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baja
08-09-2013, 11:26 AM
From an email;

I recently saw a Food inspector on TV.... He said he had lived overseas and he had seen the filthy conditions their foods are raised and processed in.

It is enough to make you throw up. Some foreign workers have to wear masks as they work in these places, because the food is so rotten and filthy, it makes them want to throw up. Many of their Fish on Fish Farms are fed Raw sewage daily. He said he has seen so much filth throughout their food growing and processing that he would "never" eat any of it. They raise this filth , put some food coloring and some flavorings on it, then they ship it to the USA for YOU to consume and feed to YOUR families. They have no Food & Safety Inspectors. They ship it to you to buy and poison your families and friends.

Imported food we eat and the junk we buy
Green Giant frozen vegetables are from China ,
And so are most of Europe 's Best.


Arctic Gardens are Okay. So is Birdseye.

Never buy the grocery store garlic unless it is clearly marked from USA or Canada, the other stuff is grown in people poop (even worse than chicken poop).
China is the largest producer of garlic in the world. U.S. Is next.

Buy only local honey, much honey is shipped in huge containers from China and re-packed here.

Cold-FX is grown and packed in China and is full of fecal bacteria. Doesn't work anyway, big scam. If the country of origin is not clearly marked beware.
If produce, ask an employee.

Watch out for packages which state "prepared for", "packed by" or "imported by". I don't understand the lack of mandatory labeling, especially the produce.
The country of origin should be clearly shown on the item in the store. I go to the local farmers' markets in season and keep a wary eye open the rest of the year.

Please read this very carefully, and read to the very bottom.
It's important for all of us.

How is it possible to ship food from China cheaper than having it produced in the U.S. Or Canada?

FOR EXAMPLE THE "OUR FAMILY" BRAND OF MANDARIN ORANGES SAYS RIGHT ON THE CAN 'FROM CHINA '. SO, FOR A FEW MORE CENTS, BUY THE LIBERTY BRAND.
GOLD BRAND OR THE DOLE IS FROM CALIFORNIA
Beware, Costco sells canned peaches and pears in a plastic jar that come from China

ALL "HIGH LINER" AND MOST OTHER FROZEN FISH PRODUCTS COME FROM CHINA OR INDONESIA . THE PACKAGE MAY SAY "PACIFIC SALMON" ON THE FRONT, BUT LOOK FOR THE SMALL PRINT. MOST OF THESE PRODUCTS COME FROM FISH FARMS IN THE ORIENT WHERE THERE ARE NO REGULATIONS ON WHAT IS FED TO THESE FISH.

Recently The Montreal Gazette had an article by the Canadian Government on how Chinese feed the fish: They suspend chicken wire crates over the fish ponds, and the fish feed on chicken s--t.
If you search the Internet about what the Chinese feed their fish, you'll be alarmed; e.g., growth hormones, expired anti-biotic from humans. Never buy any type of fish or shellfish that comes from these countries: Vietnam , China , Philippines

Check this out personally. I did. Steinfeld's Pickles are made in India - just as bad!

Another example is in canned mushrooms. No-Name brand came from Indonesia.

Also check those little fruit cups. They used to be made in Canada in the Niagara region until about 2 years ago. They are now packaged in China!

While the Chinese export inferior and even toxic products, dangerous toys, and goods to be sold in North American markets, the media wrings its hands!

Yet, 70% of North Americans believe that the trading privileges afforded to the Chinese should be suspended!

Well, duh! Why do you need the government to suspend trading privileges?


SIMPLY DO IT YOURSELF, CANADA AND THE U.S.!


Simply look on the bottom of every product you buy, and if it says 'Made in China ' or 'PRC' (Peoples Republic of China, and that now includes Hong Kong), simply choose another product, or none at all. You will be amazed at how dependent you are on Chinese products, and you will be equally amazed at what you can do without.

THINK ABOUT THIS:

If 200 million North Americans refuse to buy just $20 each of Chinese goods, that's a billion dollar trade imbalance resolved in our favor...fast!! The downside? Some Canadian/American businesses will feel a temporary pinch from having foreign stockpiles of inventory.

Just one month of trading losses will hit the Chinese for 8% of their North American exports.
Then they will at least have to ask themselves if the benefits of their arrogance and lawlessness are worth it.

START NOW and don't stop.

Send this to everybody you know. Let's show them that we are intelligent, and and NOBODY can take us for granted.

Meck77
08-09-2013, 12:10 PM
This is an area where you and I do agree. Maybe not for the same doomsday idea though.

My organic heirloom seed collection just hit 5 million or so recently with my latest haul.

I'm perfecting a system to where every American can have a back yard garden with 20+ plants for I'm hoping less than $60.00. It will come living and mobile from my farms. Still working on final costs. Proto types are pumping out superior organic, virtually no maintenance, weed free food!

While some see America on the decline I see a renaissance happening all across America with new technology for farming, local community farms, CSA farms, huge farmers markets, gardening classes in every small town and major city, the American people's potential is LIMITLESS!!!!!!!!!!!!!

It's an exciting time to be an American!

Bacchus
08-09-2013, 12:16 PM
Jesus Christ, it keeps getting harder and harder just to ****ing live.

Meck77
08-09-2013, 12:26 PM
Jesus Christ, it keeps getting harder and harder just to ****ing live.
I guess it depends on how you look at things. Growing your food has never been easier, signing up to own shares in an an organic farm to provide all your fresh healthy food has never been easier. Hell most of them have websites where you click a mouse, give them a credit card, and they will damn near deliver it to your house or within a few miles of your house.

No more fighting crowds at the grocery store buying ****ty food! It's like dominos pizza service but the food is amazing.

Here are several HUNDRED THOUSAND options for you.

Personally I like the ones where you pick the food yourself. No lines at the grocery store, pay the farmer cash, food is on the grill 20 minutes after you pick it. (depending on your location of course).

http://www.localharvest.org/

Rohirrim
08-09-2013, 12:46 PM
The only seafood I buy says "Wild caught in Alaska" right on the package. I don't buy shrimp anymore. Ninety percent of it is farmed and the other ten percent comes from the Gulf. I don't really care what BP says, that **** ain't safe. I don't eat farmed seafood. I'm sure Tilapia is no different, as far as the conditions go. I also don't buy any produce grown outside the U.S., especially Mexico. I get my raw, unfiltered honey from Ambrosia Honey Co. in Longmont, at least until I can get my own hive going. ;D

Rigs11
08-09-2013, 12:47 PM
Agree. Watch out for pet treats from china too.

Rohirrim
08-09-2013, 12:49 PM
Unfortunately, we are trashing the oceans at such an alarming rate that pretty soon nothing from the ocean will be safe either.

B-Large
08-09-2013, 02:01 PM
We've had a nice yield from our garden this year, I have eatin so much eggplant I think I am turning purple...

I am really reluctant to eat anything these days. We eat alot of lentils that we soak (no canned) in many of out dishes, kind of hard to **** up a organic lentil. Alot beans we soak as well, good sources of protein, and again, pretty hard to **** up an organic bean.

I went into a Walmart once, a buddy of mine needed something and it was close. for fun I went a looked at the food.. my gosh, scary- all the fish was from Thailand, the beef was a grayish/brown or starting to go there in msot packages, overall, yikes.

Plant based has been a good thing for me, I don;t have to worry about alot of those things....

did I mentioned beer and Boubon were plant based... oh yeah!

baja
08-09-2013, 03:01 PM
Basically if it comes in a package or box and is not from a natural foods store with the organic emblem that you are pretty sure it is toxic to some degree.

ak1971
08-09-2013, 05:33 PM
So that's why everyone calls me a pussy

baja
08-09-2013, 05:51 PM
So that's why everyone calls me a p***Y

and why they call Bob shiit for brains

W*GS
08-09-2013, 05:56 PM
Basically if it comes in a package or box and is not from a natural foods store with the organic emblem that you are pretty sure it is toxic to some degree.

Water is toxic to some degree.

baja
08-09-2013, 06:00 PM
Water is toxic to some degree.


Toxic to the extreme if your community water department is adding fluoride to your water.

baja
08-09-2013, 06:00 PM
BTW Wags is your logic everything is toxic so don't worry about being selective?

nyuk nyuk
08-09-2013, 07:12 PM
Just saw a movie and ate a hot dog.

Am I a weenie?

No wait, I'm not a Democrat.

baja
08-09-2013, 07:21 PM
http://www.peta.org/resized-image.ashx/__size/550x0/__key/CommunityServer-Blogs-Components-WeblogFiles/00-00-00-01-48/6505.IG_2D00_hotdog_2D00_v4.jpg






http://www.peta.org/b/thepetafiles/archive/2013/07/01/whats-in-your-hot-dog.aspx

W*GS
08-09-2013, 07:23 PM
Toxic to the extreme if your community water department is adding fluoride to your water.

General Jack D. Ripper: Mandrake, do you realize that in addition to fluoridating water, why, there are studies underway to fluoridate salt, flour, fruit juices, soup, sugar, milk... ice cream. Ice cream, Mandrake, children's ice cream.
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: [very nervous] Lord, Jack.
General Jack D. Ripper: You know when fluoridation first began?
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: I... no, no. I don't, Jack.
General Jack D. Ripper: Nineteen hundred and forty-six. 1946, Mandrake. How does that coincide with your post-war Commie conspiracy, huh? It's incredibly obvious, isn't it? A foreign substance is introduced into our precious bodily fluids without the knowledge of the individual. Certainly without any choice. That's the way your hard-core Commie works.
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: Uh, Jack, Jack, listen... tell me, tell me, Jack. When did you first... become... well, develop this theory?
General Jack D. Ripper: [somewhat embarrassed] Well, I, uh... I... I... first became aware of it, Mandrake, during the physical act of love.
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: Hmm.
General Jack D. Ripper: Yes, a uh, a profound sense of fatigue... a feeling of emptiness followed. Luckily I... I was able to interpret these feelings correctly. Loss of essence.
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: Hmm.
General Jack D. Ripper: I can assure you it has not recurred, Mandrake. Women uh... women sense my power and they seek the life essence. I, uh... I do not avoid women, Mandrake.
Group Capt. Lionel Mandrake: No.
General Jack D. Ripper: But I... I do deny them my essence.

W*GS
08-09-2013, 07:23 PM
BTW Wags is your logic everything is toxic so don't worry about being selective?

"Toxic to some degree" is meaningless.

baja
08-09-2013, 07:24 PM
Last year, Americans purchased more than 700 million packages of hot dogs at retail stores (and that’s excluding sales from Wal-Mart, which doesn't report numbers). Figure in restaurants, food carts, circuses, ballparks and the like, and that’s a lot of dogs. In fact, the National Hot Dog and Sausage Council estimates that Americans consume 20 billion hot dogs annually.

The country’s most beloved tube of meat is Sara Lee’s Ball Park brand, which eclipsed sales of Oscar Mayer in 2010. Other media outlets have pulled back the curtain on hot dog ingredients in the past -- and since we’re at the start of prime hot dog season, it seems as good a time as any to take another look at the who’s who of hot dog ingredients.

So without further ado, before the Fourth of July grills are aflame, here's the skinny on America's winning wiener, the Original Ball Park frank:

Mechanically separated turkey: Looking more like strawberry frosting than blended meat and bone bits, the USDA defines mechanically separated poultry (MSP) as “a paste-like and batter-like poultry product produced by forcing bones, with attached edible tissue, through a sieve or similar device under high pressure to separate bone from the edible tissue.” Hot dogs can contain any amount of mechanically separated chicken or turkey.

Pork: According to 1994 USDA rules, any meat labeled as the meat it is can be taken off the bone by advanced meat recovery (AMR) machinery that "separates meat from bone by scraping, shaving, or pressing the meat from the bone without breaking or grinding the bone."

Water The USDA states that hot dogs must contain less than 10 percent water.

Corn syrup: A combo of cornstarch and acids, corn syrup is used as a thickener and sweetener, as MSNBC notes -- it contains no nutrients but does add extra calories.

Beef: In 2004, to protect consumers against Bovine Spongiform Encephalopathy (mad cow disease), mechanically separated beef was considered inedible and prohibited for use as human food, so be glad you won't be finding it in your dog.

Salt: Hot dogs are salty, that's part of their job. And in fact, each one has about 480 milligrams, the rough equivalent of 20 percent of your recommended daily allowance.

Potassium lactate: This hydroscopic, white, odorless solid is prepared commercially by the neutralization of lactic acid with potassium hydroxide. The FDA allows its use as as a flavor enhancer, flavoring agent, humectant, pH control agent, and for inhibiting the growth of certain pathogens.

Sodium phosphates: Any of three sodium salt of phosphoric acids that can be used as a food preservative or to add texture -- because texture is important when you're eating a tube of meat paste.

Flavorings: Under current FDA guidelines, most flavoring agents allowed to be listed as "flavor" rather specified individually, so, this remains a bit of a mystery.

Beef stock: You know the drill: Boiled water with pieces of muscle, bones, joints, connective tissue and other scraps of the carcass.

Sodium diacetate: This is a molecular compound of acetic acid, sodium acetate, and water of hydration. The FDA allows its use as an antimicrobial agent, a flavoring agent and adjuvant, a pH control agent, and as an inhibitor of the growth of certain pathogens.

Sodium erythorbate: A sodium salt of erythorbic acid, it is often used as a preservative and helps meat-based products keep their rosy hue. Side effects have been reported, such as dizziness, gastrointestinal issues, headaches and on occasion, kidney stones.

Maltodextrin: Basically, a filler and/or thickening agent used in processed foods, it's a compound made from cooked starch, corn, or wheat.

Sodium nitrate: This common preservative helps preserve the red color of cured meat -- although studies have shown that consuming sodium nitrite may increase cancer risk and trigger migraines. Animal studies have linked sodium nitrates to an increased risk of cancer.

Extractives of paprika: An oil-based extract from the paprika plant -- natural ingredient! -- used for color and longer shelf life.

For natural, organic hot dogs that have a minimal ingredient list, try hot dogs from Applegate Farms or other all-natural meat makers.

baja
08-09-2013, 07:30 PM
"Toxic to some degree" is meaningless.

Wags you are a very poor shill


You worry about global warming yet you scoff at being selective with what you put into you body. Do you think any poster here takes you seriously. Your section chief should fire you or at least reassign you.


Go eat a hot dog and fart into a jar.

jhat01
08-09-2013, 08:06 PM
I just had a grass fed bison flat iron steak, with onions and peppers from the garden sautéed in ghee and some roasted broccoli..delicious. I don't know why I waited so long to cut out grains, but I'm glad I did.

W*GS
08-09-2013, 09:35 PM
Wags you are a very poor shill


You worry about global warming yet you scoff at being selective with what you put into you body. Do you think any poster here takes you seriously. Your section chief should fire you or at least reassign you.


Go eat a hot dog and fart into a jar.

There's nothing that's *not* "toxic" in "some degree".

I wouldn't recommend a diet of arsenic, or cyanide, or Taco Bell. Or Alex Jones, for that matter.

What good is a sound body if one has a sick mind (like yours)?

Fedaykin
08-10-2013, 05:30 PM
Recently The Montreal Gazette had an article by the Canadian Government on how Chinese feed the fish: They suspend chicken wire crates over the fish ponds, and the fish feed on chicken s--t.

...

Never buy the grocery store garlic unless it is clearly marked from USA or Canada, the other stuff is grown in people poop (even worse than chicken poop).



I'm surprised to see an organic food honk being squeamish about time honored, 100% all natural organic farming methods.

What do you think organic (and non organic) fertilizer is? Pixie dust?

Rohirrim
08-10-2013, 05:40 PM
Just saw a movie and ate a hot dog.

Am I a weenie?

No wait, I'm not a Democrat.

Really? Bob Hope humor?. Evolve, man! Evolve!

baja
08-10-2013, 05:49 PM
I'm surprised to see an organic food honk being squeamish about time honored, 100% all natural organic farming methods.

What do you think organic (and non organic) fertilizer is? Pixie dust?

Fine you eat it.

Fedaykin
08-10-2013, 05:55 PM
Fine you eat it.

Nice non reply. I just find it fascinating that you're complaining about organic farming methods.

Feces (everything from bacterial waste and worm poop to human poop) is used all the time in the production of food. It's pretty much 100% impossible to buy farmed food, of any kind, that was not produced, at some point, with the use of feces.

Sounds like you're angling for 100% artificial fertilizers in engineered soil. The only way to get something grown that is definitely not poop based...

;)

Fedaykin
08-10-2013, 05:59 PM
http://www.peta.org/resized-image.ashx/__size/550x0/__key/CommunityServer-Blogs-Components-WeblogFiles/00-00-00-01-48/6505.IG_2D00_hotdog_2D00_v4.jpg






http://www.peta.org/b/thepetafiles/archive/2013/07/01/whats-in-your-hot-dog.aspx


All those things would be found in pretty much any food product. (obv not certain things that are meat product specific)

baja
08-10-2013, 06:04 PM
Nice non reply. I just find it fascinating that you're complaining about organic farming methods.

Feces (everything from bacterial waste and worm poop to human poop) is used all the time in the production of food. It's pretty much 100% impossible to buy farmed food, of any kind, that was not produced, at some point, with the use of feces.

Sounds like you're angling for 100% artificial fertilizers in engineered soil. The only way to get something grown that is definitely not poop based...

;)

It's my standard non reply to pompous jack asses such as yourself. It is all you deserve.

Go have a heaping helping of organic heavy metals and other toxic waste.

I'll have my organic certified thank you;

http://www.ccof.org/certification

W*GS
08-10-2013, 06:12 PM
I'll have my organic certified thank you

Does "organic" mean "poop-free"? It cannot. Ergo, you eat stuff that has had poop on it.

http://farm4.staticflickr.com/3060/3113856604_1e22040bb0_z.jpg

Fedaykin
08-11-2013, 12:27 AM
It's my standard non reply to pompous jack asses such as yourself. It is all you deserve.


Ahh poor baby. I'm sorry that pointing out your inability to engage in critical thinking of any sort hurts your feelings so much.



Go have a heaping helping of organic heavy metals and other toxic waste.

I'll have my organic certified thank you;

http://www.ccof.org/certification


Poop is not toxic waste. It's the basis of all agriculture.

baja
08-11-2013, 06:38 AM
Ahh poor baby. I'm sorry that pointing out your inability to engage in critical thinking of any sort hurts your feelings so much.

You love the term critical thinking but that is not what you are doing. You point out that feces is natures fertilizer but fail to mention in a man made concentrated growing area manure from vegetation eating animals is what is used not people poop. You also fail to acknowledge the lack of regulations in the Chinese agribusiness. If you want to eat food grown in China fine but don't try an convince me it's fine by making the broad statement poop is an organic fertilizer and ignore all the other likely contaminants in their unregulated systems. Critical Thinking you claim LOL



Poop is not toxic waste. It's the basis of all agriculture.

Nobody said manure wasn't an acceptable fertilizer

Bold


If only you were half as smart you you think you are.

Meck77
08-11-2013, 10:27 AM
Nestle's CEO pissing and moaning about organic food. He even goes on to say that access to water should not be a public right. Keep in mind Nestle is one of the biggest if not the biggest bottled water companies in the world.

http://www.realfarmacy.com/nestle-ceo-water-right/

So next time you are cruising the isles at the store thinking about stuffing your child with a Nestle's product think of this ahole.

baja
08-11-2013, 10:39 AM
Rural Communities Exploited by Nestle for Your Bottled Water
Across the U.S., rural communities are footing the bill for the booming bottled water industry.
May 29, 2007 |
Across the country, multinational corporations are targeting hundreds of rural communities to gain control of their most precious resource. By strong-arming small towns with limited economic means, these corporations are part of a growing trend to privatize public water supplies for economic gain in the ballooning bottled water industry.

With sales of over $35 billion worldwide in the bottled water market, corporations are doing whatever it takes to buy up pristine springs in some of our country's most beautiful places. While the companies reap the profits, the local communities and the environment are paying the price.

One of the biggest and most voracious of the water gobblers is Nestle, which controls one-third of the U.S. market and sells 70 different brand names -- such as Arrowhead, Calistoga, Deer Park, Perrier, Poland Spring and Ice Mountain -- which it draws from 75 springs located all over the country.

Nestle's latest target is McCloud, located in the shadow of Northern California's snow-capped Mt. Shasta. The town of McCloud has worked hard to try to reinvent itself in recent years. McCloud is a former timber town that is learning how to stand on its own feet again after the lumber companies bottomed out and took off.

http://www.alternet.org/story/52526/rural_communities_exploited_by_nestle_for_your_bot tled_water

baja
08-11-2013, 10:42 AM
Nestlé Sued AGAIN For Falsely Representing Bottled Tap Water As Naturally Spring-Sourced
Comment Now Follow Comments

(Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A Chicago-based business has sued Nestlé over claims that the five gallon jugs of Ice Mountain Water it purchased for its office dispensers were falsely advertised as containing natural spring water when in reality they were simply filled with regular tap water.

It’s not that The Chicago Faucet Shoppe is unaware that many brands of bottled water on the market today tout the same stuff that flows into every kitchen sink. In fact, bottled water increasingly comes from the tap. A 2009 report found that nearly half of the bottled water in PET plastic bottles came from municipal sources.The company simply contends that Nestlé is misrepresenting its product by blatantly claiming that it’s something other than it is.

The Chicago Faucet Shoppe had been buying Ice Mountain Water since 2008 believing it to be true spring water containing naturally occurring minerals. It wasn’t until July 2012 that an executive at the company was tipped off to the water’s true origins by an employee.

Labels on bottles of Ice Mountain Water, print ads and advertising on the side of delivery trucks scream “100% Natural Spring Water” beneath picturesque images of ice-capped mountains. Marketing blurb on the Ice Mountain Water website asserts that the water has been filtered through mineral-rich aquifers and can be traced back thousands of years to the last ice age when melting glaciers fed rivers and springs. The website even boasts environmental stewardship and a commitment to preserve and protect Ice Mountain Water’s natural springs:


http://www.forbes.com/sites/nadiaarumugam/2012/10/19/nestle-sued-again-for-falsely-representing-bottled-tap-water-as-naturally-spring-sourced/

B-Large
08-11-2013, 11:10 AM
I'm surprised to see an organic food honk being squeamish about time honored, 100% all natural organic farming methods.

What do you think organic (and non organic) fertilizer is? Pixie dust?

Dehydrated poultry waste, that IS fertilizer... Unless you use alfalfa pellets...

baja
08-11-2013, 11:17 AM
The Dangers of Farmed Fish
by Dr. Josh Axe on March 3, 2010
You may have heard that eating fish is a healthy option. That’s a true statement, but in most cases today, it’s only a partially true statement. The reality of where our fish comes from is of paramount importance for our health! There is a vast different between wild caught fish and farmed fish.

Fish farms produce supermarket protein with high concentrations of antibiotics, pesticides and lower levels of healthy nutrients. Research has found that farmed fish has less usable omega-3 fatty acids than wild-caught fish and a 20% lower protein content. A USDA review confirmed the findings. Farmed fish are fattier and have a high concentration of omega-6 fatty acids. Imbalances in the levels of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids create inflammation in the body.

Farm-raised fish are given antibiotics to stave off disease that results from crowded conditions and are also treated with pesticides to combat sea lice. Sea lice from fish farms kill up to 95% of migrating juvenile wild salmon.

The pesticides used to treat sea lice in fish farms circulate throughout the ocean. Pesticides that have been banned for decades have concentrated in the fat of much marine life.

This fat is used in the feed that fish farms use, and studies by the Environmental Working Group, along with those done in Canada, Ireland and the UK, have found that cancer-causing polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) exist in farm-raised salmon at 16 times the rate of wild salmon.

Dibutyltin is a chemical used in PVC plastics. Dibutyltin can interfere with normal immune responses and inflammation control in both animals and humans. A 2008 study found that dibutyltin may be contributing to the rise of allergies, asthma, obesity and other metabolic and immune disorders in humans. Scientists have found that dibutyltin in farm-raised mussels is more than 6 times higher than that of wild mussels.

Researchers have also found levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE), a chemical used as a flame retardant, in high levels in farm-raised fish. PBDEs are endocrine disruptors that are thought to contribute to cancer. Scientists believe that both fish feed and increasing concentrations in the open oceans are contributing to high PBDE levels in fish and humans.

Another study, conducted at the University of New York at Albany found that dioxin levels in farm-raised salmon are 11 times higher than those in wild salmon.



http://www.draxe.com/the-dangers-of-farmed-fish/

baja
08-11-2013, 11:24 AM
Fish Farming's Growing Dangers

By Ken Stier Wednesday, Sept. 19, 2007

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A man holds a farmed salmon.

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In her book Diet for a Small Planet, Frances Moore Lappe argued more than 35 years ago that grain-fed cattle were essentially "reverse protein factories" because they required many more pounds of plant protein to produce a pound of flesh. Now there's a similar dynamic in the global fish farming, or aquaculture, industry — especially as it strains to satisfy consumers' voracious appetite for top-of-the-food chain, carnivorous fish, such as salmon, tuna and shrimp.

Close to 40% of the seafood we eat nowadays comes from aquaculture; the $78 billion industry has grown 9% a year since 1975, making it the fastest-growing food group, and global demand has doubled since that time. Here's the catch: It takes a lot of input, in the form of other, lesser fish — also known as "reduction" or "trash" fish — to produce the kind of fish we prefer to eat directly. To create 1 kg (2.2 lbs.) of high-protein fishmeal, which is fed to farmed fish (along with fish oil, which also comes from other fish), it takes 4.5 kg (10 lbs.) of smaller pelagic, or open-ocean, fish. "Aquaculture's current heavy reliance on wild fish for feed carries substantial ecological risks," says Roz Naylor, a leading scholar on the subject at Stanford University's Center for Environmental Science and Policy. Unless the industry finds alternatives to using pelagic fish to sustain fish farms, says Naylor, the aquaculture industry could end up depleting an essential food source for many other species in the marine food chain.

Industry and publicly funded research have significantly mitigated this inefficiency and reduced the percentage of fish and oil content in aqua-feed, replacing it with vegetable proteins and oils. "I would say cost, the sustainability of resources — pelagic fisheries — and human health concerns have been driving researchers to find replacements for fishmeal and fish oil — and we are doing this to the greatest extent possible," says Dr. David Higgs, a fish nutritionist for the Canadian government who works closely with British Columbia's $450 million salmon industry. (Reducing the fish content in feed also reduces the accumulation of PCBs in farmed fish, though Higgs insists that PCB levels in fish from British Columbia are some 50 to 70 times below FDA standards.) But such improvements have been offset by the industry's explosive growth. In the salmon industry, the largest aquaculture sector, the amount of wild fish required to produce one unit of salmon was reduced 25% between 1997 and 2001, but total industry production grew by 60% during the same time.

There are other worrisome trends, such as the rapid expansion of other species now being farmed, which have much higher feed requirements. Ranched tuna, for instance, dine on live pelagic fish, such as anchovies, sardines and mackerel, but it takes about 20 kg (44 lbs.) of such feed to get 1 kg of tuna ready for a sushi bar near you. (Tuna are ranched — that is, corralled from the wild and then fed in anchored pens — because despite prodigious efforts, especially by the Japanese, no one has been able to raise tuna from eggs.)

"The problem is we've gone straight to the top. We are essentially, as some argue, farming tigers when we raise tuna or striped bass or cod," says Brian Halweil, a senior researcher with WorldWatch, a Washington-based environmental NGO. By contrast, the fish species at the core of the millennia-long tradition of fish-farming in Asia and parts of Africa — catfish, carp and milkfish — actually require less fish input than is ultimately harvested, because they are herbivorous or omnivorous. In Asia, the idea of feeding several times more fishmeal to get one pound back would seem sheer folly. "Ultimately that is really where the solution is — to cut back on these carnivorous species and turn our attention to these plant-eating ones," says U. Rashid Sumaila, a bioeconomist at the University of British Columbia (UBC). "Whether we are willing to do that is another thing, but that's the fundamental solution."

Environmentalists and industry dispute whether current wild-fish harvesting is done at sustainable levels, but there's no dispute that it's a finite resource — and demand keeps growing. A staggering 37% of all global seafood is now ground into feed, up from 7.7% in 1948, according to recent research from the UBC Fisheries Centre. One third of that feed goes to China, where 70% of the world's fish farming takes place; China now devotes nearly 1 million hectares (close to 4,000 sq. mi.) of land to shrimp farms. And about 45% of the global production of fishmeal and fish oil goes to the world's livestock industry, mostly pigs and poultry, up from 10% in 1988. If current trends continue, demand for fish oil will outstrip supply within a decade and the same could happen for fishmeal by 2050, says Stanford's Naylor. Already, the global supply of fishmeal has dropped from 7.7 million metric tons to 5.8 million metric tons between 1994 and 2005, according to the International Fishmeal and Fish Oil Organization.




Read more: http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1663604,00.html#ixzz2bgMyfTHb

baja
08-11-2013, 11:42 AM
FUQING, China — Here in southern China, beneath the looming mountains of Fujian Province, lie dozens of enormous ponds filled with murky brown water and teeming with eels, shrimp and tilapia, much of it destined for markets in Japan and the West.


Fuqing is No. 1 on a list for refused seafood shipments from China.
Fuqing is one of the centers of a booming industry that over two decades has transformed this country into the biggest producer and exporter of seafood in the world, and the fastest-growing supplier to the United States.

But that growth is threatened by the two most glaring environmental weaknesses in China: acute water shortages and water supplies contaminated by sewage, industrial waste and agricultural runoff that includes pesticides. The fish farms, in turn, are discharging wastewater that further pollutes the water supply.

“Our waters here are filthy,” said Ye Chao, an eel and shrimp farmer who has 20 giant ponds in western Fuqing. “There are simply too many aquaculture farms in this area. They’re all discharging water here, fouling up other farms.”

Farmers have coped with the toxic waters by mixing illegal veterinary drugs and pesticides into fish feed, which helps keep their stocks alive yet leaves poisonous and carcinogenic residues in seafood, posing health threats to consumers.

Environmental degradation, in other words, has become a food safety problem, and scientists say the long-term risks of consuming contaminated seafood could lead to higher rates of cancer and liver disease and other afflictions.

No one is more vulnerable to these health risks than the Chinese, because most of the seafood in China stays at home. But foreign importers are also worried. In recent years, the European Union and Japan have imposed temporary bans on Chinese seafood because of illegal drug residues. The United States blocked imports of several types of fish this year after inspectors detected traces of illegal drugs linked to cancer.



http://www.nytimes.com/2007/12/15/world/asia/15fish.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

baja
08-11-2013, 11:47 AM
So Fedaykin - eat up it's just fertilizer





Chinese Fish Farms Full of Toxic Chemicals
Wednesday, July 09, 2008 by: David Gutierrez, staff writer
Tags: farmed fish, health news, Natural News


(NaturalNews) Contamination of water supplies and illegal use of veterinary drugs has led to the severe contamination of Chinese fish farms, with potentially serious health consequences for those who eat the fish.

China produces 70 percent of the world's farmed fish, and since the 1980s has become the biggest seafood exporter in the world. Yet this growth has only exacerbated the pollution problems already facing China's water sources. The high density of fish farms in regions like the Fuqing Province in the south has led to the discharge of huge quantities of wastewater into already compromised rivers.

"Our waters here are filthy," said Ye Chao, an eel and shrimp farmer from Fuqing. "There are simply too many aquaculture farms in this area. They're all discharging water here, fouling up other farms."

The Chinese government has declared more than half of the rivers in the country too polluted to drink from. Many sections of Fuqing's major waterway, the Long River, have been declared too toxic for any use.

Pollution of river and coastal waters comes from rapidly growing industries that are discharging pesticides, oil, mercury, lead, copper and agricultural runoff. This pollution has caused massive die-offs at fish farms, leading farmers to illegally mix veterinary drugs into their ponds to try and keep their fish alive. According to farmers who eventually abandoned such practices, not using drugs led to an immediate 30 percent increase in fish mortality.

Beyond the health risks to the fish themselves, pollution causes the accumulation of toxic substances in the bodies of the fish, which poses a health risk to people who eat them.

"There are heavy metals, mercury and flame retardants in fish samples we've tested," said Ming Hung Wong, a biology at Hong Kong Baptist University.

Wang Wu, a professor from the Shanghai Fisheries University, attributes the problem to unbridled growth. "For 50 years, we've blindly emphasized economic growth," he said. "The only pursuit has been GDP, and now we can see that the water turns dirty and the seafood gets dangerous."


Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/023593_fish_farms_Chinese.html#ixzz2bgRZArze

But it looks all pretty and such in them there nice plastic wrapped packages in Wall Mart and the price, well oh my it's cheap.

Rohirrim
08-11-2013, 11:51 AM
Nestle's CEO pissing and moaning about organic food. He even goes on to say that access to water should not be a public right. Keep in mind Nestle is one of the biggest if not the biggest bottled water companies in the world.

http://www.realfarmacy.com/nestle-ceo-water-right/

So next time you are cruising the isles at the store thinking about stuffing your child with a Nestle's product think of this ahole.

Reminds me of the cold logic of the Nazis.

Meck77
08-11-2013, 12:08 PM
Reminds me of the cold logic of the Nazis.

It's unbelievable how candid he was. I did cross check to make sure that the man speaking was the CEO of Nestle and it was. A quick google imagine search verified. You see I believe it's important to at least try and verify the information we post in this forum and not use "Don't shoot the messenger" as a excuse for just posting random garbage not based on any fact at all.

If we demand responsibility from farmers to grow healthy food as members of this community I feel we are responsible to try and post FACTUAL information the best we can to help one another.

baja
08-11-2013, 12:32 PM
It's unbelievable how candid he was. I did cross check to make sure that the man speaking was the CEO of Nestle and it was. A quick google imagine search verified. You see I believe it's important to at least try and verify the information we post in this forum and not use "Don't shoot the messenger" as a excuse for just posting random garbage not based on any fact at all.

If we demand responsibility from farmers to grow healthy food as members of this community I feel we are responsible to try and post FACTUAL information the best we can to help one another.

Plenty of material floats through here with no research at all by the poster and sadly admittedly.


Translation; The stuff I don't believe