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SouthStndJunkie
07-04-2009, 11:34 PM
I just started Jason Elam's (and Steve Yohn) second book: "Blown Coverage"(Riley Covington Thriller Series #2).

I thought "Monday Night Jihad" was a decent book. I am not a religious person, and the book definitely had some Christian overtones, but Elam made a point of showing why the Muslim extremists think how they think and the events that make them think these things. It was a good enough read that I wanted to read their second effort.

SouthStndJunkie
07-04-2009, 11:37 PM
Reading books is a great escape and one of the great joys of life.

I have a few friends that had not read a book for enjoyment in their entire life and I prodded them to start reading some books of mine and now they like to read books more than watch tv. It was kind of cool to get them reading books and seeing the enjoyment they get from it.

tsiguy96
07-04-2009, 11:42 PM
finished the books misery and cujo. good books, stephen king is an amazing writer.

SouthStndJunkie
07-04-2009, 11:59 PM
finished the books misery and cujo. good books, stephen king is an amazing writer.

I haven't read 'Misery'.

'Cujo' was excellent.

backup qb
07-05-2009, 07:19 AM
For a quick entertaining and enlightening read check out The Heroin Diaries by Nikki Sixx. Bleachers by Grisham is very good. Just finished Boys Will Be Boys by Jeff Pearlman chronicling the rise and fall of the 88-96 cowboys. It was ok, nothing great, but glad I read it.

Rohirrim
07-05-2009, 07:46 AM
Pynchon's awful. I'm not sure why he gets all the pomo love, when Robert Coover, William H. Gass (Read the novella/long short story "Heart in the heart of the country" utterly brilliant), and Donald Barthelme absolutely own him.

Gass' "Heart..." is one of my favorite all time stories. Check out Italo Calvino if you haven't already. Another favorite story of mine is Gabriel Garcia Marquez' "The Handsomest Drowned Man in the World." I agree on Pynchon. A self-inflated turd.

tsiguy96
07-05-2009, 08:01 AM
I haven't read 'Misery'.

'Cujo' was excellent.

its very good. the weird thing about stephen king is ALL his books are so good, i dont think one is better than the other. i think back to all these books ive read and i dont think one is any better than the other...so go read it. asw well as all his other books.

footstepsfrom#27
07-05-2009, 09:16 AM
http://www.abroadview.org/topics/books/images/banker_to_poor.jpghttp://ebooks-imgs.connect.com/product/400/000/000/000/000/063/261/400000000000000063261_s4.jpghttp://ebooks-imgs.connect.com/product/400/000/000/000/000/041/735/400000000000000041735_s4.jpghttp://dailybahai.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/world.jpghttp://blogs.whattheythink.com/going-green/media/2008/04/making-sustainability-work.jpghttp://www.leftbooks.com/store/media/shamenation.jpg

Cito Pelon
07-05-2009, 09:19 AM
I really like Steve Berry! He's a great writer in the Dan Brown mold!

I'm somewhat of a art history nut....so Iain Pears is a personal favorite of mine. I also like M.J. Rose quite alot.

He's pretty good.

Archer81
07-05-2009, 01:55 PM
In the last month I have read Antony and Cleopatra, The Reagan Diaries, Percy Jackson and the Olympians series, Twilight series, and Ben Franklin. Had alot of free time.

:Broncos:

Jens1893
07-05-2009, 06:34 PM
Reading books is a great escape and one of the great joys of life.

I have a few friends that had not read a book for enjoyment in their entire life and I prodded them to start reading some books of mine and now they like to read books more than watch tv. It was kind of cool to get them reading books and seeing the enjoyment they get from it.

ROFL!

Do we know each other by any chance?

My friend, who spends a fortune at B&N every month, gave me the first book of Vince Flynn´s Mitch Rapp series when I visited her and I went thru the whole series in less than a month afterwards. Hadn´t really read a fiction book in ages before that. Recently also went thru the Gabriel Allon series by Daniel Silva. Looking forward to his new book, which is out this month.

OCBronco
07-06-2009, 11:05 AM
Read a bunch of Cormac McCarthy awhile back: No Country for Old Men, Blood Meridian, The Road.

Blood Meridian is one of my favorite books of all time.

Reading Ms. Lonelyhearts and The Day of the Locust right now.

vancejohnson82
07-06-2009, 11:09 AM
Read "The White Boy Shuffle" by Susan Lori Parks

interesting political commentary using the absurd to get points across....

gyldenlove
07-06-2009, 11:17 AM
I am looking for some good sci fi to take my mind off things, preferably something in the same vein as the Ringworld books or Neuromancer.

dbfan21
07-06-2009, 11:23 AM
Just finished "Same Kind of Different As Me" by Ron Hall & Denver Moore.


Great book!! :thumbsup:

worm
07-06-2009, 11:38 AM
Undaunted Courage.

The best Lewis and Clark book I have read. Truly an amazing story of American perseverance.

I just finished a 1200mile motorcycle trip this past week where I followed a good portion of their route in Idaho and Montana and staying at some of their actual campsites. It made it even more impressive to me on what they accomplished and the era that they did it in.

BroncoLifer
07-06-2009, 12:52 PM
I finished Gates of Fire by Steven Pressfield (the stand by the Spartan 300 at Thermopylae) and his follow-up Tides of War (The Peloponnesian War from the focus of the slippery Alcibiades) over the last week.

Both were very good - I highly recommend each of them, together or separately.

broncosteven
07-06-2009, 02:10 PM
Reading books is a great escape and one of the great joys of life.

I have a few friends that had not read a book for enjoyment in their entire life and I prodded them to start reading some books of mine and now they like to read books more than watch tv. It was kind of cool to get them reading books and seeing the enjoyment they get from it.

My daughter and I signed up for our Library summer reading programs, she has won a couple of prizes so far, she is 6 and has read over 6 hours in the last 5 weeks.

Good stuff!

broncocalijohn
07-06-2009, 02:29 PM
My daughter and I signed up for our Library summer reading programs, she has won a couple of prizes so far, she is 6 and has read over 6 hours in the last 5 weeks.

Good stuff!

They have the Anaheim Angels reading program where each base they get a prize. I love it as he is quiet for two hours in the morning reading all by himself. He is going into the 1st grade in September and is reading at an above 2nd grade level.
As for me, I dont read much but this title caught my eye and I had to read it of the 430 pages. Titled, "Satan, how he fools CEOs into hiring him. The McDaniel story" written by some psuedo name of Taco John.

broncosteven
07-06-2009, 02:42 PM
They have the Anaheim Angels reading program where each base they get a prize. I love it as he is quiet for two hours in the morning reading all by himself. He is going into the 1st grade in September and is reading at an above 2nd grade level.
As for me, I dont read much but this title caught my eye and I had to read it of the 430 pages. Titled, "Satan, how he fools CEOs into hiring him. The McDaniel story" written by some psuedo name of Taco John.

It really isn't hard to motivate young kids.

Boobs McGee
07-06-2009, 02:58 PM
My dad and his wife came to visit for my birthday a couple weeks ago, and at dinner one night we all started talking about our favorite books. After a couple of hours, it became readily apparent that my thirst for the written word has seriously been waning in the past few years...SO. My dad took me to barnes and nobles shortly after and bought me a few classics. War and Peace is on the docket first (****). So I'll see you guys in a couple months haha :D

gotta start BIG i guess

broncosteven
07-06-2009, 03:10 PM
My dad and his wife came to visit for my birthday a couple weeks ago, and at dinner one night we all started talking about our favorite books. After a couple of hours, it became readily apparent that my thirst for the written word has seriously been waning in the past few years...SO. My dad took me to barnes and nobles shortly after and bought me a few classics. War and Peace is on the docket first (****). So I'll see you guys in a couple months haha :D

gotta start BIG i guess

I bought a 2nd hand copy of War and Peace this summer also... I still need to finish, by that I mean start, Les Miserables.

gyldenlove
07-06-2009, 03:19 PM
The first volume of War and Peace is epic, the 2nd volume is so-so if compared to the first in my view.

SouthStndJunkie
07-06-2009, 03:21 PM
Undaunted Courage.

The best Lewis and Clark book I have read. Truly an amazing story of American perseverance.

I just finished a 1200mile motorcycle trip this past week where I followed a good portion of their route in Idaho and Montana and staying at some of their actual campsites. It made it even more impressive to me on what they accomplished and the era that they did it in.

I agree....excellent book.

Boobs McGee
07-06-2009, 03:32 PM
The first volume of War and Peace is epic, the 2nd volume is so-so if compared to the first in my view.


lol I didn't even know there WERE two volumes....I've got this one:

http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/519sY%2BMq%2BGL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA240_SH20_OU01_.jpg

The cover just says "original version".

He also gave me Thoreau's Walden and Civli Disobediances and Thomas Paine's Common Sense.

It's gonna be a literature filled summer

Boobs McGee
07-06-2009, 03:33 PM
I bought a 2nd hand copy of War and Peace this summer also... I still need to finish, by that I mean start, Les Miserables.

Haven't read Les Mis yet. Seen the musical about 15 times, but never started the book

broncosteven
07-06-2009, 07:12 PM
Haven't read Les Mis yet. Seen the musical about 15 times, but never started the book

I think it is going back in the "read later" pile, I checked this out the library:

http://www.amazon.com/Day-We-Found-Universe/dp/0375424296

Looks awesome and jumped behind my Apollo Guidance computer book I am reading now.

baja
07-07-2009, 07:51 PM
ROFL!

Do we know each other by any chance?

My friend, who spends a fortune at B&N every month, gave me the first book of Vince Flynn´s Mitch Rapp series when I visited her and I went thru the whole series in less than a month afterwards. Hadn´t really read a fiction book in ages before that. Recently also went thru the Gabriel Allon series by Daniel Silva. Looking forward to his new book, which is out this month.

Tell your friend to check out the Kindle Reader sold by Amazon they have 300,000 titles available for this electronic reader, most for $9.99 all in one 4 oz. book... AWESOME!!!!!

Mr. Trout
07-08-2009, 12:21 AM
The Last Survivor by Marcus Lutrell..awesome...read all 470 pages in one day at the airport.

FireFly
07-08-2009, 12:51 AM
Just finished King Arthur by M. K. Hume. Really enjoyed it. It suprised me.

Also, Masters of Rome series by Colleen McCullen = win.

TDmvp
07-08-2009, 01:38 AM
I hear Gaff's next book is coming out soon ...

http://img190.imageshack.us/img190/796/51d4tvrqvtlss500.jpg


:P

Archer81
07-08-2009, 04:35 AM
Just finished King Arthur by M. K. Hume. Really enjoyed it. It suprised me.

Also, Masters of Rome series by Colleen McCullen = win.


Agreed. Antony and Cleopatra is the weakest of the entire series, but its still a solid book.

:Broncos:

KillerBronco#76
07-08-2009, 07:30 PM
Just finished re-reading my Two favorite books of all time...

http://dontcallmemike.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/bloodmeridian.jpg

http://2.media.tumblr.com/SwB8yjjD2iixzdev7ckNDDjio1_400.jpg

I you have never read McCarthy do yourself a favor and pick up blood meridian incredible book as far as blending history and fiction. the battle of science and faith. And the hypocrisy of war and religion. Never read a book before that made killing almost poetic very interesting and not to long of a read.

Suttree has alot of really dark humor. So if you arn't a really cynical person you might want to stay away but the literary skill in both these books is amazing.

You can tell he loves classic style of writing, IMO it is like reading Faulkner with action.

broncosteven
07-08-2009, 07:48 PM
Just finished re-reading my Two favorite books of all time...

http://dontcallmemike.files.wordpress.com/2009/05/bloodmeridian.jpg

http://2.media.tumblr.com/SwB8yjjD2iixzdev7ckNDDjio1_400.jpg

I you have never read McCarthy do yourself a favor and pick up blood meridian incredible book as far as blending history and fiction. the battle of science and faith. And the hypocrisy of war and religion. Never read a book before that made killing almost poetic very interesting and not to long of a read.

Suttree has alot of really dark humor. So if you arn't a really cynical person you might want to stay away but the literary skill in both these books is amazing.

You can tell he loves classic style of writing, IMO it is like reading Faulkner with action.

I am a big fan of Cormac.

Ever read "The Road" or the Trilogy, All the Pretty Horses, Cities of the plain, The Crossing?

Great stuff by our greatest living author.

L.A. BRONCOS FAN
07-08-2009, 08:11 PM
Currently reading "The Real Frank Zappa Book."

Some really funny anecdotes and war stories - even if you're not a fan.

broncosteven
07-08-2009, 08:20 PM
Currently reading "The Real Frank Zappa Book."

Some really funny anecdotes and war stories - even if you're not a fan.

When I heard about Zappa, I bought either We're only in it for the money and or Lumpy gravy (maybe on same CD?) anyway I decided to listen to it one night before bed with the head phones in the dark, I was into that back then.

I turned my amp and CD player on put the headphones on then cranked it up kinda high.

Anyway a couple minutes later my dad busts in the room, he calmly asked me to turn it down. Apparently I forgot to set the amp to the headphones.

My poor dad worked like 3 jobs at the time and here I am waking him up to crazy Zappa **** I really didn't like.

I did get into Captian Beefheart for a while. I was in my Luigi Nono Luciano Berio Phase.

KillerBronco#76
07-08-2009, 08:38 PM
I am a big fan of Cormac.

Ever read "The Road" or the Trilogy, All the Pretty Horses, Cities of the plain, The Crossing?

Great stuff by our greatest living author.

Huge fan,

I just read "The Road" and " No Country for Old Men" have not had the chance to start on the Trilogy yet, was side tracked by "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich", then i decided to read Meridian and Suttree again

"The Road" was by far the easiest read. It meant alot to me personally because the relationship i had with my father but prose wise was very basic compared to his others. Especially considering some of the archaic language he uses in his other novels.

Blood Meridian was the first book i read by him, i was about 100 pages untill I finally truly understood what he was saying so i started over. i have now read it 5 times, never read anything like it before i don't think I will ever get tired of that book. I could talk for days on that one. The judge is my favorite character of all time because of what he represents even though he tends to be on the evil side.

But, Suttree is written so poetically it amazes me how he can write about subjects so dark yet with complete beauty (for lack of a better word).

Always nice to know someone appreciates good literature many people I try to get to read his books don't understand what he is trying to say and give up . So I would recommend "The Road" for someone who hasn't read him.

titan
07-08-2009, 09:43 PM
Tell your friend to check out the Kindle Reader sold by Amazon they have 300,000 titles available for this electronic reader, most for $9.99 all in one 4 oz. book... AWESOME!!!!!

I bought an Amazon Kindle this year and it's one of the best investments I've made! I've been reading alot more books, thanks to the Kindle, and it has some cool features (like the ability to underline your favorite passages in a book and later read your highlighted passages on the web)

Also with the Kindle you can download the 1st chapter of a book for free. After reading a chapter I usually can tell if the book is worth purchasing or not.

Miss I.
07-18-2009, 07:29 AM
Couple things, I am now thinking of buying the Kindle thing and loading it with books (though I loathe to do it because I really have a thing about having a book in my hand, the printed word, don't know why, but just still value that, probably why I still buy movies and not just download them all...I like the physicality of ownership I guess). It's on Amazon for $299...is that a good price? Anyone know any better places to get it, etc or is it worth it?

Secondly, I tried going through all these posts and probably will eventually to compile an interesting list of reads, but I am looking for some specific recommendations on non-fiction history and biographies. Would really like to learn more about Churchill, FDR, Teddy Roosevelt, The early struggle for women's equality in the US, but also internationally (getting the vote, etc), Catherine the Great of Russia, Queen Victoria and her reign, Ronald Reagan, Iran Contra, John F. Kennedy, Abraham Lincoln, Thomas Jefferson,, The history of the FBI, CIA, KGB type stuff, Benjamin Franklin, Margaret Thatcher. Just kind of feeling this need to read interesting stuff and learn a little more. A little Italian History woudl be great too so when I go visit there next year I feel less ignorant. Which reminds me, anyone know any good language learning things? I would like to get a basic knowledge to travel with of German, French and Italian.

And finally any suggestions on books or videos that are good for learning the history of the National Football League and the development of American Football and specifically the Denver Broncos (I have seen some the NFL videos, they are lacking quite a bit I think, particularly on the early history of the team). I know some stuff I can get on the net, but some of that's just so sketchy, I would prefer stuff that actually had to be published by a vaguely reputable publishing house.

Well, have a good one. Looking forward to seeing some of your suggestions. (I did look on Amazon, there were some good ones there, but also some really stupid things).

broncogary
07-18-2009, 08:33 AM
. It's on Amazon for $299...is that a good price? Anyone know any better places to get it, etc or is it worth it?



It's an excellent price. They just dropped the price $60 to $299 about a week ago. I don't think you can get a new one anywhere else, at least not cheaper.

And as far as ownership, you always have the books with you. The battery lasts about a week, too, if you leave the wireless off, except when you're downloading or shopping.

Many of the books are only $.99 and some are even free.

Requiem
07-18-2009, 10:16 AM
Saw some dude talking about a book called Life Inc., on the Colbert Report the other day. Looked interesting.

BroncoInferno
07-18-2009, 10:31 AM
Huge fan,

I just read "The Road" and " No Country for Old Men" have not had the chance to start on the Trilogy yet, was side tracked by "The Rise and Fall of the Third Reich", then i decided to read Meridian and Suttree again

"The Road" was by far the easiest read. It meant alot to me personally because the relationship i had with my father but prose wise was very basic compared to his others. Especially considering some of the archaic language he uses in his other novels.

Blood Meridian was the first book i read by him, i was about 100 pages untill I finally truly understood what he was saying so i started over. i have now read it 5 times, never read anything like it before i don't think I will ever get tired of that book. I could talk for days on that one. The judge is my favorite character of all time because of what he represents even though he tends to be on the evil side.

But, Suttree is written so poetically it amazes me how he can write about subjects so dark yet with complete beauty (for lack of a better word).

Always nice to know someone appreciates good literature many people I try to get to read his books don't understand what he is trying to say and give up . So I would recommend "The Road" for someone who hasn't read him.

If you love McCarthy you should give William Gay a try. His novel Twilight (not to be confused with the putrid and inferior vampire series) is one of the darkest things I've ever read and is written in a similar poetic style to McCarthy. Check out a synopsis here: http://www.amazon.com/Twilight-William-Gay/dp/1596922648/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1247938076&sr=1-2. His short story collection I Hate To See That Evening Sun Go Down is amazing as well. He has two other works I have yet to read--Long Way Home and Provinces of Night--but will be reading them soon. He also has a new novel coming out in November called The Lost Country.

broncosteven
07-19-2009, 10:31 AM
I just finished "The Wealthy Barber" Some of the material is dated but still good practice.

Everyone should read this book ASAP Especially you young kids.

SouthStndJunkie
07-31-2009, 09:10 AM
Just finished "The Crossing" by Cormac McCarthy.

Good book, but I liked "All the Pretty Horses" better.

The first half of "The Crossing" was very good....I really enjoyed the wolf trapping. The second half kind of drug on. McCarthy has some very long winded philosophical prose, some of which dragged on for pages and pages and kind of bored me.

All in all, a good read though.

broncosteven
07-31-2009, 10:47 AM
Just finished "The Crossing" by Cormac McCarthy.

Good book, but I liked "All the Pretty Horses" better.

The first half of "The Crossing" was very good....I really enjoyed the wolf trapping. The second half kind of drug on. McCarthy has some very long winded philosophical prose, some of which dragged on for pages and pages and kind of bored me.

All in all, a good read though.

Did you read Cities of the plain?

SouthStndJunkie
07-31-2009, 11:13 AM
Did you read Cities of the plain?

That is next on my list to read.

No1BroncoFan
09-23-2009, 06:26 PM
I got the new Dan Brown book, "The Lost Symbol" last night. I'll let you all know how it is.

Recent reads:
Anne McCaffrey - "The Tower and the Hive" series.
Pretty typical McCaffrey. Good, but not great, mildly over the top Sci-Fi.

Neil Gaiman - "The Graveyard Book"
Mildly sub-standard for Gaiman, way above standard for anyone else. This guy is a major talent and I would recommend any of his books but especially "Stardust" (they kinda based a movie on it but got it so terribly wrong...), "American Gods" and "Interworld" (aimed at "young adult" readers but I've rarely had as much fun reading a book).

Cornelia Funke - "The Thief Lord" and "Dragon Rider"
Another couple of books aimed at "young adult" readers but can be read by anyone. The dim-wit who writes the pathetic "Eragon" books should be forced to read "Dragon Rider!"

Greg Iles - "The Footprints of God"
So-so thriller about a supercomputer/god figure. Overdone concepts without much new to the genre. A "cookie-cutter" book. I'll give Mr. Iles another chance (this is the first of his I've read), but if he doesn't have better game I'll be looking elswhere.

Terry Pratchett - "Truckers," "Diggers" and "Wings"
The Bromeliad Trilogy. An absolutely charming set of books about the Fey Folk in the modern world.

On deck:
Anything/everything I can get my hands on!

Ben

SouthStndJunkie
09-23-2009, 07:28 PM
Right now, I am reading 'Scar Tissue', an autobiography by Anthony Kiedis of the Red Hot Chili Peppers.

atomicbloke
09-23-2009, 07:37 PM
The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable. By Nicholas Massim Taleb.

Kid A
09-23-2009, 07:39 PM
Just finished "The Crossing" by Cormac McCarthy.

Good book, but I liked "All the Pretty Horses" better.

The first half of "The Crossing" was very good....I really enjoyed the wolf trapping. The second half kind of drug on. McCarthy has some very long winded philosophical prose, some of which dragged on for pages and pages and kind of bored me.

All in all, a good read though.

I read "Pretty Horses" and "Cities of the Plain," but have somehow missed the middle book. Good reading.

Kid A
09-23-2009, 07:40 PM
Currently reading Middlesex by Jeffrey Eugenides.

Meck77
09-23-2009, 07:43 PM
Broncos! How Sweet it Is!
Charlie Goldberg and Jim McNally
Forword by Pat Bowlen

http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/0967951208/ref=dp_olp_used?ie=UTF8&condition=used

Description of book "Above all it is a special tribute to Charlie Goldberg, who believed in a color ORANGE that symbolized a victorious viewpoint. It was his determination and involvement with the Broncos that spurred others to join the effort to translate despair through triumph. This one is for you, Charlie "Bronco" Goldberg.

Think about that statement Orangemaners............

BroncoBuff
09-23-2009, 07:59 PM
I'm wanting to start in on the J.A. Jance novels, the P.J. Beaumont series.

Beaumont's (fictional) office was set just two blocks from me.

BroncoBuff
09-23-2009, 08:00 PM
Description of book "Above all it is a special tribute to Charlie Goldberg, who believed in a color ORANGE that symbolized a victorious viewpoint. It was his determination and involvement with the Broncos that spurred others to join the effort to translate despair through triumph. This one is for you, Charlie "Bronco" Goldberg.

That's awesome ... but I can't help remembering that orange is the color they use in fast food dining rooms. Why? It has the subliminal effect of hastening the departure of diners. ::)

No1BroncoFan
09-23-2009, 08:12 PM
One other recent read and I wanted to ask a question about it:
Dean Koontz - "Frankenstein" (all three books)
What's the big deal? They weren't bad books, but they were typical Koontz cookie cutter books. The very typical Koontz formula was on display. Man and woman (usually a with a romantic interest between them) and a dog/small child go up against a purely evil really powerful bad guy with no redeeming characteristics whatsoever and defeat him in a big climactic (dare I say apocalyptic) showdown.

Good books, but nothing special. While I enjoy reading Koontz, I do try to limit myself because his books are so very cookie-cutter in their formula.

"FrankenDarkestHusbandFromtheCornerofHisSoleSurvivo r"
This should be the title of his next book.

Ben

bombay
09-23-2009, 08:26 PM
Just re-read Nick Hornby's High Fidelity.

Still great.

Dutch
09-23-2009, 09:10 PM
Glad to see this thread pop up again. Just finished the two books that Tom Hanks and Steven Speilberg used to make the Mini Series "The Pacific" for HBO. "Helmet for my pillow" by Robert Leckie and "With the Old Breed" by E.B. Sledge. Ambrose never got to finish his book on the Pacific theater before he passed, these were the two books he was using to build his around. As mentioned a couple of pages back, everything by Stephen Pressfield has been great. I especially enjoyed his latest "Killing Rommel" about the formation of the Long Range Desert Group (think "Rat Patrol" for those of us old enough to remember it). Great read. Also tore through the Daniel Silva/Gabriel Allon + his earlier books. Don't start those unless you are the type that can easily put down a page turner. They cost me several nights of decent sleep! Been stuck in a history groove for a bit with a military/espionage bend. Not a bad place to have been, actually.

Dutch
09-23-2009, 09:17 PM
Ooops, almost forgot agreat read. "Three cups of tea" by Greg Mortenson.
From Publishers Weekly:
Starred Review. Some failures lead to phenomenal successes, and this American nurse's unsuccessful attempt to climb K2, the world's second tallest mountain, is one of them. Dangerously ill when he finished his climb in 1993, Mortenson was sheltered for seven weeks by the small Pakistani village of Korphe; in return, he promised to build the impoverished town's first school, a project that grew into the Central Asia Institute, which has since constructed more than 50 schools across rural Pakistan and Afghanistan. Coauthor Relin recounts Mortenson's efforts in fascinating detail, presenting compelling portraits of the village elders, con artists, philanthropists, mujahideen, Taliban officials, ambitious school girls and upright Muslims Mortenson met along the way. As the book moves into the post-9/11 world, Mortenson and Relin argue that the United States must fight Islamic extremism in the region through collaborative efforts to alleviate poverty and improve access to education, especially for girls. Captivating and suspenseful, with engrossing accounts of both hostilities and unlikely friendships, this book will win many readers' hearts.

Great read and powerful food for thought. I am humbled by what this guy has accomplished.

Archer81
09-23-2009, 09:30 PM
One other recent read and I wanted to ask a question about it:
Dean Koontz - "Frankenstein" (all three books)
What's the big deal? They weren't bad books, but they were typical Koontz cookie cutter books. The very typical Koontz formula was on display. Man and woman (usually a with a romantic interest between them) and a dog/small child go up against a purely evil really powerful bad guy with no redeeming characteristics whatsoever and defeat him in a big climactic (dare I say apocalyptic) showdown.

Good books, but nothing special. While I enjoy reading Koontz, I do try to limit myself because his books are so very cookie-cutter in their formula.

"FrankenDarkestHusbandFromtheCornerofHisSoleSurvivo r"
This should be the title of his next book.

Ben


I read the Frankenstein Trilogy. Ending of the third one was kind of lame. Jocko was funny though.

:Broncos:

Taco John
09-23-2009, 09:33 PM
I just finished "The Alchemist" by Paulo Coelho.

A great read. Just fantastic.

Taco John
09-23-2009, 09:42 PM
I've been sitting on The Count of Monte Cristo for some time. That book looks like a committment.

I suppose I'll start it soon.

Archer81
09-23-2009, 09:54 PM
I've been sitting on The Count of Monte Cristo for some time. That book looks like a committment.

I suppose I'll start it soon.


Fantastic book. You will enjoy it Taco.


:Broncos:

No1BroncoFan
09-25-2009, 07:55 PM
I read the Frankenstein Trilogy. Ending of the third one was kind of lame. Jocko was funny though.

:Broncos:
Jocko was my favorite character. :rofl:

SPfloppy
09-27-2009, 05:06 PM
I am not sure it was "good" but I polished off the new Dan brown "The Lost Symbol" last week. If you have read any of his other books (Digital Fortress, Deception Point, Davinci Code, Angles and deamons) you know how this one will go. I swear the man uses the same outline without variation for every book he writes. Don't get me wrong it was very engaging and cut a great pace. But again if you have read any of his other books you will be able to figure out the twists 12 chapters in. High on suspense, high on details, fast paced and of course covers a mysterious old order. Save a few bucks and get it at Walmart for $16. Borders, B.Dalton both had it for like $24

Archer81
09-27-2009, 05:26 PM
I am not sure it was "good" but I polished off the new Dan brown "The Lost Symbol" last week. If you have read any of his other books (Digital Fortress, Deception Point, Davinci Code, Angles and deamons) you know how this one will go. I swear the man uses the same outline without variation for every book he writes. Don't get me wrong it was very engaging and cut a great pace. But again if you have read any of his other books you will be able to figure out the twists 12 chapters in. High on suspense, high on details, fast paced and of course covers a mysterious old order. Save a few bucks and get it at Walmart for $16. Borders, B.Dalton both had it for like $24


so yet again the Church conspires to enslave mankind and oppress women by besmirching the sacred feminine?

:Broncos:

SPfloppy
09-27-2009, 06:41 PM
so yet again the Church conspires to enslave mankind and oppress women by besmirching the sacred feminine?

:Broncos:

Nah. This time we supposed to have sympathy for freemasons and government types. Oh yeah and we are to believe that amazing unbelievable scientific breakthrus are possible just by wishing it so....

SPfloppy
09-27-2009, 06:43 PM
Hey don't take it as me griping because I thought it was bad. It was engaging. i am more pissed at myself for spoiling it by guessing right. To his credit the book reads like a screan play and should be very easy to adapt for a third franchise movie

No1BroncoFan
10-02-2009, 04:37 PM
Well, after finishing "The Lost Symbol" I'm disappointed. As pointed out, it was very predictable and the ending was too "woo-woo" metaphysical. Dan Brown is succumbing to Dean Koontz disease. Every book follows the exact same formula with almost the exact same outcome.

"The Talbot Odyssey" by Nelsom DeMille however is quite good. A little dated (before the collapse of the Soviet Union" but the story and pacing are outstanding! I'd recommend it over the new Brown novel.

Ben

Tombstone RJ
10-02-2009, 05:55 PM
I just finished "The Alchemist" by Paulo Coelho.

A great read. Just fantastic.

I think I read that in like 4th grade. Way to go Taco!

broncosteven
10-02-2009, 06:36 PM
I got Saccomano's Denver Broncos book, the complete illustrated history.

Taco John
10-05-2009, 07:31 PM
I think I read that in like 4th grade. Way to go Taco!

Pick it up again. It's a great read! :)


I just started The Illiad. It's been at least a dozen years since I have read it - and that was because I was forced to in college. I never thought I'd pick up the book because I was genuinely interested in it, but I watched Troy a couple weeks back, and really got into the idea of a greek war story. Reading it for the second time, but falling in love with it for the first. A great read so far.

The Count of Monte Cristo has been put on hold.

SPfloppy
10-06-2009, 01:01 PM
I just started "A Brave New world". I love the distopian syosiety reads like Farenhieght 451, Brave new World, 1984 ect. Anybody else down with depression?

alkemical
10-06-2009, 01:27 PM
I just started "A Brave New world". I love the distopian syosiety reads like Farenhieght 451, Brave new World, 1984 ect. Anybody else down with depression?

Read some Phillip K Dick

L.A. BRONCOS FAN
10-06-2009, 03:44 PM
Working on "The Holographic Universe" by Michael Talbot.

broncosteven
10-06-2009, 06:34 PM
I am finally reading Les Miserables. It took awhile to get into it and keep who was what but it I am a couple hundred pages in now and hooked.

Only problem is that I am reading from a book printed in 1887 and there are lots of mistakes in the printing but it was handed down to me and when I finish I get to scratch reading it off the bucket list. I have meant to read my handed down books for the last 20 years.

SouthStndJunkie
12-11-2009, 11:57 PM
I finally finished reading 'Blasphemy' by Douglas Preston.

Enjoyable read....along the likes of 'Tyrannosaur Canyon' and 'The Codex'.

The main character in "Blasphemy' is the ex-CIA agen turned monk, Wyman Ford, who was in 'Tyrannosaur Canyon'.

SouthStndJunkie
12-11-2009, 11:58 PM
Next up is finishing 'The Border Trilogy' by reading 'Cities of the Plain'.

Rohirrim
12-12-2009, 01:05 AM
Pick it up again. It's a great read! :)


I just started The Illiad. It's been at least a dozen years since I have read it - and that was because I was forced to in college. I never thought I'd pick up the book because I was genuinely interested in it, but I watched Troy a couple weeks back, and really got into the idea of a greek war story. Reading it for the second time, but falling in love with it for the first. A great read so far.

The Count of Monte Cristo has been put on hold.

If you've never read Steven Pressfield, I recommend him. Start with Gates of Fire.

broncosteven
12-12-2009, 09:14 AM
Next up is finishing 'The Border Trilogy' by reading 'Cities of the Plain'.

The Border Trilogy rocks, I now know what it must have been like as a reader when Hemingway was alive, waiting for the next great book of his to come out and read.

Did you ever read "The Road"? Great novela, I am not sure if I will see the movie as i have such vivid images of that book.

I am still slogging through Les Miserables, it is very dry at times then it gets very very good and I can't put it down then there is more dry backstory. I just want to say I finished it at this point.

BlaK-Argentina
12-12-2009, 10:04 AM
I'm hooked on Wilbur Smith's books. Any fan of his here? I loved River God and am currently reading The Seventh Scroll.

Absolutely loved Eagle in the Sky and Eye of the Tiger.

Jens1893
12-12-2009, 01:22 PM
Almost through Michael Connelly´s Harry Bosch series. Currently reading The Narrows and I unfortunately only have Echo Park, The Overlook, 9 Dragons and The Scarecrow (although it´s not a Bosch book) left afterwards.

NYBronco
12-12-2009, 07:20 PM
Jack DuBrul, Havoc.

SPfloppy
12-17-2009, 02:12 PM
Silence of the Lambs and Hannibal. Also for non-fiction the Bret Hart autobio was great

broncosteven
12-17-2009, 06:36 PM
It is very interesting to see what other people read.

I stick to the classics, history, NASA/computer history and don't know any of the current authors outside of McCarthy.

Nice reading tips.

Archer81
12-24-2009, 01:06 PM
Stephen Hunter, Havana. I found this book buried behind my bookshelf...also been reading Colleen McCullough's Men of Rome books. Grass Crown, Caesars Women, October Horse...great series.

:Broncos:

bombay
01-01-2010, 10:23 AM
Almost through Michael Connelly´s Harry Bosch series. Currently reading The Narrows and I unfortunately only have Echo Park, The Overlook, 9 Dragons and The Scarecrow (although it´s not a Bosch book) left afterwards.

Connelly is easily the best in his genre.

Old Dude
02-10-2010, 01:51 PM
Finished the entire 6-book series "War of the Spider Queen"

(Fellow D&D nerds only)

Then "Return of the Archwizards" trilogy (which actually took place first)

Now starting the Aboleth Sovereignty - trying to get some ideas about the spellplague, Mystra's murder, etc. but I'm very confused about some of the timeline issues and could use some help.

No1BroncoFan
02-13-2010, 09:09 PM
I am looking for some good sci fi to take my mind off things, preferably something in the same vein as the Ringworld books or Neuromancer.
Good sci-fi?
Anything by C.J. Cherryh but especially the Chanur saga (less the fifth book which isn't really a part of the saga anyway) and the Faded Sun trilogy.
Larry Niven - "Destiny's Road" and "Footfall" (with Jerry Pournelle).
Jack McDevitt - "Ancient Shores" and "Eternity Road."
Orson Scott Card - "Ender's Game"
Richard K. Morgan also seems to be an up and comer on the sci-fi scene

For a comprehensive list of the best writing in sci-fi and fantasy, click here (http://dpsinfo.com/awardweb/nebulas/). This site lists all the Nebula Award winners and nominees from 1965-2008 (the 2009 awards will be held next month).

My friend, who spends a fortune at B&N every month, gave me the first book of Vince Flynn´s Mitch Rapp series when I visited her and I went thru the whole series in less than a month afterwards. Hadn´t really read a fiction book in ages before that. Recently also went thru the Gabriel Allon series by Daniel Silva. Looking forward to his new book, which is out this month.
Seeing that you liked Vince Flynn, have you read anything by Brad Meltzer or Richard North Patterson? Very good writers in this genre.

Ben

cq1
02-16-2010, 12:15 AM
Almost through Michael Connelly´s Harry Bosch series. Currently reading The Narrows and I unfortunately only have Echo Park, The Overlook, 9 Dragons and The Scarecrow (although it´s not a Bosch book) left afterwards.

If you like Michael Connelly, check out John Sandford's Prey series of novels. If you do, make sure you start from the first book, there are quiet a few of them.

BroncoInferno
04-20-2010, 10:29 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51UvXhiuF9L._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

We got any Pynchon fans here? This is my first go at him. Most people suggested I start with V or The Crying of Lot 49, but I chose this one because the plot was said to be more linear than most of his works. I love it. It is packed with true historical data, but is also an absurdist comedy. It is a whopper of a book (773 densely written pages), but it is worth the effort.

extralife
04-20-2010, 10:34 PM
Just read GR

BroncoInferno
04-20-2010, 10:45 PM
Just read GR

I plan to read The Crying of Lot 49 next (short and a bit of a breather) and then Gravity's Rainbow. If it is as funny and informative as Mason & Dixon, it will be time well spent.

Taco John
04-21-2010, 02:46 PM
Finished The Count of Monte Cristo a couple weeks ago. Now that was a GREAT read. Probably my favorite book yet.

Taco John
04-21-2010, 02:48 PM
In the middle now of a book called Pandora's Star by Peter F. Hamilton. An interesting futuristic tale, but a bit of a let down after reading Count.

Rohirrim
04-22-2010, 09:20 AM
Finished Rubicon: The Last Years of the Roman Republic by Tom Holland and then jumped into Persian Fire, about the conflict between Persia and the Greeks. Really great books.

Smiling Assassin27
04-22-2010, 02:03 PM
The Road To Serfdom by Friedrich Hayek

Scary good book.

loborugger
04-22-2010, 03:11 PM
The Road To Serfdom by Friedrich Hayek

Scary good book.

That is an older one, isnt it?

Smiling Assassin27
04-22-2010, 03:39 PM
That is an older one, isnt it?

Yes, it was written in the 40's.

loborugger
04-22-2010, 05:02 PM
Yes, it was written in the 40's.

Is it still in print? Its on my list of to eventually read.

Smiling Assassin27
04-23-2010, 12:34 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Road-Serfdom-Fiftieth-Anniversary/dp/0226320618/ref=ntt_at_ep_dpt_1

Archer81
04-23-2010, 12:43 PM
Currently reading Bite Me: A Love Story by Christopher Moore. He is definately my favorite author.


:Broncos:

Taco John
05-05-2010, 03:30 PM
Anybody else here read Pandora's Star by Peter F. Hamilton? I'm almost through with this book and am eager to dive into the second one.

Drunk Monkey
05-05-2010, 04:37 PM
Anybody else here read Pandora's Star by Peter F. Hamilton? I'm almost through with this book and am eager to dive into the second one.

Loved it. The second on is really good also.

He wrote / is writing a 3 book series that follows those 1000 years later. Waiting on the last book now.

BlaK-Argentina
05-05-2010, 04:39 PM
Finished The Count of Monte Cristo a couple weeks ago. Now that was a GREAT read. Probably my favorite book yet.

Mine too. I loved every word of it.

Taco John
05-05-2010, 05:29 PM
Loved it. The second on is really good also.

He wrote / is writing a 3 book series that follows those 1000 years later. Waiting on the last book now.



I hated the first half of the book, and kept wondering why I was sticking with it. But most of the reviews that I read raved about it, so I did. And then when it finally dawned on me why the book was titled "Pandora's Star," interest started to pick up and we were off! I'm starting to run out of pages on this one and am expecting a cliffhanger towards the end. I'm thrilled now that he follows this one with another massive story. This one would make a great graphic novel and maybe even movie, IMO. The only thing that bothers me about it is that I think Wilson Kime is a jackass. I like my starship captains to at least seem like refined, intelligent people - not uncouth unrespectable pricks. But I can look past that for the great story.

loborugger
05-05-2010, 07:08 PM
http://www.amazon.com/Beyond-Bogota-Diary-Journalist-Colombia/dp/0807061484/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1273111559&sr=8-1

Beyond Bogota: Diary of a Drug War Journalist in Colombia

A little preachy at times but overall a thought provoking read.

bombay
05-05-2010, 07:16 PM
Anyone read any of Charlie Huston's great NYC vampire books?

That One Guy
05-05-2010, 10:30 PM
I'm currently forcing myself to get through Robinson Crusoe... so hard to read it really detracts from the story. So wordy that I find myself at the end of a sentence and realize I went into a daze from the run-on and missed the point of the sentence.

Ugh...

DivineLegion
05-06-2010, 01:45 AM
Right now I'm reading the Eagles series (Roman Legions) by Simon Scarrow. Im a big history buff so a lot of my casual reading is geared toward what I love. (Good series so far, its hard not to get involved with Scarrows characters)

Just finnished the Lords of the North series by Bernard Cronwell (ok series, first time I have taken intrest to Cronwell)

The Ghengis Series by Con Igguldin (Awsome absolutly awsome!)

Archer81
05-06-2010, 11:28 AM
Right now I'm reading the Eagles series (Roman Legions) by Simon Scarrow. Im a big history buff so a lot of my casual reading is geared toward what I love. (Good series so far, its hard not to get involved with Scarrows characters)

Just finnished the Lords of the North series by Bernard Cronwell (ok series, first time I have taken intrest to Cronwell)

The Ghengis Series by Con Igguldin (Awsome absolutly awsome!)


For my history paper I picked up four books on World War One. Good reads. Also rereading 1776 and A. Lincoln. Summer/spring reading is awesome.


:Broncos:

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 11:39 AM
I'm currently forcing myself to get through Robinson Crusoe... so hard to read it really detracts from the story. So wordy that I find myself at the end of a sentence and realize I went into a daze from the run-on and missed the point of the sentence.

Ugh...

Well, that's how they wrote back in those days. They had to tell the story in every detail, there was no video accompaniment. They had to present every detail. If you can't follow it, blame it on your short attention span, not the author's attention to detail.

broncosteven
05-06-2010, 11:46 AM
I'm currently forcing myself to get through Robinson Crusoe... so hard to read it really detracts from the story. So wordy that I find myself at the end of a sentence and realize I went into a daze from the run-on and missed the point of the sentence.

Ugh...

Try Les Mis next, he goes into French historical minutia that even the French probably forgotten. But the parts that are good make it impossible to put down and worth some digressions, much like my posts.

I started Don Quixote and am really digging it. It reads more like a current novel than I thought it would.

Pseudofool
05-06-2010, 11:55 AM
I'm currently forcing myself to get through Robinson Crusoe... so hard to read it really detracts from the story. So wordy that I find myself at the end of a sentence and realize I went into a daze from the run-on and missed the point of the sentence.

Ugh...

When you finish that read Foe by Coetzee. It will make the Crusoe suffering somewhat worth while. Coetzee is wonderful in his own right.

Archer81
05-06-2010, 12:03 PM
Read anything by Chaucer. If you thought Crusoe would make your brain melt...

:Broncos:

bombay
05-06-2010, 12:07 PM
Read anything by Chaucer. If you thought Crusoe would make your brain melt...

:Broncos:

Yeah. It's like being in the 7th circle of hell.

Archer81
05-06-2010, 12:08 PM
Yeah. It's like being in the 7th circle of hell.


Definately. I had to translate a few paragraphs of it in cultural anthropology...I did ok...but Jesus Christ on a cracker I am happy english is no longer written or spelled that way.


:Broncos:

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 12:10 PM
For my history paper I picked up four books on World War One. Good reads. Also rereading 1776 and A. Lincoln. Summer/spring reading is awesome.


:Broncos:

I hope one of those four books about WWI is "The Guns of August", by Barbara Tuchman. One of the most important books alltime.

If you want to read an interesting history book, read "The Road to Oxiana", by Robert Byron. It's a travelogue of he and some friends in 1933 trying to go from London to Afghanistan, via Palestine, Syria, Iraq, Persia. By motorcar. In 1933. Dude was queer as a three-dollar bill, so that might interest you.

One of the most interesting and entertaining history books I've ever read, and very interesting to read since it's just a diary. Not a bunch of fluff and opinion, dude talks about getting robbed here and there, talks about the accomodations along the road, trying to cross flooded streams in broken down vehicles, b****es about every damn thing with good reason (it's 1933 in Syria, Palestine, Persia, OK?) talks about the people and the terrain, very interesting.

Archer81
05-06-2010, 12:12 PM
I hope one of those four books about WWI is "The Guns of August", by Barbara Tuchman. One of the most important books alltime.

If you want to read an interesting history book, read "The Road to Oxiana", by Robert Byron. It's a travelogue of he and some friends in 1933 trying to go from London to Afghanistan, via Palestine, Syria, Iraq, Persia. By motorcar. In 1933. Dude was queer as a three-dollar bill, so that might interest you.

One of the most interesting and entertaining history books I've ever read, and very interesting to read since it's just a diary. Not a bunch of fluff and opinion, dude talks about getting robbed here and there, talks about the accomodations along the road, trying to cross flooded streams in broken down vehicles, b****es about every damn thing with good reason (it's 1933 in Syria, Palestine, Persia, OK?) talks about the people and the terrain, very interesting.


Nice recommendation. I'll look for it.


:Broncos:

Pseudofool
05-06-2010, 12:13 PM
Chaucer was the original Po-mo writer. Irony, pastiche, multiple povs, vignettes building to a whole. Yeah the middle english thing sucks, so read him in translation.

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 12:15 PM
Nice recommendation. I'll look for it.


:Broncos:

And read The Guns of August. It's a smooth read.

Pseudofool
05-06-2010, 12:16 PM
Well, that's how they wrote back in those days. They had to tell the story in every detail, there was no video accompaniment. They had to present every detail. If you can't follow it, blame it on your short attention span, not the author's attention to detail.That's part of it. But writers have stylistically improved over the past 200 years or so since Defoe was writing. Most 19th century writers lack refinement and have an inability to even make images (i.e. scraps of prescient detail that actually mean). The notion of the 'real' of course, changed drastically at the end of the 19th century. The details that mattered weren't one of setting, but one of psychology and emotion. It makes sense that reading a style that devalues meaningful detail replacing it with willy-nilly detail would be frustrating to read.

Archer81
05-06-2010, 12:17 PM
And read The Guns of August. It's a smooth read.


What's funny is I found a copy of it at Barnes and Noble and considered picking it up but figured 5 books would be a bit much to read for a 10 page paper. Im going to Pueblo tomorrow so I'll get that one, too.


:Broncos:

Archer81
05-06-2010, 12:18 PM
Chaucer was the original Po-mo writer. Irony, pastiche, multiple povs, vignettes building to a whole. Yeah the middle english thing sucks, so read him in translation.


Middle English is close enough to get the gist of what he is trying to say...but you will need a french and latin dictionary to get the words that make no damn sense.


:Broncos:

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 12:28 PM
What's funny is I found a copy of it at Barnes and Noble and considered picking it up but figured 5 books would be a bit much to read for a 10 page paper. Im going to Pueblo tomorrow so I'll get that one, too.


:Broncos:

Whatever professor you're gonna have to perform for will be mightily impressed if you quote Barbara Tuchman in your paper.

Tuchman and Guns of August is universally considered the best work on WWI. Tuchman's The Proud Tower is another classic. It's considered the classic on what led up to WWI from the Gilded Age in the 1890's to WWI.

mhgaffney
05-06-2010, 12:33 PM
holy blood, holy grail... my dad read that and messianic legacy a while back. funny now there's all this hoopla over the da vinci code, a work of fiction, when these non-fiction books (if not others) on a similar topic have been out for years.

Holy Blood Holy Grail was superficial and largely incorrect -- but a popular best seller nonetheless.

If you want to understand the deeper meaning of the Grail (the spiritual meaning) check out my book

Gnostic Secrets of the Naassenes.

www.gnosticsecrets.com

Cito Pelon
05-06-2010, 12:50 PM
That's part of it. But writers have stylistically improved over the past 200 years or so since Defoe was writing. Most 19th century writers lack refinement and have an inability to even make images (i.e. scraps of prescient detail that actually mean). The notion of the 'real' of course, changed drastically at the end of the 19th century. The details that mattered weren't one of setting, but one of psychology and emotion. It makes sense that reading a style that devalues meaningful detail replacing it with willy-nilly detail would be frustrating to read.

I absolutely agree, but Robinson Crusoe was not one of them.

There was a lot of drivel printed as you point out, just plain drivel. Charles Dickens was one of the only English novelists that wasn't drivel, he wrote in the vernacular, and he was printed early 19th-century. Don't get too carried away condemning anything printed before the late 19th-century.

Voltaire was printed in the 18th century. Probably there was more lost to us printed in the 18th century but burned.

The political tracts are what tends to survive from England from the late-18th to the late-19th centuries. Works from Ireland? No. Works from Scotland? No. Why? Because they were burnt.

Drunk Monkey
05-06-2010, 04:30 PM
I hated the first half of the book, and kept wondering why I was sticking with it. But most of the reviews that I read raved about it, so I did. And then when it finally dawned on me why the book was titled "Pandora's Star," interest started to pick up and we were off! I'm starting to run out of pages on this one and am expecting a cliffhanger towards the end. I'm thrilled now that he follows this one with another massive story. This one would make a great graphic novel and maybe even movie, IMO. The only thing that bothers me about it is that I think Wilson Kime is a jackass. I like my starship captains to at least seem like refined, intelligent people - not uncouth unrespectable pricks. But I can look past that for the great story.

One of the things I like about Hamilton is the breath of his stories. It does take a while to unfold but once it does there is a massive chain of events in play. Some of the stories are better than others but he ties them up nicely. I love SCi Fi and not many do a space opera better then him. I lost track of how many planets and characters are involved but it is up there. Yes Kimes is a bit of a douche but he redeemed himself a little later on. He belongs behind a desk not on the bridge.

Mr. Trout
05-06-2010, 10:35 PM
eh, I am about 36 pages late. But, Lone Survivor by Marcus Luttrell was AWESOME. Wonder if anybody else in here mentioned it.

OrangenBlueOhio
05-07-2010, 06:58 AM
Just read two by Greg Iles. Turning Angel, and Devil"s Punchbowl. Both very good. I had never heard of this guy before, but he is pretty good.

Turning Angel- Story about a doctor in his 40"s ends up having an affair with a 17 yr. old, (his babysitter) she ends up dead.

Devil"s Punchbowl-Ex IRA goon running a riverboat casino, with a bunch of illegal action on the side, dogfighting, prostitution.

Both are based on a central character, Penn Cage, in a small southern town on the Missisippi, called Natchez.

(He's not the doctor, or the goon)

loborugger
05-07-2010, 07:42 AM
For my history paper I picked up four books on World War One. Good reads. Also rereading 1776 and A. Lincoln. Summer/spring reading is awesome.


:Broncos:

What did you pick up on WWI?

Archer81
01-23-2011, 09:12 PM
What did you pick up on WWI?


I can't remember the title and I cant find where it is but it was an abridged history of the war...annoying me because I reread it about 3 weeks ago, another book on the history of the german people from Rome to now and a third book on the Franco-German war in 1870. History never happens in a vacuum.

Oh,

Bump.

:Broncos:

SouthStndJunkie
01-23-2011, 09:15 PM
Last 3 books I've read.

Abraham Lincoln: Vampire Hunter by Seth Grahame-Smith

Rhino Ranch by Larry McMurtry

Amazonia by James Rollins

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:25 PM
I noticed someone at the top of this page mentioned Robinson Crusoe. I've tried to read that book probably every 6 months for the past 2 or 3 years. Never get more than MAYBE halfway through it and I just lose interest. I really want to but I just can't do it. I was even more pumped one of the times because I read Swiss Family Robinson and then wanted to switch over to Robinson Crusoe and still came to a grinding halt.

I feel like a fat guy trying to do one of the final events in the Ninja Warrior challenge. No matter how many times I try, I'm just not getting up that curved wall thingie and I'm not finishing that damn book.

HAT
01-23-2011, 09:27 PM
"Faster Than the Speed of Love"......Getting ready to start "Wish It, Want It, Do it"

Archer81
01-23-2011, 09:27 PM
I can't remember the title and I cant find where it is but it was an abridged history of the war...annoying me because I reread it about 3 weeks ago, another book on the history of the german people from Rome to now and a third book on the Franco-German war in 1870. History never happens in a vacuum.

Oh,

Bump.

:Broncos:


A Mighty Fortress: A New History of the German People-Steven E Ozment

The First World War- John Keegan

The Franco-Prussian War: The German Conquest of France 1870-1871-Geoffrey Wawro

:Broncos:

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:29 PM
I noticed someone at the top of this page mentioned Robinson Crusoe. I've tried to read that book probably every 6 months for the past 2 or 3 years. Never get more than MAYBE halfway through it and I just lose interest. I really want to but I just can't do it. I was even more pumped one of the times because I read Swiss Family Robinson and then wanted to switch over to Robinson Crusoe and still came to a grinding halt.

I feel like a fat guy trying to do one of the final events in the Ninja Warrior challenge. No matter how many times I try, I'm just not getting up that curved wall thingie and I'm not finishing that damn book.

Haha... I didn't realize they were commenting on my bitching about that book approximately 6 months ago. Hillarious because I just made an attempt again back at the beginning of Christmas break and failed, as usual.

From the last page in the thread:

I'm currently forcing myself to get through Robinson Crusoe... so hard to read it really detracts from the story. So wordy that I find myself at the end of a sentence and realize I went into a daze from the run-on and missed the point of the sentence.

Ugh...

Archer81
01-23-2011, 09:29 PM
I noticed someone at the top of this page mentioned Robinson Crusoe. I've tried to read that book probably every 6 months for the past 2 or 3 years. Never get more than MAYBE halfway through it and I just lose interest. I really want to but I just can't do it. I was even more pumped one of the times because I read Swiss Family Robinson and then wanted to switch over to Robinson Crusoe and still came to a grinding halt.

I feel like a fat guy trying to do one of the final events in the Ninja Warrior challenge. No matter how many times I try, I'm just not getting up that curved wall thingie and I'm not finishing that damn book.


I have that same problem with Shakespeare. The plays they want us to read are the ones I can't stand...(Romeo and Juliet...I actually made a comment in class back in HS that I was happy at the end because the two most insipid characters are dead)...

:Broncos:

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:33 PM
Well, that's how they wrote back in those days. They had to tell the story in every detail, there was no video accompaniment. They had to present every detail. If you can't follow it, blame it on your short attention span, not the author's attention to detail.

Apparently I hadn't seen this thread in quite some time.

It's not just the details that kill me about a story. I appreciate the details. It's how they can write a three page run-on sentence just to say "I farted". It's the space filling words that don't provide detail nor significance to the story and just come across as trying to read a story out of a word search. You know the significant words are in there somewhere, they key is just to know what words you're looking for and you might be able to deduce a point.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:35 PM
I have that same problem with Shakespeare. The plays they want us to read are the ones I can't stand...(Romeo and Juliet...I actually made a comment in class back in HS that I was happy at the end because the two most insipid characters are dead)...

:Broncos:

Shakespeare is another that I really wish I could appreciate. I've made an attempt and at the end (or when I declare it the end), my response is usually along the lines of "Really?".

It's the same response I got with The Great Gatsby. I finished it and went... where's the story? What's the point? That's REALLY a classic?

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:39 PM
And since SirH mentioned some war books, I recently had to read Fox of the North for a Russian History class I was taking. It was a biography of General Kutuzov who fought against Napoleon.

It's a very interesting story for me because the concepts that were being implemented by the generals in the days of Napoleon are still proving to be true today. They knew then concepts like holding ground did not win you wars - preservation of your army and destruction of the enemy army did. For 50 years though, we've thought as long as we hold land (or in some cases, just keep retaking land) then somehow the enemy would give up and we'd win. It was fascinating to read this and think, "Duh".

Archer81
01-23-2011, 09:40 PM
Shakespeare is another that I really wish I could appreciate. I've made an attempt and at the end (or when I declare it the end), my response is usually along the lines of "Really?".

It's the same response I got with The Great Gatsby. I finished it and went... where's the story? What's the point? That's REALLY a classic?


I feel the same way about Hemmingway. My father and brother love the guy. I just dont care for his writing. Or Maya Angelou.

I am not too fond of the newer material from Steven King, either.

:Broncos:

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:44 PM
Try Les Mis next, he goes into French historical minutia that even the French probably forgotten. But the parts that are good make it impossible to put down and worth some digressions, much like my posts.

I started Don Quixote and am really digging it. It reads more like a current novel than I thought it would.

When you finish that read Foe by Coetzee. It will make the Crusoe suffering somewhat worth while. Coetzee is wonderful in his own right.

Read anything by Chaucer. If you thought Crusoe would make your brain melt...

:Broncos:



Just making sure noone was actually suggesting any of these books. Don Quixote I don't know the story to so I might look that up but the rest were just trying to make my head pop and not serious, right?

Archer81
01-23-2011, 09:48 PM
Just making sure noone was actually suggesting any of these books. Don Quixote I don't know the story to so I might look that up but the rest were just trying to make my head pop and not serious, right?


Chaucer as originally written will make your brain explode. If you have to translate the french, latin or germanic words, you will get a migraine. If you have it already translated, its not too bad.


:Broncos:

loborugger
01-23-2011, 09:49 PM
A Mighty Fortress: A New History of the German People-Steven E Ozment

The First World War- John Keegan

The Franco-Prussian War: The German Conquest of France 1870-1871-Geoffrey Wawro

:Broncos:

I have read the first two books. I have a bunch of WWI books. Its more interesting to me now than WWII and in this post Cold War era, I think its more relevant.

Odysseus
01-23-2011, 09:55 PM
Have a little Faith - Mitch Albom - This is an amazing short read.

Intercultural Communications in Contexts - Judith Martin / Thomas Nakayama

I wish that I could find some eBooks of Chaucer.

Archer81
01-23-2011, 09:56 PM
I have read the first two books. I have a bunch of WWI books. Its more interesting to me now than WWII and in this post Cold War era, I think its more relevant.


History is repeating. The world of 2011 thinks (much like the world of 1911 thought) that war would never happen. The same things that sparked the first world war are at it again, the only thing that has changed is where the powderkeg is.


:Broncos:

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 09:59 PM
Have a little Faith - Mitch Albom - This is an amazing short read.

Intercultural Communications in Contexts - Judith Martin / Thomas Nakayama

I wish that I could find some eBooks of Chaucer.

http://www.gutenberg.org/browse/authors/c#a144

This Chaucer? Not familiar with the person so maybe there's another.

loborugger
01-23-2011, 10:08 PM
History is repeating. The world of 2011 thinks (much like the world of 1911 thought) that war would never happen. The same things that sparked the first world war are at it again, the only thing that has changed is where the powderkeg is.


:Broncos:

I dont know about all that. I certainly dont. What's the saying - only the dead have seen an end of war.

WWI to me is fascinating as Europe stood astride the globe, dominating in every fashion. And they just dismembered themselves. And it was really all about pride. Everyone wanted that war. Everyone wanted the chance to prove that they were the best. The powderkeg wasnt the Balkans, that was just an excuse to get after each other. The powderkeg was in the hearts of the leaders on both sides.

That One Guy
01-23-2011, 10:12 PM
I dont know about all that. I certainly dont. What's the saying - only the dead have seen an end of war.

WWI to me is fascinating as Europe stood astride the globe, dominating in every fashion. And they just dismembered themselves. And it was really all about pride. Everyone wanted that war. Everyone wanted the chance to prove that they were the best. The powderkeg wasnt the Balkans, that was just an excuse to get after each other. The powderkeg was in the hearts of the leaders on both sides.

That really is the key to why Europe and, moreso, East Europe has never been able to prosper to their maximum potential. All of them were so intent on conquering each other that they were constantly absorbed in war. From England to Russia, it's been a series of contries just attacking each other then reloading whenever they lose to jump back in.

Requiem
01-23-2011, 10:15 PM
Lots of books by Deepak Chopra.

Pseudofool
01-24-2011, 12:10 AM
Shakespeare is another that I really wish I could appreciate. I've made an attempt and at the end (or when I declare it the end), my response is usually along the lines of "Really?".

It's the same response I got with The Great Gatsby. I finished it and went... where's the story? What's the point? That's REALLY a classic?You've gots to read Shakespeare. At least learn the story of Hamlet, King Lear, Macbeth, and perhaps the King Henry play's (other's will say different one's but there's value almost everywhere his **** is so tight). Take a look at specific passages after you've gained context and see the complex tragedy he weaves. The themes that Shakespeare feature are ones so consequential they haunt us still today. It's good stuff dude.

Fitzgerald's essays are way better. I agree on the Gatsby.

There's so much late 20th century literature that people should be reading rather than the classics, honestly.

broncogary
01-24-2011, 05:05 AM
History is repeating. The world of 2011 thinks (much like the world of 1911 thought) that war would never happen. The same things that sparked the first world war are at it again, the only thing that has changed is where the powderkeg is.


:Broncos:

All Quiet on the Western Front by Erich Maria Remarque. Doesn't get into the reasons for the war, but the effect on it's participants.

TailgateNut
01-24-2011, 05:37 AM
"Matterhorn", by Karl Marlantes. A novel about the Vietnam war which will open some eyes for those who "didn't know".

Jesterhole
01-24-2011, 06:18 AM
Not going to comb through and I'm sure it's been mentioned, but the best fantasy out there right now is 'Song of Ice and Fire' by George R. R. Martin. It's currently four books, and the first three rival any series by any author of any time. Just as epic as Tolkien or Jordan, but far more readable and written for adults.

Bronco Yoda
01-26-2011, 02:03 AM
Lots of books by Deepak Chopra.

I've enjoyed many of his books.

I would also suggest you check out Eckhart Tolle, if you haven't already.

mosca
01-26-2011, 07:48 PM
Not going to comb through and I'm sure it's been mentioned, but the best fantasy out there right now is 'Song of Ice and Fire' by George R. R. Martin. It's currently four books, and the first three rival any series by any author of any time. Just as epic as Tolkien or Jordan, but far more readable and written for adults.
Don't forget about the HBO series coming out soon based on it!

<iframe title="YouTube video player" class="youtube-player" type="text/html" width="640" height="390" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/43LW7a_NKMk" frameborder="0" allowFullScreen></iframe>

llayne
01-26-2011, 08:00 PM
bill bryson: a complete history of nearly everything

Really good non fiction.

epicSocialism4tw
01-26-2011, 08:08 PM
Not going to comb through and I'm sure it's been mentioned, but the best fantasy out there right now is 'Song of Ice and Fire' by George R. R. Martin. It's currently four books, and the first three rival any series by any author of any time. Just as epic as Tolkien or Jordan, but far more readable and written for adults.

So he's going with the two middle initials like Tolkkien?

Maybe he should go all the way and go with "G. R. R. Martin".

By the way, Tolkkien is clearly written for adults. Just because he handles his characters with dignity and makes his points of interest philosophical instead of based in entertainment-value gore/sex/language doesnt make it any less adult. The philosophical content in The Rings Trilogy is beyond the scope of what most adults understand.

You're looking at the difference between Beethoven and Motley Crue.

Also, Tolkkien created that genre. So he's pretty much the ultimate. One may enjoy something else more, but that something else will never be better.

baja
01-26-2011, 08:12 PM
Jesus, CEO

broncosteven
01-26-2011, 08:18 PM
I am reading Keith Richards bio.

I don't usually go for Rock and roll bio's but I couldn't pass this one up.

It won't win any prizes but it is very entertaining.

epicSocialism4tw
01-26-2011, 08:38 PM
I am reading Keith Richards bio.

I don't usually go for Rock and roll bio's but I couldn't pass this one up.

It won't win any prizes but it is very entertaining.

Is he really Bernie from "Weekend at Bernie's"?

broncosteven
01-26-2011, 08:42 PM
Is he really Bernie from "Weekend at Bernie's"?

Apparetly he made it out of the '70's OK and is having a great life. being the guy who shot up john phillips for the 1st time then the next time they meed Phillips owns a Pharmacy so he can get his drugs. Sadly Phillips was not long for the world after that.

NUB
01-26-2011, 08:55 PM
I have begun to amass a pretty large collection of books. Here's one recent addition:

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/9605/dbroncos.jpg

http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/498/dbroncos1.jpg

Kid A
01-26-2011, 09:18 PM
bill bryson: a complete history of nearly everything

Really good non fiction.

Very enjoyable (he's a good travel writer as well). What I like about Complete History was not so much his explaining how basic scientific concepts work, but more the stories of the people who first made discoveries and measurements of the earth, including its age, weight and size.

Lots of facts we take for granted now, but that involved insanely complicated and often bizarre research on the part of those early pioneers. There were some memorable eccentric characters that made those breakthroughs, and Bryson does a good job at telling lots of their stories in one book.

broncosteven
01-26-2011, 09:36 PM
I have begun to amass a pretty large collection of books. Here's one recent addition:

http://img151.imageshack.us/img151/9605/dbroncos.jpg

http://img171.imageshack.us/img171/498/dbroncos1.jpg

I got this one also.

Tombstone RJ
01-27-2011, 09:44 AM
I just started "A Brave New world". I love the distopian syosiety reads like Farenhieght 451, Brave new World, 1984 ect. Anybody else down with depression?

A Brave New World is a great book. The author does create a utopia, it's just that many peeps can't fathom how a utopia could work, especially morons in the good ole US of A.

I remember talking to some peeps about A Brave New World and they were all like "but what about the lower classes, how is a society with classes a Utopia? Blah, blah, blah...." I'm like, just shut your pie holes because obviously the book went right over your ignorant asses.

Tombstone RJ
01-27-2011, 09:48 AM
I'm currently reading "In the Beginning Was the Word" by Vern S. Poythress. Very enlightening stuff.

alkemical
01-27-2011, 10:10 AM
Working on "The Holographic Universe" by Michael Talbot.

I read that book many years ago, and it has laid the ground work for some of my side projects on using fractals to represent the holographic nature of "reality".

alkemical
01-27-2011, 10:13 AM
I'm currently reading "In the Beginning Was the Word" by Vern S. Poythress. Very enlightening stuff.

Id' be interested in this. I studied a lot of linguistic work/communication. I often think of language as a virus (not in a negative term, but in how it mutates and gets passed on, in addition to the changes in brain function that different uses of language influence.)

Mk69
01-27-2011, 10:26 AM
"Matterhorn", by Karl Marlantes. A novel about the Vietnam war which will open some eyes for those who "didn't know".

Just finished it. Great book.

Quoydogs
01-27-2011, 10:56 AM
Confessions of serial killer. Mafia Richard Kuklinski


I don't read and I could not put this book down. He is one sick twisted F@@k

epicSocialism4tw
01-27-2011, 11:07 AM
Id' be interested in this. I studied a lot of linguistic work/communication. I often think of language as a virus (not in a negative term, but in how it mutates and gets passed on, in addition to the changes in brain function that different uses of language influence.)

Thats better covered in a field of biology called "memetics". Check it out.

alkemical
01-27-2011, 11:15 AM
Thats better covered in a field of biology called "memetics". Check it out.

Thanks, already been there.

baja
01-27-2011, 12:14 PM
Id' be interested in this. I studied a lot of linguistic work/communication. I often think of language as a virus (not in a negative term, but in how it mutates and gets passed on, in addition to the changes in brain function that different uses of language influence.)

"In the beginning there was the word"

baja
01-27-2011, 12:16 PM
What has a beginning?

epicSocialism4tw
01-27-2011, 12:16 PM
Thanks, already been there.

You should stay there, because its a young field.

baja
01-27-2011, 12:20 PM
Can anything that has a beginning not have an ending?


Can anything with a beginning be real?

alkemical
01-27-2011, 12:25 PM
You should stay there, because its a young field.

It's always been a principle of my studies, always. It's one of the reasons I have a magazine getting ready to go to distribution.

Tombstone RJ
01-27-2011, 02:32 PM
Can anything that has a beginning not have an ending?


Can anything with a beginning be real?

can a guy with too much time be a nitwit?

alkemical
01-27-2011, 04:23 PM
...and other people just like taking cheap shots at others because they are assholes.

BroncoBuff
01-27-2011, 07:49 PM
Got an advance copy of this from Amazon Vine .... DAMN good.

He went nuts late in life, but what a ride though the 60s and 70s...

https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/51QXtQBl%2BvL._AA240_.jpg

Not available til next week, but if anybody wants my copy, PM me
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0307463907

Tombstone RJ
01-28-2011, 09:00 AM
...and other people just like taking cheap shots at others because they are a-holes.

I don't think baja is an a-hole, and I don't know why you think he's an a-hole either.

ICON
01-28-2011, 09:03 AM
How to Read People Like a Book: 50 Uncommon Tips You Need to Know (Succesful Living) [Paperback]Murray Oxman

ant1999e
01-28-2011, 09:15 AM
The Forever War by Dexter Filkins. It's about his experiences as a reporter in the Iraq and Afganistan wars. A really good read.

loborugger
01-28-2011, 11:10 AM
The Forever War by Dexter Filkins. It's about his experiences as a reporter in the Iraq and Afganistan wars. A really good read.

Forever war? Pffft. Those are conflicts with clearly defined and achievable goals that will end shortly. And there is no war profiteering going on, either. ;)

No1BroncoFan
01-27-2012, 09:45 PM
A whole year since the last post? Seriously? Has no one read anything good in the last year?

Recent reads:
"The Hunger Games," "Catching Fire" and "Mockingjay" by Suzanne Collins
These were recommended by a friend at work and are the best "kids books" (yeah, right, teenage kids battling to the death) since Harry Potter.

All five of the "Underland Chronicles," also by Suzanne Collins.
After ripping through the "Hunger Games" books I simply had to read these as well. Not as good, but still fun reads.

All seven of James Alan Gardner's "League of Peoples" series (re-read).
A sci-fi series where humanity is not the central species. While not entirely novel, it's still refreshing when an author can put humans in the back seat (back end of the bus in this case) of the power structure of the far-future inter-stellar community.

Currently reading:
The "Chanur" series by C.J. Cherryh (pronounced cherry).
Another far-future sci-fi where humans aren't the top of the pyramid. This author hasn't even let them on the bus for these books (though she does in other books/series). Cherryh is also one of a very few authors who can do sci-fi and fantasy very, very well.

On-deck:
Not sure, though I'm sure it will be something! My "to read" list has gotten so freakin' long it's sometimes hard to pick and choose. Maybe I'll just head for the library without my list and see what falls to hand. I've found some of my favorite books that way.

Ben

rovolution
01-27-2012, 09:48 PM
just finished reading The Hunger Games and really liked them

Jay3
01-28-2012, 03:28 AM
My daughter and wife just finished the Hunger Games and liked it. I'd read it, but I'm too manly.

Currently reading Dr. Zhivago.

Rother8
01-28-2012, 05:07 AM
Big terydactals. (sp?)

backup qb
01-28-2012, 05:26 AM
Ready Player One is a good one especially if you grew up in 80s and are a gamer. Currently reading Tebow's book.

Jay3
01-28-2012, 06:07 AM
Ready Player One is a good one especially if you grew up in 80s and are a gamer.

Had not heard of that one. How did I miss it? I'll probably read that. Thanks.

Drunk Monkey
01-28-2012, 06:41 AM
I made the mistake of picking up book 1 of the Wheel of Time series. I am now on book 8.

JCsuperstar
01-28-2012, 07:00 AM
I read Tell-All by Chuck Palahniuk. It wasn't very good seems to me his stuff has been trending downhill for a while now. Now I am onto the Clash of Kings by George R. R. Martin which is amazing. I have never been much of a fantasy reader but I really am enjoying the A song of ice and fire series. Anyone have suggestions for other good fantasy series?

BroncsRule
01-28-2012, 07:03 AM
I made the mistake of picking up book 1 of the Wheel of Time series. I am now on book 8.

8-9-10-11 are a hard push, but 12-13 are worth it.

TheReverend
01-28-2012, 07:31 AM
8-9-10-11 are a hard push, but 12-13 are worth it.

^ that. I don't remember 11 being so bad either.

Also you guys should just rest your eyes. You're going to want to read mine a dozen times this summer.

Drunk Monkey
01-28-2012, 07:47 AM
8-9-10-11 are a hard push, but 12-13 are worth it.

I almost always read Sci-fi. I wanted a break and I was in a book store in Hong Kong when I was traveling (limited options). I had no idea at that time WOT was part of a 13 book (and counting) series. I am enjoying it so far.

TheReverend
01-28-2012, 07:51 AM
I almost always read Sci-fi. I wanted a break and I was in a book store in Hong Kong when I was traveling (limited options). I had not idea at that time WOT was part of a 13 book (and counting) series. I am enjoying it so far.

You'll hit a wall for a few but worth it to push through.

hades
01-28-2012, 07:53 AM
I started reading Through My Eyes, jeez, it was horrible! I made it to chapter 4 and put it down. I like Tim, but not this book...

Broncomutt
01-28-2012, 07:54 AM
I thought Catch 22 was a great book and recently read another along that line. Absurdly funny one page, horrifying and sad the next. It's also about pilots, but the setting is WWI instead.

Goshawk Squadron by Derek Robinson. Very good.:thumbs:

mosca
01-28-2012, 07:58 AM
8-9-10-11 are a hard push, but 12-13 are worth it.
Yup - trying to finish Wheel of Time is like competing in an Ironman Triathlon. I believe I gave up after book 9 and one too many chapters describing intricate styles of dress that minor characters were sporting. Sadly our worst fears came to be true when Robert Jordan kicked the bucket before finishing the series.

BroncoInferno
01-28-2012, 08:30 AM
In the middle of Blood Meridian by Cormac McCarthy (again). Amazing read. McCarthy's prose is mesmerizing.

No1BroncoFan
01-29-2012, 08:05 PM
I don't get the love for the "Wheel of Time" books. Jordon was so blatantly derivative that I couldn't get past the first few. Same thing with the "Eregon" books. I might read Sanderson's WOT books though. Everything else of his has been incredible, especially "Elantris."

Archer81
01-29-2012, 08:41 PM
I need a few new series. The books I have I love...but you can reread them only so many times in a 2 month period.

City of Bones, Ash, Glass, Fallen Angels; Harry Turtledove's WW2 alt history series, Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Colleen McCulloughs Rome series...

:Broncos:

broncosteven
01-29-2012, 09:44 PM
I am rereading some of my favorite books that I read way too young.

I just finished my favorite book ever, it changed my life it was so good: "Razors Edge" my Somerset Maugham. I picked it up at a used book sale in the early 90's because the book was really old and it looked cool. It is a reprint from 1947, not worth anything though but I enjoy reading books in the older fonts and printing layouts, sure beats out an Ipad or kindleing.

After dinner I am reading the kids Hemmingway's "Old man and the sea".

I started "The sun also rises"

After that I have a pile: Mann's "Magic Mountain" and "Buddenbrooks", Collected Short Stories of Maugham, Williams, Fitzgerald, Hemmingway.


Plus at night I read the Little House books to my 9 year old daughter, we are close to the end on "These Happy Golden Years".

If you don't read to your kids you should. My daughter loves anything to do with Laura Ingalls Wilder and you should see her face light up when she talks about her. She wants to go to her house in Missouri, I am going to try to find any Wilder historical sites and plan a family trip around them if my health cooperates.

Great Memories.

BroncoBuff
01-30-2012, 08:26 PM
I don't get the love for the "Wheel of Time" books. Jordon was so blatantly derivative that I couldn't get past the first few.

Nothing wrong with derivative if the reader is unfamiliar with the source(s). And honestly, isn't everything in that "good vs. evil/brave knight/slay the dragon/ravish the maiden" genre derivative?

You can over-think anything. As great a book as McCarthy's "The Road" is completely ruined if you think for one second - any and every form of survivors/bandits/thieves and rogues would be clinging to the edges of that highway. The Dad and the kid wouldn't have made it 20 miles.

theAPAOps5
01-30-2012, 08:46 PM
I am rereading some of my favorite books that I read way too young.

I just finished my favorite book ever, it changed my life it was so good: "Razors Edge" my Somerset Maugham. I picked it up at a used book sale in the early 90's because the book was really old and it looked cool. It is a reprint from 1947, not worth anything though but I enjoy reading books in the older fonts and printing layouts, sure beats out an Ipad or kindleing.

After dinner I am reading the kids Hemmingway's "Old man and the sea".

I started "The sun also rises"

After that I have a pile: Mann's "Magic Mountain" and "Buddenbrooks", Collected Short Stories of Maugham, Williams, Fitzgerald, Hemmingway.


Plus at night I read the Little House books to my 9 year old daughter, we are close to the end on "These Happy Golden Years".

If you don't read to your kids you should. My daughter loves anything to do with Laura Ingalls Wilder and you should see her face light up when she talks about her. She wants to go to her house in Missouri, I am going to try to find any Wilder historical sites and plan a family trip around them if my health cooperates.

Great Memories.

Old Man and the sea! Love that book!

Anything by Hemingway is good. I have a book of his short stories, haven't read them in a while though.

BroncoBuff
01-30-2012, 09:40 PM
I just finished my favorite book ever, it changed my life it was so good: "Razors Edge" my Somerset Maugham.

Something of Maugham's has affected my life as well. There's a specific exchange in "Of Human Bondage" that recurrently comes to mind over the years: The (partially) crippled protagonist is an aspiring painter ... at some point he has the opportunity to speak with a successful master painter, and summons the courage to ask, "please tell me, do I have enough talent, do I have what it takes?" ... the master says "don't you believe you have enough talent to make it?" ... his response is, "perhaps, but I have many friends who believe they possess such, and I know them to be mistaken."

That passage has often come to mind for me. I've always tried to avoid self-delusion, not seeing myself through those rose-colored glasses, friends who've known me for years knock my "ruthless" self-examination. In hindsight, there should be some middle ground: you should be confident beyond objectivity, but not beyond reality.

broncosteven
01-30-2012, 10:27 PM
Something of Maugham's has affected my life as well. There's a specific exchange in "Of Human Bondage" that recurrently comes to mind over the years: The (partially) crippled protagonist is an aspiring painter ... at some point he has the opportunity to speak with a successful master painter, and summons the courage to ask, "please tell me, do I have enough talent, do I have what it takes?" ... the master says "don't you believe you have enough talent to make it?" ... his response is, "perhaps, but I have many friends who believe they possess such, and I know them to be mistaken."

That passage has often come to mind for me. I've always tried to avoid self-delusion, not seeing myself through those rose-colored glasses, friends who've known me for years knock my "ruthless" self-examination. In hindsight, there should be some middle ground: you should be confident beyond objectivity, but not beyond reality.

Yep, Of Human Bondage and "Rain" are great reads also up there for me with Steinbeck's East of Eden, of Mice and Men, Grapes of Wrath, Kranz's "Failure is not an option". How one deals with adversity and the choices we make.

I know people who knock lit because it is old and they were forced to read some in school but the history of lives bad decisions are just plot twists away on my shelf.

I told my 9 year old daughter that if anything happened to me and she needed an answer to a life lesson her answer is in her book and my meager library in my den if she is patient to look hard enough. It is amazing to see how much great commonsense is packed into Abby's Little House books, and to see it in her face and she understands how Ma and Pa Inglals make decisions based on no money and hope. Almanzo said at one point in one of the books you "Got to make your own luck".

Can't wait to read Harper Lee, Truman Copote, Dickens, more Dickens, etc...as they both get older and understand what is happening.

READ TO YOUR KIDS or if you have an older alzheimer family memeber READ TO THEM. Reading to some one is a great thing and great memories.

Read!

Read!







read.

extralife
01-30-2012, 10:42 PM
I need a few new series. The books I have I love...but you can reread them only so many times in a 2 month period.

City of Bones, Ash, Glass, Fallen Angels; Harry Turtledove's WW2 alt history series, Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Colleen McCulloughs Rome series...

:Broncos:

go read proust, you slack-jawed prole

Archer81
01-30-2012, 10:49 PM
go read proust, you slack-jawed prole


A 19th century french homo?

:Broncos:

extralife
01-30-2012, 11:51 PM
the best kind of homo, undoubtedly

Fedaykin
01-30-2012, 11:59 PM
I don't get the love for the "Wheel of Time" books. Jordon was so blatantly derivative that I couldn't get past the first few. Same thing with the "Eregon" books. I might read Sanderson's WOT books though. Everything else of his has been incredible, especially "Elantris."

Eragon the movie is my current litmus test for "worse movie ever".

Fedaykin
01-31-2012, 12:06 AM
Currently finishing off Song of Ice and Fire (2nd read for 1-4).

I'm giving The Gunslinger (King) series another shot. Though I might have to take the sage advice to just read the synopsis of Book 1. Last time I tried to read it the prose (esp the overuse of a thesaurus by King) just about gave me an aneurism.

cmhargrove
01-31-2012, 06:11 AM
I need a few new series. The books I have I love...but you can reread them only so many times in a 2 month period.

City of Bones, Ash, Glass, Fallen Angels; Harry Turtledove's WW2 alt history series, Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Colleen McCulloughs Rome series...

:Broncos:

I'm not reading back through all 40 pages of this thread to see if it has already been mentioned, but if you like Epic Science Fiction, I am near the end of Steven Erikson's 10,000+ page series of "the Malazan Book of the Fallen." Ten books, each around 900-1,300 pages. I have never, ever in my life read a storyline as complex. Sometimes you read one sentence that turns the plot from 5,000 pages earlier in the series and re-weaves it into the current story line. It is truly amazing.

I am also reading my first graphic novel "Jimmy Corrigan the Smartest Kid on Earth." I am only about 50 pages into it, so I don't know what I think of it yet, but it is pretty interesting for a grown up comic book. Relatively depressing so far, but an interesting take on grown up angst/regret/remorse.

cmhargrove
01-31-2012, 06:16 AM
The Forever War by Dexter Filkins. It's about his experiences as a reporter in the Iraq and Afganistan wars. A really good read.

I second this. I have read this book twice, the latest time we had one of my friends read it and come to my book club - he was a medic that had recently returned from Afghanistan with the Oklahoma National Guard unit that was shot up there. The book is intense and graphic, and our discussion was very interesting and confirmed Filkins' take on the situation there.

If you like Filkins, check out his recent youtube interviews on Afghanistan/Pakistan and his take on where we actually stand in that region - the two part interview lasts about 20 minutes, but is a really good follow up to the book.

mosca
01-31-2012, 04:14 PM
Currently finishing off Song of Ice and Fire (2nd read for 1-4).

I'm giving The Gunslinger (King) series another shot. Though I might have to take the sage advice to just read the synopsis of Book 1. Last time I tried to read it the prose (esp the overuse of a thesaurus by King) just about gave me an aneurism.
I've been telling myself to re-read Song of Ice and Fire for years now... bought autographed copies of 1-4 but I just cannot make it through Feast for Crows, no matters how much I loved Books 1-3! I hate to say it, but Martin is really suffering from whatever plagued Robert Jordan in the WoT series. The plot just starts draaaaging. Hope I can make it through Feast one day so I can get on and read Dance With Dragons.

The Dark Tower series is definitely worth your read. Books 1-4 are incredible... Wolves of the Calla and Song for Susannah were a bit different, but the last book is definitely anti-climactic. Still a great read and an awesome concept. I think King just had some trouble wrapping it up and putting it all together towards the end. I'm pumped for the new Dark Tower book King is releasing this year -The Wind Through the Keyhole?

Archer81
01-31-2012, 04:23 PM
Eragon the movie is my current litmus test for "worse movie ever".


The first Ghost Rider flick gives Eragon a run for its money as worst film ever. As does Sheena of the Jungle.

:Broncos:

Mile High Mojoe
01-31-2012, 05:20 PM
I’ve been on a horizontal trip reading about every American War since October of last year. In order here’s what I’ve read.

The war that made America: A short history of the French and Indian War by Fred Anderson

The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 by Robert Middlekauff

1776 by David McCullough

Union 1812 by A.J. Langguth

The Guns of August by Barbara Wertheim Tuchman

The Rise and fall of the Third Reich by William L. Shirer

Strong Men Armed: The United States Marines against Japan by Robert Leckie

I liked all of these books since I’m a history nut. The Rise and fall of the 3rd Reich was an amazing book I must say.

The one that impressed me the least was The Guns of August. So I need to find a better book at WWI. I still have yet to read a good book on the Whisky Rebellion, The Korean War and the Vietnam War. If you guys have suggestions I'd love to hear them.

I read The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara and The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang years ago. Within the last year I read Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut. That was a strange and interesting book. I want to read Catch 22 someday too.

I just finished Strong Men Armed last week. It was a tough one to get through because it was all battle and combat, the graphic nature of it got to me a little bit. So I’m taking a break and reading something light right now. But I want to continue my American War study soon.

broncosteven
01-31-2012, 05:58 PM
I’ve been on a horizontal trip reading about every American War since October of last year. In order here’s what I’ve read.

The war that made America: A short history of the French and Indian War by Fred Anderson

The Glorious Cause: The American Revolution, 1763-1789 by Robert Middlekauff

1776 by David McCullough

Union 1812 by A.J. Langguth

The Guns of August by Barbara Wertheim Tuchman

The Rise and fall of the Third Reich by William L. Shirer

Strong Men Armed: The United States Marines against Japan by Robert Leckie

I liked all of these books since I’m a history nut. The Rise and fall of the 3rd Reich was an amazing book I must say.

The one that impressed me the least was The Guns of August. So I need to find a better book at WWI. I still have yet to read a good book on the Whisky Rebellion, The Korean War and the Vietnam War. If you guys have suggestions I'd love to hear them.

I read The Killer Angels by Michael Shaara and The Rape of Nanking by Iris Chang years ago. Within the last year I read Slaughterhouse 5 by Kurt Vonnegut. That was a strange and interesting book. I want to read Catch 22 someday too.

I just finished Strong Men Armed last week. It was a tough one to get through because it was all battle and combat, the graphic nature of it got to me a little bit. So I’m taking a break and reading something light right now. But I want to continue my American War study soon.

I found this at the library a few years ago, it was pretty good but was limited to the USA involvement.

Gilbert, Martin. The Somme: Heroism and Horror in the First World War

I live near Cantigny, the home of Robert McCormack (Tribune Publisher after the war) I read a book on the battle of Cantigny but it was not a gripping read, just history.

I found a WWI BBC series that was heavy on the 1st couple years and light on the Somme and USA involvement I have found the books and features on History Channel in the USA is opposite, light on the start and beginning and heavy on the USA actions.

HooptyHoops
01-31-2012, 06:08 PM
8-9-10-11 are a hard push, but 12-13 are worth it.

I totally agree with this....8 started the blah, and then I read 9(really bad) and I ordered 10(back in the day) and never read it. Maybe I should just skip to 12 and 13? I read this series a long time ago, and I haven't read a series of books sense then....and yes, I would like to find the next series of books that could compete with the 1st 7 books of WofT.....any suggestions?

OCBronco
01-31-2012, 08:34 PM
The last several months I have been reading my way through the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. If you've never read them, they are really great fun. It's hard to explain why, but it feels like the books have made me a better thinker and student of the world, as well.

I have also been working my way through the Robert Harris roman trilogy. Great stuff.

No1BroncoFan
02-02-2012, 08:39 PM
I need a few new series. The books I have I love...but you can reread them only so many times in a 2 month period.

City of Bones, Ash, Glass, Fallen Angels; Harry Turtledove's WW2 alt history series, Harry Potter, Game of Thrones, Colleen McCulloughs Rome series...

:Broncos:

Here are some ideas for you (and it seems from your list that we have similar tastes in books):
"Chanur" series by C.J Cherryh
-Minus the last book, "Chanur's Legacy." Not up to Cherryh's usual standards (far from it) and a spin-off from the series.

"Foreigner" series also by C.J Cherryh
-Twelve books and counting (#13 due out in March).

"Faded Sun" trilogy, again by C.J Cherryh
-One of Cherry's best (and earliest) works.

"Species Imperative" series by Julie E Czerneda
-Great series by an author I'd never heard of before. Got the first book at the then local used book store on a whim and was impressed.

"Freedom" series and "Pern" series by Anne McCaffrey
-To a degree, typical McCaffrey but better than most of her stuff.

"Artemis Fowl" by Eoin Colfer
-A twelve year old criminal mastermind? Really? Yes, really. I've read this series through three or four times.

"Ender" series by Orson Scott Card
-Hands down, one of the greatest sci-fi series of all time.

The "League of Peoples" books by James Alan Gardner.
-Not a series in the traditional sense as the characters change from one book to the next with one semi-main character appearing in five of the seven books, but definitely related and should be read in publication order.

The "Hunger Games" series by Suzanne Collins
-One of the freshest new voices in sci-fi.

"Idlewild" series by Nick Sagan (son of Carl).
-I picked up the second book (didn't know it was a series) at the library simply because I heard Nick was the son of astronomer, astrophysicist, cosmologist, author, science popularizer and science communicator Carl Sagan. It absolutely blew my freakin' doors off! All three are great reads and I've read the series three times now, in just the last year or so.

These are the ones I can think of without having to dig into my favorite site, Fantastic Fiction (http://www.fantasticfiction.co.uk).

Hope this helps.

broncosteven
02-02-2012, 10:00 PM
The last several months I have been reading my way through the Sherlock Holmes stories and novels by Sir Arthur Conan Doyle. If you've never read them, they are really great fun. It's hard to explain why, but it feels like the books have made me a better thinker and student of the world, as well.

I have also been working my way through the Robert Harris roman trilogy. Great stuff.

My dad gave me my Grandfathers library when I was a kid, way too young to give a kid such nice collections, my younger brother destroyed one of the Doyle books. Some nice hardbound reprints from 1919-1940's of Les Miserables, Collected works of Doyle, Collected works of Poe, Collected works of Kipling (overrated in my book).

I enjoyed Les Mis and the Doyle books the best.

BTW I am not a fan of Mystery on PBS but I caught the latest BBC iteration of Sherlock Holms and I love it, it is a modern day version and is entertaining.

Cito Pelon
02-02-2012, 10:41 PM
I'm reading "Nostromo" for the first time.

Lycan
02-07-2012, 03:45 PM
I am currently reading the Sword of Truth books by Terry Goodkind.

Just started but pretty good so far.

SonOfLe-loLang
02-07-2012, 03:50 PM
i hear that My Sweet Saga by Brett Sills was damn good :D

Slightly Soiled
02-07-2012, 04:41 PM
HP Lovecraft is kind of my current obsession. I also enjoy historical fiction ie "Vlad"- about the rise and fall of The "real" Dracula.

broncosteven
02-07-2012, 06:19 PM
I picked up "Just kids" from the library.

Not into Maplethorp's "art" but I am into French lit and so is Patty Smith. She is a pretty good writer and it is entertaining so far. I like how she compares her bohemian late 60's life to her favorite French authors.

No1BroncoFan
02-07-2012, 07:20 PM
I am currently reading the Sword of Truth books by Terry Goodkind.

Just started but pretty good so far.

My condolences.

Seriously though, those books get real repetitive. I barely managed to slog through them taking many long breaks between books and still only managed to make it through "Confessor" (the last book at the time). When I heard there were more on the way I cried a little. Never did get back into them.

Hopefully you'll enjoy them more than I did.

On another note, seeing as I am nearly done with the "Chanur" books, I headed to the library. No list, no expectations and found several new (or at least new to me) books. "Ghost" and "Firefly" by Piers Anthony who may not be the worlds bet writer, but he is entertaining. "Blindsight" (the one I'm starting next, sounds wayyyyyy too good), "Starfish" and "Maelstrom" by Peter Watts. I've never read anything by him before so I may be taking two of them back if the first one sucks, but they all sound good. I'll let you all know if his stuff's worth reading.

Chris
02-08-2012, 07:12 PM
Currently reading Down and Out in Paris and London by George Orwell. His first published book I believe. It could easily be depressing but it's not... it's fascinating, colourful and in a way comforting so far... it's even sometimes funny.

No1BroncoFan
03-24-2012, 05:16 PM
"Ghost" and "Firefly" sucked ass! Piers Anthony's characters had all the depth of spilled beer and the plots were tiresome. Ugh! Majorly disappointing from a guy who's usually so fun to read.

"Blindsight," "Starfish," "Maelstrom," "Behemoth: B-Max" and "Behemoth: Seppouku" by Peter Watts were amazing. "Blindsight" is a stand alone novel about in-system space travel with a vampire captain, the rest are 4 parts in a trilogy (the publisher required Mr. Watts to publish the third volume as two books or kill the story by hacking out a third) about an ancient viral life-form that has survived in the deep ocean trenches and what happens when it gets loose. These were easily some of the best new fiction I've read in the last decade.

I also picked up "Omnitopia Dawn" by Diane Duane and the Moonlight bay books by Dean Koontz ("Fear Nothing" and "Seize the Night"). The one by Diane Duane was pretty good. A story that's been done before, but dressed up in a fresh set of clothes it all worked well. The Moonlight Bay books are a third or fourth re-read for me.

Up next:
"The Final Judgement" by Richard North Patterson and "The Wheel of Darkness" by Douglas Preston and Lincoln Child, both new to me purchases from the thrift store. I've also got a few others I picked up at the library that I can't remember the names of.

Jay3
03-24-2012, 05:23 PM
I think it was somebody here that recommended Ready Player One (a futuristic quest/mystery that depends on knowing a lot of 80's pop culture trivia). If it was, thanks. Reading it and enjoying now.

BroncoInferno
03-24-2012, 05:25 PM
http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/51c8Li8BYGL._BO2,204,203,200_PIsitb-sticker-arrow-click,TopRight,35,-76_AA300_SH20_OU01_.jpg

A facsinating read about human origins.

ColoradoDarin
03-24-2012, 05:55 PM
We dumped satellite TV almost 2 months ago, so I've been reading so much more than I used to. I read the Thrawn Trilogy (Star Wars books, but definitely have the feel of the original Trilogy), and I read a couple of Harlan Coben books (Long Lost and Caught) and am just starting Live Wire. Probably going to read Ender's Game next and picked up a few more Timothy Zahn books (more Star Wars) for after that.

Fedaykin
03-24-2012, 05:59 PM
I am currently reading the Sword of Truth books by Terry Goodkind.

Just started but pretty good so far.

STOP after the first! I repeat STOP after the first!

The first is decent, if a bit derivative. An excellent self contained character driven story. Then Goodkind decided to expand the universe into an "epic" in which he introduces an entirely new plot. That's fine, it happens a lot.

The real problem is that along the way he stops writing a story and starts preaching. Several of the books are nothing more than a enormous rants about his political and philosophical positions in which he constructs a society that embodies a straw man for him to easily beat on. Faith of the Fallen is about 950 pages of rant and 50 pages of actual story. There is absolutely zero progression of the series plot despite the story lasting almost 2 years for the characters. I could summarize that book in less than 20 words. The next two books are similarly constructed. He seems to think this makes his books "literary".

They also become increasingly self repetitive. The same basic story happens:

1.) Richard and Kahlan start off happy after succeeding in the last book.
2.) Richard and Kahlan are separated by the forces of evil in the current book
2a.) Richard and Kahlan go all emo about being separated and question each other's love.
3.) Richard and Kahlan overcome the evil and are reunited learning that all along everything was OK between them!

I think Goodkind has some serious abandonment/relationship issues =P

uplink
03-25-2012, 03:02 AM
just read "A Prayer for Own Meany". I define good art as things you never will forget, I think I'll always remember the characters in this book.

Miss I.
03-25-2012, 03:10 AM
i hear that My Sweet Saga by Brett Sills was damn good :D

Actually I just started that book, it's pretty hilarious. I highly recommend it, even if the author is kind of a punk ass.

SonOfLe-loLang
03-25-2012, 07:40 AM
Actually I just started that book, it's pretty hilarious. I highly recommend it, even if the author is kind of a punk ass.

Everything in this post=completely true! :)

Rohirrim
03-25-2012, 07:57 AM
Just finished Cormac McCarthy's Child of God. I'm going back through his books, reading the ones I've missed. Weird little book.

DarkHorse30
03-25-2012, 08:12 AM
spy novels - (2 weeks worth here)

Boneman's Daughters - Ted Dekker
Edge - Jeff Deaver (this guy can spin a tale like few others)

Alex Cross books by James Patterson
(Along came a Spider and kiss the girls)

just saw "Girl with the Dragon Tatoo" - great casting, and followed the book almost verbatim (except for Harriet's location - they left out New Zealand)

3 weeks ago read Godfather - Mario Puzo. The screen plays were lifted directly from the book - fun read, since I've seen the movies about a dozen times.

broncosteven
03-25-2012, 02:41 PM
I finished a Robert Heinlein book I started 30 years ago, I thought it would be worth the effort, sadly it was not, I should have picked a different Heinlein book to start back in HS.

I am close to finishing a Bio on Bix Biderbecke by Ralph Berton which was very entertaining though it was a mix between Bix and Berton family bio but I didn't mind because I didn't know about Gene and Vic Berton before reading this book. I highly recommend it if you want to read a Jazz Bio.

I have a bunch of technical reading to catch up with that I am not looking forward to.

HooptyHoops
04-02-2012, 08:42 PM
Just finished The Shack by WM. Paul Young - best book I've read in the past couple of years!

snowspot66
04-02-2012, 09:33 PM
My condolences.

Seriously though, those books get real repetitive. I barely managed to slog through them taking many long breaks between books and still only managed to make it through "Confessor" (the last book at the time). When I heard there were more on the way I cried a little. Never did get back into them.

Hopefully you'll enjoy them more than I did.


You might want to finish the series. The middle ones are repetitive and preachy (though I still enjoyed them, I think I have more patience than most) but in the end it wraps up quite nicely and in a way I certainly wasn't expecting.

Crushaholic
04-02-2012, 10:13 PM
I am currently reading "In The Fullness Of Time", by Vincent Nicolosi. It is a fictional book about the architect of the Warren G. Harding memorial. it is set at the time of the JFK assassination. The main character attempts to draw parallels between JFK and Harding...

Shananahan
04-02-2012, 10:54 PM
Since February:

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_QWXq50JfLrU/TS-q0hfXJyI/AAAAAAAADGY/Y10XK3VqSmY/s1600/TheLoomingTower.jpg

This was awesome. I was disappointed in that it really does stop, almost abruptly, shortly after 9/11, but the amount of research and background that went into this book is pretty impressive.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-MUi9NtZW7Oc/TcppxsVViTI/AAAAAAAAB1s/GQKg66ndCVU/s1600/Visit%2Bfrom%2Bthe%2BGoon%2BSquad.jpg

Enjoyed this. At times her writing was a little too experimental for my taste, but at other times it's almost downright brilliant. It reminded me of some of those Wayside Stories books, only for messed up adults.

http://www.spectermagazine.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/10/The_Marriage_Plot-Eugenides.jpg

Definitely no Middlesex, but I like his style nonetheless. Romances aren't my normal genre of choice.

I've read a ton of books since last summer. Too many to list. The best book I read in that time was Mailer's The Naked and The Dead. Easily one of the most enjoyable reading experiences I've had and one of my favorite books in the past five years. It's long as hell, but worth it.

Dedhed
04-03-2012, 07:01 AM
I just finished The Abstinence Teacher by Tom Perlotta. Pretty poor, imo, and reminded me why I rarely read novels. He hashed his way through a tired old story line; small town divided by a religious/secular rift, with characters who amount to nothing more than stick figures and straw men.

I read it because the author is going to be speaking at a literary festival in town and I wanted to be able to ask some questions about his work. The only question I have for him now is, "How do you find an agent who can get extremely mediocre work published"?

Reading A Comedy of Errors now. I always go to Shakespeare to wash off the taste of a bad literary experience.

No1BroncoFan
04-04-2012, 12:06 PM
You might want to finish the series. The middle ones are repetitive and preachy (though I still enjoyed them, I think I have more patience than most) but in the end it wraps up quite nicely and in a way I certainly wasn't expecting.

No thanks. Time is too precious for bad fiction. There are far too many better stories and better writers out there.

Glad you enjoyed them though.

Broncomutt
04-04-2012, 12:52 PM
Just finished Lonesome Dove by Larry McMurtry which was good. If not for the character of Gus McCrae I wouldn't have liked it as much.

Currently reading Shogun by James Clavelle and loving it.

bendog
04-04-2012, 12:53 PM
Through My Eyes by Tim Tebow

(thread hijack)

ghwk
04-04-2012, 01:15 PM
American Desperado See this thread:

http://www.orangemane.com/BB/showthread.php?t=104694