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View Full Version : 1977 DENVER BRONCOS.........Tell me about them


(Jae)
01-24-2007, 05:00 PM
The only Non-Elway team to get to the SuperBowl.
I usually forget there was life before Elway as far as SB's , way before my time, anyone have any personal memories of this team they care to share?
I'd like to hear about this team from a Bronos fan who remembers that season.
What kind of year was it? How good were they really?


This ESPN " TOP 80 SB Teams Of All Time" link has sparked my interest in them.
They're ranked 61st overall.
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=super/rankings/80-61

DomCasual
01-24-2007, 05:11 PM
I was 7, and that was the first year I ever watched football. I remember snapshots more than many of the games. Growing up, I would replay that season in my backyard. They beat the Raiders 30-7 in week 7. That's the game I remember most about that season, other than the AFC Championship.

I remember Craig Morton being slower than molasses in winter time. Randy Gradishar was my first Bronco hero back then - he was a god. Rick Upchurch was like Dante Hall a few years ago returning kicks. The coolest thing to have were these Orange Crush t-shirts - they had the Orange Crush logo with the word "Defense" in that cheesy 70's lettering underneath.

After that year, my Broncos obsession just took off.

broncosteven
01-24-2007, 05:13 PM
Bernard Jackson was a great pickup at Safety.

Tom Jackson was a beast at LB.

They had an Old QB that had a gun for an arm.

Ran RBBC with Armstrong, jensen, Lytle, Lonnie Perrin

Haven Moses was a stud Vs Oakland in the Title game.

They had a solid D line rotation in the 3-4. Alzado was a goo NT.

Billy Thompson could hit.

Amazing to watch all the stunting that went on back then. hardly any lead blocking with fullback inside, only on outside sweeps. Lots of inside counters & traps using guards to seal & block LB's. Not a lot of big rushing plays unlike today.

Very physical on both sides of ball though. Good to great O line.

If they didn't implode & Morton was 100% the SB could have been closer.

broncosteven
01-24-2007, 05:15 PM
I forgot Randy Gradishar at MLB! Guess it was because he is not in HOF!

Dos Rios
01-24-2007, 05:30 PM
I was 7, and that was the first year I ever watched football. I remember snapshots more than many of the games. Growing up, I would replay that season in my backyard.

Same for me on all accounts.

I had an album for years called "The Year of the Broncos" narrated by Bob Martin, which replayed the year. Wore that album out.

The snapshot I remember from that year (I think) was an interception by one of the linebackers, Gradishar or Jackson I think, who began running it back slowly up the left side. As the linebacker lumbered along, Louis Wright came flying out of nowhere, asked for and got a handoff, and then shot down the sideline for a touchdown like everyone else was running in molasses. Both Gradishar and Wright should be in the HOF.

Anyone remember the Craig Morton wind-up doll? It took 5 steps back, stood still for 5 seconds, then fell over.

Smiling Assassin27
01-24-2007, 05:36 PM
Jim Kiick, formerly of 1972 Miami Dolphin fame, was on that team.

broncosteven
01-24-2007, 05:40 PM
Same for me on all accounts.

I had an album for years called "The Year of the Broncos" narrated by Bob Martin, which replayed the year. Wore that album out.

The snapshot I remember from that year (I think) was an interception by one of the linebackers, Gradishar or Jackson I think, who began running it back slowly up the left side. As the linebacker lumbered along, Louis Wright came flying out of nowhere, asked for and got a handoff, and then shot down the sideline for a touchdown like everyone else was running in molasses. Both Gradishar and Wright should be in the HOF.

Anyone remember the Craig Morton wind-up doll? It took 5 steps back, stood still for 5 seconds, then fell over.


Amazing the line gave him time to throw.

broncosteven
01-24-2007, 05:43 PM
Mean Joe Green Punched both Offensive Guards in the guts at the end of the 2nd Q in the Divisional game (thanks Atlas!), He knocked Howard out with a gut shot.

Cheapest shot I ever saw from a player. They shook hands after Denver walked off the field with a 34-21 win.

worm
01-24-2007, 05:48 PM
After that year, my Broncos obsession just took off.

n00b.

Bronx33
01-24-2007, 05:51 PM
The bridge of Lyle alzados nose was always bleeding (always)

worm
01-24-2007, 05:51 PM
After the AFC championship game...I stopped trying to make deals with God.

He answered that one and I felt guilty for asking for anything more.

Such a great year and a franchise defining AFC Championship game.

watermock
01-24-2007, 05:52 PM
I was a freshman at D.U. and fairly preoccupied with the fear of being one in the big city. Lots of snobs at that school was intimidating...I was no longer big man on campus (HS)...but here's what was crazy. The town just getting more and more and more excited each week...by the playoffs, the entire town was in a feeding frenzy.

Denver brought in the Dallas reject Morton and he was kinda like a Bledsoe. The Defense was simply dominant and Lyle Alzado was allready a crazy animal.

Smiling Assassin27
01-24-2007, 05:55 PM
I remember, being 8 years old, screaming at the TV during the superbowl: Damn it, Mr. Miller, put in Weese!'

I got smacked for saying 'Damn'.

Bronx33
01-24-2007, 05:55 PM
After the AFC championship game...I stopped trying to make deals with God.

He answered that one and I felt guilty for asking for anything more.

Such a great year and a franchise defining AFC Championship game.


It was like magic the whole town was on fire that whole season it looked like a small hunting town full of hunters wearing orange. And that was the drunkest i ever saw my dad when he came home from the game with a huge chunk of the endzone grass in one hand and a beer in the other. (They also parked the RV on the frontlawn)

DomCasual
01-24-2007, 06:02 PM
n00b.

Geezer.

broncosteven
01-24-2007, 06:08 PM
I remember, being 8 years old, screaming at the TV during the superbowl: Damn it, Mr. Miller, put in Weese!'

I got smacked for saying 'Damn'.

I got a Migraine from watching the SB.

My best friend was a Cowboy fan, we both lived in Michigan at the time, we had moved from Denver in March of 77.

I had to take my lumps the next day.

For xmas the next year my parents bought me a Puzzle of Morten trying to throw a pass over Too-tall, & Henderson. I hated that puzzle.

BroncoBuff
01-24-2007, 06:18 PM
Maaake those miracles haa-ppen...
Make those MIR-acles haa-ppen ...
Nobody ...
Nobody does it alone!

That was RB Jon Keyworth's big hit single that year ... kinda like the Bears' "SuperBowl Shuffle," but before ESPN.

It was a magical time for me personally - I turned 16 during that season and started driving and dating and, well, you know. The car radio on that green Galaxy 500 was either on 105.9 FM - Pete McKay and "KBPI Rocks the Rockies," or AM 850 - BroncoTalk with Bob Martin. People were apoplectic about whether (that east-coast bastard) Howard Cosell would include the Broncos Sunday game in his halftime highlights on Monday Night Football. If he did not, he was reviled, if he did, he wasn't so bad after all. I kinda felt - rightly so in retrospect - that the "small town" of Denver was coming of age just as I was.

And EVERYBODY was wearing orange ... everybody. The Cinderella aspect of that whole season simply cannot be overstated ... remember, Denver had NEVER been to the playoffs before 1977, not even once. And although it's easily forgotten, it was Red Miller's first year with the Broncos ... that only added to the Cinderella atmosphere. Even Woody Paige was on the bandwagon .... in fact, the Rocky Mtn News ran a poll: "Should Red Miller change his name to Orange Miller?" That kinda crazy stuff.

On the team, I mostly remember the linebackers ... we played a 3-4, and those four guys were superstars in Colorado:

Randy Gradishar
Joe Rizzo
Tom Jackson
Bob Swenson

BigPlayShay
01-24-2007, 06:27 PM
I was a toddler, but I did utter my first word (touchdown) while watching a Broncos game from that season.

My dad also got fired from a job because he refused to work on the day of the AFC Championship game (New Years Day as well) because he had tickets.

KipCorrington25
01-24-2007, 06:28 PM
Who can forget Godwin Turk from that '77 team?

DomCasual
01-24-2007, 06:33 PM
Maaake those miracles haa-ppen...
Make those MIR-acles haa-ppen ...
Nobody ...
Nobody does it alone!

That was RB Jon Keyworth's big hit single that year ... kinda like the Bears' "SuperBowl Shuffle," but before ESPN.

It was a magical time for me personally - I turned 16 during that season and started driving and dating and, well, you know. The car radio on that green Galaxy 500 was either on 105.9 FM - Pete McKay and "KBPI Rocks the Rockies," or AM 850 - BroncoTalk with Bob Martin.

Granted, I am not anywhere near as old as you. Seriously, I'm nowhere near! But I grew up listening to KBPI. I assume it's not there anymore, or it's probably not the same format. But I remember tuning in for the Top 8 at 8 every night. Those were pretty good times. Technology has taken the novelty off of things like that (there are new novelties, I suppose), but I remember being outraged when I song I didn't like made it to number one on the Top 8 at 8. Good times.

DomCasual
01-24-2007, 06:41 PM
That was also Steve Antonopoulos first or second year with the team. I had Orange Crush soda cans (they were steel) that had pictures of the Broncos on them. I had probably fifty that had Steve Antonopoulos photo on them.

Atlas
01-24-2007, 06:43 PM
My dad also got fired from a job because he refused to work on the day of the AFC Championship game (New Years Day as well) because he had tickets.

Smart man. You can always get another job!!!

errand
01-24-2007, 06:44 PM
The '77 Broncos were a very good team. Defensively, they could toss a shutout on any given Sunday. The biggest win during the regular season was a 30-7 whipping of the Raiders in which they forced 7 INT's and tossed Stabler around like a rag doll. The team went 12-2 with our losses being Oakland exacting revenge to the tune of 24-14 in Denver, and a 14-6 loss to Dallas in the season finale on the road.

They beat the Steelers 34-21 with Tom Jackson intercepting 2 in the 4th, and Morton hitting Jack Dolbin in the corner of the end zone on a 32 yard play-action TD pass.

The next week they jumped on defending NFL champion Oakland early with Morton hitting Moses on a medium out that he turned into a 64 (or was it 74?) yard TD. That game had a bit of controversy as Rob Lytle lost the ball inside the Oakland 5, and it was called a "non-fumble" (kind of like Tom Brady's "no-fumble tuck")...but there was also a pass ruled incomplete where Jack Dolbin went low to snag a Morton pass, got up and raced to the end zone, it was ruled "IN-COM-PLETE", but replays showed Dolbin did indeed catch the ball. So either way Denver should have won the game.

The Super Bowl started out OK for us defensively...Dallas fumbled on the initial play, and there were several other opportunities where they could have won the game....Shultz missed a chance to snag a fumbled punt inside the Dallas 5, an INT was negated by a bad call when the refs said Staubach stepped out and again replays showed he was actually in.

Yeah Morton tossed 4 INTs, but they were mostly due to the immense pressure Dallas was able to put on him. The NFL Today use to use a play where a split second after Morton released the pass, he was pancaked by Too Tall as their intro back in the late 70's, early 80's.

We rushed for 157 yards, but only mustered 35 yards passing. Morton had a few passes dropped, and two completions were subsequently fumbled by Riley Odoms and Dolbin. They were also done in by two precise passes that hit their marks despite pretty damn good coverage on the receivers. Johnson's TD that he lost control of as he crossed the goal line (this was BTW the first time I had known that the ball just crossing the goal line defined it as a TD) and the HB option pass to Golden Richards.

The final was 27-10 Dallas, but it wasn't the route people think it was by looking at the scoreboard. We turned the ball over 8 times, 7 in the first half, and trailed only 13-3 at halftime. Rick Upchurch returned a KO 67 yards and after Morton was harrassed into another near INT, Red Miller made the switch to the more nimble Weese. But Weese fumbled in the 4th and that if memory serves me it set Dallas up for the final coup de' gace HB option pass.

BroncoBuff
01-24-2007, 06:53 PM
errand - that's AWESOME recall!

I still think Riley Odoms is one of the Top 5 Broncos ever (Zim, Champ, TD, Swenson) when judged as "the very best at his position" over 2+ years. Odoms was best in the league at blocking TE, and among the top 2 or 3 receiving TE for several years. Swenson was the best Sam LB in the league for a couppla years, Zimmerman and Champ were/are the best at their positions, as TD was for 2 years there. As great as Elway was, he was never really the best QB in the league for 2+ years in a row, despite the fact he's undoubtedly the best Bronco ever

And Jack Dolbin ... thanks for that memory!!!

#82 ... he was a blur, especially for a white guy.

worm
01-24-2007, 06:59 PM
Geezer.


heh. You got 2 years on me dude.

course...its not the years..its the mileage.....and my liver is 85!

DomCasual
01-24-2007, 07:05 PM
heh. You got 2 years on me dude.

course...its not the years..its the mileage.....and my liver is 85!

Hey, there's a lot of living in two years.

BroncoBuff
01-24-2007, 07:12 PM
Smart man. You can always get another job!!!
Definitely. And Shay ... that game was also on NEW YEAR'S DAY!

And that brings up another aspect of Broncomania: 1978 was the Chinese "Year of the Horse." So the Ch-Ship game - on New Year's Day - was thought to be pre-determined based upon "The Year of the Horse." (even though the Chinese new year starts weeks later).

Best Newspaper Headline Ever: Craig Morton threw 2 TDs to Haven Moses in the game that sealed the first-ever AFC West championship, and the NFL playoffs for the first time. Monday's Paper:
Moses Leads Broncos to Promised Land

loborugger
01-24-2007, 07:16 PM
If my memory serves me correctly, that SB set records for most turnovers and penalties and is often referred to as the sloppiest SB ever played.

Tredici
01-24-2007, 07:17 PM
I think I still have every Rocky Mountain News Front Page from the 1977 Season. I used to tack them up on the wall in the den.

I still get misty over reading the pilot coming onto the speaker during the team's flight home from their game in Houston.

"Gentlemen. You are Champions."

(It took the outcome of the, I think, Baltimore game still in progress when the flight left to make that determination.)

Bronx33
01-24-2007, 07:20 PM
If my memory serves me correctly, that SB set records for most turnovers and penalties and is often referred to as the sloppiest SB ever played.

Your really taking the fun otta this thread ya know :wiggle: , sure we lost and we lost bad but that year put this team and city into the next gear as a legit sporting team/city, which we all enjoy today. (from 1977 to 1999 the team reached the play-off's 13 times)

BigPlayShay
01-24-2007, 07:23 PM
Definitely. And Shay ... that game was also on NEW YEAR'S DAY!


yeah I know, I mentioned that. Needless to say it wasn't a great job that he was getting the axe from.

loborugger
01-24-2007, 07:25 PM
Your really taking the fun otta this thread ya know :wiggle: , sure we lost and we lost bad but that year put this team and city into the next gear as a legit sporting team/city, which we all enjoy today. (from 1977 to 1999 the team reached the play-off's 13 times)

It was a lousy ending to an otherwise magical season. Knocking off the Steelers and Raiders in the playoffs was pretty sweet. Woulda been nice to seal the deal, but cant win em all (or if your Minn and Buff, any).

Wasnt this the season when Tom Jackson told Madden, "Its over fat man!"?

Bronx33
01-24-2007, 07:30 PM
Let's not forget the guy that layed the groundwork for red miller...

http://www.denverpost.com/catchingupwith/ci_4727096

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2006/1126/20061126_070325_WhereRalston112706_200.jpg

John Ralston compiled a 34-33-3 record as Broncos coach from 1972-76, leaving before the team played in its first Super Bowl. Also a former Stanford coach who won the Rose Bowl twice, Ralston is a fund-raiser for San Jose State. (Post file

Editor's note: In the Colorado Classics series, The Denver Post takes a weekly look at individuals who made their mark on the Colorado sports landscape and what they are doing now.

Critics of John Ralston's term as Broncos coach had a catchphrase that claimed his clipboard was empty.

But upon further review, Ralston's trademark accessory wasn't empty. A closer look reveals the clipboard's contents were instrumental in getting the Broncos to their first Super Bowl.

Ralston's legacy from his term at the helm of the Broncos from 1972-76 was his draft choices. The list reads like a lineup that could go right to the Super Bowl.

"We had the fifth pick of the draft my first year and we took tight end Riley Odoms," Ralston said recently as he tested his memory from his office at San Jose State that allows him to stay in touch with football. "Winning boils down to picking real good players in the draft. You have to build with a solid base of good players out of the draft."

Ralston reeled off a list of first- round draft choices over those four years who became a who's who of the Broncos. Running back Otis Armstrong was taken in 1973 with the ninth pick of the draft. Linebacker Randy Gradishar (1974), defensive back Louis Wright (1975) and guard Tom Glassic (1976) followed.

Ralston's drafting expertise didn't stop in the first round. Defensive end Barney Chavous, guard Paul Howard and linebacker Tom Jackson were drafts picks in 1973. Offensive tackle Claudie Minor was a Denver draft pick in 1974 and nose tackle Rubin Carter, defensive back Steve Foley and wide receiver Rick Upchurch were picked in 1975.

All played key roles at the Louisiana Superdome in the Broncos' first Super Bowl, which they lost 27-10 to the Dallas Cowboys on Jan. 15, 1978.

But Ralston wasn't with them in New Orleans. His knowledge of how to put a team together didn't always transfer to victories on the field. After a 9-5 season in 1976, a group of Denver players gave a vote of no confidence in their coach and Ralston was fired, with an overall 34-33-3 record.

Red Miller was hired and the 1977 Broncos went 12-2 before beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 34-21 at Mile High Stadium in a playoff game. Then the Broncos beat the Oakland Raiders 20-17 in the AFC championship game, also at Mile High.

"It would hurt anybody," Ralston said of his dismissal from the Broncos. "Losing a job in that business happens to about everyone. There's no bitterness."

Miller, in Ralston's estimation, completed the puzzle that put the Broncos on the map. Miller traded Steve Ramsey, Ralston's quarterback, to the New York Giants for quarterback Craig Morton.

"Red did a great job in putting the right quarterback into the mix," Ralston said.

Ralston no longer carries a clipboard. While he spends most of his time fundraising for San Jose State, Ralston also watches hundreds of game tapes of California high school and junior college games seeking possible recruits for the Spartans.

Without saying directly, Ralston is always looking for another Merlin Olsen. He coached Olsen at Utah State and calls the former NFL star the best player he ever coached.

Ralston also participates in the Master Coaches Survey, which he hopes someday might become part of the formula used in the Bowl Championship Series standings. His fellow Master Coaches Survey voters include Don James, John Robinson, Vince Dooley, Bill Mallory and George Welsh.

Ralston, 79, looks back 66 years to when he was 13 and living in Michigan as the time he decided he wanted to be a coach.

"I don't know why I decided that," Ralston said. "I was living in a small mining town and everyone looked up to the high school coach. Maybe that was it, but I never wanted to do anything else. I tell everybody that I haven't worked a day in my life."

Ralston's coaching stops didn't all end in disappointment. After guiding Utah State (1959-62), Ralston coached nine years at Stanford, and his teams won Rose Bowl games against Ohio State and Michigan.

"The two Rose Bowl victories probably are the high point, but nothing compares to losing a son," Ralston said, looking back some 20 years when illness claimed his son, Larry.

Ralston remains loyal to his former Denver players despite his firing by the Broncos, saying Gradishar and several others belong in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He looks at road victories toward the end of his last season as Denver's coach as indications the Broncos were moving toward the Super Bowl.

"It was unbelievable how many fans would meet us at the airport when we returned from some of those games," Ralston said. "But there was a lot of pressure to win. I probably didn't do as good a job as I should have. Being honest with myself, I probably should have stayed at Stanford."

TomServo
01-24-2007, 07:35 PM
as awesome as it was winning SB32, it still cant compare to getting into SB12. it was a totally different, innocent kinda feeling.
i recall watching one of the playoff games at the brand spanking new pueblo mall. the pueblo mall and the citidel were the only malls in all of so.co. back then. and getting to hit the mall as a young pup and living 90 miles away, i wasnt going to miss a trip to a mall. anyway i ended up with the enormous crowd watching at mongomery wards. every tv in the mall was tuned in. the whole mall was as loud as a stadium when we won.

TomServo
01-24-2007, 07:37 PM
i also was going to creit coach ralston. the man didnt have what it took to be a HC. but his drafting talent makes shanahan look like a amature in comparison

BroncoBuff
01-24-2007, 07:38 PM
Everybody should remember - in reference to that SB - that Tom Glassic had the flu for 2+ weeks prior, and lost 15 pounds (233 on gameday!) Randy White and their D-Line just destroyed Glassic ... we had to keep TE and RB in pass protection, and that limited the offense, etc... It was awful, just awful.

In restrospect, starting Norris Weese by surprise might have been the best way to go. We were a smallish O-Line even before Glassic got sick, and Craig Morton - already a statue - had been hobbling. In fact, he was in the hospital until New Year's Day morning - only leaving for the AFC ch-ship game.

And I'm not clear in my memory on this, somebody I hope will recall:
Wasn't there a play where the refs blew a call? They said Staubach had stepped out of bounds before he threw a pass that Louie Wright intercepted? And the replay showed he stepped out AFTER the ball left his hand? Am i remembering this right ... I don't know. I DO know that turnovers made that team ... and that int could have changed the whole game.


A couple of those Dallas D-linemen later called Riley Odoms the best blocker they faced all season, one called him "vicious."

orangefan
01-24-2007, 07:40 PM
I was a high school junior, our school ran a concession stand for a fund raiser.
(lower level- NE Corner) I was at every home game for the entire season, including the 1st ever home playoff game and the AFC Championship game.
That is the only time I can remember the goal posts coming down in Mile High.
Fans went wild after the AFC Championship game, the north goal posts came down, people were taking seats, and anything else they could get their hands on as souveniers. I saw where 1 other poster mentioned turf from the end zone, mine came from the 50 yard line NFL logo and was respectfully planted
in my parents backyard. The Orange Crush and the feel it inspired about town was amazing. People were painting their houses orange and blue, John Keyworth was heard on every station in town and while many will talk of how slow Morton was, I can still remember him scoring on several boots throughout
the season. It was truly a magical time in Bronco history, I for one have not missed seeing a regular or post season game played by the Broncos since that point in time. I even had to pony up an extra 200 bucks this last season so I could purchase a Slingbox and not miss any games during a 6 week trip to Italy.

dsmoot
01-24-2007, 07:43 PM
The '77 Broncos were a very good team. Defensively, they could toss a shutout on any given Sunday. The biggest win during the regular season was a 30-7 whipping of the Raiders in which they forced 7 INT's and tossed Stabler around like a rag doll. The team went 12-2 with our losses being Oakland exacting revenge to the tune of 24-14 in Denver, and a 14-6 loss to Dallas in the season finale on the road.

They beat the Steelers 34-21 with Tom Jackson intercepting 2 in the 4th, and Morton hitting Jack Dolbin in the corner of the end zone on a 32 yard play-action TD pass.

The next week they jumped on defending NFL champion Oakland early with Morton hitting Moses on a medium out that he turned into a 64 (or was it 74?) yard TD. That game had a bit of controversy as Rob Lytle lost the ball inside the Oakland 5, and it was called a "non-fumble" (kind of like Tom Brady's "no-fumble tuck")...but there was also a pass ruled incomplete where Jack Dolbin went low to snag a Morton pass, got up and raced to the end zone, it was ruled "IN-COM-PLETE", but replays showed Dolbin did indeed catch the ball. So either way Denver should have won the game.

The Super Bowl started out OK for us defensively...Dallas fumbled on the initial play, and there were several other opportunities where they could have won the game....Shultz missed a chance to snag a fumbled punt inside the Dallas 5, an INT was negated by a bad call when the refs said Staubach stepped out and again replays showed he was actually in.

Yeah Morton tossed 4 INTs, but they were mostly due to the immense pressure Dallas was able to put on him. The NFL Today use to use a play where a split second after Morton released the pass, he was pancaked by Too Tall as their intro back in the late 70's, early 80's.

We rushed for 157 yards, but only mustered 35 yards passing. Morton had a few passes dropped, and two completions were subsequently fumbled by Riley Odoms and Dolbin. They were also done in by two precise passes that hit their marks despite pretty damn good coverage on the receivers. Johnson's TD that he lost control of as he crossed the goal line (this was BTW the first time I had known that the ball just crossing the goal line defined it as a TD) and the HB option pass to Golden Richards.

The final was 27-10 Dallas, but it wasn't the route people think it was by looking at the scoreboard. We turned the ball over 8 times, 7 in the first half, and trailed only 13-3 at halftime. Rick Upchurch returned a KO 67 yards and after Morton was harrassed into another near INT, Red Miller made the switch to the more nimble Weese. But Weese fumbled in the 4th and that if memory serves me it set Dallas up for the final coup de' gace HB option pass.



I remember Rick Upchurch having one incredible special teams years with both KO and Punt returns. That was one part of the team we were absolutely dominant in. Who can remember the fake field goal with high tops Jim Turner catching a touchdown pass. Craig Morton transformed himself from a QB that always turned the ball over at the wrong time to one that was very error free that year (until SB when he was given no time). A lot of demons were exorcized that year in beating both Pittsburg and the Raiders twice. Truely Magical. Frankly, much more amazing year than either SB victory years. This team had only been an above .500 team for a couple of years afters years of being pushed around.


I very much agree that major kudos go to John Ralston. He was the ultimate optimist. He had a major role in turning this team around prior to 1977. He has never been given his due and I think it was something that personally hurt him. He brought in some real quality players.

errand
01-24-2007, 08:05 PM
If my memory serves me correctly, that SB set records for most turnovers and penalties and is often referred to as the sloppiest SB ever played.

Actually the sloppiest SB ever played was the Colts 16-13 win over the Cowboys in SB V. Morton was the Cowboys QB, and tossed 3 INT's in that game. In fact it is kind of ironic that the last one was a ball that former Broncos head coach Dan Reeves should have caught, but it went thru his hands into Colts LB Mike Curtis' and it set up the game winning FG.

Supe Bowl XII was more two great D's forcing opposing offenses into mistakes rather than two inept teams playing each other

errand
01-24-2007, 08:16 PM
Staubach never stepped out, but the refs said his his right foot touched the line. Replays from the camera above showed they missed the call. They didn't have the replay challenegs then so....while it was the wrong call, it is an understandable one.

Morton had a severely bruised hip after the Dallas game (season finale)...and it was aggravated even more from the Steelers hitting him. The trainer had to tie his cleats in the locker room prior to the AFC title bout.

The worst loss in his tenure as our QB wasn't the SB...it was the 13-10 wild card loss to the Oilers who didn't have Earl Campbell or Dan Pastorini in the lineup.

Goobzilla
01-24-2007, 11:12 PM
If you get a chance take a look at a book called "Broncos!: The Team that Makes Miracles Happen" by Lou Sahadi. Pretty good book that starts at the beginning of the franchise and covers the '77 season game by game in great depth. Pretty sure it's out of print, but this link has several used copies available:

http://www.bestwebbuys.com/0812825047

Spider
01-24-2007, 11:43 PM
The only Non-Elway team to get to the SuperBowl.
I usually forget there was life before Elway as far as SB's , way before my time, anyone have any personal memories of this team they care to share?
I'd like to hear about this team from a Bronos fan who remembers that season.
What kind of year was it? How good were they really?


This ESPN " TOP 80 SB Teams Of All Time" link has sparked my interest in them.
They're ranked 61st overall.
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=super/rankings/80-61

man where to start ......... 77 is very special to me ....... well the fat man game is one I will never forget ......... apparently neither will Al Davis ....... still wont allow Tom Jackson anywhere near anything to do with Raiders ....
Howard Cosell runnin his pie hole about Denver ...............
we had some big time stars , in fact I think Champ Baily is on the same level as Louis Wright ......
But the fat man game was the game where Denver served notice to the NFL , we are here .........

24champ
01-25-2007, 02:11 PM
the 77 superbowl is on ESPN right now...My god Bronco fans look like a bunch of crazy clowns back then LOL

Bronx33
01-25-2007, 02:12 PM
the 77 superbowl is on ESPN right now...My god Bronco fans look like a bunch of crazy clowns back then LOL



Funny thing was most folks were hunters and already had all the color/gear.

Beej
01-25-2007, 02:58 PM
Let me know if I'm wrong on this, but didn't we have a
fake punt in the SB, with Bucky Dilts trying to throw
a pass, but instead ran for a yard to get the first down?

BroncoBuff
01-25-2007, 08:55 PM
Staubach never stepped out, but the refs said his his right foot touched the line. Replays from the camera above showed they missed the call.
Okay ... your memory is tops in this thread I think - so tell me:

1) Appx what yard-line was Louie Wright on when he intercepted? (And did he return it?)
2) What became of that Cowboys' possession?

gunns
01-25-2007, 09:27 PM
Ran RBBC with Armstrong, jensen, Lytle, Lonnie Perrin

I remember Keyworth being more with that group than Jensen.

The main thing I remember about that season is that we went to Oakland, our defense was on fire intercepting everything and then the TD pass to Jim Turner, the kicker. I was rolling on that one. And then two weeks later Oakland comes to Denver and we lose. Couldn't figure that out. Then the Baltimore game with Tom Jackson running his butt off after that interception.

That was the year my love of defense came. That defense was for real. I also remembering the whole year I wished we had someone besides Morton behind the ball and in the SB he proved why.

titan
01-25-2007, 09:57 PM
1977 was a magical season - if espn ever replays the highlight film from that year it is one of the best (I just watched it again last week). I was 21 and attended most of the home games that year - the AFC Championship game victory over the Raiders (20-17) still ranks as my favorite Bronco home game ever, and the regular season win in Oakland, featuring a fake field goal pass to Jim Turner and td, was perhaps the Broncos greatest regular season win.

Looking back at the playoffs that year, the Broncos were absolutely amazing. Even playing at home it was incredible that a team with zero playoff experience beat two of the greatest teams of all time to get to the Super Bowl (the 70's Steelers with Terry Bradshaw, who won 4 Super Bowls, and the defending super bowl champ raiders with Kenny Stabler - the best of the raider teams). Too bad they had to face another great team (Dallas) in the Super Bowl instead of one of the Viking teams that routinely lost Super Bowls in the 70's.

If only the Broncos had recovered that Dallas fumbled punt inside the 5 yard line early in the 1st quarter ...

No1BroncoFan
01-25-2007, 11:34 PM
Granted, I am not anywhere near as old as you. Seriously, I'm nowhere near! But I grew up listening to KBPI. I assume it's not there anymore, or it's probably not the same format. But I remember tuning in for the Top 8 at 8 every night. Those were pretty good times. Technology has taken the novelty off of things like that (there are new novelties, I suppose), but I remember being outraged when I song I didn't like made it to number one on the Top 8 at 8. Good times.
KBPI is indeed still rocking the Rockies!

I'll say this because it needs to be said. On Superbowl Sunday in January of 1978, the better team lost. Call it fate or just bad luck, but the '77 Broncos were a better team than the '77 Cowpies. Six turnovers in the first half and eight in the game, but they still got a parade when they got home. If the Broncos lost a Superbowl with eight turnovers now, today's fans would likely lynch 'em in Larimer Square whan they got home.

Ben

WoodMan
01-26-2007, 03:32 AM
That defense was absolutely terrific. Alzado and Paul Smith got great pressure from both defensive end positions while Ruben Carter controlled the center. They were all great players in their prime in front of Jackson, Gradishar, Swenson and Rizzo. That front seven could stop the run, better than most defenses ever. The backfield with Louie Wright and Bernard Jackson at the corners and Steve Foley and Billy Thompson at safeties were icing on the cake. Louie Wright is the best corner I have ever seen play until Champ Bailey. Thompson and Foley(all time Bronco interception leader) are probably the best two cover safeties to play in Denver. Gosh, they were fun to watch. You just knew they were going stop an offense when they had too. Someone was going to make a big play.

B-Love
01-26-2007, 08:16 AM
Okay ... your memory is tops in this thread I think - so tell me:

1) Appx what yard-line was Louie Wright on when he intercepted? (And did he return it?)
2) What became of that Cowboys' possession?

Billy Thompson intercepted the pass in the end zone, not Louie.

And when they said Staubach stepped out of bounds and it negated the play, the Cowboys did get three points on the possession.

Combined with Butch Johnson's fraudulent TD catch, and that is 10 very questionable points that Dallas earned.

To be fair, Herrera missed 3 of 5 Fg attempts in the first half for Dalla, so we did dodge some bullets.

BroncoBuff
01-26-2007, 09:11 AM
Billy Thompson intercepted the pass in the end zone, not Louie.

And when they said Staubach stepped out of bounds and it negated the play, the Cowboys did get three points on the possession.

Combined with Butch Johnson's fraudulent TD catch, and that is 10 very questionable points that Dallas earned.

To be fair, Herrera missed 3 of 5 Fg attempts in the first half for Dalla, so we did dodge some bullets.

Thanks, B ... I wish I had seen the replay the other night.

Atlas
01-26-2007, 11:20 AM
1977 was a magical season - if espn ever replays the highlight film from that year it is one of the best (I just watched it again last week). I was 21 and attended most of the home games that year - the AFC Championship game victory over the Raiders (20-17) still ranks as my favorite Bronco home game ever, and the regular season win in Oakland, featuring a fake field goal pass to Jim Turner and td, was perhaps the Broncos greatest regular season win.



I believe the fake FG was when Denver played at Oakland not the AFC Champoionship game.

errand
01-26-2007, 11:38 AM
Thanks, B ... I wish I had seen the replay the other night.

B-love can hook you guys up with virtually any Broncos game....including the aforementioned Super Bowl XII....for a small fee of course;D

orangeatheist
01-26-2007, 01:12 PM
That was the year my family had to move from Denver to San Francisco. I hadn't really watched much football while I lived in Denver, but the Broncos going to the SuperBowl that year made me realize I still had a link back home and I became an instant HUGE fan of the team.

I remember seeing magazines at the store in the Bay Area which featured the Broncos. The most memorable picture from one of those mags (I still have it somewhere) was of a Broncos cheerleader. She wore a shiny cowboy hat and had on a matching frilled vest. She was looking skyward with her fingers crossed. It was either in that picture or another one, and there was a banner or a sign some fans were holding that said, "Make Those Miracles Happen".

That's what I remember most: Make Those Miracles Happen.

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-16-2011, 07:27 PM
If you get a chance take a look at a book called "Broncos!: The Team that Makes Miracles Happen" by Lou Sahadi. Pretty good book that starts at the beginning of the franchise and covers the '77 season game by game in great depth. Pretty sure it's out of print, but this link has several used copies available:

http://www.bestwebbuys.com/0812825047

Awesome book!!! I have this--in the back there is a two-page spread of the head shots of all the players from the '77 team. Only thing I would've changed is the big picture of Staubach in the Super Bowl XII section. The four pic layout of Rob Lytle was nice.

http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/Broncos.jpg

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-16-2011, 07:37 PM
Maaake those miracles haa-ppen...
Make those MIR-acles haa-ppen ...
Nobody ...
Nobody does it alone!

That was RB Jon Keyworth's big hit single that year ... kinda like the Bears' "SuperBowl Shuffle," but before ESPN.


Later in 1978, Jon Keyworth recorded an album called "Keys", which I have in my collection. The cover has some soft-core porn on it, so that's why you only see half of it ;)

http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/JonKeyworthAlbum.jpg

dsmoot
01-17-2011, 05:37 AM
The only Non-Elway team to get to the SuperBowl.
I usually forget there was life before Elway as far as SB's , way before my time, anyone have any personal memories of this team they care to share?
I'd like to hear about this team from a Bronos fan who remembers that season.
What kind of year was it? How good were they really?


This ESPN " TOP 80 SB Teams Of All Time" link has sparked my interest in them.
They're ranked 61st overall.
http://sports.espn.go.com/espn/page2/story?page=super/rankings/80-61

Start to finish it was the most magical sports experience of my lifetime which includes the Colts of the 60's, the Orioles of the 60's and early 70's and the Elway years in Denver. The fans were far more excited, vocal and supportive than even the SB victories and certainly today. Putting the season in perspective, the Broncos had to face Super Bowl and Hall of Fame laden teams like the Oakland Raiders and Pittsburgh Steelers that were still at the peak of their talent on multiple occasions that year. If I remember correctly, Denver had its first winning season only 2 years before after some really dismal ones. There was tremendous hope among the fan base without the intense criticism when things didn't go well including the SB loss vs. Dallas. The number of fans that met the team at the airport following some games including SB12 was incredible.

The media had not yet been changed into a dirt digging, negatively focused group and they actually had an ability to write something without the need to be sensational.

Remember, not one HOF football player played for Denver that season (a crime). Denver never had a better defense. Truly one of the greatest defenses, I have ever seen, playing an unconventional defense at that time. We were using a discarded, almost wornout, immobile and turnover prone QB that transformed himself that year. This was one tough playing bunch of guys that simply had great chemistry and played well under pressure.

If I could relive any Bronco year in would be 1977 bar none.

dsmoot
01-17-2011, 05:45 AM
Let's not forget the guy that layed the groundwork for red miller...

http://www.denverpost.com/catchingupwith/ci_4727096

http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site36/2006/1126/20061126_070325_WhereRalston112706_200.jpg

John Ralston compiled a 34-33-3 record as Broncos coach from 1972-76, leaving before the team played in its first Super Bowl. Also a former Stanford coach who won the Rose Bowl twice, Ralston is a fund-raiser for San Jose State. (Post file

Editor's note: In the Colorado Classics series, The Denver Post takes a weekly look at individuals who made their mark on the Colorado sports landscape and what they are doing now.

Critics of John Ralston's term as Broncos coach had a catchphrase that claimed his clipboard was empty.

But upon further review, Ralston's trademark accessory wasn't empty. A closer look reveals the clipboard's contents were instrumental in getting the Broncos to their first Super Bowl.

Ralston's legacy from his term at the helm of the Broncos from 1972-76 was his draft choices. The list reads like a lineup that could go right to the Super Bowl.

"We had the fifth pick of the draft my first year and we took tight end Riley Odoms," Ralston said recently as he tested his memory from his office at San Jose State that allows him to stay in touch with football. "Winning boils down to picking real good players in the draft. You have to build with a solid base of good players out of the draft."

Ralston reeled off a list of first- round draft choices over those four years who became a who's who of the Broncos. Running back Otis Armstrong was taken in 1973 with the ninth pick of the draft. Linebacker Randy Gradishar (1974), defensive back Louis Wright (1975) and guard Tom Glassic (1976) followed.

Ralston's drafting expertise didn't stop in the first round. Defensive end Barney Chavous, guard Paul Howard and linebacker Tom Jackson were drafts picks in 1973. Offensive tackle Claudie Minor was a Denver draft pick in 1974 and nose tackle Rubin Carter, defensive back Steve Foley and wide receiver Rick Upchurch were picked in 1975.

All played key roles at the Louisiana Superdome in the Broncos' first Super Bowl, which they lost 27-10 to the Dallas Cowboys on Jan. 15, 1978.

But Ralston wasn't with them in New Orleans. His knowledge of how to put a team together didn't always transfer to victories on the field. After a 9-5 season in 1976, a group of Denver players gave a vote of no confidence in their coach and Ralston was fired, with an overall 34-33-3 record.

Red Miller was hired and the 1977 Broncos went 12-2 before beating the Pittsburgh Steelers 34-21 at Mile High Stadium in a playoff game. Then the Broncos beat the Oakland Raiders 20-17 in the AFC championship game, also at Mile High.

"It would hurt anybody," Ralston said of his dismissal from the Broncos. "Losing a job in that business happens to about everyone. There's no bitterness."

Miller, in Ralston's estimation, completed the puzzle that put the Broncos on the map. Miller traded Steve Ramsey, Ralston's quarterback, to the New York Giants for quarterback Craig Morton.

"Red did a great job in putting the right quarterback into the mix," Ralston said.

Ralston no longer carries a clipboard. While he spends most of his time fundraising for San Jose State, Ralston also watches hundreds of game tapes of California high school and junior college games seeking possible recruits for the Spartans.

Without saying directly, Ralston is always looking for another Merlin Olsen. He coached Olsen at Utah State and calls the former NFL star the best player he ever coached.

Ralston also participates in the Master Coaches Survey, which he hopes someday might become part of the formula used in the Bowl Championship Series standings. His fellow Master Coaches Survey voters include Don James, John Robinson, Vince Dooley, Bill Mallory and George Welsh.

Ralston, 79, looks back 66 years to when he was 13 and living in Michigan as the time he decided he wanted to be a coach.

"I don't know why I decided that," Ralston said. "I was living in a small mining town and everyone looked up to the high school coach. Maybe that was it, but I never wanted to do anything else. I tell everybody that I haven't worked a day in my life."

Ralston's coaching stops didn't all end in disappointment. After guiding Utah State (1959-62), Ralston coached nine years at Stanford, and his teams won Rose Bowl games against Ohio State and Michigan.

"The two Rose Bowl victories probably are the high point, but nothing compares to losing a son," Ralston said, looking back some 20 years when illness claimed his son, Larry.

Ralston remains loyal to his former Denver players despite his firing by the Broncos, saying Gradishar and several others belong in the Pro Football Hall of Fame. He looks at road victories toward the end of his last season as Denver's coach as indications the Broncos were moving toward the Super Bowl.

"It was unbelievable how many fans would meet us at the airport when we returned from some of those games," Ralston said. "But there was a lot of pressure to win. I probably didn't do as good a job as I should have. Being honest with myself, I probably should have stayed at Stanford."

The memory of John Ralston in Denver has mostly gone unappreciated. Being a Stanford fan, I was thrilled when he came to Denver. Without his contributions, 1977 would not have happened, period. He set the table and changed the attitude of the organization, even if he was too rah rah for many.

footstepsfrom#27
01-17-2011, 06:48 AM
The memory of John Ralston in Denver has mostly gone unappreciated. Being a Stanford fan, I was thrilled when he came to Denver. Without his contributions, 1977 would not have happened, period. He set the table and changed the attitude of the organization, even if he was too rah rah for many.
It was mostly his team that went to that first Superbowl. No Bronco fan who experienced that season will ever forget it. It was the highest high and the lowest low all wrapped into one. If I close my eyes I can still see that fumbled punt bouncing away from Rob Lytle near the Cowboys goal line...what might have been.

Rubin Carter was a pro bowl NT for Denver that year. He was he size of Elvis Dumervil.

How things have changed...

BroncoBuff
01-17-2011, 07:08 AM
Later in 1978, Jon Keyworth recorded an album called "Keys", which I have in my collection. The cover has some soft-core porn on it, so that's why you only see half of it ;)

Nice, you're my favorite of the Young Turks around here, Corner.

Your avatar was ill and lost by some accounts 15 pounds in the two weeks leading up to XII ... Harvey Martin and Randy White have the awards to prove it.

footstepsfrom#27
01-17-2011, 08:33 AM
Nice, you're my favorite of the Young Turks around here, Corner.

Your avatar was ill and lost by some accounts 15 pounds in the two weeks leading up to XII ... Harvey Martin and Randy White have the awards to prove it.
Yep...Glassic played at 225 that game if you can imagine that. He was the size of a tailback today, trying to block White. No chance, especially with a QB less mobile than a dead man.

mikey555
01-17-2011, 08:36 AM
I was nine years old and sundays everyone would come over and gather in front of the tube and hoot an hollar for the broncos!! and usually me and my older brother would have cauliflower ears from mom grabbing us by a headlock and cheering for our beloved broncs.

GOOD TIMES... And yes they were really that good.
If the OL would not have came down with the stomach flu...SB might have had a diff outcome..
Poor Morton watched his protection drop about 20 lbs per player.

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 08:38 AM
Nice, you're my favorite of the Young Turks around here, Corner.

Your avatar was ill and lost by some accounts 15 pounds in the two weeks leading up to XII ... Harvey Martin and Randy White have the awards to prove it.

You know, there was no mention of Tom's illness in the 1978 book I have "Broncos!" that was released just after their SB appearance. In the 1979 highlight film I have, they did a segment on Tom and he talked about his weight loss, but he said it happened when the Broncos played against the Browns. That would've been in November 1978 because they didn't play against them in '77.

I can't wait to get the September 1980 "reunion" game between the Broncos and the Cowboys because that's when Tom and Randy had a fight--guess Douchebag Manster could've believe what a difference two-and-a-half years made! :thumbs:

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 08:40 AM
Nice, you're my favorite of the Young Turks around here, Corner.

Your avatar was ill and lost by some accounts 15 pounds in the two weeks leading up to XII ... Harvey Martin and Randy White have the awards to prove it.

Thanks for the kind words BroncoBuff! :sunshine:

I like this board a lot better than BroncosCountry, btw.

NYBronc
01-17-2011, 08:44 AM
I was 8 and Phyliss George came to my elementary school (Phillips) and interviewed the kids during Super Bowl Week. That was great!

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 08:44 AM
The memory of John Ralston in Denver has mostly gone unappreciated. Being a Stanford fan, I was thrilled when he came to Denver. Without his contributions, 1977 would not have happened, period. He set the table and changed the attitude of the organization, even if he was too rah rah for many.

I've been trying to post this here, but for some reason it won't go through. Let me try this once more. This article appeared in a sport magazine in September 1977, just before Broncomania took off.

http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/Mutiny1.jpg

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 08:45 AM
http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/Mutiny2.jpg
http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/Mutiny3.jpg

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 08:46 AM
http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/Mutiny4.jpg
http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/Mutiny5.jpg

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 08:47 AM
http://i837.photobucket.com/albums/zz291/schober75/Mutiny6.jpg

errand
01-17-2011, 09:17 AM
Anyone remember the Craig Morton wind-up doll? It took 5 steps back, stood still for 5 seconds, then fell over.

Wow, more Morton bashing.....the difference in SB XII was pass protection....Landry adjusted to Denver's pass rush while Red Miller did not. Having said that the game was closer than the score indicated considering the Broncos committed 8 turnovers.

Morton had one of the NFL's strongest arms, and he was a tough son of bitch. Your poor attempt at humor is no accurate picture of the guy. He stood tall in the pocket and in that SB was brutalized by Too Tall and Randy White all over him. Sure he threw 4 INT's in the game.....but had you watched the game you'd have been suprised that the guy was even able to walk after it was over. Think Cutler vs the Giants this season....Morton completed only 4 passes for 35 yards....3 of his completions were fumbled and he was forced into throwing 4 INT's too

Morton was a leader. Roger Staubach even said himself that had he QB'd Denver and Morton the Cowboys, the outcome wouldn't have changed.

The Broncos D played an exceptionally good game...they forced fumbles but didn't recover but one i believe, they intercepted a pass or two but had one called back due to the refs claiming Staubach stepped out of bounds...replay showed he did not. How good was that '77 D? The Broncos turned the ball over 7 times in the first half....and the score was Dallas 13...Denver 3

When the more mobile Norris Weese was inserted as our QB, we kept the game close until some bull**** TD catch was allowed. That probably was the best team Broncos SB team to never win the game....at least the best defense.

Cito Pelon
01-17-2011, 10:41 AM
The memory of John Ralston in Denver has mostly gone unappreciated. Being a Stanford fan, I was thrilled when he came to Denver. Without his contributions, 1977 would not have happened, period. He set the table and changed the attitude of the organization, even if he was too rah rah for many.

Ralston and Joe Collier (amazingly) are unsung heroes from those years. Ralston really did set the table for the 1977 team.

Look at the roster in 1977:

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/den/1977_roster.htm

About 95% of the roster was acquired by Ralston either by draft, bringing in guys from other teams, or bring in guys from nowhere like Jack Dolbin, Bob Swenson.

Cito Pelon
01-17-2011, 11:03 AM
Wow, that was some good stuff, Corner, thanks for posting that. That was some superb posting.

I like this quote from Ralston, "I know ten times as much football as Fred Gehrke will ever know." Little bit of an adversarial relationship there.

The Phipps family were barely serviceable as owners of the franchise at that time. They had done some good things, and I don't want to demonize them or Fred Gehrke. I believe Gehrke stayed on to work with Reeves, Kaiser, and Bowlen.

It's interesting to look back on memory lane.

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 11:18 AM
Wow, more Morton bashing.....the difference in SB XII was pass protection....Landry adjusted to Denver's pass rush while Red Miller did not. Having said that the game was closer than the score indicated considering the Broncos committed 8 turnovers.

Morton had one of the NFL's strongest arms, and he was a tough son of b****. Your poor attempt at humor is no accurate picture of the guy. He stood tall in the pocket and in that SB was brutalized by Too Tall and Randy White all over him. Sure he threw 4 INT's in the game.....but had you watched the game you'd have been suprised that the guy was even able to walk after it was over. Think Cutler vs the Giants this season....Morton completed only 4 passes for 35 yards....3 of his completions were fumbled and he was forced into throwing 4 INT's too

Morton was a leader. Roger Staubach even said himself that had he QB'd Denver and Morton the Cowboys, the outcome wouldn't have changed.

The Broncos D played an exceptionally good game...they forced fumbles but didn't recover but one i believe, they intercepted a pass or two but had one called back due to the refs claiming Staubach stepped out of bounds...replay showed he did not. How good was that '77 D? The Broncos turned the ball over 7 times in the first half....and the score was Dallas 13...Denver 3

When the more mobile Norris Weese was inserted as our QB, we kept the game close until some bull**** TD catch was allowed. That probably was the best team Broncos SB team to never win the game....at least the best defense.

Naysayers and doubters of Morton should watch the 1979 game against the Seahawks at Mile High if they get an opportunity to see it. Into the third quarter, Denver was down 34-10. Weese was starting in lieu of Morton, and he played below expectations. Converting on third downs was a hardship, the Orange Crush was in la-la land and it was Orange Sunday, of all things. Then Morton comes onto the field to take over for Weese. I truly believe it was Craig's mere presence on that gridiron that woke the Broncos up because what happened from that moment on was magic.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A0W7zPsG8nU

This link comes from my You Tube page. It's a homemade video of the best moments from that game. Okay, the first part of it not-so-much, but you can see how Denver was letting Seattle get away with murder. This is, IMO, one of the best comeback wins by the Broncos ever. Very exciting game in the second half!! And Bob Swenson's two interceptions and tip-off were awesome to watch!! (I hope he got the game ball for that win). :sunshine:

bendog
01-17-2011, 11:29 AM
I was in college you ungrateful youngsters. Man we had it tough. No digital tv. If you had 27inch screens you were rich. Chevy Vegas and Ford Pintos. Since they burned well, it was probably good they didn't run half the time.

Seriously, it was RBBC because Otis Armtrong (a great black 70s dresser) had a knee, after 1000 yds the prior year. Alzado was the DE over the LT, and he was so mean that he kept guys off of Tommy Jackson and let him run free. Rubin Carter was the NT, and even for the day he was a bit undersized. Low center of gravity and very quick for the postion. Chavous was a steady guy. The linebackers were all undersized for the day. But no team could consistently run outside.

I've read that they blitzed very little. I don't really have a recollection beyond that most of the sacks seemed to be by the line. I think Louis Wright got dissed by the hall as much or more than Grads because Mike Haynes was probably the best cover corner, but Wright was right behind.

I jumped the thread only because some other people and I were talking John Fox, and his offense in Car was similar. Miller did not take ANY chances on his side of the 50. Morton would go deep a couple of times on first or second, but they were happy to punt the ball back over the 50 and let the D play. The playcalling beyond being conservative was HEAVY to the run.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/den/1977.htm

Which was interesting because Miller was a pass guy at heart.

As for the dallas superbowl, Den never really had a chance. Besides being an inferior team, the word was some partied a bit too hard in NOLA the night before. The legend is that Miller had to tie Morton's shoes before the Oakland game because he was so beat up. He was in the hospital with a thigh contusion after the Oak game and before the superbowl.

bendog
01-17-2011, 11:36 AM
edit, the defensive philosophy was not to give up the home run. In a sense it was classic bend don't break, but the reality was they were so good that if teams had to consistetly plug away at 3 downs for a first, eventually the D would make a play to put them in long yardage or get a takeaway.

It was boring compared to shanahan, but maybe it'll work with tebow ... assuming den starts drafting well.

broncosteven
01-17-2011, 11:55 AM
I was 8 and Phyliss George came to my elementary school (Phillips) and interviewed the kids during Super Bowl Week. That was great!

I would have had a perpetual prepubecent boner if she came to my school.

She was smoking hot.

Were you the kid who said that Landry needed a hat because he was bald?

I remember that segment.

broncosteven
01-17-2011, 11:56 AM
Anyone who is interested in '77 should read Terry Frei's book "'77".

Great read for die hards.

InMyCornerOfTheWorld
01-17-2011, 12:09 PM
Anyone who is interested in '77 should read Terry Frei's book "'77".

Great read for die hards.

I've read in some places that too much emphasis was on Richard Lamm but not the team itself. Maybe they were just overexaggerating??

One Broncos book I'd like to get eventually was written back in '78 I think. My local library had this book but this is going back 15 years or so. It was probably "Orange Madness" by Woody Paige but I could be wrong. The one thing I remember about it was one of the inside photos was of Gradishar, Rizzo, Jackson and Swenson doing one of those old school on-the-field "leaping" poses.

bendog
01-17-2011, 12:13 PM
One thing I am grateful to Tom Glassic over is that it really bugged R66v6s when Glassic would let his dog in the shower.

Cito Pelon
01-17-2011, 12:32 PM
I was in college you ungrateful youngsters. Man we had it tough. No digital tv. If you had 27inch screens you were rich. Chevy Vegas and Ford Pintos. Since they burned well, it was probably good they didn't run half the time.

Seriously, it was RBBC because Otis Armtrong (a great black 70s dresser) had a knee, after 1000 yds the prior year. Alzado was the DE over the LT, and he was so mean that he kept guys off of Tommy Jackson and let him run free. Rubin Carter was the NT, and even for the day he was a bit undersized. Low center of gravity and very quick for the postion. Chavous was a steady guy. The linebackers were all undersized for the day. But no team could consistently run outside.

I've read that they blitzed very little. I don't really have a recollection beyond that most of the sacks seemed to be by the line. I think Louis Wright got dissed by the hall as much or more than Grads because Mike Haynes was probably the best cover corner, but Wright was right behind.

I jumped the thread only because some other people and I were talking John Fox, and his offense in Car was similar. Miller did not take ANY chances on his side of the 50. Morton would go deep a couple of times on first or second, but they were happy to punt the ball back over the 50 and let the D play. The playcalling beyond being conservative was HEAVY to the run.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/teams/den/1977.htm

Which was interesting because Miller was a pass guy at heart.

As for the dallas superbowl, Den never really had a chance. Besides being an inferior team, the word was some partied a bit too hard in NOLA the night before. The legend is that Miller had to tie Morton's shoes before the Oakland game because he was so beat up. He was in the hospital with a thigh contusion after the Oak game and before the superbowl.

Friggin' college boy, eh. I was in the US Army overseas. Not that I have anything against college boys, I used the GI Bill to acquire a college education, and I sure thank Uncle Sam for giving that to me for a mere 6 years of service.

I didn't see a single game that year, but I was hyped up. Got an Article 15 for a fistfight I got into after the Super Bowl with a Cowboy fan. Cost me a promotion, actually. I enjoyed putting my fist into that guy's eye at the time, but came to regret it later. Kind of dumb, actually, but those are the follies of youth. Good story, anyway.