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baja
06-03-2013, 05:47 AM
Rand Paul pushes for legalization of industrialized hemp in new farm bill
Monday, June 03, 2013 by: Jonathan Benson, staff writer



(NaturalNews) As the nation's lawmakers continue to bore through the details of the upcoming federal farm bill revision, a number of forward-thinking members of Congress are simultaneously pushing for the antiquated and indefensible prohibition on hemp farming to be lifted as part of its new provisions. And included among these proponents of hemp legalization is Kentucky Senator Rand Paul, who is reportedly working with Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell to pass an amendment to the new farm bill that would once again legalize industrial hemp production in the U.S., and consequently jump-starting the national economy.

Even though hemp contains less than one percent tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive compound found in marijuana, the Controlled Substances Act erroneously recognizes hemp as a Schedule I "drug" with "a high potential for abuse," despite the fact that it is impossible to get high from smoking or eating hemp. Other Schedule I drugs include substances like heroin and LSD (lysergic acid diethylamide), and of course marijuana, none of which are in any way similar to hemp in terms of how they are used.

On the contrary, industrial hemp has vast potential to sustainably replace many industrial applications that rely on oil, genetically-modified (GM) crops, and various other unsustainable and heavy-polluting source materials. Hemp is arguably the most versatile crop known to man with more than 25,000 known uses, including its amazing ability to be transformed into consumer goods like durable rope, paper, clothing, reinforcement material for concrete and automobiles, and even fuel. And the best part about hemp is that it requires minimal water and other natural resources to grow, and actually helps to clean up the natural environment where it is planted and cultivated.

"If hemp were legal to grow in the U.S., we would be creating more jobs here in the U.S. and generating more money for our own country instead of giving our money to other countries," says Dana Dwight from Forbidden Leaf. Hemp can legally be imported into the U.S. to create things like hemp oil and hemp protein, but American farmers have been needlessly barred by the federal government from participating in this lucrative market for about 75 years.

"In 1619 there were 'must grow' laws passed in America; if you were a farmer back then and you didn't grow hemp you would have been jailed or kicked out of the country as a non patriot," she adds, as quoted by The 420 Times. "Our government has been so hypocritical over hemp. It just doesn't make sense."

Urge your Congressmen to support the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 and help restore America's rich hemp history

Needless to say, the federal government continues to stunt the American economy by preventing U.S. farmers from growing hemp, all the while allowing the crop to be legally imported from places Canada and Europe. But "we the people" have the opportunity to change this by supporting the passage of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013, which would not only differentiate between marijuana and hemp, but also exempt hemp from being categorized as a Schedule I drug when individual state laws recognize hemp as a legal crop.

You can read the full text of the Industrial Hemp Farming Act of 2013 by visiting:
http://www.govtrack.us/congress/bills/113/s359/text

You can also contact your senators and urge them to sponsor the bill by visiting:
http://www.senate.gov/general/contact_information/senators_cfm.cfm

To learn more about the history of hemp cultivation in America, and how many of America's Founding Fathers personally grew this versatile crop, visit:
http://hemphistory.org/

Sources for this article include:

http://blog.norml.org

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

http://www.huffingtonpost.com

http://www.votehemp.com/

http://hemphistory.org/


Learn more: http://www.naturalnews.com/040606_farm_bill_Rand_Paul_hemp_farming.html#ixzz2 V9mZpNwT

Rohirrim
06-03-2013, 07:19 AM
We could replace all our plastic, cardboard and paper packaging with biodegradable hemp based packaging and the ocean gyres that are now filled with plastic would clear up in a generation. Corn plastics are definitely not the answer. The corn industry is about as damaging to the environment as the oil industry. Of course, 10% of oil production goes to plastics so if we switched to hemp packaging we also reduce our need to import. Using hemp would also lower our carbon footprint. Cotton is one of the most environmentally damaging crops on Earth. Hemp could replace it and produce a better textile than cotton, without the use of billions of gallons of insecticides and fertilizers pouring into the sea. For those who are not aware of it, there is a massive dead zone in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico: http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/dead-zone-the-source-of-the-gulf-of-mexicos-hypoxia/
Replacing cotton with hemp would reduce the crap pouring into the Gulf by billions of gallons.

B-Large
06-03-2013, 08:43 AM
I'll get the lobby that supports Corn and Cotton will be thrilled

baja
06-03-2013, 09:00 AM
I'll get the lobby that supports Corn and Cotton will be thrilled

Special interest has a huge part in making the federal government horribly broken. US politics on the national level is now like a cancer eating it's host (country & constitution ). Will we kill the host or will we wake up and fix this mess? That is the primary question we should concern ourselves with, all other issues ride on what we do about the failure of Washington.

Bronco Yoda
06-03-2013, 09:22 AM
Good for Rand Paul on this. Makes too much sense so it will never make it through.

Rohirrim
06-03-2013, 10:12 AM
I'll get the lobby that supports Corn and Cotton will be thrilled

Not to mention the ones that sell oil, pesticides and fertilizer.

baja
06-03-2013, 10:17 AM
Another amazing thing about hemp is it actually enriches the soil it is grown in.

baja
06-03-2013, 10:21 AM
Growing Hemp was outlawed by the efforts of Randoff Hurst because he wanted to eliminate hemps real threat to the news print industry. Hurst had vast holdings in forests that were used to make paper so he used his power to outlaw the growing of hemp.

Rohirrim
06-03-2013, 11:15 AM
Growing Hemp was outlawed by the efforts of Randoff Hurst because he wanted to eliminate hemps real threat to the news print industry. Hurst had vast holdings in forests that were used to make paper so he used his power to outlaw the growing of hemp.

Actually, probably not.
http://www.alternet.org/story/77339/debunking_the_hemp_conspiracy_theory

I guess it won't replace paper either. Or plastics. The cost of processing it is too high:

The cost of hemp pulp is approximately six times that of wood pulp,[40] mostly because of the small size and outdated equipment of the few hemp processing plants in the Western world, and because hemp is harvested once a year (during August)[citation needed] and needs to be stored to feed the mill the whole year through. This storage requires a lot of (mostly manual) handling of the bulky stalk bundles. Another issue is that the entire hemp plant cannot be economically prepared for paper production. While the wood products industry uses nearly 100% of the fiber from harvested trees, only about 25% of the dried hemp stem the bark, called bast contains the long, strong fibers desirable for paper production.[42] All this accounts for a high raw material cost. Hemp pulp is bleached with hydrogen peroxide, a process today also commonly used for wood pulp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

That's a shame. It might be part of a solution. They are using it as an ingredient in car body parts, replacing some plastics.

We could use it to reduce the amount of cotton we grow. It seems as though its use as a textile is about the most cost effective.

mhgaffney
06-03-2013, 11:19 AM
Good news.

Hemp used to be the major source of fiber here in the US.

It deserves to be again. This weed can save our forests.

It can also be grown with very little water -- thus saving a dwindling resource.

And I've just learned that hemp seeds are extremely nutritious. One of the ver best high value foods.

MHG

mhgaffney
06-03-2013, 11:21 AM
Hemp grows at a much faster rate than wood fiber. A hemp field will outproduce a forest any day.

So don't believe the nonsense about the increased cost.

baja
06-03-2013, 11:21 AM
THE CONSPIRACY

William Randolph Hearst (Citizen Kane) and the Hearst Paper Manufacturing Division of Kimberly Clark owned vast acreage of timberlands. The Hearst Company supplied most paper products. Patty Hearst’s grandfather, a destroyer of nature for his own personal profit, stood to lose billions because of hemp.

In 1937, DuPont patented the processes to make plastics from oil and coal. DuPont’s Annual Report urged stockholders to invest in its new petrochemical division. Synthetics such as plastics, cellophane, celluloid, methanol, nylon, rayon, Dacron, etc., could now be made from oil. Natural hemp industrialization would have ruined over 80% of DuPont’s business.

Andrew Mellon became Hoover’s Secretary of the Treasury and DuPont’s primary investor. He appointed his future nephew-in-law, Harry J.Anslinger, to head the Federal Bureau of Narcotics and Dangerous Drugs.

Secret meetings were held by these financial tycoons. Hemp was declared dangerous and a threat to their billion-dollar enterprises. For their dynasties to remain intact, hemp had to go. These men took an obscure Mexican slang word: ‘marijuana’ and pushed it into the consciousness of America.


http://www.lewrockwell.com/spl2/reason-hemp-is-illegal.html

Dr. Broncenstein
06-03-2013, 11:23 AM
Plus, you cant get high off corn. How come nobody talks about this?

baja
06-03-2013, 11:48 AM
Plus, you cant get high off corn. How come nobody talks about this?

Moonshine!

Rohirrim
06-03-2013, 01:05 PM
Hemp grows at a much faster rate than wood fiber. A hemp field will outproduce a forest any day.

So don't believe the nonsense about the increased cost.

The cost is in the processing. Only the outer bark of hemp is usable for paper products. Stripping it off and treating it is more costly than using soft pine which is 100% usable.

alkemical
06-03-2013, 01:34 PM
Monsanto is not pleased.

baja
06-03-2013, 01:35 PM
Monsanto is not pleased.

I will not be surprised to see Rand Paul to come down with a fast acting pancreatic cancer.

alkemical
06-03-2013, 03:31 PM
I will not be surprised to see Rand Paul to come down with a fast acting pancreatic cancer.

There's no need - he'll vote for the good of the stock holders.

Arkie
06-03-2013, 04:15 PM
First they had to find a different name because Cannabis already had a good image. So they borrowed Marijuana from the Mexicans. Then they spread crazy lies to make it illegal.

http://media-cache-ak1.pinimg.com/550x/4e/36/e2/4e36e251a3f9f03f1a6a0d89bfd41fee.jpg

cutthemdown
06-03-2013, 06:39 PM
The reason cotton is more popular is because its so much softer. Hemp clothing good for some things, not so good for most though.

hemp rope was a big part of life but my friends who sail claim even as strong and durable as it was its nothing compared to todays blended nylon ropes, and other fibers also etc.

But hemp should be leagle to grow if the farmer has a market for it. Just let it happen and see how it goes. But replace cotton, replace pulp paper from wood, nope wont happen. Hemp paper feels much different and isn't as flexible as paper made from wood pulp.

alkemical
06-03-2013, 08:23 PM
the message above is paid for by monsanto

cutthemdown
06-03-2013, 10:03 PM
not at all I have been to hemp clothing stores. It's great for hats, probably work jeans and maybe a few other heavier fiber type things. But it won't replace cotton. I do agree though insane to not let people grow it if there is a market for it. If there is a market then go for it. I say there would not be much because other products are superior to it.

Meck77
06-04-2013, 05:14 AM
We could replace all our plastic, cardboard and paper packaging with biodegradable hemp based packaging and the ocean gyres that are now filled with plastic would clear up in a generation. Corn plastics are definitely not the answer. The corn industry is about as damaging to the environment as the oil industry. Of course, 10% of oil production goes to plastics so if we switched to hemp packaging we also reduce our need to import. Using hemp would also lower our carbon footprint. Cotton is one of the most environmentally damaging crops on Earth. Hemp could replace it and produce a better textile than cotton, without the use of billions of gallons of insecticides and fertilizers pouring into the sea. For those who are not aware of it, there is a massive dead zone in the middle of the Gulf of Mexico: http://www.usgs.gov/blogs/features/usgs_top_story/dead-zone-the-source-of-the-gulf-of-mexicos-hypoxia/
Replacing cotton with hemp would reduce the crap pouring into the Gulf by billions of gallons.

Wait...No "wack job" comment from you about Paul's?

BTW...Colorado has it's very hemp farm. Friend of mine has been working on pushing through legislation at our state capital. Not sure where the progress stands now.

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_23232417/first-major-hemp-crop-60-years-is-planted

Rohirrim
06-04-2013, 06:57 AM
Wait...No "wack job" comment from you about Paul's?

BTW...Colorado has it's very hemp farm. Friend of mine has been working on pushing through legislation at our state capital. Not sure where the progress stands now.

http://www.denverpost.com/breakingnews/ci_23232417/first-major-hemp-crop-60-years-is-planted

Even a blind squirrel finds a nut on occasion. He's still a whack job.

And you can see I changed my outlook after this post once I decided to go read up about it a bit. Not nearly the "miraculous" crop it's made out to be. I wish it was. One of my key issues is getting the plastic out of the ocean. I would love it if we could find a replacement for all our packaging that ends up floating in the ocean. Unfortunately, corn is too environmentally expensive, requiring lots of water, fertilizer and insecticide. Hemp would be a excellent replacement if it wasn't so expensive to process and if the products made were attractive. Cotton is one of the most environmentally damaging crops on Earth. We've got to clean up our act if we want to leave a healthy world to our great grandchildren. The first thing we can do is stop using plastic. Everybody take your own bags to the store. It's a start. :thumbs:

baja
06-04-2013, 08:06 AM
Even a blind squirrel finds a nut on occasion. He's still a whack job.

And you can see I changed my outlook after this post once I decided to go read up about it a bit. Not nearly the "miraculous" crop it's made out to be. I wish it was. One of my key issues is getting the plastic out of the ocean. I would love it if we could find a replacement for all our packaging that ends up floating in the ocean. Unfortunately, corn is too environmentally expensive, requiring lots of water, fertilizer and insecticide. Hemp would be a excellent replacement if it wasn't so expensive to process and if the products made were attractive. Cotton is one of the most environmentally damaging crops on Earth. We've got to clean up our act if we want to leave a healthy world to our great grandchildren. The first thing we can do is stop using plastic. Everybody take your own bags to the store. It's a start. :thumbs:




I do that and go one better I take my bags to the farmers market thus eliminating several middle men and transportation costs

alkemical
06-04-2013, 03:21 PM
Even a blind squirrel finds a nut on occasion. He's still a whack job.

And you can see I changed my outlook after this post once I decided to go read up about it a bit. Not nearly the "miraculous" crop it's made out to be. I wish it was. One of my key issues is getting the plastic out of the ocean. I would love it if we could find a replacement for all our packaging that ends up floating in the ocean. Unfortunately, corn is too environmentally expensive, requiring lots of water, fertilizer and insecticide. Hemp would be a excellent replacement if it wasn't so expensive to process and if the products made were attractive. Cotton is one of the most environmentally damaging crops on Earth. We've got to clean up our act if we want to leave a healthy world to our great grandchildren. The first thing we can do is stop using plastic. Everybody take your own bags to the store. It's a start. :thumbs:

How much of it is upfront cost to ramp up that infrastructure? How much $ is saved on the back end due to local shipping/distribution/water/fertilizer requirements?

If we're looking at ROI and long term gains - that's where i'd start.

mhgaffney
06-04-2013, 07:17 PM
The cost is in the processing. Only the outer bark of hemp is usable for paper products. Stripping it off and treating it is more costly than using soft pine which is 100% usable.

The cellulose in wood is tough -- difficult to break down for use as fiber.

Wood pulp mills are also sources of pollution.

Hemp is a much better alternative.

Obushma
06-05-2013, 03:27 PM
Actually, probably not.
http://www.alternet.org/story/77339/debunking_the_hemp_conspiracy_theory

I guess it won't replace paper either. Or plastics. The cost of processing it is too high:

The cost of hemp pulp is approximately six times that of wood pulp,[40] mostly because of the small size and outdated equipment of the few hemp processing plants in the Western world, and because hemp is harvested once a year (during August)[citation needed] and needs to be stored to feed the mill the whole year through. This storage requires a lot of (mostly manual) handling of the bulky stalk bundles. Another issue is that the entire hemp plant cannot be economically prepared for paper production. While the wood products industry uses nearly 100% of the fiber from harvested trees, only about 25% of the dried hemp stem the bark, called bast contains the long, strong fibers desirable for paper production.[42] All this accounts for a high raw material cost. Hemp pulp is bleached with hydrogen peroxide, a process today also commonly used for wood pulp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

That's a shame. It might be part of a solution. They are using it as an ingredient in car body parts, replacing some plastics.

We could use it to reduce the amount of cotton we grow. It seems as though its use as a textile is about the most cost effective.

Of course, you're wrong, as usual.

Did anyone even bother to look at the garbage blog Ro linked? It's a blog, some sh*t for brains liberal blog, the guy doesnt know sh*t from shinola.

Harvested once a year? Only the bark can be used in paper production? This guy is a regular Hurst ass kisser.

1 acre of trees can take anywhere from 50 to 500 years to grow enough to be used for paper. 1 acre of hemp can be cultivated within 100 days. 1 acre of hemp produces fiber pulp equal to 4 acres of trees. Hemp paper can be recycled up to three times more then regular wood paper. Hemp is harvested and transported like corn, which is a lot cheaper then wood.

BTW, wood is not bleached w/ hydrogen peroxide like hemp.

Arkie
06-05-2013, 04:32 PM
Logging has other costs on society. I've personally known two different loggers killed in the last six years. I've lost count of the injuries, some permanent. It's one of the most dangerous jobs.

Rohirrim
06-05-2013, 05:52 PM
Of course, you're wrong, as usual.

Did anyone even bother to look at the garbage blog Ro linked? It's a blog, some sh*t for brains liberal blog, the guy doesnt know sh*t from shinola.

Harvested once a year? Only the bark can be used in paper production? This guy is a regular Hurst ass kisser.

1 acre of trees can take anywhere from 50 to 500 years to grow enough to be used for paper. 1 acre of hemp can be cultivated within 100 days. 1 acre of hemp produces fiber pulp equal to 4 acres of trees. Hemp paper can be recycled up to three times more then regular wood paper. Hemp is harvested and transported like corn, which is a lot cheaper then wood.

BTW, wood is not bleached w/ hydrogen peroxide like hemp.

Damn! They still haven't found the blend of medications that works best for you? That's a shame.

The truth is that finding an unbiased, legitimate site regarding hemp is about as easy as finding an unbiased study of Roswell. That was about as close as I could come.

BTW, Hurst [sic] has been dead for over sixty years. I doubt he is still much interested in keeping hemp down.

Obushma
06-05-2013, 06:19 PM
Damn! They still haven't found the blend of medications that works best for you? That's a shame.

A blend of HGH, prevacid, and THC. What are they using on you geriatics nowadays anyway?

The truth is that finding an unbiased, legitimate site regarding hemp is about as easy as finding an unbiased study of Roswell. That was about as close as I could come.

BTW, Hurst [sic] has been dead for over sixty years. I doubt he is still much interested in keeping hemp down.

No see, the problem is you posted this as FACT

I guess it won't replace paper either. Or plastics. The cost of processing it is too high:

The cost of hemp pulp is approximately six times that of wood pulp,[40] mostly because of the small size and outdated equipment of the few hemp processing plants in the Western world, and because hemp is harvested once a year (during August)[citation needed] and needs to be stored to feed the mill the whole year through. This storage requires a lot of (mostly manual) handling of the bulky stalk bundles. Another issue is that the entire hemp plant cannot be economically prepared for paper production. While the wood products industry uses nearly 100% of the fiber from harvested trees, only about 25% of the dried hemp stem the bark, called bast contains the long, strong fibers desirable for paper production.[42] All this accounts for a high raw material cost. Hemp pulp is bleached with hydrogen peroxide, a process today also commonly used for wood pulp. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemp

That's a shame. It might be part of a solution. They are using it as an ingredient in car body parts, replacing some plastics.

We could use it to reduce the amount of cotton we grow. It seems as though its use as a textile is about the most cost effective.

So instead of posting like you know what your talking about, just say, Hey, I pulled this bull**** from a blog, maybe right, maybe wrong.

Requiem
06-05-2013, 08:08 PM
Prevacid, LOL.

TonyR
06-19-2013, 10:59 AM
Speaking of Rand Paul, sounds like he's off an running.

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113494/president-rand-paul-hes-becoming-better-politician-every-day

Rohirrim
06-19-2013, 12:04 PM
Speaking of Rand Paul, sounds like he's off an running.

http://www.newrepublic.com/article/113494/president-rand-paul-hes-becoming-better-politician-every-day

I would say that I hope he wins the nomination of the GOP, but then I realized that Hillary probably gets the Dem nod, so it's a wash - radical libertarian versus Republican Lite. No-win situation. :pity:

BroncoInferno
06-19-2013, 12:42 PM
I would say that I hope he wins the nomination of the GOP, but then I realized that Hillary probably gets the Dem nod, so it's a wash - radical libertarian versus Republican Lite. No-win situation. :pity:

Well, I wouldn't call it a wash...GOP Lite isn't a "win", but it's vastly preferable to a far right-wing jackal like Paul.

It's amazing how far to the right this country has shifted in the past couple of decades. Politicians who have basically the same views as Richard Nixon are the most progressive choices we're given :TJnPopps:

broncocalijohn
06-20-2013, 10:40 AM
I'll get the lobby that supports Corn and Cotton will be thrilled

But if they have to add Corn Fructose to the Hemp, we are good to go. This is another example of lobbying our government to benefit the good of a few over the population as a whole.