-05-2011, 07:45 PM
Dude, that monster grapevine of mine has expanded 36 inches since June 29th. I tell ya, it's a monster. It would take over the neighborhood if I didn't prune it constantly.

I'm guessing it's 20 years old, I didn't plant it so I'm assuming it was planted when the house was built. It's 10" in diameter at the root, and has six 2 - 4" diameter shoots off of the root.

It's an absolute monster. I seriously think that thing could reach 100 feet in diameter if I let it grow.

holy frick!

you making wine?

alkemical
07-12-2011, 07:45 AM
http://www.myfoxdetroit.com/dpp/news/local/julie-bass-of-oak-park-faces-misdemeanor-charge-for-vegetable-garden-20110630-wpms

Oak Park Woman Faces 93-Days in Jail For Planting Vegetable Garden

By ALEXIS WILEY
WJBK | myFOXDetroit.com

OAK PARK, Mich. (WJBK) - "The price of organic food is kind of through the roof," said Julie Bass.

So, why not grow your own? However, Bass' garden is a little unique because it's in her front yard.

"We thought it'd be really cool to do it so the neighbors could see. The kids love it. The kids from the neighborhood all come and help," she said.

Bass' cool garden has landed her in hot water with the City of Oak Park. Code enforcement gave her a warning, then a ticket and now she's been charged with a misdemeanor.

"I think it's sad that the City of Oak Park that's already strapped for cash is paying a lot of money to have a prosecutor bothering us," Bass told FOX 2's Alexis Wiley.

"That's not what we want to see in a front yard," said Oak Park City Planner Kevin Rulkowski.

Why? The city is pointing to a code that says a front yard has to have suitable, live, plant material. The big question is what's "suitable?"

We asked Bass whether she thinks she has suitable, live, plant material in her front yard.

"It's definitely live. It's definitely plant. It's definitely material. We think it's suitable," she said.

So, we asked Rulkowski why it's not suitable.

"If you look at the definition of what suitable is in Webster's dictionary, it will say common. So, if you look around and you look in any other community, what's common to a front yard is a nice, grass yard with beautiful trees and bushes and flowers," he said.

But when you look at front yards that are unsightly and overgrown, is Bass' vegetable garden really worth the city's time and money?

We asked Rulkowski what he would say to those who feel this is ridiculous.

"I would argue that you won't find that opinion from most people in Oak Park," he responded.

"I have a bunch of little children and we take walks to come by and see everything growing. I think it's a very wonderful thing for our neighborhood," said neighbor Devorah Gold.

"They don't have (anything) else to do (if) they're going to take her to court for a garden," said neighbor Ora Goodwin.

We did find one neighbor who wasn't a fan and thinks it needs to go.

"I know there's a backyard. Do it in the backyard," he said.

"They say, 'Why should you grow things in the front?' Well, why shouldn't I? They're fine. They're pretty. They're well maintained," said Bass.

It looks like this critical debate is headed for a jury trial and neither side is backing down.

"I could sell out and save my own self and just not have them bother me anymore, but then there's no telling what they're going to harass the next person about," Bass told us.

There's another pretrial scheduled for July 26. The next step could be a jury trial.

mkporter
07-12-2011, 11:14 AM
Peaches and concord grapes coming in. Woo!

28825

Cito Pelon
07-13-2011, 09:43 AM
holy frick!

you making wine?

No, we prefer just eating the grapes (as do the raccoons and birds). The monster has expanded another 30" since July 4th and it hasn't had much sun since then. Once it gets hot and dry again no doubt it will hit its 6" per day. I tell ya, it's a monster.