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peacepipe
04-04-2012, 01:53 PM
S.M. Stirlings the change series.

mhgaffney
04-04-2012, 03:02 PM
hey how was that Clinton book? I'm not big on auto biographies, or biographis in general but that one got me thinking about checking it out for whatever reason.

Here is the best book on Clinton. It will blow your mind.

mhgaffney
04-04-2012, 03:10 PM
Here is the killer interview with author Terry Reed -- who talks about his experience training Contra pilots in western Arkansas in the mid 1980s.

Reed describes the CIA operation -- and the drug connection. Clinton was then governor and was receiving kick backs -- millions in drug profits that were laundered through banks in Little Rock.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o3nF8k_8Kgw

Orange_Beard
04-05-2012, 03:13 PM
I have been reading "On The Road": The Original Scroll.
Just fished the part about him traveling out to Denver and his experience in LODO and sounds like Capital Hill. Fun to read about old Denver.

broncosteven
04-05-2012, 03:21 PM
I have been reading "On The Road": The Original Scroll.
Just fished the part about him traveling out to Denver and his experience in LODO and sounds like Capital Hill. Fun to read about old Denver.

On The Road creeped me out for weeks after reading it but I loved the book.

st.bernard
04-05-2012, 03:56 PM
excellent read:

the art of racing in the rain

HooptyHoops
04-08-2012, 11:25 AM
Wow, just finished Elantris by Brandon Sanderson....great book! Hard to believe that was his 1st book.....fanominal!!

No1BroncoFan
04-10-2012, 07:39 PM
Wow, just finished Elantris by Brandon Sanderson....great book! Hard to believe that was his 1st book.....fanominal!!

"Elantris" is one of the best books I've read in the last 10 years!

Have you read the "Mistborn" books by Sanderson yet? They are also very good.

Ben

SouthStndJunkie
04-10-2012, 07:53 PM
I finished up "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo".

A little bit of a slow start, but an excellent read.

I'll be reading the other 2 books in the series.

Archer81
04-10-2012, 07:54 PM
Benjamin Franklin, by Walter Issacson.

Not a bad read.

:Broncos:

No1BroncoFan
05-01-2012, 07:44 PM
I'm just finishing "The Wind Through the Keyhole" by Stephen King (Dark Tower 8, in between 4 and 5 in the timeline). Very good read, but not the best of the Dark Tower books.

Ben

broncocalijohn
05-01-2012, 07:53 PM
NO. Going strong over 10 years.Maybe more.

TheReverend
05-01-2012, 07:57 PM
NO. Going strong over 10 years.Maybe more.

Color me stunned.

That sure is something to brag about and be proud of too.

Archer81
05-01-2012, 07:58 PM
NO. Going strong over 10 years.Maybe more.


You have not read a book in 10 years?

Uhh...really?

:Broncos:

broncocalijohn
05-01-2012, 08:15 PM
You have not read a book in 10 years?

Uhh...really?

:Broncos:

Yes, not a good one. Actually, I reread the John Jakes series North and South. Loved reading it back in High School and will hopefully start to read Jakes' series that predates N & S. Big Series to read.

Archer81
05-01-2012, 08:24 PM
Yes, not a good one. Actually, I reread the John Jakes series North and South. Loved reading it back in High School and will hopefully start to read Jakes' series that predates N & S. Big Series to read.


I pegged you as a Hunt for Red October/Red Cardinal kind of guy. I've never read North and South.

:Broncos:

broncocalijohn
05-01-2012, 08:31 PM
I pegged you as a Hunt for Red October/Red Cardinal kind of guy. I've never read North and South.

:Broncos:

If you like history with drama, you might like it. His first books start from early 1700s I believe to Revolution and beyond. North and South starts before the American-Mexican War up to the South's defeat. When the mini series came out, it is when I became a fan of Patrick Swayze (Red Dawn didn't hurt either).

SouthStndJunkie
05-01-2012, 09:33 PM
I finished up "The Girl Who Played With Fire" by Stieg Larsson a few nights ago.

Good read....I think I liked "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" more though.

baja
05-01-2012, 10:03 PM
ROME the mini series not a book but really good.

baja
05-01-2012, 10:10 PM
Oh and if you like history

Check out Scipio Africanus - Rome's Greatest General

by Richard Gabriel

edog24
05-02-2012, 08:08 AM
Right now I am between two books, All the Pretty Horses by Mccarthy and Thirteen Days, a memoir of the Cuban missile crisis. Both are really good, highly recommended. I am almost done with the Mccarthy book, it started a bit slow but has been great toward the end. I have read The Road also, his books are awesome, highly recommend both.

Drunk Monkey
05-11-2012, 09:37 AM
Just finished book 12 of WOT and moving on to 13. It feels like I have been reading them forever but I am almost finished. Book 12 was great, really looking forward to 13. Then a 6 month wait until the final book comes out.

SouthStndJunkie
05-19-2012, 05:24 PM
I started reading: 'Three and Out - Rich Rodriguez and the Michigan Wolverines - In the Crucible of College Football' by John U. Bacon.

It basically is a behind the scenes look at Michigan football and chronicles the 3 year era of Rich Rodriguez at Michigan.

It shows you the behind the scene politicking, factions, bickering, and everything else that the public doesn't get to see when it comes to big money college football.

SouthStndJunkie
05-19-2012, 05:26 PM
Finished up the 3rd and final book ('The Girl who kicked the Hornet's Nest) of the 'The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo' trilogy by Stieg Larsson.

All three were pretty good books.

SouthStndJunkie
05-19-2012, 05:36 PM
American Desperado See this thread:

http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showthread.php?t=104694

I read this a few weeks back after reading a few posters recommendations.

Excellent read....if half of those stories are true, he lived about as wild and crazy of a life as is possible.

broncosteven
05-19-2012, 06:29 PM
I finished off Gunther Schulers Early Jazz, more non-fiction music appreciation than anything but a very good read and some nice notation of a couple of Pop's best trumpet solos.

I decided to read Asimov's foundation series, almost through the 1st one.

One of my neighbors sells used books with another retired teacher out of her house, one of them is really into beat stuff so i picked up some more Kerouac, I enjoyed the 1st 2 books of his I got over the last 2 years.

I also bought a Grahm Greene book from the same sale, I have heard a lot of good things about him and am looking forward to it.

I checked out Jazz by Toni Morrison mostly because I must have been on ambien at the time and didn't remember. I thought it was fiction based on non-fiction events but confused, not sure if I am going to read it or not if anyone has read it let me know if it is worth the time.

Archer81
05-19-2012, 08:47 PM
My brother bought a book called "Great Bastards in History" by Jure Fiorillo.

William the Conqueror, Elizabeth I, Alexandre Dumas Fils, Robert Lawrence (Lawrence of Arabia), Billie Holliday, Leonardo Di Vinci, Jack London, and Fidel Castro are some of the world's great bastards.

Interesting book.

:Broncos:

baja
05-19-2012, 08:55 PM
The Power of Habit

Hamrob
05-20-2012, 08:35 AM
I just finished reading Inheritance by Simon Tolkien (J.R.R. Tolkien's Grandson). It was a very good book...not quite excellent, simply because the main character was never really developed adequately enough. But, good book nevertheless.

Drunk Monkey
05-20-2012, 08:53 AM
Finished book 13 of WOT. Now I am reading Blue Remembered Earth by Alastair Reynolds. He is one of my favorite Sci Fi writers.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51H-oeU1tGL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

DeusExManning
05-20-2012, 10:37 PM
Just finished C.S. Friedman' In Conquest Born, great Sci Fi Opera, I loved it.

Taco John
05-20-2012, 11:35 PM
Finished book 13 of WOT. Now I am reading Blue Remembered Earth by Alastair Reynolds. He is one of my favorite Sci Fi writers.

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51H-oeU1tGL._SL500_AA300_.jpg

Cool. I've been looking for a new sci fi book.

Taco John
05-20-2012, 11:39 PM
I started Vernor Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep," but I put it down for ASOIAF.

amandasessions
05-22-2012, 02:10 PM
I have just read an incredible political thriller ebook. I was browsing around at amazon.com and found this ebook called The Cain Sanction, I read the preview and a few chapters. It really was a page turner can’t put it down kind of book.
I didn’t know how it ends until the last sentence of the last page.. great read!!

ludo21
05-22-2012, 02:29 PM
first post in the book thread?

spam???

bfoflcommish
05-22-2012, 02:34 PM
first post in the book thread?

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Drunk Monkey
05-22-2012, 03:12 PM
I started Vernor Vinge's "A Fire Upon the Deep," but I put it down for ASOIAF.

I want to get into that series also but need a break from the fantasy genera after 13 straight books.

broncosteven
05-22-2012, 03:20 PM
first post in the book thread?

spam???

His real username is AmadaHugginkiss

mosca
05-25-2012, 11:22 AM
A Game of Thrones, by George R.R. Martin.

This was on the NY Times best-seller list for a long time, but I put off reading it because I sort of burned out on romantic fantasy and swords & sorcery and all that stuff a long time ago.

But I'm about 200 pages into this one and I can't put it down. This is like romantic fantasy where things went wrong. Very wrong. It's like someone took the war of the roses (the York & Lancaster one - - not the Douglas & Turner movie) and stuck it in the middle of a Mercedes Lackey novel about talking cats and psychic princesses.

Brutal I tell you. And facinating.

And several more books to go in the epic.
Bumping this post by Old Dude, and props for him mentioning GoT / ASOIAF back in 2005. Nice to see everyone else on the bandwagon now :D

nooner
05-25-2012, 12:05 PM
The Persuader by Lee Child.

The ultimate loner. An elite ex-military cop who left the service years ago, he's moved from place to place ... without family ... without possessions ... without commitments. And without fear. Which is good, because trouble—big, violent, complicated trouble—finds Reacher wherever he goes. And when trouble finds him, Reacher does not quit, not once, not ever. But some unfinished business has now found Reacher. And Reacher is a man who hates unfinished business. Ten years ago, a key investigation went sour and Francis Xavier Quinn got away with murder. Now a chance encounter outside Boston's Symphony Hall brings it all back. Now Reacher sees his one last shot. Some would call it vengeance. Some would call it redemption. Reacher would call it justice.

Smiling Assassin27
05-25-2012, 12:09 PM
His real username is AmadaHugginkiss

I thought it was Hugh Jass.

Broncomutt
05-25-2012, 12:16 PM
Nicholas and Alexandra by Robert K. Massie.

Very intimate details of the lives of the last Emperor and Empress of Russia, disastrous wars, and the horrors of hemophilia.

Smiling Assassin27
05-25-2012, 12:21 PM
Walker Percy, Love In The Ruins.

2 words: Superb Book.

MagicHef
05-25-2012, 01:08 PM
John Dies at the End.

Pony Boy
05-25-2012, 01:08 PM
Take Your Eye Off the Ball by Pat Kirwan, is a good read ......... there are plenty of OM posters that could benefit from this book.

Shananahan
05-25-2012, 01:22 PM
I have just read an incredible political thriller ebook. I was browsing around at amazon.com and found this ebook called The Cain Sanction, I read the preview and a few chapters. It really was a page turner can’t put it down kind of book.
I didn’t know how it ends until the last sentence of the last page.. great read!!
Is it really a 'page-turner' when there aren't any pages to turn?

HooptyHoops
06-03-2012, 02:12 PM
I want to get into that series also but need a break from the fantasy genera after 13 straight books.

Out of the 13, what books(s) where your favorite?

gyldenlove
06-03-2012, 02:36 PM
I finished up "The Girl Who Played With Fire" by Stieg Larsson a few nights ago.

Good read....I think I liked "The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo" more though.

That series goes steadily downhill from the first book.

HooptyHoops
06-03-2012, 04:14 PM
"Elantris" is one of the best books I've read in the last 10 years!

Have you read the "Mistborn" books by Sanderson yet? They are also very good.

Ben

Yes, after reading Elantris, I jumped right into Mistborn....it was good, but Elantris was better.

What would you recommend from here?

SonOfLe-loLang
06-03-2012, 04:25 PM
Finished up the 3rd and final book ('The Girl who kicked the Hornet's Nest) of the 'The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo' trilogy by Stieg Larsson.

All three were pretty good books.

Dragon tattoo eh? Well, if you're looking for another good book that takes place in Sweden...try ummm My Sweet Saga. No shameless self promotion or anything:) 35k people have dl'd it to their e-readers, though sales have tailed off...but check it out!

Oh look, here's a link: http://www.amazon.com/My-Sweet-Saga-ebook/dp/B005VGO162/ref=tmm_kin_title_0?ie=UTF8&m=AG56TWVU5XWC2&sr=8-1

Broncomutt
06-03-2012, 05:04 PM
Just finished The Girl With the Dragon Tattoo. Took me 4.5 days to read, like 150 pages per night. Hard to put down.

steeledude
06-04-2012, 01:53 AM
recently read 'hyperion' by dan simmons and am currently finishing up 'fall of hyperion', the sequel. very thought-provoking sci-fi.
next up is 'song of susannah', book 6 of stephen king's dark tower. the last book wasn't the best, but the series is wrapping up so i gotta finish it.

no1broncofan - how do you rate larry niven's work? haven't read any of it but heard good things.

Have you read "the Terror" by Dan Simmons? It is way different from Hyperion, it is historical fiction mixed with an abominable snowman, but nonetheless, it is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's huge too. Like 800 pages. I couldn't put it down. Takes place in the arctic (back when it was still cold and frozen), and I remember feeling cold the entire time I read it. I highly recommend it.

P.S. didn't realize I was responding to you from 8 years in the past! I was wondering why you were just reading Song of Susanah! Wolves of the Calla was pretty bad, and I quit there back in 2004.

Jay3
06-04-2012, 04:50 AM
Have you read "the Terror" by Dan Simmons? It is way different from Hyperion, it is historical fiction mixed with an abominable snowman, but nonetheless, it is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's huge too. Like 800 pages. I couldn't put it down. Takes place in the arctic (back when it was still cold and frozen), and I remember feeling cold the entire time I read it. I highly recommend it.

P.S. didn't realize I was responding to you from 8 years in the past! I was wondering why you were just reading Song of Susanah! Wolves of the Calla was pretty bad, and I quit there back in 2004.

Whoa, not only another Simmons fan, but a fan of The Terror. That's one of my favorites. He's been pretty hit or miss for years, but that one was hard to put down.

Drunk Monkey
06-04-2012, 05:04 AM
Out of the 13, what books(s) where your favorite?

Probably Towers of Midnight. After toughing it out through a brutal stretch of bla bla bla for several thousand pages it was nice to see the story start to wrap up. Jordan started some quality story lines that have been treading water up for several books. It's about time they get into the action.

mosca
06-04-2012, 09:21 AM
Have you read "the Terror" by Dan Simmons? It is way different from Hyperion, it is historical fiction mixed with an abominable snowman, but nonetheless, it is one of the best books I've read in a long time. It's huge too. Like 800 pages. I couldn't put it down. Takes place in the arctic (back when it was still cold and frozen), and I remember feeling cold the entire time I read it. I highly recommend it.

P.S. didn't realize I was responding to you from 8 years in the past! I was wondering why you were just reading Song of Susanah! Wolves of the Calla was pretty bad, and I quit there back in 2004.
Haha, no prob, 8 years ago is nothing when there are so many good books out. Yes, I've read 'The Terror' and it's actually the last new Simmons book I have read. Flashback is on my list to read, but alas my amount of reading has dropped lately. Anyways, 'The Terror' was awesome, I definitely felt that cold feeling you mention. Heck, that book actually put me into a somewhat grey, semi-depressed slothy state for about two weeks near the middle of the book. And I really loved the turn at the end with the Native American spiritual spin. Hope they make a movie sometime.

Speaking of Dark Tower, anyone notice that there's a new Dark Tower novel out by King? Forgot the name, but I'm tempted to read it... looks to be a flashback type story in the vein of 'Wizard and Glass' which I really loved.

mosca
06-04-2012, 09:23 AM
Whoa, not only another Simmons fan, but a fan of The Terror. That's one of my favorites. He's been pretty hit or miss for years, but that one was hard to put down.
I agree... I absolutely love the Hyperion Cantos, and Ilium started off great, but by the time it ended I was pretty sure I had no desire whatsoever to read Olympos. Sad thing is that I bought Olympos... heh.

I've been thinking of picking of Carrion Comfort for a while, is it worth the read? I've never really been into horror but I love sci-fi.

Speaking of sci-fi - a great Hugo award winner I read last year was Robert Charles Wilson's 'SPIN'... Awesome concept for sci-fi and it really felt like something that could actually happen. There's a couple sequels out - 'Axis' and something else, which I haven't read, but the first book was definitely worth it.

alkemical
06-04-2012, 09:47 AM
Wow, i read the first hyperion....but it was so long ago!

Jay3
06-04-2012, 10:25 AM
I've been thinking of picking of Carrion Comfort for a while, is it worth the read? I've never really been into horror but I love sci-fi.

Yes, it's one of his best books, in my "top three" for him.

However, it was probably 20+ years ago since I read it, so maybe my discriminating taste has changed. But it was extremely well done -- horror that was actually scary.

mosca
06-04-2012, 11:26 AM
Wow, i read the first hyperion....but it was so long ago!
I think the first book gets the most acclaim... but IMO the last two are by far the best of the Cantos. The tale of Raul Endymion and Aenea will stay with me forever...

alkemical
06-04-2012, 12:13 PM
I think the first book gets the most acclaim... but IMO the last two are by far the best of the Cantos. The tale of Raul Endymion and Aenea will stay with me forever...

I will have to re-read & get up to speed.

Jay3
06-04-2012, 12:46 PM
I agree... I absolutely love the Hyperion Cantos, and Ilium started off great, but by the time it ended I was pretty sure I had no desire whatsoever to read Olympos. Sad thing is that I bought Olympos... heh.

You called it right -- I loved Ilium (all of it), but the Olympos was a hot mess and kind of ruined the "series" for me. I know longer have fond memories of Ilium because of what Olympos did to it. (Still a great idea, though).

I call this "The Matrix Syndrome."

No1BroncoFan
06-11-2012, 08:18 PM
Yes, after reading Elantris, I jumped right into Mistborn....it was good, but Elantris was better.

Agreed.

What would you recommend from here?

The Halfblood Chronicles by Andre Norton and Mercedes Lackey (fantasy).

Anything by C.J. Cherryh, but especially the "Fortress" series (fantasy), the "Faded Sun" trilogy (sci fi) and the "Foreigner" series (sci fi).

The "Idlewild" series (post-apocalyptic sci-fi) from Nick Sagan, son of eminent cosmologist and author of "Contact," Carl Sagan.

"The Hunger Games" trilogy (distopian future sci-fi) by Suzanne Collins.

"The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocolypse" (think "Hitchikers Guide" but with fairy tale creatures :)) by Robert Rankin.

The "Alcatraz" books (fantasy) by Brandon Sanderson are a lot of fun even if they are aimed at a juvenile crowd.

Also can't forget the "Artemis Fowl" books by Eoin Colfer.

Those are just some of the places you can go.

Ben

alkemical
06-12-2012, 05:14 AM
I finished the "Walking Dead" compendium last week. I enjoyed it.

Drunk Monkey
06-19-2012, 09:36 AM
Cool. I've been looking for a new sci fi book.

Just finished, not his best work. If you are going to read something by Reynolds I would recomend Chasm City

http://img1.fantasticfiction.co.uk/images/n4/n24739.jpg

HooptyHoops
06-28-2012, 12:44 PM
Agreed.



The Halfblood Chronicles by Andre Norton and Mercedes Lackey (fantasy).

Anything by C.J. Cherryh, but especially the "Fortress" series (fantasy), the "Faded Sun" trilogy (sci fi) and the "Foreigner" series (sci fi).

The "Idlewild" series (post-apocalyptic sci-fi) from Nick Sagan, son of eminent cosmologist and author of "Contact," Carl Sagan.

"The Hunger Games" trilogy (distopian future sci-fi) by Suzanne Collins.

"The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocolypse" (think "Hitchikers Guide" but with fairy tale creatures :)) by Robert Rankin.

The "Alcatraz" books (fantasy) by Brandon Sanderson are a lot of fun even if they are aimed at a juvenile crowd.

Also can't forget the "Artemis Fowl" books by Eoin Colfer.

Those are just some of the places you can go.

Ben

Thanks for the recommends, as I had an awesome run on books(The Shack, then Elantris, then the Mistborn series), but then went to Peter Watts and the Starfish series.....yep, I stopped reading midway through the 2nd book!

BroncoMan4ever
06-28-2012, 11:53 PM
Agreed.



The Halfblood Chronicles by Andre Norton and Mercedes Lackey (fantasy).

Anything by C.J. Cherryh, but especially the "Fortress" series (fantasy), the "Faded Sun" trilogy (sci fi) and the "Foreigner" series (sci fi).

The "Idlewild" series (post-apocalyptic sci-fi) from Nick Sagan, son of eminent cosmologist and author of "Contact," Carl Sagan.

"The Hunger Games" trilogy (distopian future sci-fi) by Suzanne Collins.

"The Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocolypse" (think "Hitchikers Guide" but with fairy tale creatures :)) by Robert Rankin.

The "Alcatraz" books (fantasy) by Brandon Sanderson are a lot of fun even if they are aimed at a juvenile crowd.

Also can't forget the "Artemis Fowl" books by Eoin Colfer.

Those are just some of the places you can go.

Ben

i liked most of those, but found The Hunger Games trilogy to be extremely overrated.

the books are put together in a way that they feel rushed, as if they were missing several chapters, especially the 2nd and 3rd books. also, Katniss is one of if not the least likeable lead characters i have ever followed in any book.

the books were decent, but on a scale of 1-10 i give the series a 5.

Taco John
06-29-2012, 12:06 AM
I'm on my second read through the Song of Ice and Fire books and am enjoying it just as much on the second read-through as I did on the first. It's amazing the little details you pick up the second time through.

Broncomutt
06-29-2012, 07:36 AM
I'm on my second read through the Song of Ice and Fire books and am enjoying it just as much on the second read-through as I did on the first. It's amazing the little details you pick up the second time through.

5000 pages is alot to read twice.

Have you tried Martin's The Hedge Knight trilogy? Set about 80-90 years before GoT. Not as good as any of the ASOIAF books IMHO, but an interesting look at Westeros under Targaryen rule and just as violent. Combined I think it's about 400-500 pages.

No1BroncoFan
07-06-2012, 10:20 PM
Thanks for the recommends, as I had an awesome run on books(The Shack, then Elantris, then the Mistborn series), but then went to Peter Watts and the Starfish series.....yep, I stopped reading midway through the 2nd book!
Really? I've enjoyed everything I've read from Peter Watts (including "Starfish" books). To each his own.

HooptyHoops
07-11-2012, 09:18 AM
Really? I've enjoyed everything I've read from Peter Watts (including "Starfish" books). To each his own.

It just didn't grab me...moved too slow....kinda like a game of baseball to me.

I agree, we all like and have different tastes, but I would much rather read something somebody really liked as a starting point.

SouthStndJunkie
07-11-2012, 10:24 AM
I read "The Old Man and the Sea" by Ernest Hemmingway the other day.

It was a book I'd been meaning to read for a while.

I enjoyed it.

Turd_Ferguson
07-11-2012, 11:42 AM
I read the Name of the Wind, and the Wise Mans Fear.. They are the first 2 books of a trilogy and the third book hasn't released yet, I thought they were awesome.

SouthStndJunkie
07-11-2012, 11:59 AM
Has anyone read the Pendergast Series of books by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child?

I think there are 11 of them out right now, with a 12th on the way.

I've enjoyed them all, for the most part.

Agent Pendergast is one cool and interesting character.

Both authors have also written some pretty good solo novels.

I really liked Douglas Preston's books 'Tyrannosaur Canyon', 'The Codex', and 'Blasphemy'.

Baba Booey
07-11-2012, 12:20 PM
http://img2-2.timeinc.net/ew/i/2012/05/16/art-of-intelligence-review_320.jpg

Talk about awesome

gyldenlove
07-11-2012, 12:29 PM
I read "The Old Man and the Sea" by Ernest Hemmingway the other day.

It was a book I'd been meaning to read for a while.

I enjoyed it.

I liked that book as well.

War and Peace is a must read, so well written.

No1BroncoFan
07-17-2012, 08:45 PM
It just didn't grab me...moved too slow....kinda like a game of baseball to me.

I agree, we all like and have different tastes, but I would much rather read something somebody really liked as a starting point.

Try the "Idlewild" books by Nick Sagan. I've read them four times in the last three years (just finished the fourth time today). This series is at or near the top of all sci-fi written in the last 30 years.

steeledude
07-18-2012, 12:30 AM
I'm on my second read through the Song of Ice and Fire books and am enjoying it just as much on the second read-through as I did on the first. It's amazing the little details you pick up the second time through.

Some of my favorite books of all time, except for Dance. I just hated Dance so much, I can't say why. Too much hype in my brain? I must've had a Martin-Hype-Overload or something.

It's friggin' nuts seeing guys like Conan O'brien say words like "Winterfell" and the "Iron Throne."

steeledude
07-18-2012, 12:32 AM
I read "The Old Man and the Sea" by Ernest Hemmingway the other day.

It was a book I'd been meaning to read for a while.

I enjoyed it.

I have For Whom the Bell Tolls on my bookshelf ready to read, and I just finished the short story the short happy life of francis macomber. Jeez, I think he had periods of his life where he hated women! Great story.

Rother8
07-18-2012, 05:38 AM
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/b/b4/Denialofdeathcover.jpg
Kind of intriguing- tough to take in but a good kick in the ass for me.

Lycan
07-18-2012, 06:51 AM
During my 8 days or so of no power I read quite a lot of books, mostly in a bathtub filled with cold water.

I read the first 3 books of the Drizzt saga by R.A. Salvatore. Very enjoyable classic fantasy books.

I also read all 6 of the Dexter books by Jeff Lindsay. Simply awesome. The same characters you know from the show (mostly) but after the 1st book the storyline forks off in very different directions.

Then I read the first 2 books of the Jack Nightingale series by Stephen Leather, wasn't expecting all that much but I ended up really liking them. Very predictable though.

I also read a big old Calvin & Hobbes compilation book I have had forever. Easily the best comic strip ever. Plus the complete Trigun collection, one of my favorite Manga.

That's pretty much it, besides maybe 3 or 4 other books that weren't worth mentioning in this fine thread.

You would be amazed how fast books fly by when you have absolutely nothing else to do.

HooptyHoops
07-19-2012, 08:01 AM
Try the "Idlewild" books by Nick Sagan. I've read them four times in the last three years (just finished the fourth time today). This series is at or near the top of all sci-fi written in the last 30 years.

Bold statement No1! I will stop by the library tomorrow and pick them up! I just got done with the Elvenblood series that you recommended and I enjoyed them...thank you!!

Jay3
07-19-2012, 09:09 AM
Some of my favorite books of all time, except for Dance. I just hated Dance so much, I can't say why. Too much hype in my brain? I must've had a Martin-Hype-Overload or something.

That's because the project is beginning to fail as a novel. Martin is great at an episodic television approach, but he's beginning to demonstrate an inability to focus on the core narrative, and to bring it to conclusion. Dance is the first one where the flop sweat really began to show -- we can see behind the curtain, so to speak.

I say that as a fan and one who will be reading the next installment.

No1BroncoFan
07-19-2012, 08:00 PM
Bold statement No1! I will stop by the library tomorrow and pick them up! I just got done with the Elvenblood series that you recommended and I enjoyed them...thank you!!

Noting wrong with bold. ;D I liked the second one the best, but it's only by the thinnest of margins.

Found a new (to me) author on my last library trip, Joe Haldeman. So far this first book of his that I'm reading, "Marsbound," has been a great ride.

Ben

mosca
07-22-2012, 02:08 AM
That's because the project is beginning to fail as a novel. Martin is great at an episodic television approach, but he's beginning to demonstrate an inability to focus on the core narrative, and to bring it to conclusion. Dance is the first one where the flop sweat really began to show -- we can see behind the curtain, so to speak.

I say that as a fan and one who will be reading the next installment.
Agh... say it ain't so! I would say the same thing about Feast for Crows, which I have never gotten around to finishing. Read the first three books about 10 years ago, waited forever for Feast to come out, and was kinda disappointed. My autographed copy of it has been sitting, collecting dust, half-finished since I bought it.

I've been re-energized to re-read it and start on Dance with the release of the TV show...was hoping that Dance got the series back on track.

Jay3
07-22-2012, 04:48 AM
Agh... say it ain't so! I would say the same thing about Feast for Crows, which I have never gotten around to finishing. Read the first three books about 10 years ago, waited forever for Feast to come out, and was kinda disappointed. My autographed copy of it has been sitting, collecting dust, half-finished since I bought it.

I've been re-energized to re-read it and start on Dance with the release of the TV show...was hoping that Dance got the series back on track.

If anything, that feeling first crept in on Feast for Crows. But you think, "well, after the third one maybe he was entitled to a set up book or something." But then Dance with Dragons makes you realize Feast for Crows was not a set up for Dance with Dragons. He's introducing elaborate elements that go nowhere. Having characters wander about to no purpose. Introducing more wandering bands of warriors that have a name for their wandering band.

Dance with Dragons confirms the sick feeling that first started to creep in with Feast for Crows. There's still hope that the core plot ends up being satisfying. But hope is lost that Martin is a genius who crafted a story that could only be told in 10,000 pages. He just can't stop himself and reel it in and focus.

Dedhed
07-22-2012, 08:35 AM
Currently reading "Folks, This Ain't Normal" by Joel Salatin. Talks about how insane our food production system has become and how to change it.

backup qb
07-22-2012, 06:29 PM
Just read 'Abe Lincoln Vampire Hunter.' Quick entertaining read. Not great but good.

SouthStndJunkie
07-22-2012, 07:34 PM
Just read 'Abe Lincoln Vampire Hunter.' Quick entertaining read. Not great but good.

Yep....I enjoyed it as well and thought it was a pretty cool adventure.

I was disappointed in the movie, as it really didn't follow the book at all.

broncosteven
07-22-2012, 09:29 PM
I started Soccer Coaching for kids. lots of great drills I have had my daughter doing the last couple weeks.

No1BroncoFan
08-19-2012, 02:53 PM
Recently re-read "Jumper" by Steven Gould. Yes, this is the book that the really bad Hayden Christensen film is based on but don't hold that against it. It's about a teenager who discovers he can teleport, how he deals with that and what he does with his talent. It is NOT some lame good guy vs. evil secret society story. In fact there is no group of villians hunting down jumpers (Davy Rice is the only one).

Easily in the top fifty sci-fi- books in the last 20 years it's an incredibly fun read.

"Reflex" (the sequel to "Jumper" and also a recent re-read) is also very good. Not as good as the first but still way better than average. Davy Rice returns as the world's only known jumper, until someone else learns how to do it.

I'm really looking forward to the release of "Impulese," the third book in the "Jumper" series, due out next year.

Other recent reads:
"Amped" by Daniel H. Wilson. Based in the near future it's a story about bigotry and hatred with meaning in today's world.

"H.I.V.E." (the Higher Institute of Villainous Education) bv Mark Walden. If you've read and liked "Artemis Fowl" by Eoin Colfer (an incredible series that is alas, finished with the latest installment) you'll probably like this first book in the series. H.I.V.E. is kinda like Hogwarts for criminal mastermind children. A lot of fun so far and I'm looking forward to the rest of the series.

HooptyHoops
10-24-2012, 04:32 PM
I've read a lot this year and I would say Mark Lawrence's Prince of Thorns and King of Thorns was completely the best in the past couple of months. Looking forward to the last book in 2013.

Right behind the Lawrence I would say Patrick Rothfuss King Killer series....get it and read it!!

Lycan
10-24-2012, 06:00 PM
I've read just about all the Dresden Files books. They're interesting, modern fantasy isn't something done well very often IMO, but these are pretty good.

I'd certainly recommend them if you are interested in swords and sorcery style fantasy done in modern Chicago.

broncosteven
10-24-2012, 06:46 PM
I read Rev's book, Would have liked a synopsis of what he went on to do after boot camp, the ending made it seem like he became a Marine then went home and was all done. Would have liked to know what he did with all that training.

I started Tom's book with Floyd. It covers a lot of the same ground as the 1st book but it is still fun to relive and reinforce those memories.

HooptyHoops
10-24-2012, 07:18 PM
I've read just about all the Dresden Files books. They're interesting, modern fantasy isn't something done well very often IMO, but these are pretty good.

I'd certainly recommend them if you are interested in swords and sorcery style fantasy done in modern Chicago.

I keep coming across the Dresden Files....I often wonder if I would like them.....your right, modern fantasy seems to go wrong a lot of the time.

TheReverend
10-24-2012, 08:02 PM
I read Rev's book, Would have liked a synopsis of what he went on to do after boot camp, the ending made it seem like he became a Marine then went home and was all done. Would have liked to know what he did with all that training.

Your mom Ha!

extralife
10-24-2012, 08:05 PM
I read Rev's book, Would have liked a synopsis of what he went on to do after boot camp

become an annoying, ubiquitous presence on the mane, duh

No1BroncoFan
01-13-2013, 11:38 AM
If you're looking for something Broncos related that won't leave you with a sick, twisted feeling in your stomach, you might want to give this a try:
Game of My Life Denver Broncos: Memorable Stories of Broncos Football by Jim Saccomano.
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/513hI0vcWnL._AA160_.jpg

I got this from my daughter for X-mas and loved every page. A great trip down memory lane and some reminders of some interesting things like the fact that since 1973 the Broncos have had more SB appearances than losing seasons. Something I don't think any other team can claim.

Great book.

WABronco
01-13-2013, 11:42 AM
"The Forgotten Soldier" is a good one...now I'm reading "The Battle of the Tanks" (catchy name). Tanks is damn good and a new author to me.

No1BroncoFan
02-28-2013, 08:35 PM
Bold statement No1! I will stop by the library tomorrow and pick them up! I just got done with the Elvenblood series that you recommended and I enjoyed them...thank you!!

Did you ever get around to the Idlewild books and if so, how'd you like 'em?

Got a Nook for Christmas and have been ransacking the local libraries for ebooks like mad:

"Aftertime" by Sophie Littlefield - Post-apocalyptic zombie story that is a great ride, and I don't much like zombie stories. Part one of a series and I've got the others on deck.

An oldie that's new to me, "Another Fine Myth" by Robert Asprin. Very good, humorous approach to the fantasy genre.

The Mitch Rapp books by Vince Flynn. CIA/political thrillers, the worst of them is still pretty good. The best are can't-put-downers.

The "Ember" series by Jeanne DuPrau. I've heard the three of the books were combined and made into a muddled, hard to follow movie. Don't know about that, but the books were solid reads. Nothing earth shaking, but solid.

On deck:

The rest of the "Aftertime" books (of course).

Seth Grahame-Smith's "Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter" and "Pride and Prejudice and Zombies." Both of these come highly recommended to me.

Anything I can get from Robert Rankin. His "Hollow Chocolate Bunnies of the Apocalypse" was one of the most entertaining books I've ever read. Laugh out loud funny in many, many places.

And of course, most anything else I can find barring bad westerns and romances. :D

BroncsCheer
02-28-2013, 08:57 PM
11/22/63 by King - great butterfly effect novel

Recently introduced to John Ringo. Reading There will Be Dragons now - good dystopian future stuff.

Re-read A Dance w/Dragons for the 3rd time after finishing season 2 of the Game of Thrones TV series. Can't wait for Winds of Winter.

Got hooked on Harry Bosch (Michael Connelley) over the summer and read all of those (B&N.com FTW)

The Secret Race is a well written bio of Tyler Hamilton exposing th seedy underbelly of pro cycling for interested readers.

Archer81
02-28-2013, 10:24 PM
She-Wolves. History of English Queens before Elizabeth I.

Unholy Night. Written by the guy who wrote Abraham Lincoln, Vampire Hunter. Not bad to this point.

Hitler & Stalin. History of the 20th century's most brutal dictators.


:Broncos:

No1BroncoFan
03-02-2013, 06:12 PM
I forgot to mention the "Maze Runner" series by James Dashner. Dystopian future fiction that reads a bit like "The Hunger Games," without the whiny protagonist but with zombie-like "cranks" (disease victims). Fantastic reads.

broncosteven
03-02-2013, 06:31 PM
I am wading through The Violin: A Social History of the World's Most Versatile Instrument.

It is interesting but there is a lot of info over the course of about 400 years and you have to at least have a passing knowledge of the history of the violin and it's great makers or heard the names at some point to string it all together.

That said the writer keeps it moving and interesting. Funny that as few as 50 years ago you could buy a Strad, Guarneri, or Amati for about $50k. The collectors are the ones who drove up the prices.

http://www.amazon.com/Violin-Social-History-Versatile-Instrument/dp/039308440X/ref=sr_1_2?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1362277673&sr=1-2&keywords=violin

Kid A
03-02-2013, 08:35 PM
Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk by Ben Fountain
A hilarious and heartbreaking satire about war, sports and American culture. I know that sounds like a book blurb, but it really is all those things and, for me, lived up to the substantial hype it has gotten. Highly recommend.

CivilWarLand in Bad Decline by George Saunders
One of the best short story writers in America, he has a new book out that I haven't had a chance to read yet, but this one is a great place to start. Like Halftime Walk this is mostly satire about America, but framed in various strange dystopian future settings. A lot of dark humor and a lot of fun.

The Passage by Justin Cronin
The first in a planned trilogy (book 2 just came out late 2012), it owes a lot to Stephen King: government experiments gone awry, paranormal child, post-apocalyptic society, super human monsters...Cronin mashes a lot together, and some of it works better than other parts. But on the whole, for a 700+ pg book, it's a solid pageturner. And it's written better than your average thriller, though still falls back on some of the genre cliches (e.g. every chapter has to end on a cliffhanger sentence).

I think it would definitely be up the alley of a lot of people here who enjoy post-apocalyptic, sci-fi, fantasy etc. Plus Ridley Scott bought the movie rights, so this is your chance to be the asshole who complains about its accuracy when it comes out!

DarkHorse30
03-03-2013, 02:22 AM
Alice Cooper, Golf Monster - funny bio

BroncoInferno
03-03-2013, 06:11 AM
CivilWarLand in Bad Decline by George Saunders
One of the best short story writers in America, he has a new book out that I haven't had a chance to read yet, but this one is a great place to start. Like Halftime Walk this is mostly satire about America, but framed in various strange dystopian future settings. A lot of dark humor and a lot of fun.

It doesn't get much better than "The 400 Pound CEO."

Maybe the God we see, the God who calls the daily shots, is merely a subGod. Maybe there's a God above this subGod who's busy for a few Godminutes with something else, and will be right back; and when he gets back will take the subGod by the ear and say: Now look. Look at that fat man. What did he ever do to you? Wasn't he humble enough? Didn't he endure enough abuse for a thousand men? Weren't the simplest tasks hard? Didn't you sense him craving affection? Were you unaware that his days unraveled as one long bad dream? And maybe as the sub- God slinks away, the true God will sweep me up in his arms, saying: My sincere apologies, a mistake has been made. Accept a new birth, as token of my esteem.

And I will emerge again from between the legs of my mother, a slighter and more beautiful baby, destined for a different life, in which I am masterful, sleek as a deer, a winner.

Good to see another Saunders fan out there. Is this the first book Saunders' book you've read? All are highly recommended. The new collection includes some of his best work, though there are one or two clunkers.

WolfpackGuy
03-03-2013, 07:02 AM
I'm currently about halfway through Mein Kampf which I found for a few bucks recently.

Very hard read because Hitler jumps from thought to thought in a disorganized manner, and the book seems like a giant run on sentence especially when he talks about himself.

Oddly, in what I've read so far, he made some rather accurate predictions about today's dysfunctional democratic process (at least in this country) and said EXACTLY WHAT HE WOULD DO if he ever got in a position of power.

IHaveALight
03-03-2013, 07:09 AM
http://ts3.mm.bing.net/th?id=H.4775051075126330&pid=15.1&H=160&W=111

Rohirrim
03-03-2013, 07:46 AM
I'm just finishing up with this:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51K6T-QXPbL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_SX240_SY320_CR,0,0,240,320_SH20_OU01_.jpg

Lot's of info, but pretty dry. More concerned with the politics than the man.

Broncomutt
03-08-2013, 09:07 AM
At the age of 10, I got a copy of the novelization of the movie Alien. Ironically, my parents wouldn't let me watch the movie, but had no problems with me reading it, so I read the movie years before I ever watched it.

The novelization is pretty much a prose version of the screenplay written by Alan Dean Foster (Alien (1979) ISBN 0-446-82977-3). The screenwriter for the movie was Dan O'Bannon. It is just shy of 200 pages long. There are only 2 differences I can remember. The first is a conversation between the female crew members. In the book, Ripley asks Lambert if she's ever slept with Ash, hinting at a fair degree of promiscuity among the crew members.

The second I include because it's possibly the most chilling part of the book, but was never featured in Ridley Scott's epic movie.





Ripley still hadn't moved. Faint shrieks reached her over the 'com. The screams were Lambert's and they faded with merciful speed. Then it was quiet again.

She spoke toward the pickup. "Parker...Lambert?"

She waited for a response, expecting none. Her expectations were fulfilled. The import of the continuing silence took only a moment to settle in.
She was alone. There were probably three living things left on the ship: the alien, Jones, and herself. But she had to be sure.

It meant leaving Jones behind. She didn't want to, but the cat had heard the screams and was meowing frantically. He was making too much noise!

She reached B deck unopposed, her flamethrower held tightly in both hands. The food locker lay just ahead. There was an outside chance the alien had left someone behind, being unable to manuever itself and two bodies through the narrow ducts. A chance that someone might still be alive.

She peered around the jamb of the locker entrance. What remained showed her how the alien had succeeded in squeezing both victims into the airshaft. Then she was running, running. Blindly, a little madly, neither thinking or caring. Walls reached out to stun her and slow her down, but nothing halted her crazed flight. She ran until her lungs hurt. They reminded her of Kane and the creature that had matured inside him, next to his lungs. That in turn reminded her of the alien.

All that thinking brought her back to her senses. Gulping for breath, she slowed and took stock of her surroundings. She'd run the length of the ship. Now she found herself standing alone in the middle of the engine room.

She heard something and stopped breathing. It was repeated, and she let out a cautious sigh. The sound was familiar, the sound was human. It was the sound of weeping.

Still cradling the flamethrower, she walked slowly around the room until the source of the noise lay directly below her. She found she was standing on a companionway cover, a round metal disc. Keeping half her attention on the well-lit chamber surrounding her, she knelt and removed the disc. A ladder descended into the near darkness.

She felt her way down the ladder until she reached solid footing. Then she activated her light bar. She was in a small maintenance chamber. The light picked out plastic crates, rarely used tools. It also fell on bones with shreds of flesh still attached. Her skin crawled as the light moved over fragments of clothing, dried blood, a ruined boot. Bizarre extrusions lined the wall.

A huge cocoon hung from the ceiling, off to her right. It looked like an enclosed, translucent hammock, woven from fine white silky material. It twitched.

Her finger tense on the trigger of the flamethrower, she walked nearer. The beam from her lightbar made the cocoon slightly transparent. There was a body inside...Dallas!

Quite unexpectadly the eyes opened and focused on Ripley. Lips parted, moved to form words. She moved closer, simultaneously fascinated and repelled.

"Kill me," the whisperer pleaded with her.

"What...what did it do to you?"

Dallas tried to speak again, failed. His head turned a little to the right. Ripley swung her light, turned it upward slightly. A second cocoon hung there, different in texture and color from the first. It was smaller and darker, the silk having formed a hard, shining shell. It looked, although Ripley couldn't know it, like the broken, empty urn on the derelict ship.

"That was Brett." Her light turned back to focus on the speaker again.

"I'll get you out of here." She was crying. "We'll crank up the autodoc, get you..."

She broke off, unable to talk. She was remembering Ash's analogy of the spider, the wasp. The live young feeding on the paralyzed body of the spider, growing, the spider aware of what was happening but...

Somehow she managed to shut off that horrid line of thought. Madness lay that way. "What can I do?" she sobbed.

The same agonized whisper. "Kill me."

She stared at him. Mercifully, his eyes had closed. But his lips were trembling, as if he were readying a scream. She didn't think she could stand to hear that scream.

The nozzle of the flamethrower rose and she convulsively depressed the trigger. A molten blast enveloped the cocoon and the thing that had been Dallas. It and he burned without a sound. Then she swung the fire around the lair. The entire compartment burst into flames. She was already scrambling back up the ladder, heat licking at her legs.

Requiem
03-08-2013, 09:09 AM
A book on the Aztecs by some anthropologist.

TerrElway
03-08-2013, 03:48 PM
In the Garden of Beasts by Erik Larson - the rise of hitler as seen through the eyes of the american ambassador to Germany. Very good.

Empire of the Summer Moon - about Quanah Parker and the rise and fall of the Comanche nation.

BroncoMutt - Alan Dean Foster was my fave author growing up. His books are a fun read.

mhgaffney
03-08-2013, 10:27 PM
The Big Bamboozle

by Phillip Marshall, former CIA pilot and Eastern & United pilot of Boeing 727s, 737s, 747s, 757s and 767s

who received a bullet in the head two days before the SuperBowl along with his two kids.

Not to be missed!

broncosteven
04-02-2013, 04:20 PM
I just read "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead" about the life and times of Warren Zevon written by his ex-wife Crystal on his request, with the provision she put in all the bad stuff.

I knew he was an Alkie but didn't realize how bad he was and how once he quit using he was able to stay on the wagon until he got the death sentence from his Dr's.

I totally love Zevon's music, glad I read this because he was a total **** person for reals.

broncolife
04-02-2013, 04:49 PM
My left nut hangs lower than my right.

This book was amazing. This is just another classic book that holds your attention and makes you want to not put it down! Such a good book!!! There are certainly many fabulous characters in this series.There are those to hate (The angry mole), to love (the curly pube), to admire (the right nut), and to despise (the saggy sack and Joff the Dick).Also the army of crabs kicked arse. The list of characters that populate this series is enormous, and it is quite daunting as you begin. As the stories continue to weave together though, it becomes easy to keep track of the characters and become absorbed in their tales. I cried, laughed and vomitted. It was a great book. I cant wait for the movie, I heard it was in 3d.

McDman
04-02-2013, 05:37 PM
"The Last Kingdom" by Bernard Cornwell. It's a n historical fiction about the Danish invasion of England. Very good.

broncosteven
04-02-2013, 06:30 PM
She-Wolves. History of English Queens before Elizabeth I.



:Broncos:

Is this about Oscar Wilde?

Archer81
04-02-2013, 06:32 PM
Is this about Oscar Wilde?


Might be. Only read about a 1/4 of it. Covered Eleanor and Matilda.


:Broncos:

R8R H8R
04-02-2013, 10:32 PM
My left nut hangs lower than my right.

This book was amazing. This is just another classic book that holds your attention and makes you want to not put it down! Such a good book!!! There are certainly many fabulous characters in this series.There are those to hate (The angry mole), to love (the curly pube), to admire (the right nut), and to despise (the saggy sack and Joff the Dick).Also the army of crabs kicked arse. The list of characters that populate this series is enormous, and it is quite daunting as you begin. As the stories continue to weave together though, it becomes easy to keep track of the characters and become absorbed in their tales. I cried, laughed and vomitted. It was a great book. I cant wait for the movie, I heard it was in 3d.

Interesting, but I'm really holding out for the sequel "Why does it hurt when I pee?" I hear it's loosely adapted from an old Frank Zappa song by the same name.

broncosteven
04-03-2013, 01:22 PM
Interesting, but I'm really holding out for the sequel "Why does it hurt when I pee?" I hear it's loosely adapted from an old Frank Zappa song by the same name.

Willie the Pimp?

BroncsCheer
04-03-2013, 03:40 PM
The People's History of the United States - 1492 to Present - Howard Zinn

Should be required reading in order to get registered to vote, IMO

I knew a lot of things were farked up but had no idea really how bad the class separation has been in this country since Day Zero.

Archer81
04-03-2013, 04:30 PM
The People's History of the United States - 1492 to Present - Howard Zinn

Should be required reading in order to get registered to vote, IMO

I knew a lot of things were farked up but had no idea really how bad the class separation has been in this country since Day Zero.


I would suggest reading more than one history of the US for proper perspective. Whatever is the same, is what you need to know and not the author's opinion.


:Broncos:

Mogulseeker
04-03-2013, 04:54 PM
Les Miserables x100

R8R H8R
04-03-2013, 07:17 PM
Willie the Pimp?

No, "Why does it hurt when I pee?" It's from the Joe's Garage album.

BroncoInferno
04-04-2013, 07:21 AM
I would suggest reading more than one history of the US for proper perspective. Whatever is the same, is what you need to know and not the author's opinion.


"History is the lie commonly agreed upon." ~ Voltaire

I don't know if you've actually read Zinn's book, but the purpose was to shed light on the forgotten players in U.S. history (hence "A People's History"). The triumphs of Washington, Jefferson, Lincoln, et al have been told from nearly every conceivable angle. This is more of a supplementary text about how common people lived.

Drunk Monkey
04-04-2013, 07:58 AM
Heir to the Empire (Star Wars The Trawn Trillogy)

It's five years after Return of the Jedi: the Rebel Alliance has destroyed the Death Star, defeated Darth Vader and the Emperor, and driven out the remnants of the old Imperial Starfleet to a distant corner of the galaxy. Princess Leia and Han Solo are married and expecting Jedi Twins. And Luke Skywalker has become the first in a long-awaited line of Jedi Knights. But thousand of light-years away, the last of the emperor's warlords has taken command of the shattered Imperial Fleet, readied it for war, and pointed it at the fragile heart of the new Republic. For this dark warrior has made two vital discoveries that could destroy everything the courageous men and women of the Rebel Alliance fought so hard to build. The explosive confrontation that results is a towering epic of action, invention, mystery, and spectacle on a galactic scale--in short, a story worthy of the name Star Wars


Well...... It would have been a lot better if I read it in 1991 when it was written. Episodes 1-3 contradict some of the events in the book. Dark Jedi instead of the Sith ect. It was also pretty cheesy but I guess that was to be expected. I will probably read the other 2 now that I am invested but really this is not a great book.

Broncomutt
04-04-2013, 08:28 AM
The Path Between the Seas by David McCullough

First and only book I've read by Mr. McCullough. When finished, I immediately bought the rest of his books.

That canal was a b****!

Tombstone RJ
04-04-2013, 09:23 AM
At the age of 10, I got a copy of the novelization of the movie Alien. Ironically, my parents wouldn't let me watch the movie, but had no problems with me reading it, so I read the movie years before I ever watched it.

The novelization is pretty much a prose version of the screenplay written by Alan Dean Foster (Alien (1979) ISBN 0-446-82977-3). The screenwriter for the movie was Dan O'Bannon. It is just shy of 200 pages long. There are only 2 differences I can remember. The first is a conversation between the female crew members. In the book, Ripley asks Lambert if she's ever slept with Ash, hinting at a fair degree of promiscuity among the crew members.

The second I include because it's possibly the most chilling part of the book, but was never featured in Ridley Scott's epic movie.





Ripley still hadn't moved. Faint shrieks reached her over the 'com. The screams were Lambert's and they faded with merciful speed. Then it was quiet again.

She spoke toward the pickup. "Parker...Lambert?"

She waited for a response, expecting none. Her expectations were fulfilled. The import of the continuing silence took only a moment to settle in.
She was alone. There were probably three living things left on the ship: the alien, Jones, and herself. But she had to be sure.

It meant leaving Jones behind. She didn't want to, but the cat had heard the screams and was meowing frantically. He was making too much noise!

She reached B deck unopposed, her flamethrower held tightly in both hands. The food locker lay just ahead. There was an outside chance the alien had left someone behind, being unable to manuever itself and two bodies through the narrow ducts. A chance that someone might still be alive.

She peered around the jamb of the locker entrance. What remained showed her how the alien had succeeded in squeezing both victims into the airshaft. Then she was running, running. Blindly, a little madly, neither thinking or caring. Walls reached out to stun her and slow her down, but nothing halted her crazed flight. She ran until her lungs hurt. They reminded her of Kane and the creature that had matured inside him, next to his lungs. That in turn reminded her of the alien.

All that thinking brought her back to her senses. Gulping for breath, she slowed and took stock of her surroundings. She'd run the length of the ship. Now she found herself standing alone in the middle of the engine room.

She heard something and stopped breathing. It was repeated, and she let out a cautious sigh. The sound was familiar, the sound was human. It was the sound of weeping.

Still cradling the flamethrower, she walked slowly around the room until the source of the noise lay directly below her. She found she was standing on a companionway cover, a round metal disc. Keeping half her attention on the well-lit chamber surrounding her, she knelt and removed the disc. A ladder descended into the near darkness.

She felt her way down the ladder until she reached solid footing. Then she activated her light bar. She was in a small maintenance chamber. The light picked out plastic crates, rarely used tools. It also fell on bones with shreds of flesh still attached. Her skin crawled as the light moved over fragments of clothing, dried blood, a ruined boot. Bizarre extrusions lined the wall.

A huge cocoon hung from the ceiling, off to her right. It looked like an enclosed, translucent hammock, woven from fine white silky material. It twitched.

Her finger tense on the trigger of the flamethrower, she walked nearer. The beam from her lightbar made the cocoon slightly transparent. There was a body inside...Dallas!

Quite unexpectadly the eyes opened and focused on Ripley. Lips parted, moved to form words. She moved closer, simultaneously fascinated and repelled.

"Kill me," the whisperer pleaded with her.

"What...what did it do to you?"

Dallas tried to speak again, failed. His head turned a little to the right. Ripley swung her light, turned it upward slightly. A second cocoon hung there, different in texture and color from the first. It was smaller and darker, the silk having formed a hard, shining shell. It looked, although Ripley couldn't know it, like the broken, empty urn on the derelict ship.

"That was Brett." Her light turned back to focus on the speaker again.

"I'll get you out of here." She was crying. "We'll crank up the autodoc, get you..."

She broke off, unable to talk. She was remembering Ash's analogy of the spider, the wasp. The live young feeding on the paralyzed body of the spider, growing, the spider aware of what was happening but...

Somehow she managed to shut off that horrid line of thought. Madness lay that way. "What can I do?" she sobbed.

The same agonized whisper. "Kill me."

She stared at him. Mercifully, his eyes had closed. But his lips were trembling, as if he were readying a scream. She didn't think she could stand to hear that scream.

The nozzle of the flamethrower rose and she convulsively depressed the trigger. A molten blast enveloped the cocoon and the thing that had been Dallas. It and he burned without a sound. Then she swung the fire around the lair. The entire compartment burst into flames. She was already scrambling back up the ladder, heat licking at her legs.

I too read the book Alien and yes, this scene is in the movie, they just edited out of the final movie release. However, you can get the DVD with the expanded version and this scene is in it.

The reason Ridley Scott deleted the scene was because of the tension of Ripley being completely alone, running through the big ship. Scott didn't want that tension broken with this scene so he cut it out of the final release. Makes sense to me because the tension of Ripley being completely alone, trying to make her way to the shuttle and being restricted by the time she has before the ship explodes is all very intense.

Tombstone RJ
04-04-2013, 09:35 AM
Also, a little bit of trivia: The original title of the movie was not Alien, but Space Truckers. The crew of the ship were not exactly the best of the best, but more like your average freight hauler. You can see this in the movie as some of the characters are sorta redneck types. However, I think it was after they settled on HR Geiger's creepy monster and put the entire set together, along with the actors and script that they realized this title would never work and they changed it to Alien

TonyR
04-04-2013, 09:59 AM
I recently read Gillian Flynn's first two novels, Sharp Objects and Dark Places. I am currently reading her third novel, Gone Girl, which is currently #3 on the NYT Best Sellers list and has been on the list for 42 weeks. I recommend all three.

broncosteven
04-04-2013, 01:01 PM
I too read the book Alien and yes, this scene is in the movie, they just edited out of the final movie release. However, you can get the DVD with the expanded version and this scene is in it.

The reason Ridley Scott deleted the scene was because of the tension of Ripley being completely alone, running through the big ship. Scott didn't want that tension broken with this scene so he cut it out of the final release. Makes sense to me because the tension of Ripley being completely alone, trying to make her way to the shuttle and being restricted by the time she has before the ship explodes is all very intense.

I was into Alan Dean Foster at the time too, he did a bunch of Star Trek books and a ton of other movie books like Outland, Black Hole, clash of the Titans etc... I still have all my paperbacks of the big blockbuster Sci-fi movies of the 70's and early 80's. I can't part with them for some reason.

Tombstone RJ
04-04-2013, 02:28 PM
I was into Alan Dean Foster at the time too, he did a bunch of Star Trek books and a ton of other movie books like Outland, Black Hole, clash of the Titans etc... I still have all my paperbacks of the big blockbuster Sci-fi movies of the 70's and early 80's. I can't part with them for some reason.

I'd like to read the Black Hole book, I like that movie as a kid.

Pick Six
04-04-2013, 02:36 PM
Heir to the Empire (Star Wars The Trawn Trillogy)

It's five years after Return of the Jedi: the Rebel Alliance has destroyed the Death Star, defeated Darth Vader and the Emperor, and driven out the remnants of the old Imperial Starfleet to a distant corner of the galaxy. Princess Leia and Han Solo are married and expecting Jedi Twins. And Luke Skywalker has become the first in a long-awaited line of Jedi Knights. But thousand of light-years away, the last of the emperor's warlords has taken command of the shattered Imperial Fleet, readied it for war, and pointed it at the fragile heart of the new Republic. For this dark warrior has made two vital discoveries that could destroy everything the courageous men and women of the Rebel Alliance fought so hard to build. The explosive confrontation that results is a towering epic of action, invention, mystery, and spectacle on a galactic scale--in short, a story worthy of the name Star Wars


Well...... It would have been a lot better if I read it in 1991 when it was written. Episodes 1-3 contradict some of the events in the book. Dark Jedi instead of the Sith ect. It was also pretty cheesy but I guess that was to be expected. I will probably read the other 2 now that I am invested but really this is not a great book.

Lucas would allow authors to make money, based on his vision. It didn't matter, when it came to the movies. The Expanded Universe was generally ignored, and Disney has hinted that the next Star Wars movie will ALSO ignore the Star Wars "expanded universe". Many of the books are nice reads, though...

broncosteven
04-04-2013, 03:43 PM
I'd like to read the Black Hole book, I like that movie as a kid.

I still love that movie, even if the end is lame. We had just moved to Florida when it came out and I was about 12 or 13 and since there were no kids in our neighborhood my mom would let me and my 10 year old sister ride our bikes a couple miles to a small mall that had a theater. My sister and I watched that movie a bunch of times.

I don't remember the book being as memorable as 2001, Blade Runner (though that is classic Sci-Fi at it's best), Alien, or even Outland, it is pretty thin. Maybe I will crack it open again and give it a read, soccer practice has started up and I have time to read.

broncosteven
07-16-2013, 06:20 PM
I have been reading some old Raymond Chandler and liking it so I thought about reading some newer mystery writers. I read Warren Zevon's Bio called "I'll Sleep When I'm Dead" and it said he was good friends with Carl Hiaasen so I thought I would give him a try.

Anyone have any thoughts on which Carl Hiaasen book to try 1st? Don't try to slip in one of his kid books either as I am wise to that scam.

I have been rereading "For Whom the Bell Tolls" by Papa and enjoying even more the 3rd or 4th time through. I also picked up "Master and Commander" by Patrick O'Brian and "The Big Sleep" by Raymond Chandler at a great little used book store on vacation in South Haven Michigan.

We have a lady who throws book sales a couple times a year out of her garage and she said she had some Carl Hiaasen so I wanted to know which ones to start with. She also said if I liked Hiaasen to try Tim Dorsey so I would welcome any thoughts on his books as well.

Thanks!

Steve

80smith
07-16-2013, 06:44 PM
The Path Between the Seas by David McCullough

First and only book I've read by Mr. McCullough. When finished, I immediately bought the rest of his books.

That canal was a b****!

You get to his book "1776" yet? I found it to be a great read!

WABronco
07-16-2013, 07:00 PM
Reading "Hell Riders" by Terry Brighton. It's the true story of the charge of the light brigade during the Crimean War. I read a lot of war history, and I can't remember having the reactions I get reading this book. What transpired was just insane...getting raked by cannons from both sides while charging head first towards another battery of cannons. And they were still using sabers/lances during those times, so there's plenty of gore. There are many first hand accounts as well, and I find it almost amusing how the soldiers would say "Oh so and so, that poor fellow, he was blown apart by a cannon ball. Poor fellow." Poor fellow, indeed.

Archer81
07-16-2013, 07:34 PM
Ran through a couple. A collection of Greek mythology, another collection of Celtic mythology and picked up Welcome to Hell and Eye of God on my kindle.


:Broncos:

alkemical
07-16-2013, 09:36 PM
jitterbug perfume - tom robbins

myMind
07-16-2013, 09:45 PM
jitterbug perfume - tom robbins

I love Robbins, have read them all. My fav is either Jitterbug, Still Life, or Fierce Invalids. Half Asleep is really good too...**** it, they are all my favs.

myMind
07-16-2013, 09:50 PM
If you like Sci-Fi and or War novels this book is a must read. I promise.

Two words: Time Dilation
Read it. Now.

http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/1823/f7nz.jpg

alkemical
07-17-2013, 01:36 PM
I love Robbins, have read them all. My fav is either Jitterbug, Still Life, or Fierce Invalids. Half Asleep is really good too...**** it, they are all my favs.

I didn't like the ending of 'Jitterbug'. I felt that it was just kinda slapped together.

I still enjoyed the book, but after this great story, i felt like he was like "****, i need to close this book out".

Pan does really smell that way though.

Smiling Assassin27
07-17-2013, 01:51 PM
Freedom Under Lincoln: Federal Power and Personal Liberty Under the Strain of Civil War by Dean Sprague

Best book I've read in a year. Barack said he wanted to be the new Lincoln--he's well on his way. Eye opening.

http://i.ebayimg.com/t/Dean-Sprague-Freedom-Under-Lincoln-Civil-War-1st-Edition-1st-Printing-1965-/00/s/MTYwMFgxMTk1/$(KGrHqN,!q8E+0VpNY5GBQInQqbyK!~~60_35.JPG

Broncomutt
07-17-2013, 01:56 PM
You get to his book "1776" yet? I found it to be a great read!

No I haven't yet, I'm kind of working my way back through history and I'm at the Napoleonic Wars now, so that might be next. Thanks.

I also picked up "Master and Commander" by Patrick O'Brian

I read Master and Commander about 3 months ago. Loved it but between the 19th century dialog, politics, music and nautical terms it was fun but it was work too.

I had to read it with an atlas, list of nautical terms and quick access to wikipedia. Felt like I learned alot though and the plot is excellent.

Quoydogs
07-17-2013, 02:05 PM
Confessions of a mafia killer ( Richard Kuklinski ) An amazing book. He killed hundreds of people in horrible ways. Video taping them being eaten by rats, burning the flesh down to the bones one toe at a time with road flairs, shoving credit cards up people asses and much much more.....

I know it sounds horrible but what amazes me was the fact that he shows zero remorse. I mean nothing. It was just another day at the job for him.

Anyways I'm not a big reader, but I could not put this book down.

Must read and a true story.

Drunk Monkey
07-17-2013, 02:06 PM
If you like Sci-Fi and or War novels this book is a must read. I promise.

Two words: Time Dilation
Read it. Now.

http://img690.imageshack.us/img690/1823/f7nz.jpg

I read that years ago. Good book.

BroncoInferno
07-17-2013, 02:13 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41PZik3LNWL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

I bought the hard copy a couple of years ago due to the awesome cover art, but I just started reading it after hearing about the TV series version airing on CBS. As usual with King, it could have used an editor, but it's an interesting read with well-rounded (if at times a bit hokey) characters. I'm looking forward to catching up on the series, which from what I've read is quite a bit different from the book. A major part of the plot deals with a meth-dealing town leader, which I've heard they've changed for the series due to similarities with Breaking Bad. Can anyone confirm this?

Drunk Monkey
07-17-2013, 02:19 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Great-North-Road-Peter-Hamilton/dp/034552666X

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/7/73/Great_North_Road.jpg/200px-Great_North_Road.jpg

I love the way Hamilton writes a space opera. Good book, not his best but a good book.

broncosteven
07-17-2013, 02:24 PM
Confessions of a mafia killer ( Richard Kuklinski ) An amazing book. He killed hundreds of people in horrible ways. Video taping them being eaten by rats, burning the flesh down to the bones one toe at a time with road flairs, shoving credit cards up people asses and much much more.....

I know it sounds horrible but what amazes me was the fact that he shows zero remorse. I mean nothing. It was just another day at the job for him.

Anyways I'm not a big reader, but I could not put this book down.

Must read and a true story.

This is one of my friends favorite books, he says he has read it a couple times.

Mediator12
07-17-2013, 03:40 PM
I am sure this is somewhere on this list, but reading Steven Pressfield's Gates of Fire. Somehow missed this book on one of the all time best stories with the 300 Spartans guarding the "Hot Gates" from Xerxes invading army of a million plus troops.

Really good novelization of one of my favorite stories in history....

DomCasual
07-17-2013, 03:55 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/41PZik3LNWL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

I bought the hard copy a couple of years ago due to the awesome cover art, but I just started reading it after hearing about the TV series version airing on CBS. As usual with King, it could have used an editor, but it's an interesting read with well-rounded (if at times a bit hokey) characters. I'm looking forward to catching up on the series, which from what I've read is quite a bit different from the book. A major part of the plot deals with a meth-dealing town leader, which I've heard they've changed for the series due to similarities with Breaking Bad. Can anyone confirm this?

No, there still seems to be a meth-dealing town leader (they haven't come out and said it, yet - although I haven't seen the most recent episode).

The series is not great. But I am a Stephen King groupie. I am almost never satisfied with film adaptations of his writing.

mhgaffney
07-17-2013, 04:55 PM
Not to be missed, MHG

The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism [Paperback]

Paul Craig Roberts (Author)

Book Description
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Former Wall Street Journal editor, and Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury Paul Craig Roberts book is a major challenge both to economic theory and to media explanations of the ongoing 21st century economic crisis. The one percent have pulled off an economic and political revolution. By offshoring manufacturing and professional service jobs, US corporations destroyed the growth of consumer income, the basis of the US economy, leaving the bulk of the population mired in debt. Deregulation was used to concentrate income and wealth in fewer hands and financial firms in corporations "too big to fail,” removing financial corporations from market discipline and forcing taxpayers in the US and Europe to cover bankster losses. Environmental destruction has accelerated as economists refuse to count the exhaustion of nature's resources as a cost and as corporations impose the cost of their activities on the environment and on third parties who do not share in the profits. This is the book to read for those who want to understand the mistakes that are bringing the West to its knees.

5.0 out of 5 stars A REVIEW

Collapse Overtakes The West July 1, 2013
By Johannes Maruschzik

The Failure Of Laissez Faire Capitalism And Economic Dissolution Of The West by Dr. Paul Craig Roberts - formerly Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury for Economic Policy - is a fundamentally important work about the dramatic changes that are taking place in the US and world economies. For this reason, I translated the book into German in the spring of 2012 for its publication under the title "Wirtschaft am Abgrund" by Weltbuch Verlag (Dresden) in July 2012. Economic and political developments during the past year have given the book even greater significance.

Roberts describes the social, political, and economic dispossession that is occurring throughout the West. The citizens in the Western democracies are being forced into acceptance of the agenda of a small oligarchy of powerful private interests. The "free" media, "democratic" governments, and most economists serve the ruling private interests. Let's face it: Private power can be just as abusive as public power. The worst-case scenario is when both are working hand in hand, what, in fact, is happening in the Western democracies today.

Economic theory based on "empty world" economics cannot deal with the problems of a "full world" economy. A mistaken understanding of free trade has blinded the West to its economic erosion by jobs offshoring--labor arbitrage that substitutes lower paid foreign labor for the higher wages in developed countries, with the result that Western economies are deprived of employment opportunities, tax base, and real GDP growth.

Contrary to government claims and media reports, the U.S. economy is still in a recession. A real recovery is not in sight. The recovery exists only in the official measure of real GDP, which is deflated by an understated measure of inflation, and in the U.3 measure of the unemployment rate, which is declining because it does not count discouraged job seekers who have given up looking for a job. No other data series indicates an economic recovery. Neither real retail sales nor housing starts, consumer confidence, payroll employment, or average weekly earnings indicate economic recovery. Consumer real income in the US is stagnant or falling, and consumers are too indebted to be able to take on yet more debt with which to finance their spending. In the absence of growing consumer demand, an economy dependent on consumer demand cannot advance.

The ongoing debt monetization in the amount of one trillion U.S. dollars annually by the Federal Reserve threatens the dollar's role as world reserve currency. The real estate and derivative bubbles that produced the financial crisis have been replaced by bond, stock, and currency bubbles.

In Europe the "sovereign debt crisis" is being used to subvert democracy and the independence of the individual member countries that constitute the European Union. The common currency is being used to centralize the budget policies of the separate countries, thus stripping them of their sovereignty. Governments of heavily indebted members of the EU, such as Greece, are being forced to extract resources from their hard-pressed populations in order to ensure that the private banks that over lent to governments suffer no losses.

Formerly, the policy was for banks to write down sovereign debt that cannot be paid; today the policy is to extract the resources from the population by cutting wages, pensions, social services, and selling the country's public assets to private interests. To stabilize the situation, German income will be tapped to provide transfer payments to alleviate the suffering of the Greek population that is being looted for the sake of the profits of private banks.

Roberts makes it clear that we are experiencing a turning point in history as Western peoples are being enserfed.

The economies of the US, UK, and EU are in a process of dissolution. For a decade, Roberts has been warning against the fatal consequences of the erosion of goods producing industries in the United States. Offshoring - the relocation of production of goods for domestic markets to low-wage countries in order to profit from labor arbitrage between different wage levels in different countries - has already destroyed millions of middle class jobs in the United States. The ladders of upward mobility in the American "Opportunity Society" have been dismantled by "globalization."

The centralization of power in the US in the hands of an increasingly unaccountable executive branch is matched in the EU by the increasingly dirigistic policies of EU politicians.

Roberts warns the Germans not to terminate their sovereignty by agreeing to turn their governance over to a central government in Brussels. Instead, Germany should resign from the EU, re-establish the D-Mark, and enter an economic alliance with resource-rich Russia. Such a cooperation, in which the states would keep their economic sovereignty and separate currencies, would create an economic bloc consisting of Germany, Russia, Eastern and Central Europe and would eventually draw in Western Europe. This development would break up NATO, an organization whose purpose ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Today NATO functions as a military auxiliary to Washington's drive for hegemony, thus enabling the numerous wars and military operations that Washington has launched in the 21st century.

If you want to understand what really is happening, read this book. No clearer or more accurate account exists.

Johnykbr
07-17-2013, 05:17 PM
The World House by Guy Adams..."
In some rooms, forests grow. In others, animals and objects come to life. Elsewhere, secrets and treasures wait for the brave and foolhardy.
And at the very top of the house, a prisoner sits behind a locked door waiting for a key to turn. The day that happens, the world will end…"


I found it at a library book sale and I don't think I've read a book as original as this in ages.

myMind
07-17-2013, 11:38 PM
But I am a Stephen King groupie. I am almost never satisfied with film adaptations of his writing.

Even The Mist? Sure Darabont took a lot of liberties, but that ending was one of the most emotionally jarring things I've ever watched.

Bacchus
07-18-2013, 04:03 AM
I stopped reading books when the internet was invented. Everything I want to know is on the internet. My god what is Miley Cyrus up to today I wonder?!?!?!?!?

BroncoInferno
07-18-2013, 05:58 AM
No, there still seems to be a meth-dealing town leader (they haven't come out and said it, yet - although I haven't seen the most recent episode).

Okay, thanks, I probably misunderstood.

The series is not great. But I am a Stephen King groupie. I am almost never satisfied with film adaptations of his writing.

Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.

Broncomutt
07-18-2013, 08:45 AM
Okay, thanks, I probably misunderstood.



Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.

The plot for Dolores Claiborne was twisted around a bit in the movie, but I thought it captured the essence of his great book also. I wouldn't call it superior though I suppose.

Quoydogs
07-18-2013, 09:11 AM
Not to be missed, MHG

The Failure of Laissez Faire Capitalism [Paperback]

Paul Craig Roberts (Author)

Book Description
Publication Date: June 1, 2013
Former Wall Street Journal editor, and Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury Paul Craig Roberts book is a major challenge both to economic theory and to media explanations of the ongoing 21st century economic crisis. The one percent have pulled off an economic and political revolution. By offshoring manufacturing and professional service jobs, US corporations destroyed the growth of consumer income, the basis of the US economy, leaving the bulk of the population mired in debt. Deregulation was used to concentrate income and wealth in fewer hands and financial firms in corporations "too big to fail,” removing financial corporations from market discipline and forcing taxpayers in the US and Europe to cover bankster losses. Environmental destruction has accelerated as economists refuse to count the exhaustion of nature's resources as a cost and as corporations impose the cost of their activities on the environment and on third parties who do not share in the profits. This is the book to read for those who want to understand the mistakes that are bringing the West to its knees.

5.0 out of 5 stars A REVIEW

Collapse Overtakes The West July 1, 2013
By Johannes Maruschzik

The Failure Of Laissez Faire Capitalism And Economic Dissolution Of The West by Dr. Paul Craig Roberts - formerly Assistant Secretary of the US Treasury for Economic Policy - is a fundamentally important work about the dramatic changes that are taking place in the US and world economies. For this reason, I translated the book into German in the spring of 2012 for its publication under the title "Wirtschaft am Abgrund" by Weltbuch Verlag (Dresden) in July 2012. Economic and political developments during the past year have given the book even greater significance.

Roberts describes the social, political, and economic dispossession that is occurring throughout the West. The citizens in the Western democracies are being forced into acceptance of the agenda of a small oligarchy of powerful private interests. The "free" media, "democratic" governments, and most economists serve the ruling private interests. Let's face it: Private power can be just as abusive as public power. The worst-case scenario is when both are working hand in hand, what, in fact, is happening in the Western democracies today.

Economic theory based on "empty world" economics cannot deal with the problems of a "full world" economy. A mistaken understanding of free trade has blinded the West to its economic erosion by jobs offshoring--labor arbitrage that substitutes lower paid foreign labor for the higher wages in developed countries, with the result that Western economies are deprived of employment opportunities, tax base, and real GDP growth.

Contrary to government claims and media reports, the U.S. economy is still in a recession. A real recovery is not in sight. The recovery exists only in the official measure of real GDP, which is deflated by an understated measure of inflation, and in the U.3 measure of the unemployment rate, which is declining because it does not count discouraged job seekers who have given up looking for a job. No other data series indicates an economic recovery. Neither real retail sales nor housing starts, consumer confidence, payroll employment, or average weekly earnings indicate economic recovery. Consumer real income in the US is stagnant or falling, and consumers are too indebted to be able to take on yet more debt with which to finance their spending. In the absence of growing consumer demand, an economy dependent on consumer demand cannot advance.

The ongoing debt monetization in the amount of one trillion U.S. dollars annually by the Federal Reserve threatens the dollar's role as world reserve currency. The real estate and derivative bubbles that produced the financial crisis have been replaced by bond, stock, and currency bubbles.

In Europe the "sovereign debt crisis" is being used to subvert democracy and the independence of the individual member countries that constitute the European Union. The common currency is being used to centralize the budget policies of the separate countries, thus stripping them of their sovereignty. Governments of heavily indebted members of the EU, such as Greece, are being forced to extract resources from their hard-pressed populations in order to ensure that the private banks that over lent to governments suffer no losses.

Formerly, the policy was for banks to write down sovereign debt that cannot be paid; today the policy is to extract the resources from the population by cutting wages, pensions, social services, and selling the country's public assets to private interests. To stabilize the situation, German income will be tapped to provide transfer payments to alleviate the suffering of the Greek population that is being looted for the sake of the profits of private banks.

Roberts makes it clear that we are experiencing a turning point in history as Western peoples are being enserfed.

The economies of the US, UK, and EU are in a process of dissolution. For a decade, Roberts has been warning against the fatal consequences of the erosion of goods producing industries in the United States. Offshoring - the relocation of production of goods for domestic markets to low-wage countries in order to profit from labor arbitrage between different wage levels in different countries - has already destroyed millions of middle class jobs in the United States. The ladders of upward mobility in the American "Opportunity Society" have been dismantled by "globalization."

The centralization of power in the US in the hands of an increasingly unaccountable executive branch is matched in the EU by the increasingly dirigistic policies of EU politicians.

Roberts warns the Germans not to terminate their sovereignty by agreeing to turn their governance over to a central government in Brussels. Instead, Germany should resign from the EU, re-establish the D-Mark, and enter an economic alliance with resource-rich Russia. Such a cooperation, in which the states would keep their economic sovereignty and separate currencies, would create an economic bloc consisting of Germany, Russia, Eastern and Central Europe and would eventually draw in Western Europe. This development would break up NATO, an organization whose purpose ended with the collapse of the Soviet Union. Today NATO functions as a military auxiliary to Washington's drive for hegemony, thus enabling the numerous wars and military operations that Washington has launched in the 21st century.

If you want to understand what really is happening, read this book. No clearer or more accurate account exists.

I thought we were talking about reading Novels ?

Johnykbr
07-18-2013, 09:14 AM
Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.

Just wait to see if The Dark Tower ever gets made. His masterpiece could be destroyed on the big screen. But otherwise I agree with that list but I personally was a huge fan of the novel's ending of The Mist but Thomas Jane did do a heck of a job.

Drunk Monkey
07-18-2013, 09:33 AM
Does anyone listen to audio books? I never did until a couple of months ago. It's great! 30 min commute to work each way plus 1 hour in the gym plus time mowing the grass, jogging ect. It adds up pretty quick. Especially if you listen at 1.2 or 1.3 speed. I prefer to read when I can but reading plus audio book and I usually finish a book about 5 times as fast.

broncolife
07-18-2013, 10:51 AM
I did for Harry potter 5,6 and 1 of the game of thrones books. Yep it's nice to listen to the books on the way to work and back. I also would listen while playing games.

Archer81
07-18-2013, 11:01 AM
I do audiobooks for long trips. The last one I did was The Gospel According to Biff, Christ's Childhood Pal.

:Broncos:

Jay3
07-18-2013, 11:26 AM
Does anyone listen to audio books? I never did until a couple of months ago. It's great! 30 min commute to work each way plus 1 hour in the gym plus time mowing the grass, jogging ect. It adds up pretty quick. Especially if you listen at 1.2 or 1.3 speed. I prefer to read when I can but reading plus audio book and I usually finish a book about 5 times as fast.

I love to listen to audiobooks. I like to have both, the book and audio book, to keep it going while driving and not driving.

DomCasual
07-18-2013, 02:42 PM
Just wait to see if The Dark Tower ever gets made. His masterpiece could be destroyed on the big screen. But otherwise I agree with that list but I personally was a huge fan of the novel's ending of The Mist but Thomas Jane did do a heck of a job.

It will probably get made eventually. But there is no way to do it justice, unless they did it as multiple movies. Instead, they'll probably do it as a crappy miniseries.

Tombstone RJ
07-18-2013, 02:59 PM
I still love that movie, even if the end is lame. We had just moved to Florida when it came out and I was about 12 or 13 and since there were no kids in our neighborhood my mom would let me and my 10 year old sister ride our bikes a couple miles to a small mall that had a theater. My sister and I watched that movie a bunch of times.

I don't remember the book being as memorable as 2001, Blade Runner (though that is classic Sci-Fi at it's best), Alien, or even Outland, it is pretty thin. Maybe I will crack it open again and give it a read, soccer practice has started up and I have time to read.

2001 A Space Odyssey is based on a book by one of my all time favorite writers, Arthur C. Clarke, and the book is fantastic. I never really understood the movie until I read the book and then it all come together. Fantastic move by Stanely Kubrik based on a fantastic book by Arthur C. Clarke. Win win.

Blade Runner is on one of the rare exceptions where the movie is far, far superior to the book. The book is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/ee/DoAndroidsDream.png/200px-DoAndroidsDream.png

Don't bother reading it, it sucks.

Jay3
07-18-2013, 03:31 PM
Blade Runner is on one of the rare exceptions where the movie is far, far superior to the book. The book is Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep?:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/thumb/e/ee/DoAndroidsDream.png/200px-DoAndroidsDream.png

Don't bother reading it, it sucks.

False. It's one of the best books ever. Better than the movie.

But it's a bit different, so if one reads the book on the basis of how well it translates the movie, then fail will happen.

DomCasual
07-18-2013, 03:33 PM
Okay, thanks, I probably misunderstood.



Really? I enjoy King, but there are several movie adaptations that I find superior to his books. Just off the top of my head: Shawshank Redemption, The Shining (sorry, King, as much as you hated Kubrick's version it was better), The Mist, The Green Mile, Carrie, Cujo, Misery. Not that those books were bad, I just liked the directors/writers interpretations better.

The three that I thought were good were The Shining, Shawshank, and Stand By Me. The interesting thing about those three is that none of them are really typical King stories. (The Shining might be an exception. But I would argue that if it's more of a ghost story than it is a horror story.)

It's been a long time since I last saw The Mist. I'll have to reserve judgement on that one, until I can watch it again. The Green Mile was, I thought, a great movie. I just didn't think it was a great adaptation of the book (if you could even call The Green Mile a "book").

On the other hand, there have been some adaptations that were just embarrassing.

There are a few things that generally keep me from liking Stephen King movie adaptations. First, I don't particularly like horror films. There have been a few exceptions, over the years; but I generally avoid them. For whatever reason, for me personally, I can read about something implausible (and let's face it - most of what you read in a Stephen King novel is pretty much implausible), and avoid getting hung up on its implausibility. When I see the same scene acted out on the screen, I usually end up thinking, "Oh, that was really awful!"

But more than that, I think there is an element to most Stephen King stories that just can't be quantified in the two-hour time frame generally allotted in a movie. This is where I get some eye-rolling when I'm talking to people who don't, say, "appreciate" Stephen King as much as I. There is a depth and intelligence to his writing that I don't see in most contemporary writers. The directors of his film adaptations seem to go after the low-hanging fruit of the stories - that is, the gore and creepy aspects of them. To me, those aspects are generally unremarkable - so, the films are generally unremarkable (at best).

Tombstone RJ
07-18-2013, 03:33 PM
False. It's one of the best books ever. Better than the movie.

But it's a bit different, so if one reads the book on the basis of how well it translates the movie, then fail will happen.

I don't understand how they link the movie to the book as they are so different. As for the book, all I can say is "booooring."

Jay3
07-18-2013, 03:55 PM
I don't understand how they link the movie to the book as they are so different. As for the book, all I can say is "booooring."

Apparently, Hollywood sometimes takes liberties and changes things when they make a movie from a book.

It was not boring. Your face is boring.

broncolife
07-30-2013, 09:34 PM
Anybody know if The Name of the Wind or The Way of Kings are any good? I am trying decide which series to read.

McDman
07-31-2013, 05:32 AM
Read "The Martian". It is amazing. It's basically Castaway meets Mars.

Tombstone RJ
07-31-2013, 07:52 AM
Apparently, Hollywood sometimes takes liberties and changes things when they make a movie from a book...

this is an understatment for said book/movie.

Pick Six
07-31-2013, 12:12 PM
I just finished "The Eye of the god". It is about a plot to steal the Hope diamond from the Smithsonian. It also recounts the bad luck that befell anyone who possessed the Hope diamond, including Marie Antoinette. Anybody who loves a good piece of historical fiction or just a good heist plot should love this book...:thumbs:

broncosteven
07-31-2013, 01:58 PM
I finally finished rereading Hemingways "For Whom the Bell Tolls", gets better every time.

Going to try either "Master and Commander" or "The Things they Carried" by Tim Obrien next.

mhgaffney
08-01-2013, 11:37 AM
Don't miss this one -- released last January. It will force you to rethink everything you thought you knew about the Islamic Republic of Iran. (Almost everything you've been told is wrong.) MHG

Going to Tehran: Why the United States Must Come to Terms with the Islamic Republic of Iran [Hardcover]
Flynt Leverett (Author), Hillary Mann Leverett (Author)

Reviews:


"The most important thing I can say is very brief, just three words: Read this book. You’ll find a lot of information that’s not generally available or not available at all and valuable insights that are sharply at odds with conventional views in the United States, views so unchallenged they can fairly be called a ‘party line.’ This book may help, if it’s widely enough understood, to halt a very clear drift towards what could be a terrible war."
—Noam Chomsky

"There is a whole slew of highly dubious assumptions and narratives about Iran and the US's relationship to it that are rarely challenged in any meaningful way in standard media circles. The Leveretts and Going to Tehran are vital to thinking critically about these claims…. Both because of their expertise and their long immersion in these issues, they (and their data-filled book) deserve a prominent voice in all serious debates about Iran."
—Glenn Greenwald, The Guardian

"A reasoned, methodical critique of the ideological folklore that prevents Washington from setting up normal diplomatic relations with Tehran. The Leveretts make an ironclad case that President Barack Obama not only can, but must, "go to Iran" to establish normal diplomatic relations…<>Going to Tehran is likely the most important book on U.S. foreign policy in 2013."
—The Washington Spectator

"This book sheds dramatic light on the central foreign policy of the Iranian government. The Leveretts superbly outline the true intentions of Iran and the way they are using international alliances and soft power to get there."
—The Huffington Post

"The most important work on the subject of U.S.-Iran relations thus far…Thanks to the Leveretts, opponents of U.S. policies of domination and intervention in the Middle East have a new and rich source of analysis to argue against those policies more effectively."
—AntiWar.com

"Going to Tehran arguably represents the most important work on the subject of U.S.-Iran relations to be published thus far…. Thanks to the Leveretts, opponents of U.S. policies of domination and intervention in the Middle East have a new and rich source of analysis to argue against those policies more effectively."
—Consortiumnews.com

"An unorthodox analysis of Iran and a scathing criticism of the US’s foreign policy….US policy-makers need to hear criticisms like these."
—Veterans Today

"The Leveretts present a long and unrelenting history of incompetence and irrationality . . . from the U.S. side"
—Let’s Try Democracy (blog)

"A sharply different deconstruction of the prevailing orthodoxy, worthy of attention."
—Kirkus Reviews

"One needn’t agree with every word in Flynt and Hillary Mann Leverett’s new book, Going to Tehran, to grasp its basic truth: U.S. Iran policy is delusional. To shatter this ‘sorry Scheme of Things,’ as the Persian poet describes it, will require a U.S. President with courage, audacity and political skill. It will also require a plan not too different from what the Leveretts lay out."
—<>Lawrence . Wilkerson, former chief of staff to Secretary of State Colin Powell

"This brilliant book eviscerates the American case for continued belligerence toward Iran. The evidence of an Iranian bomb is just not there, the Leveretts write, and American diplomacy should be focused on resolving the conflict, and not expanding it. There is a precedent—Nixon and Kissinger's stunning reversal of policy toward China in 1971 that produced the Shanghai Communique, with its public call for mutual respect and a reduction of tensions. It is time, the book concludes, for an American president to reach for peace and go to Tehran."
—<>Seymour Hersh, staff writer, The New Yorker

"This courageous and important book contains the three elements that are necessary for a rethinking of US policy towards Iran: a rigorous critique of the intellectual foundations of present strategy; a devastating expose of misreporting of Iran in the Western media; and a set of bold ideas for how the present dangerous impasse in relations can be broken. It should be essential reading for policymakers and journalists alike."
—<>Anatol Lieven, professor of War Studies, King's College London; senior fellow of the New America Foundation

"Armchair warriors howling to have a go at Iran will denounce this book: you can count on it. Those who have had a bellyful of needless wars will have a different view. Going to Tehran is balanced, sober, impressively documented, and rich in insight. As an antidote to the warmongering that passes for analysis of Iran and US-Iranian relations, its appearance could hardly be more welcome or more timely."
—<>Andrew J. Bacevich, author of Washington Rules: America's Path to Permanent War

Tombstone RJ
08-12-2013, 06:23 PM
At the age of 10, I got a copy of the novelization of the movie Alien. Ironically, my parents wouldn't let me watch the movie, but had no problems with me reading it, so I read the movie years before I ever watched it.

The novelization is pretty much a prose version of the screenplay written by Alan Dean Foster (Alien (1979) ISBN 0-446-82977-3). The screenwriter for the movie was Dan O'Bannon. It is just shy of 200 pages long. There are only 2 differences I can remember. The first is a conversation between the female crew members. In the book, Ripley asks Lambert if she's ever slept with Ash, hinting at a fair degree of promiscuity among the crew members.

The second I include because it's possibly the most chilling part of the book, but was never featured in Ridley Scott's epic movie.





Ripley still hadn't moved. Faint shrieks reached her over the 'com. The screams were Lambert's and they faded with merciful speed. Then it was quiet again.

She spoke toward the pickup. "Parker...Lambert?"

She waited for a response, expecting none. Her expectations were fulfilled. The import of the continuing silence took only a moment to settle in.
She was alone. There were probably three living things left on the ship: the alien, Jones, and herself. But she had to be sure.

It meant leaving Jones behind. She didn't want to, but the cat had heard the screams and was meowing frantically. He was making too much noise!

She reached B deck unopposed, her flamethrower held tightly in both hands. The food locker lay just ahead. There was an outside chance the alien had left someone behind, being unable to manuever itself and two bodies through the narrow ducts. A chance that someone might still be alive.

She peered around the jamb of the locker entrance. What remained showed her how the alien had succeeded in squeezing both victims into the airshaft. Then she was running, running. Blindly, a little madly, neither thinking or caring. Walls reached out to stun her and slow her down, but nothing halted her crazed flight. She ran until her lungs hurt. They reminded her of Kane and the creature that had matured inside him, next to his lungs. That in turn reminded her of the alien.

All that thinking brought her back to her senses. Gulping for breath, she slowed and took stock of her surroundings. She'd run the length of the ship. Now she found herself standing alone in the middle of the engine room.

She heard something and stopped breathing. It was repeated, and she let out a cautious sigh. The sound was familiar, the sound was human. It was the sound of weeping.

Still cradling the flamethrower, she walked slowly around the room until the source of the noise lay directly below her. She found she was standing on a companionway cover, a round metal disc. Keeping half her attention on the well-lit chamber surrounding her, she knelt and removed the disc. A ladder descended into the near darkness.

She felt her way down the ladder until she reached solid footing. Then she activated her light bar. She was in a small maintenance chamber. The light picked out plastic crates, rarely used tools. It also fell on bones with shreds of flesh still attached. Her skin crawled as the light moved over fragments of clothing, dried blood, a ruined boot. Bizarre extrusions lined the wall.

A huge cocoon hung from the ceiling, off to her right. It looked like an enclosed, translucent hammock, woven from fine white silky material. It twitched.

Her finger tense on the trigger of the flamethrower, she walked nearer. The beam from her lightbar made the cocoon slightly transparent. There was a body inside...Dallas!

Quite unexpectadly the eyes opened and focused on Ripley. Lips parted, moved to form words. She moved closer, simultaneously fascinated and repelled.

"Kill me," the whisperer pleaded with her.

"What...what did it do to you?"

Dallas tried to speak again, failed. His head turned a little to the right. Ripley swung her light, turned it upward slightly. A second cocoon hung there, different in texture and color from the first. It was smaller and darker, the silk having formed a hard, shining shell. It looked, although Ripley couldn't know it, like the broken, empty urn on the derelict ship.

"That was Brett." Her light turned back to focus on the speaker again.

"I'll get you out of here." She was crying. "We'll crank up the autodoc, get you..."

She broke off, unable to talk. She was remembering Ash's analogy of the spider, the wasp. The live young feeding on the paralyzed body of the spider, growing, the spider aware of what was happening but...

Somehow she managed to shut off that horrid line of thought. Madness lay that way. "What can I do?" she sobbed.

The same agonized whisper. "Kill me."

She stared at him. Mercifully, his eyes had closed. But his lips were trembling, as if he were readying a scream. She didn't think she could stand to hear that scream.

The nozzle of the flamethrower rose and she convulsively depressed the trigger. A molten blast enveloped the cocoon and the thing that had been Dallas. It and he burned without a sound. Then she swung the fire around the lair. The entire compartment burst into flames. She was already scrambling back up the ladder, heat licking at her legs.

Here's the scene:

<iframe width="420" height="315" src="//www.youtube.com/embed/dS5MtzrW1vU" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

broncosteven
08-12-2013, 06:40 PM
I read Tim O'brien's "The things they carried" in about 2 days.

I then dove into Patrick O'Brian's "Master and Commander" and totally love it. I thought it would be too much about boats but so far, 200 pages in, it is a lot less about the boat or details about seafaring than Moby Dick was. Totally love this book and this series should see me through 3 days a week of soccer practices!

No1BroncoFan
11-16-2013, 07:35 PM
Just scored a signed first of the new "Legend" series book my Marie Lu, "Champion"!

Woo hoo!:yayaya:

This is the third and final(?) book in the serias and I'm actually almost done with it already. I already had it on my nook (pre-ordered a while back) and the signed first is carefully put away.

Really good dystopian future series if you like those.

Archer81
11-16-2013, 08:19 PM
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.

:Broncos:

Archer81
11-16-2013, 08:19 PM
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.

:Broncos:

BroncsCheer
11-16-2013, 08:34 PM
I'm hooked on the Gray Man books by Mark Greaney now.

Page turning sob's

Miss I.
11-16-2013, 09:08 PM
Dr. Sleep by Stephen King. Sequel to "The Shining"

Archer81
11-16-2013, 09:10 PM
Dr. Sleep by Stephen King. Sequel to "The Shining"


Any good? I saw it on my kindle but I am not sure it's worth buying.


:Broncos:

Rohirrim
11-16-2013, 09:14 PM
Going back in time and reading everything by Philip K. Dick, who I never read before. Just finished Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Amazing how different this book is from the movie Blade Runner. The only scene in the movie that came straight from the book is Decker's interview with Rachel, and even that is changed considerably.

Miss I.
11-16-2013, 09:16 PM
Any good? I saw it on my kindle but I am not sure it's worth buying.


:Broncos:

I enjoyed it, but what I would recommend if you aren't sure about it is see if the local library has a program where you can check out Ebooks. Mine does, as well as for electronic Audiobooks. You can ususally get out about 20 at a time for about 30 days each or so and keep renewing them if nobody else has reserved them. Being a newer book they might have it so you can read it for free.

Archer81
11-16-2013, 09:22 PM
I enjoyed it, but what I would recommend if you aren't sure about it is see if the local library has a program where you can check out Ebooks. Mine does, as well as for electronic Audiobooks. You can ususally get out about 20 at a time for about 30 days each or so and keep renewing them if nobody else has reserved them. Being a newer book they might have it so you can read it for free.


Sweet. Normally I am not a Steven King fan but I'll read anything somewhat interesting.


:Broncos:

Tombstone RJ
11-16-2013, 10:04 PM
Rise and Fall of the Third Reich.

:Broncos:

Great book, written in 1947, right after the war. If you wanna know how Hitler got away with all that crap, this book is mandatory reading. Long, but very, very, very good.

Archer81
11-17-2013, 12:29 AM
Great book, written in 1947, right after the war. If you wanna know how Hitler got away with all that crap, this book is mandatory reading. Long, but very, very, very good.


Hindsight is a hell of a thing. I am currently at September 17, 1939. When the Soviets and Germans made changes to their secret protocol of their non aggression/trade pact. Exchanging Lithuania for some Polish provinces.

Always interesting to see that even after everything Hitler pulled, the French were willing to negotiate after the Germans invaded Poland. Even the writer admits when he was in Germany he was taken in by the Nazis and their rhetoric.

:Broncos:

BroncosfanGuy
02-25-2014, 07:32 PM
I then dove into Patrick O'Brian's "Master and Commander" and totally love it. I thought it would be too much about boats but so far, 200 pages in, it is a lot less about the boat or details about seafaring than Moby Dick was. Totally love this book and this series should see me through 3 days a week of soccer practices!

Probably anout 2/3 of the way through War and Peace right now. I did pick up a copy of Master and Commander, though, and plan to take that one down sometime after I finish Tolstoy's epic.

Broncosteve, you get around to reading anymore of the Aubrey/Maturin series? I've read that it really starts to pick up with the 2nd installment The Post Captain.

BroncosfanGuy
02-25-2014, 07:33 PM
Going back in time and reading everything by Philip K. Dick, who I never read before. Just finished Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep. Amazing how different this book is from the movie Blade Runner. The only scene in the movie that came straight from the book is Decker's interview with Rachel, and even that is changed considerably.

one of the few times I think I enjoyed the movie more than the book.

that's not to say I didn't like the book. I just didn't get as into it as I did the movie for some reason.

broncosteven
02-25-2014, 08:59 PM
Probably anout 2/3 of the way through War and Peace right now. I did pick up a copy of Master and Commander, though, and plan to take that one down sometime after I finish Tolstoy's epic.

Broncosteve, you get around to reading anymore of the Aubrey/Maturin series? I've read that it really starts to pick up with the 2nd installment The Post Captain.

It cracks me up that you bumped this thread. I did a search because I found a great book the other day at the library book sale and wanted to mention it here. I did the search only to find that the thread was on the 1st page of the forum!

To answer your question 1st, I love the Aubrey/Maturin series, I was let down a little with Post Captain but it finished strong, I just got the 3rd book at a used book store and it is in my read pile. I was afraid that it would be to nautical for me to slog through but so far it isn't in the way of the story telling.

Like I said above I was at the library Monday and I always try to stop at the book sale offerings because you can get used books for a $1.00 or less. I was drawn to a book. Anything that is published by a University Press gets my attention and the cover and fonts just drew me to it. Then I read the 1st paragraph and was blown away. Anyone hear of Conrad Richter's "Sea of Grass"? I never hear of Richter before and googled him. His 1st paragraph of his 1st novel is one of the best opens I have ever read! Can't wait to read it but I need to finish the bio of Bing Crosby I am reading right now.

I got into Bing through Bix Biederbecke, read a Bix Bio and found out Bing sang my favorite Bix song then researched Bing's early stuff. Very good and detailed Bio that is entertaining. Bing was the Beatles of his day and pioneered quite a bit in recording, performing and radio, not to mention his film roles that I have neglected until recently. I have been big into anything from the 20's for the last 5-7 years.

BroncoMan4ever
02-25-2014, 09:31 PM
My fiance recently got me hooked on a book series by Sherrilyn Kenyon. It is something like 25 books long and growing. I don't know why, I am usually not that into the Urban Fantasy story genre. I usually find them to be rather predictable and obvious. Just stories that let women's fantasies run wild about hot dudes and steamy sex stories.

For some reason these books have really grabbed my attention. So if anyone is interested in books that deal with a lot of paranormal stuff, mixed into Greek mythology, that have violence, gore, romance, brutality and sex, than I recommend Sherrilyn Kenyon's Dark Hunter series.

SouthStndJunkie
02-26-2014, 12:48 AM
I read '11/22/63' by Stephen King a while back and really enjoyed that adventure.

I've read a few more of the 'Jack Reacher' novels and enjoy them when I'm in the mood for that genre.

I read 'White Fire', the latest of the Agent Pendergast novels by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child....that was the 14th book in the series, that started with 'Relic'. I've really enjoyed this series over the years. Anyone else read any of the novels in this series?

I read 'The Art of Intelligence: Lessons from a Life in the CIA's Clandestine Service' by Henry A. Crumpton a while back....an inside look at intelligence gathering pre-9/11 and post-9/11. It was interesting to get more of an idea of what happens in the intelligence gathering community, but it was a pretty dry read after a while. It started reading like more like a text book, laden with theory than the 'spellbinding' story the book advertised to be. It was an interesting, albeit dry read.

Drunk Monkey
02-26-2014, 04:42 AM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/412vjlwJkNL._SY344_PJlook-inside-v2,TopRight,1,0_SH20_BO1,204,203,200_.jpg

Good sifi book. I like most things Reynolds writes. If you are into sifi you should check him out.

backup qb
02-26-2014, 06:59 AM
I am currently reading 'American Sniper' the Chris Kyle autobiography. Only 100 pages in but it is really good.

TheReverend
02-26-2014, 07:17 AM
I'm reading a translated French historical fiction series called the "Accursed Kings" by Maurice Druon about the Capet dynasty and all that entailed (burning the Templars, murder for the throne, lots of kings dying, succession laws, manipulating the papacy, etc).

Pretty terrific stuff despite being dry. I've learned quite a bit.

iforgotmypassword
02-26-2014, 07:21 AM
slow getting up by Nate Jackson has tons of good Bronco tidbits and is a solid read.

I usually read non-fiction but because all my students have been reading the Divergent series I figured I could skim through it and bare it enough to have conversations with them.... now I'm hooked.

Drunken.Broncoholic2
02-26-2014, 08:32 AM
If anyone grew up skateboarding in Northern Cali or in general FTC has put out a book detailing the SF scene back in the EMB days. Back when skateboarding was real, instead of cookie cutter energy drink contest robots of today.

backup qb
02-26-2014, 10:30 AM
Slow Getting Up was a solid read.

Broncomutt
02-26-2014, 12:21 PM
Shift by Hugh Howey

Not too shabby.

Old Dude
02-26-2014, 12:55 PM
Steelheart, by Brandon Sanderson (same guy who completed Wheel of Time and authored the Mistborn trilogy).

Premise: About 10 years ago, a mysterious event granted comic book-like superpowers to a number of random individuals. (Perhaps a hundred or so in the US alone). Bad news is that virtually every one of them becomes a super-villain: arrogant, tyrannical, psychopathic, sadistic, etc. The level of power varies, but a good number of them are immortal and "almost" invulnerable.

I say "almost" because every one of them has some secret individual "weakness," which often makes no particular sense outside of comic book conventions.

The government collapses and the entire country is broken into numerous small "city-states" and spheres of influence for the various super-villains, called "Epics."

The protagonists are a small group of resistance fighters, dedicated to assassinating the villains, one-by-one-by-one. It takes place primarily in Newcago, which is what is left of Chicago after almost every inorganic object in the city was turned to steel by a bad guy.

Light reading, but fun if you like that kind of stuff.

Cito Pelon
02-26-2014, 01:21 PM
gutenberg.org - http://www.gutenberg.org/

Check it out, good stuff online. Classics like Poe, Dickens, etc . . . ..

broncosteven
02-26-2014, 01:43 PM
gutenberg.org - http://www.gutenberg.org/

Check it out, good stuff online. Classics like Poe, Dickens, etc . . . ..

Your right but I prefer to read a hard copy even if I have to resort to reading glasses these days.

When I got my 1st smart phone back before the general public had them I read a couple e-books and it just wasn't the same. I read a bunch of Doyle's Holmes short stories and stuff I could find for free, mostly at lunch if I was alone. All I ended up doing was wearing down the battery and then couldn't make a call when I needed to later in the day, this was back when you were lucky to get 6-8 hours of battery time on a smart phone.

There are all sorts of places to get used books dirt cheap that I don't need to go online looking for more. Plus with all the "Green" issues I prefer to use a device that doesn't need to be powered to read.

I could see where it would be a boon for some one who took a train and commuted to work every day but for sitting at home or in the back yard I prefer my read pile.

Cito Pelon
02-26-2014, 01:57 PM
Your right but I prefer to read a hard copy even if I have to resort to reading glasses these days.

When I got my 1st smart phone back before the general public had them I read a couple e-books and it just wasn't the same. I read a bunch of Doyle's Holmes short stories and stuff I could find for free, mostly at lunch if I was alone. All I ended up doing was wearing down the battery and then couldn't make a call when I needed to later in the day, this was back when you were lucky to get 6-8 hours of battery time on a smart phone.

There are all sorts of places to get used books dirt cheap that I don't need to go online looking for more. Plus with all the "Green" issues I prefer to use a device that doesn't need to be powered to read.

I could see where it would be a boon for some one who took a train and commuted to work every day but for sitting at home or in the back yard I prefer my read pile.
There's this thing called "change font" and expand. For instance, I'm reading this page at 175%. Looks nice. You download and save the book in plain text then suit it to your screen, Gene.

I have this thing called a DC to AC inverter in my truck, it charges batteries that run off of AC. Takes the DC power from the truck battery, changes it to AC, and voila, you have AC power at demand . . . .

broncosteven
02-26-2014, 02:03 PM
There's this thing called "change font" and expand. For instance, I'm reading this page at 175%. Looks nice. You download and save the book in plain text then suit it to your screen, Gene.

I have this thing called a DC to AC inverter in my truck, it charges batteries that run off of AC. Takes the DC power from the truck battery, changes it to AC, and voila, you have AC power at demand . . . .

Yep, I know you can change the fonts and I have a phone charger in my car as well.

My point was that I prefer hard copy books so much I would rather use reading glasses than resort to a laptop, phone, or tablet even though they are easier to use/read. It is not the same to me, plus I can't take a powered device into a hot tub though I am sure a lot of you guys would like me to.

Drunk Monkey
02-26-2014, 06:04 PM
Yep, I know you can change the fonts and I have a phone charger in my car as well.

My point was that I prefer hard copy books so much I would rather use reading glasses than resort to a laptop, phone, or tablet even though they are easier to use/read. It is not the same to me, plus I can't take a powered device into a hot tub though I am sure a lot of you guys would like me to.

I held on to physical books for a long time always saying I would never go the ebook route. Then my mom bought me a kindle for my bday and I never went back. I travel a fair amount for work and I hated carting around several books for the longer trips. With books on my kindle as well as my phone auto synching it is so convenient to read when I have a few minuets. As pansy as it sounds, physically turning pages and holding a heavy book is not anywhere near as comfortable as a tablet. About 6 months ago I read a physical Clancy book and remembered why it had been years since I last did the real book thing.

McDman
03-07-2014, 11:09 PM
Just finished The Dark Tower series. I don't even know how to feel after that ending. God damnit. ****.

tesnyde
03-08-2014, 04:34 AM
I have been reading CJ Box's Joe Pickett series. If you hunt and and like mystery & suspense, you might like it.

Hamrob
03-08-2014, 08:57 AM
I have the kindle for PC app....so, I can have ebooks on by laptop and download from amazon. Works great. I will say...I'm still trying to get used to it. I'm so used the feel of a real book.

I recently read, "The Columbus Affair" by Steve Berry, "White Fire" by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child", and "Gilead" by Marilynne Robinson.

The Columbus Affair and White Fire both mysteries and easy reads. Gilead was superb...great book!

Next up for me: the "Goldfinch" by Donna Tartt, and "The Art Forger" by B.A. Shapiro. Has anyone read either of these two??

bowtown
03-08-2014, 09:03 AM
I have the kindle for PC app....so, I can have ebooks on by laptop and download from amazon. Works great. I will say...I'm still trying to get used to it. I'm so used the feel of a real book.

I recently read, "The Columbus Affair" by Steve Berry, "White Fire" by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child", and "Gilead" by Marilynne Robinson.

The Columbus Affair and White Fire both mysteries and easy reads. Gilead was superb...great book!

Next up for me: the "Goldfinch" by Donna Tartt, and "The Art Forger" by B.A. Shapiro. Has anyone read either of these two??

Chick lit.

Miss I.
03-08-2014, 09:48 AM
I sort of have a backlog on my books, I have a few hard copies because they aren't available as Ebooks, a ton on Kennedy and Hitler because I read other books that pointed me to these. I find history quite fascinating. For fun, I am reading George Takei's "Oh Myyyy!" on my kindle which is pretty funny. That dude is hilarious.

As for my other kindle books current in line; Four Days in November, An Unfinished Life, The Death of a President, The Kennedy Half Century, all procured around the 50th anniversary, and I keep meaning to read. I also got, Chris Carter's "Crucifix Killer" some sort of serial of books that I read somewhere was good so figured I'd start it. I also have a bunch of Stephen King stuff, Erik Larson, Charlaine Harris and Karin Slaughter stuff. I tend to vary between history, biography, true crime, suspense-horror and on occasion fluffier historical romance books like Diana Gabaldon and Deborah Harkness (which is actually history-romance-horror...sort of Twilight if it was written for non-stupid people).

broncosteven
06-07-2014, 07:49 PM
Currently reading Unbroken, I know it has been out for awhile but I needed a break from the Patrick OBrian series and was having trouble finding another book after starting a good 5 other books.

http://www.amazon.com/Unbroken-World-Survival-Resilience-Redemption/dp/1400064163

I can't put this thing down, I read Seabiscuit by the same author and loved her writting style but this one is even better. You can tell she researched a lot about the Pacific theater air war as far as the B-17's and B-24's, lots of great info.

Zamp was on pace to be the 1st sub 4 minute miler and ran in the '36 Olympics, even getting Goebbels to take a picture of Hitler after running his race. Interesting how a life can be interrupted like that and what he had to endure. I can relate.

I started a book on BeBop after reading Leaves of Grass before trying to get into Collages by Anais Nin and a Carl Hiaasen book.

Highly recommend Unbroken so much I am going to log off to read some more.