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Powderaddict
02-16-2014, 10:38 AM
So after 1 1/2 years I've decided my current job is unsalvageable. I cannot make it work. The job sucks, the pay is absolute crap, at least the benefits are pretty good. So for the last couple months I've been looking for a new job.

The job market here is very, very tight. Jobs that I want, and can afford to work at, come by very rarely. In the last 3 months, I've applied for 3 different positions. I'm going to be a little picky, in that I don't want to jump from one terrible situation to another.

My problem is that it's been so long since I've really had to work at finding a job, I've kind of forgotten how. I was at my previous job for about 8 years, 1 1/2 at my current. My current job is the first I applied for when I found out my previous employer was moving out of state. My current employer contacted me right away after receiving my application/resume, and interviewed me the following week. A friend got me into my previous job. So really, it's been over 10 years since I've really had to do a serious job search.

One position I applied for I really, really want. The pay is about $3.50 an hour more than I'm making now, plus it would get me out of the office environment. It's pretty much exactly what I'm looking for. I turned in my app/resume about 2 1/2 weeks ago when the job posted. They stopped accepting applications on the 7th. I immediately followed up my application with an e-mail to them after turning in my app, and I followed it up as well by calling last Wednesday (I left a message) stating I was really interested, and felt my skills really would fit the position well, and stated I hoped to be able to meet with them to discuss the position.

So my main questions are (sorry for the long windedness):

1. Would it be a good idea to go into the business on Monday and just introduce myself, and reiterate my interest? Or would that be pestering, considering I've already emailed and called? I don't want to be annoying, but I want to show my interest.

2. It's been a just over a week since they stopped accepting applications, and I haven't heard anything - is this a bad sign, or am I just being impatient? I'm normally pretty patient, but I really want this job. I should mention it's a job working for the city, so maybe local government offices just run slow.

Any other tips, reminders, advice, etc would be welcome. I'm pretty good at interviewing, and present myself pretty well in person, but a bit of a refresher wouldn't hurt!

rugbythug
02-16-2014, 10:56 AM
So after 1 1/2 years I've decided my current job is unsalvageable. I cannot make it work. The job sucks, the pay is absolute crap, at least the benefits are pretty good. So for the last couple months I've been looking for a new job.

The job market here is very, very tight. Jobs that I want, and can afford to work at, come by very rarely. In the last 3 months, I've applied for 3 different positions. I'm going to be a little picky, in that I don't want to jump from one terrible situation to another.

My problem is that it's been so long since I've really had to work at finding a job, I've kind of forgotten how. I was at my previous job for about 8 years, 1 1/2 at my current. My current job is the first I applied for when I found out my previous employer was moving out of state. My current employer contacted me right away after receiving my application/resume, and interviewed me the following week. A friend got me into my previous job. So really, it's been over 10 years since I've really had to do a serious job search.

One position I applied for I really, really want. The pay is about $3.50 an hour more than I'm making now, plus it would get me out of the office environment. It's pretty much exactly what I'm looking for. I turned in my app/resume about 2 1/2 weeks ago when the job posted. They stopped accepting applications on the 7th. I immediately followed up my application with an e-mail to them after turning in my app, and I followed it up as well by calling last Wednesday (I left a message) stating I was really interested, and felt my skills really would fit the position well, and stated I hoped to be able to meet with them to discuss the position.

So my main questions are (sorry for the long windedness):

1. Would it be a good idea to go into the business on Monday and just introduce myself, and reiterate my interest? Or would that be pestering, considering I've already emailed and called? I don't want to be annoying, but I want to show my interest.

2. It's been a just over a week since they stopped accepting applications, and I haven't heard anything - is this a bad sign, or am I just being impatient? I'm normally pretty patient, but I really want this job. I should mention it's a job working for the city, so maybe local government offices just run slow.

Any other tips, reminders, advice, etc would be welcome. I'm pretty good at interviewing, and present myself pretty well in person, but a bit of a refresher wouldn't hurt!

It's not a good sign that they stopped accepting applications and you have heard nothing. You need to get a hold of someone alive. At this point you have like 5% chance at the job. This could be a sham posting for them to hire someone they wanted the whole time. Going in can't hurt, not likely to bump into the decision maker and you need to find out who that is anyway. FYI-The Message I would not have done. You need to create a desire for them to hire you. It sounded like you told them a desire for you to hire them. Think about it from their perspective, You want to be Peyton Manning, not Shaun Phillips.

Powderaddict
02-16-2014, 11:03 AM
I did mention on the voice mail several skills that were very relevant to the position. Do you feel calling them is just a bad idea in general, or leaving a voice mail is a bad idea?

rugbythug
02-16-2014, 11:06 AM
I did mention on the voice mail several skills that were very relevant to the position. Do you feel calling them is just a bad idea in general, or leaving a voice mail is a bad idea?

I call, but I would not leave a VM. Just not terribly effective, and too likely to be detrimental.

ZONA
02-16-2014, 11:29 AM
I don't know your skill set but I do know that the grass always seems greener on the other side. People tend to focus on things they don't like about situations rather then focusing on the positives of a situation. Often times, once they get to the other side of the grass, the do the same thing and after a period of time when the newness wears off, they once again start to focus on the negatives.

I will say this, that every person at one point or another, should at least consider self employment. IMO, that is the fastest way to improving your financial self. It's risky yes, but sounds like you're bored of the same old same old. Give it some serious thought, what skills do you have that you can see yourself doing as a self employed person. I was in your position a few years back and got tired of working my tail off and then 4 years later the company outsourcing my dept and my job along with it. That happened 3 times in 10 years and it always seemed like I had to start over at the end of the line. Being self employed is very enjoyable. It's hard work, but many times you have more freedom then working a 8-5 job.

Oh, and I would not go back and bother that company again. They know you're interested, along with the other 250 applicants, lol. You have to impress the hell out of them during your interview. You have to sell yourself. Make YOU sound so much better then just your resume.

Best of luck

Powderaddict
02-16-2014, 11:38 AM
I don't know your skill set but I do know that the grass always seems greener on the other side. People tend to focus on things they don't like about situations rather then focusing on the positives of a situation. Often times, once they get to the other side of the grass, the do the same thing and after a period of time when the newness wears off, they once again start to focus on the negatives.

I will say this, that every person at one point or another, should at least consider self employment. IMO, that is the fastest way to improving your financial self. It's risky yes, but sounds like you're bored of the same old same old. Give it some serious thought, what skills do you have that you can see yourself doing as a self employed person. I was in your position a few years back and got tired of working my tail off and then 4 years later the company outsourcing my dept and my job along with it. That happened 3 times in 10 years and it always seemed like I had to start over at the end of the line. Being self employed is very enjoyable. It's hard work, but many times you have more freedom then working a 8-5 job.

Oh, and I would not go back and bother that company again. They know you're interested, along with the other 250 applicants, lol. You have to impress the hell out of them during your interview. You have to sell yourself. Make YOU sound so much better then just your resume.

Best of luck

I feel like I've given this position a fair shot, and it's progressively gotten worse. I know for a fact every single person in my department is looking to get out. I don't take leaving a job lightly, I went through a lot of BS at my last job, but there were enough positives to stick with it, until the picked up and left anyways.

I've been thinking of what kind of business I could do. I've been looking into the process to get a titles on motorcycles with lost titles. I though I could buy bikes cheap, title them, then sell them. I just don't know how much demand there would be. I'd love to get a tire changing machine and learn how to change motorcycle tires, there is nowhere within 25 miles that changes motorcycle tires. Even then many people travel 60 miles to get their motorcycle tires changed. Right now we are really tight, so finding money to get something off the ground will be difficult.

I've also considered getting a CDL, I see tons of ads for CDL drivers around here. Which is weird, because I talk to truck drivers frequently that tell me there is no work. It seems like those that I know that do it put in 70+ hour weeks regularly, and I'm not willing to spend that much time away from my family.

DenverBound
02-16-2014, 01:25 PM
I feel like I've given this position a fair shot, and it's progressively gotten worse. I know for a fact every single person in my department is looking to get out. I don't take leaving a job lightly, I went through a lot of BS at my last job, but there were enough positives to stick with it, until the picked up and left anyways.

I've been thinking of what kind of business I could do. I've been looking into the process to get a titles on motorcycles with lost titles. I though I could buy bikes cheap, title them, then sell them. I just don't know how much demand there would be. I'd love to get a tire changing machine and learn how to change motorcycle tires, there is nowhere within 25 miles that changes motorcycle tires. Even then many people travel 60 miles to get their motorcycle tires changed. Right now we are really tight, so finding money to get something off the ground will be difficult.

I've also considered getting a CDL, I see tons of ads for CDL drivers around here. Which is weird, because I talk to truck drivers frequently that tell me there is no work. It seems like those that I know that do it put in 70+ hour weeks regularly, and I'm not willing to spend that much time away from my family.

What profession are you in or looking to get into?

I'm in the same boat, kind of. I'm moving to CO on the 7th of next month and haven't even started the ACTUAL job hunt yet.

The tire changing idea isn't a bad one. What do those machines usually cost?

DenverBound
02-16-2014, 01:29 PM
I just did a quick search and found that they are really inexpensive. Even a fully automated unit is just over $1,000. That's an easy investment. As with any new business, it's the marketing that's the killer.

Powderaddict
02-16-2014, 02:06 PM
What profession are you in or looking to get into?

I'm in the same boat, kind of. I'm moving to CO on the 7th of next month and haven't even started the ACTUAL job hunt yet.

The tire changing idea isn't a bad one. What do those machines usually cost?

My background is customer service/general office stuff.

I do have a couple leads, and something will turn up at some point I'm sure. I just need to get out of the office I'm currently in.

barryr
02-16-2014, 02:24 PM
The most important thing you have to do is make yourself stand out from the rest somehow. If that means volunteering somewhere, if you have the time, just get yourself noticed. Offer to do more than what is expected from you. Make follow up calls, stress how much you would love to be apart of that company's team because you can offer whatever you feel would be important to it. People are always noticing what you do or don't do, so get as many good references as you can. Like I said, if that means volunteering time someplace, than in itself could lead to other possibilities that you don't know exist right now. People know someone who someone kind of thing. Above all, remain positive, and doors will open at some point. Good luck!