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View Full Version : Scientists discover what’s killing the bees and it’s worse than you thought


Bronco Yoda
07-25-2013, 11:37 AM
http://qz.com/107970/scientists-discover-whats-killing-the-bees-and-its-worse-than-you-thought/

http://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/beeinsectide.jpg?w=700

houghtam
07-25-2013, 11:42 AM
http://qz.com/107970/scientists-discover-whats-killing-the-bees-and-its-worse-than-you-thought/

http://qzprod.files.wordpress.com/2013/07/beeinsectide.jpg?w=700

We need less regulation, not more! Besides, the bee problem is obviously a government-concocted scheme to get more money out of the taxpayer. Look, you can even see live bees in that very picture you posted! Nothing to see here, folks!

Rohirrim
07-25-2013, 11:49 AM
You mean we can't just spray fungicides and pesticides all over our environment with impunity? That's weird. Fortunately, the corporations who control our government, like Monsanto, don't have to worry about this ****.

Bee populations are so low in the US that it now takes 60% of the country’s surviving colonies just to pollinate one California crop, almonds. And that’s not just a west coast problem—California supplies 80% of the world’s almonds, a market worth $4 billion.
Somebody is knocking on the door, humanity. Keep pretending your not at home. ;D

Rigs11
07-25-2013, 11:52 AM
bees are like trees and polar bears, who needs them! stupid liberals....Hilarious!

BroncoBeavis
07-25-2013, 01:20 PM
bees are like trees and polar bears, who needs them! stupid liberals....Hilarious!

What's funny is you think there's some sort of turnkey solution that da librals have on the shelf. Does Potato Famine sound like an acceptable alternative? Fungicides, like most agricultural advancements, will inevitably have side effects. So far the good far outweighs the bad.

We learn, we run into new challenges, we try to address them, and we move on. The world as it stands could not function under this organic-agrarian pipe dream so many people subscribe to.

Rohirrim
07-25-2013, 03:08 PM
What's funny is you think there's some sort of turnkey solution that da librals have on the shelf. Does Potato Famine sound like an acceptable alternative? Fungicides, like most agricultural advancements, will inevitably have side effects. So far the good far outweighs the bad.

We learn, we run into new challenges, we try to address them, and we move on. The world as it stands could not function under this organic-agrarian pipe dream so many people subscribe to.

It can also not function without bees.

Oh, and coral reefs. And trees. And atmosphere. And water.

theAPAOps5
07-25-2013, 03:10 PM
So it is a giant wielding a mean looking ice pick. IT.ALL.MAKES.SENSE.

alkemical
07-25-2013, 03:57 PM
What's funny is you think there's some sort of turnkey solution that da librals have on the shelf. Does Potato Famine sound like an acceptable alternative? Fungicides, like most agricultural advancements, will inevitably have side effects. So far the good far outweighs the bad.

We learn, we run into new challenges, we try to address them, and we move on. The world as it stands could not function under this organic-agrarian pipe dream so many people subscribe to.

What caused the blight?

Rigs11
07-25-2013, 04:25 PM
What's funny is you think there's some sort of turnkey solution that da librals have on the shelf. Does Potato Famine sound like an acceptable alternative? Fungicides, like most agricultural advancements, will inevitably have side effects. So far the good far outweighs the bad.

We learn, we run into new challenges, we try to address them, and we move on. The world as it stands could not function under this organic-agrarian pipe dream so many people subscribe to.

bs.you righties don't want to address shet.

BroncoBeavis
07-25-2013, 05:01 PM
bs.you righties don't want to address shet.

Heh. Truth of the matter is, many progressives only like theoretical improvement. Because theory rarely exhibits real-world drawbacks. Once that theory is driven into production, however, they become aghast at the imperfection of it all and start dreaming about the future again (at the expense of the present)

Irony is, this method of progressivism only leads to paralysis. We need to figure out how to accommodate the bees for sure. But it can't be at the cost of the return of large-scale agricultural blight.

houghtam
07-25-2013, 05:07 PM
Heh. Truth of the matter is, many progressives only like theoretical improvement. Because theory rarely exhibits real-world drawbacks. Once that theory is driven into production, however, they become aghast at the imperfection of it all and start dreaming about the future again (at the expense of the present)

Irony is, this method of progressivism only leads to paralysis. We need to figure out how to accommodate the bees for sure. But it can't be at the cost of the return of large-scale agricultural blight.

Yes, because large scale blight will affect a large amount of people for a relatively short amount of time. No bees, on the other hand, that will only affect everyone everywhere forever.

Rohirrim
07-25-2013, 05:10 PM
The arrogance and stupidity of man will cause him to live in conflict with nature until nature finally wins and does away with man.

Meck77
07-25-2013, 05:18 PM
The arrogance and stupidity of man will cause him to live in conflict with nature until nature finally wins and does away with man.

Assuming we are the only planet with "man". Who's to say their isn't intelligent live out there? Are we really that special here on little ole Earth?

Arkie
07-25-2013, 05:22 PM
stupidity of man

I would argue that we have too much intelligence for our own good.

alkemical
07-25-2013, 10:15 PM
organic farming methods wont produce another dust bowl due to the dead soil that erodes.

organic farms are also more drought resistant and have shown (see rodale's 30yr study) greater prooduction.

blight can be combated in a number of organic methods: crop rotation being one of them. using aact, will breed a larger more diverse colony of bacteria, fungus and protoza which can also out compete the pathogen.

part of the issue with the potato famine/blight was due to monoculture methods, coupled with the serf rules placed upon the irish from the british crown (see corn laws) and the exportation of food from british owned assets in ireland, to british interests.

by citing the potato famine as an example of a failure of organic farming is incorrect. monoculture, with little diversity creates stressors that enable disease to become more rampent.

elsid13
07-26-2013, 06:37 AM
organic farming methods wont produce another dust bowl due to the dead soil that erodes.

organic farms are also more drought resistant and have shown (see rodale's 30yr study) greater prooduction.

blight can be combated in a number of organic methods: crop rotation being one of them. using aact, will breed a larger more diverse colony of bacteria, fungus and protoza which can also out compete the pathogen.

part of the issue with the potato famine/blight was due to monoculture methods, coupled with the serf rules placed upon the irish from the british crown (see corn laws) and the exportation of food from british owned assets in ireland, to british interests.

by citing the potato famine as an example of a failure of organic farming is incorrect. monoculture, with little diversity creates stressors that enable disease to become more rampent.

Nice post. This is very easy problem to fix, but man being lazy will whine and bitch about solving it until we have to act.

alkemical
07-26-2013, 09:49 AM
Nice post. This is very easy problem to fix, but man being lazy will whine and b**** about solving it until we have to act.

I'm starting a Not-For-Profit, as well as building a business. The best thing I can do is try to build vehicles to get to goals. Creating jobs, getting people to grow their own is huge!

During the Victory Gardens era 40% of the nations consumed produce came from victory gardens. It is possible to create jobs in an agrarian & technologically driven society. People like to assume there is one magic bullet answer, there isn't. The one thing that is great about the AG industry is you can MAKE things. If you want to grow the finest jasmine and make the finest jasmine oil, you will always have a market. If you grow great microgreens you can sell them to a local biz.

I just see lots of opportunity and have taken action on several projects. Once my paperwork is filed i'll share more about the not for profit i'm starting and share the vision of what we're trying to accomplish.

BroncoBeavis
07-26-2013, 10:09 AM
I'm starting a Not-For-Profit, as well as building a business. The best thing I can do is try to build vehicles to get to goals. Creating jobs, getting people to grow their own is huge!

During the Victory Gardens era 40% of the nations consumed produce came from victory gardens. It is possible to create jobs in an agrarian & technologically driven society. People like to assume there is one magic bullet answer, there isn't. The one thing that is great about the AG industry is you can MAKE things. If you want to grow the finest jasmine and make the finest jasmine oil, you will always have a market. If you grow great microgreens you can sell them to a local biz.

I just see lots of opportunity and have taken action on several projects. Once my paperwork is filed i'll share more about the not for profit i'm starting and share the vision of what we're trying to accomplish.

Rolling out of the depression, Americans tended to be both thrifty and resourceful. And agricultural production has multiplied many many times since those days.

Cajoling today's Joe-six pack into some gardening is going to produce a drop in the bucket compared to modern industrial agriculture.

And don't get me wrong, I'm not personally against some effort towards self-sufficiency. I just don't see it having any measurable macro-impact on the demand for a $1 head of lettuce at Wally World.

Arkie
07-26-2013, 11:35 AM
That article is about America’s population of apis mellifera. That bee species was brought over from Europe. There have always been other pollinators in America for as long as flowers have grown here. Environmentalists have been saying "the end is near" for decades just like the economists.

alkemical
07-26-2013, 02:09 PM
Rolling out of the depression, Americans tended to be both thrifty and resourceful. And agricultural production has multiplied many many times since those days.

Cajoling today's Joe-six pack into some gardening is going to produce a drop in the bucket compared to modern industrial agriculture.

And don't get me wrong, I'm not personally against some effort towards self-sufficiency. I just don't see it having any measurable macro-impact on the demand for a $1 head of lettuce at Wally World.

Agricultural production of what? Inferior products? Lack of sustainable practices that increase cost of food while decreasing quality?

I don't need to "cajole" anyone, people who have the eyes to see and the ears to hear understand the message of: Grow.Your.Own.

Not seeing any measurable impact from transportation costs, packaging costs, putting chemical ferts into the land that run into the waterways for a $1. Well, that's just ignorance and short sighted isn't it?

I suggest you keep eating the peasants food, and that's the last bit of time i'll waste on you.

mhgaffney
07-26-2013, 02:09 PM
That article is about America’s population of apis mellifera. That bee species was brought over from Europe. There have always been other pollinators in America for as long as flowers have grown here. Environmentalists have been saying "the end is near" for decades just like the economists.

Yes and we are killing off those other pollinators too.

Rohirrim
07-26-2013, 03:16 PM
That article is about America’s population of apis mellifera. That bee species was brought over from Europe. There have always been other pollinators in America for as long as flowers have grown here. Environmentalists have been saying "the end is near" for decades just like the economists.

The pollinators indigenous to America were pollinating indigenous flowers, trees and plants, not millions of acres of nut trees, fruit trees, vine fruits, vegetables, etc. etc. etc. Like the article states, the almond crop alone is worth $4 billion. No environmentalist with any scientific knowledge would argue that we are going to wipe out nature. We are simply going to wipe out us or create a new world we will be forced to adapt to.

For example, the nurseries of the oceans are the coral reefs that inhabit the Tropics in a band around the Earth, from thirty degrees North to thirty degrees South. This is where the plankton that feeds the entire seas of the world originate. When we have finished wiping them out through a combination of anthropomorphic climate change and the flushing of billions of tons of agricultural, chemical and human waste into the sea, we won't kill the oceans. The oceans will still be filled with creatures - creatures like jelly fish and urchins and starfish. Detritus and algae eaters. There are already huge bays along the coast of China that are filled with algae. Our Gulf Coast is filling up with algae. Like Darwin taught us, new niches will be opened by the extinguishing of food species and will be populated by new species that can adapt to the temperatures and chemicals. Perhaps we will be able to make food products from jellyfish and algae?

So, if we wipe out the bees will we still survive? Probably. We'll just have to change from a diet that includes nuts and fruits to one that includes new foods like thistles and lichen, algae and cactus, etc. Not to mention, insects. It can be done. :~ohyah!:

BroncoBeavis
07-26-2013, 04:59 PM
Agricultural production of what? Inferior products? Lack of sustainable practices that increase cost of food while decreasing quality?

I don't need to "cajole" anyone, people who have the eyes to see and the ears to hear understand the message of: Grow.Your.Own.

Not seeing any measurable impact from transportation costs, packaging costs, putting chemical ferts into the land that run into the waterways for a $1. Well, that's just ignorance and short sighted isn't it?

I suggest you keep eating the peasants food, and that's the last bit of time i'll waste on you.

Not sure why you take it personally. I never said that was a nice $1 head of lettuce. I've grown my own lettuce. Among many other vegetables. I enjoy them. I'm just not under any illusion that I'd ever be able to produce enough to go without the supermarket variety, especially mid-winter.

And I'm especially not under any illusion that a country growing more urban literally by the day is suddenly going to see an explosive growth in the number of people willing to subsistence garden. It's not a trivial amount of work. Most people lead far too busy of lives to suddenly become hobby farmers.

Rohirrim
07-26-2013, 05:12 PM
Don't worry. The top 1% will still be able to procure whatever delicacies their hearts desire.

nyuk nyuk
07-27-2013, 03:07 PM
One thing I would suggest here, folks, and this is something that happens ALL the time in the media.

They publish ONE study with a scary or semi-scary result and they act like it's unquestioned fact and the world is ending.

Don't blindly swallow it. It's one study, folks.

Rohirrim
07-28-2013, 12:16 PM
One thing I would suggest here, folks, and this is something that happens ALL the time in the media.

They publish ONE study with a scary or semi-scary result and they act like it's unquestioned fact and the world is ending.

Don't blindly swallow it. It's one study, folks.

There have been dozens of studies published about these issues. The Right Wing has purely political reasons for ignoring, or discrediting them. Since the chief purveyors and supporters of the anti-scientific campaign are organizations like energy companies and the Koch Bros., their obvious reason for doing so is greed.

nyuk nyuk
07-28-2013, 02:46 PM
There have been dozens of studies published about these issues. The Right Wing has purely political reasons for ignoring, or discrediting them. Since the chief purveyors and supporters of the anti-scientific campaign are organizations like energy companies and the Koch Bros., their obvious reason for doing so is greed.

The article in this thread is about "a study." I will not shoot wet brown gobs across the room over one study. This thread is about one topic, not "these issues." You're lumping in things not even on this thread. Note the article, "a first of it's kind study." There is no plural here. One study. Uno. Me no poopie in panic.

Rigs11
07-31-2013, 08:56 AM
Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the size of Connecticut

The dead zone that has formed in the Gulf of Mexico this summer is smaller than predicted, but is still larger than average, spanning an area roughly the size of Connecticut. This zone, an area without oxygen and almost completely devoid of life that crops up every summer, covers 5,840 square miles (15,125 square kilometers), according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


In June, NOAA predicted the dead zone would be at least 20 percent larger this summer, expecting it to take up at least 7,286 square miles (18,871 square km).

Dead zones are the indirect result of nutrients, largely from fertilizer use, running off into rivers and then into bodies of water such as the gulf. Once these excess nutrients reach the ocean, they fuel algae blooms. The algae then die and decompose in a process that consumes oxygen and creates oxygen-free areas where fish and other aquatic creatures can't survive. This zone can have serious impacts on commercial and recreational fisheries on the Gulf Coast, causing fish die-offs.

But the dead zone this summer, the time of year when the phenomenon occurs, is larger than average: Over the past five years, the average dead zone has covered 5,176 square miles (13,405 km), according to NOAA. That's more than twice the 1,900-square- mile (4,921 square km) goal set by the Gulf of Mexico / Mississippi River Watershed Nutrient Task Force, a group that seeks to reduce the size of this lifeless area, according to NOAA.

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/gulf-mexico-dead-zone-size-connecticut-6C10798946#

Rohirrim
07-31-2013, 09:05 AM
I was watching a Georgia peach farmer on the news yesterday talking about how last year the drought destroyed his crop and this year excessive rain is destroying his crop.

Still waiting for the Red Staters to figure out how to add it all up. ;D

nyuk nyuk
07-31-2013, 10:35 AM
Gulf of Mexico dead zone is the size of Connecticut

The dead zone that has formed in the Gulf of Mexico this summer is smaller than predicted, but is still larger than average, spanning an area roughly the size of Connecticut. This zone, an area without oxygen and almost completely devoid of life that crops up every summer, covers 5,840 square miles (15,125 square kilometers), according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).


In June, NOAA predicted the dead zone would be at least 20 percent larger this summer, expecting it to take up at least 7,286 square miles (18,871 square km).

Dead zones are the indirect result of nutrients, largely from fertilizer use, running off into rivers and then into bodies of water such as the gulf. Once these excess nutrients reach the ocean, they fuel algae blooms. The algae then die and decompose in a process that consumes oxygen and creates oxygen-free areas where fish and other aquatic creatures can't survive. This zone can have serious impacts on commercial and recreational fisheries on the Gulf Coast, causing fish die-offs.

But the dead zone this summer, the time of year when the phenomenon occurs, is larger than average: Over the past five years, the average dead zone has covered 5,176 square miles (13,405 km), according to NOAA. That's more than twice the 1,900-square- mile (4,921 square km) goal set by the Gulf of Mexico / Mississippi River Watershed Nutrient Task Force, a group that seeks to reduce the size of this lifeless area, according to NOAA.

http://www.nbcnews.com/science/gulf-mexico-dead-zone-size-connecticut-6C10798946#


All too often life is a catch-22. Things people use to help things grow and not be devoured by insects to feed people then cause an effect somewhere else.

nyuk nyuk
07-31-2013, 10:40 AM
I was watching a Georgia peach farmer on the news yesterday talking about how last year the drought destroyed his crop and this year excessive rain is destroying his crop.

Still waiting for the Red Staters to figure out how to add it all up. ;D

Blindly accept alarmism? If global warming is behind every fluctuation in climate, then I guess it also caused the drying up of the natural harbor near the Great Pyramids and the unusual wet years on the Great Plains in the 1910s and early 1920s that encouraged over-farming before the Dust Bowl and the unusual 10+ years of extreme drought and unusually hot temperatures after the unusually wet period which brought on Dust Bowl conditions and killed thousands from dust pneumonia.

Meh.

BroncoBeavis
07-31-2013, 11:23 AM
All too often life is a catch-22. Things people use to help things grow and not be devoured by insects to feed people then cause an effect somewhere else.

No! There is a simple and perfect balance out there with no unintended side effects. Only progressives know what it is. And they can't show it to you until you give them control over every aspect of your life. :)

Fedaykin
07-31-2013, 11:58 AM
No! There is a simple and perfect balance out there with no unintended side effects. Only progressives know what it is. And they can't show it to you until you give them control over every aspect of your life. :)

Is there some sort of competition to see how many strawmen can be crammed into a single post?

BroncoBeavis
07-31-2013, 12:02 PM
Is there some sort of competition to see how many strawmen can be crammed into a single post?

It's hard to scarecrow a war on fungicides in the midst of an era of record-breaking agricultural production. :)

Some things speak for themselves.

nyuk nyuk
07-31-2013, 12:10 PM
No! There is a simple and perfect balance out there with no unintended side effects. Only progressives know what it is. And they can't show it to you until you give them control over every aspect of your life. :)

It involves destruction of industry and return to "green" living which involves third world squalor and having a gathering-based food economy, amirite?!

Rohirrim
07-31-2013, 12:14 PM
All too often life is a catch-22. Things people use to help things grow and not be devoured by insects to feed people then cause an effect somewhere else.

The great turning point in the modern history of corn, which in turn marks a key turning point in the industrialization of our food, can be dated with some precision to the day in 1947 when the huge munitions plant at Muscle Shoals, Alabama, switched over from making explosives to making chemical fertilizer. After World War II, the government had found itself with a tremendous surplus of ammonium nitrate, the principal ingredient in the making of explosives. Ammonium nitrate also happens to be an excellent source of nitrogen for plants. Serious thought was given to spraying America's forests with the surplus chemical, to help the timber industry. But agronomists in the Department of Agriculture had a better idea: spread the ammonium nitrate on farmland as fertilizer. The chemical fertilizer industry (along with that of pesticides, which are based on the poison gases developed for war) is the product of the government's effort to convert its war machine to peacetime purposes. As the Indian farmer activist Vandana Shiva says in her speeches, "We're still eating the leftovers of World War II."

Read more: http://www.smithsonianmag.com/people-places/presence-jul06.html#ixzz2aeEgKQvu


Yeah. There are no alternatives. We must destroy the land to save ourselves, even though destroying the land eventually will destroy us. We must destroy the oceans in order to survive even if, unfortunately, destroying the oceans eventually destroys us. But the oceans are far away. Who cares? We're just not clever enough to figure out some other way to do it, I guess. And we certainly wouldn't want to upset the profit models of Conagra and Archer Daniels Midland.

nyuk nyuk
07-31-2013, 12:17 PM
^^ That didn't answer anything I said and is a false dichotomy. The point is that everything has a consequence of some kind. That we aren't using a different technique isn't necessarily the result of a grand corporate conspiracy. Perhaps it's just we don't have an affordable alternative yet. And for all we know, alternatives may prove to be even more destructive.

Rohirrim
07-31-2013, 12:27 PM
^^ That didn't answer anything I said and is a false dichotomy. The point is that everything has a consequence of some kind. That we aren't using a different technique isn't necessarily the result of a grand corporate conspiracy. Perhaps it's just we don't have an affordable alternative yet. And for all we know, alternatives may prove to be even more destructive.

It's not complex. We don't explore alternatives because of greed. Simple.

BroncoBeavis
07-31-2013, 01:26 PM
It involves destruction of industry and return to "green" living which involves third world squalor and having a gathering-based food economy, amirite?!

You didn't go into the millions of middle-class $80k a year solar-panel installers paying all the bills. Other than that, I think you probably fairly summed up the super-secret utopian blueprint.

Although only David Miscavige probably knows for sure. LOL

alkemical
08-02-2013, 09:10 AM
http://seedstock.com/2013/07/25/with-3-million-heads-of-lettuce-cleveland-hydroponics-operation-revitalizes-low-income-area/

Heads of lettuce may not seem life changing, but when you grow 3 million of them each year, the result can reinvigorate an entire area.

Such is the idea behind Green City Growers Cooperative’s greenhouse in Cleveland. At three-and-a-quarter acres, the greenhouse spans the equivalent of three football fields.

“It’s one of the largest local food initiatives in the United States,” said Mary Donnell, Green City Growers’ chief executive officer. It also ranks as the nation’s largest food production greenhouse in a core urban area.

Green City Growers Cooperative is a for-profit, worker-owned company that operates under the umbrella of parent company Evergreen Cooperatives. Although working at a grass-roots level, the organization has a highly structured, corporate management system with boards of directors and layers of chief executive officers.

Evergreen, launched in 2008, operates two other green businesses besides Green City Growers — a laundry company and solar-energy company. It aims for “building businesses, hiring from the neighborhoods where they’re located and then distributing profits back to employee members over time, which would help build financial assets and help transform lives and transform neighborhoods,” said Donnell.

Each business operates independently, with its own financing and management.

The idea for the economic revitalization project began when local institutions, including the Cleveland Foundation, University Hospitals, the Cleveland Clinic and Case Western Reserve University, began meeting to discuss area poverty, said Donnell.

After realizing that the surrounding neighborhoods housed 43,000 residents with a median income under $18,500, the institutions came together to figure out how to use their buying power to create jobs. Cleveland is historically supportive of the local food movement, said Donnell, and founders saw opportunity in the ability to provide local food year round.

Contd on site

Guess Who
03-06-2014, 11:29 PM
Eugene, Oregon Passes Resolution Banning Neonicotinoids


Washington, DC--(ENEWSPF)--March 5, 2014. The City of Eugene, Oregon, became the first community in the nation to specifically ban from city property the use of neonicotinoid pesticides, which have scientifically linked to the decline of honey bee colonies. The passage of the resolution came just one week after the Oregon state legislature passed a pollinator protection bill that removed language requiring the restriction of neonicotinoid pesticides, and includes instead a weaker requirement to set up a task force that will examine the possibility of future restrictions. In addition to neonicotinoid restrictions, the City’s resolution also expands Eugene’s pesticide-free parks program and now requires all departments to adopt integrated pest management (IPM) standards.

http://enewspf.com/latest-news/science/science-a-environmental/50703-eugene-oregon-passes-resolution-banning-neonicotinoids.html

Damn, I love Oregon. I need to move to a blue state in the worst way. Texas is horrible.

Rohirrim
03-07-2014, 05:41 AM
I would argue that we have too much intelligence for our own good.

Vonnegut wrote a book about that called Galapagos where man eventually evolves beyond his "too big brain" because it's causing him so many problems. Here's a synopsis of part of it from Wiki:

Galápagos is the story of a small band of mismatched humans who are shipwrecked on the fictional island of Santa Rosalia in the Galápagos Islands after a global financial crisis cripples the world's economy. Shortly thereafter, a disease renders all humans on Earth infertile, with the exception of the people on Santa Rosalia, making them the last specimens of humankind. Over the next million years, their descendants, the only fertile humans left on the planet, eventually evolve into a furry species resembling seals: though possibly still able to walk upright (it is not explicitly mentioned, but it is stated that they occasionally catch land animals), they have a snout with teeth adapted for catching fish, a streamlined skull and flipper-like hands with rudimentary fingers (described as "nubbins").

Humans are a strange lot. We have the intelligence to put rovers on Mars and yet the lizard and primate parts of our brains are still fully operational.

Guess Who
11-11-2014, 06:05 AM
37 Million Bees Found Dead In Ontario, Canada After Planting Large GMO Corn Field

http://organichealth.co/wp-content/uploads/2014/10/bees_pesticide.jpg

Millions of bees dropped dead after GMO corn was planted few weeks ago in Ontario, Canada. The local bee keeper, Dave Schuit who produces honey in Elmwood lost about 37 million bees which are about 600 hives.

“Once the corn started to get planted our bees died by the millions,” Schuit said. While many bee keepers blame neonicotinoids, or “neonics.” for colony collapse of bees and many countries in EU have banned neonicotinoid class of pesticides, the US Department of Agriculture fails to ban insecticides known as neonicotinoids, manufactured by Bayer CropScience Inc.

Two of Bayer’s best-selling pesticides, Imidacloprid and Clothianidin, are known to get into pollen and nectar, and can damage beneficial insects such as bees. The marketing of these drugs also coincided with the occurrence of large-scale bee deaths in many European countries and the United States.

Nathan Carey another local farmer says that this spring he noticed that there were not enough bees on his farm and he believes that there is a strong correlation between the disappearance of bees and insecticide use.

In the past, many scientists have struggled to find the exact cause of the massive die-offs, a phenomenon they refer to as “colony collapse disorder” (CCD). In the United States, for seven consecutive years, honeybees are in terminal decline.

US scientists have found 121 different pesticides in samples of bees, wax and pollen, lending credence to the notion that pesticides are a key problem. “We believe that some subtle interactions between nutrition, pesticide exposure and other stressors are converging to kill colonies,” said Jeffery Pettis, of the ARS’s bee research laboratory.

The collapse in the global honeybee population is a major threat to crops. It is estimated that a third of everything we eat depends upon honeybee pollination, which means that bees contribute over 30 billion to the global economy.

A new study published in the Journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences revealed that neonicotinoid pesticides kill honeybees by damaging their immune system and making them unable to fight diseases and bacteria.

After reporting large losses of bees after exposure to Imidacloprid, banned it for use on corn and sunflowers, despite protests by Bayer. In another smart move, France also rejected Bayer’s application for Clothianidin, and other countries, such as Italy, have banned certain neonicotinoids as well.

After record-breaking honeybee deaths in the UK, the European Union has banned multiple pesticides, including neonicotinoid pesticides.


Full article plus find out the top 30 celebrity bodies: http://organichealth.co/37-million-bees-found-dead-in-ontario-canada-after-planting-large-gmo-corn-field/

Pony Boy
11-11-2014, 09:58 AM
Wow that's some scary stuff ....... well just be glad you don't need bees to pollinate your marijuana plants.

Rohirrim
11-11-2014, 08:57 PM
Wow that's some scary stuff ....... well just be glad you don't need bees to pollinate your marijuana plants.

When the last bee dies, the days of human civilization are numbered. Yuk it up.

Guess Who
11-12-2014, 02:36 AM
When the last bee dies, the days of human civilization are numbered. Yuk it up.

Honey bees and Plankton are two of the most important species on earth.

Stop quoting Ponygurl as I have him on ignore.

Rohirrim
11-12-2014, 08:12 PM
Monsanto is the company that made Agent Orange and dioxin. Now, on their website, they call themselves the "Sustainable Agriculture" company. In other words, for a couple of bucks, they would kill their own mothers.