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24champ
03-01-2013, 12:41 AM
Just read about how CableVision is suing Viacom over on bundling channels that send customers bills through the roof. Here's the story:

"The manner in which Viacom sells its programming is illegal, anti-consumer and wrong," Cablevision said. "Viacom effectively forces Cablevision's customers to pay for and receive little-watched channels in order to get the channels they actually want."

Well, well, well. Sure sounds as if the nation's fifth-largest cable company, operating primarily on the East Coast, is saying the same thing I've been saying for years: Cable and satellite subscribers should pay only for the channels they want.

Or is it?

After the lawsuit was announced this week, I spoke with Charlie Schueler, Cablevision's executive vice president of communications. I asked what a legal win for the company would mean for Cablevision subscribers.

Would it mean lower bills? Would it mean so-called a la carte programming that is, allowing subscribers to pick their own channel lineup from a menu of options?

"Without forced bundling," Schueler said, "cable providers could tailor smaller and lower-priced packages to specific audiences."

OK, but that basically means customers would still have to buy a package of channels, rather than pick the channels they want.

"We would offer more flexibility to customers," Schueler replied. "We would favor anything that offers broader choices and flexibility for customers."

But you're not saying the words. Will you offer a la carte programming?

"Choice and flexibility are the words I'll offer."



Cable and satellite companies will pocket an average $73.44 per household for video services this year, according to market researcher SNL Kagan. That's up nearly 11% since 2010.

Chances are, your paycheck hasn't gone up 11% over the last few years.

http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lazarus-20130301,0,2193723,full.column


Looking forward to the day Cable Companies become obsolete, and at this current rate with Cable/Satellite bills, it will be around 200 dollars/month or more in less than 10 years. You probably don't even watch 80 percent of the available channels but your paying for them anyway. It's a joke.

cutthemdown
03-01-2013, 02:03 AM
it is a joke what we pay for internet and cable tv. Throw in cell phone bills. No wonder they say families don't go camping/fishing/boating etc as much as they used to. It's added another 2-3 thousand a yr to the family budget. Hell maybe more.

maven
03-01-2013, 02:06 AM
Cable companies are so scared of a la carte programming. Is grandma going to buy, for example ESPN, which she never watches? We will see if changes happen one day. I doubt it anytime soon or ever. Even your above article proves it.

Bacchus
03-01-2013, 02:29 AM
I don't have cable. I have Roku, netflix and Hulu. Costs me a total of $17 a month. I watch all my sporting events on the internet so keep those links coming!!!!

Ratboy
03-01-2013, 02:32 AM
Start here.

http://www.reddit.com/r/cordcutters/

Ratboy
03-01-2013, 02:40 AM
Quit complaining and stop paying.

There are plenty of alternatives that cost much less.

Drek
03-01-2013, 02:56 AM
I don't have cable. I have Roku, netflix and Hulu. Costs me a total of $17 a month. I watch all my sporting events on the internet so keep those links coming!!!!

The only times I've had cable in the last half-decade was when it was offered free with my internet service. As soon as they want real money for it its back to Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon on Demand (included with my Prime account), and good ol' fashioned antenna.

People don't realize what over the air broadcasting offers post-digital transition. All the major networks broadcast in uncompressed HD, far better picture quality than what cable or satellite provide. At the same time the added bandwidth has resulted in PBS featuring 4 different channels (PBS, PBS Create, PBS Kids, and PBS community calendar), along with most networks spinning off their own 24/7 weather and traffic sub-channel.

Cable companies are on their way out. We are going to see an a la carte service offered via internet streaming in the not too distant future and when we do they're toast.

Bacchus
03-01-2013, 05:22 AM
The only times I've had cable in the last half-decade was when it was offered free with my internet service. As soon as they want real money for it its back to Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon on Demand (included with my Prime account), and good ol' fashioned antenna.

People don't realize what over the air broadcasting offers post-digital transition. All the major networks broadcast in uncompressed HD, far better picture quality than what cable or satellite provide. At the same time the added bandwidth has resulted in PBS featuring 4 different channels (PBS, PBS Create, PBS Kids, and PBS community calendar), along with most networks spinning off their own 24/7 weather and traffic sub-channel.

Cable companies are on their way out. We are going to see an a la carte service offered via internet streaming in the not too distant future and when we do they're toast.

I have been doing this for 1.5 years and I'll neve rhave cable or satellite again. I figure sometime in the furture you will just be able to goto the HBO website and pay them and you can stream whatever you want right off the internet.

Requiem
03-01-2013, 05:41 AM
it is a joke what we pay for internet and cable tv. Throw in cell phone bills. No wonder they say families don't go camping/fishing/boating etc as much as they used to. It's added another 2-3 thousand a yr to the family budget. Hell maybe more.

Those are luxuries. Don't have to have them.

As people have said: Netflix + Hulu + Amazon under $25.00 a month. What most people spend in one night going to get a drink and dinner.

High-speed internet service is as cheap as $19.99 too -- entertainment for under $50.00 a month.

pricejj
03-01-2013, 07:28 AM
I cut the cord a year ago and haven't looked back. Regular old cheap antenna, Roku, Netflix...as per others.

Plus I have a HDHomerun that works as a TV tuner to my laptop (for over the air Broncos games). Windows Media Player DVR.

Powderaddict
03-01-2013, 07:51 AM
I got cable for the first time in over a decade just a couple months ago. The only reason is that it lowered my internet bill, and gave me faster internet speeds. For 1 year my internet bill will be lower, and I have faster speeds. I very rarely turn on the cable box either.

I see people all the time who are behind on their water, behind on their electricity, behind on their mortgage, but current on their cell phone (with expensive data plans of course) and current on their cable. Seems like many people have their priorities completely out of whack!

Broncos4Life
03-01-2013, 09:05 AM
Just wondering what proof it is you have that cable companies are on their way out. This not so distant future you speak of is probably what, 30-50 years from now?
I think most poor people know what over the air broadcasting is. And still not everybody can get it. These are people that don't have TVs that are newer than 2007, and can't afford a converter box. I work for a cable company. So I guess I should start looking for another job before my job disappears.


The only times I've had cable in the last half-decade was when it was offered free with my internet service. As soon as they want real money for it its back to Netflix, Hulu Plus, Amazon on Demand (included with my Prime account), and good ol' fashioned antenna.

People don't realize what over the air broadcasting offers post-digital transition. All the major networks broadcast in uncompressed HD, far better picture quality than what cable or satellite provide. At the same time the added bandwidth has resulted in PBS featuring 4 different channels (PBS, PBS Create, PBS Kids, and PBS community calendar), along with most networks spinning off their own 24/7 weather and traffic sub-channel.

Cable companies are on their way out. We are going to see an a la carte service offered via internet streaming in the not too distant future and when we do they're toast.

Requiem
03-01-2013, 09:06 AM
I got cable for the first time in over a decade just a couple months ago. The only reason is that it lowered my internet bill, and gave me faster internet speeds. For 1 year my internet bill will be lower, and I have faster speeds. I very rarely turn on the cable box either.

I see people all the time who are behind on their water, behind on their electricity, behind on their mortgage, but current on their cell phone (with expensive data plans of course) and current on their cable. Seems like many people have their priorities completely out of whack!

That is cause most people are silly.

Cable free since Hurricane Katrina.

Smartphone free since August 2012.

The Req Way! :~ohyah!:

BroncoBeavis
03-01-2013, 09:18 AM
I just can't do the no ESPN thing. I keep the basic-est of basic cable pretty much just for that.

The cable/network cartel won't be broken until quality content builds up outside the cartel. As soon as the cable TV networks see serious content competition outside of cable, they'll have to start opening their own content beyond the coax as well. Then they'll slip out for a pack of smokes on the cable companies in a hurry so their content can reach the newer streaming audience.

Which reminds me, I need to check out House of Cards on Netflix, just to support the concept. Anyone watched it yet?

Taco John
03-01-2013, 09:24 AM
They will evolve into cloud computing companies. If you ever wanted to build your own PC, now is the time to do it, because it won't be long until people plug into their wall for computing power.

Bacchus
03-01-2013, 09:25 AM
I just can't do the no ESPN thing. I keep the basic-est of basic cable pretty much just for that.

The cable/network cartel won't be broken until quality content builds up outside the cartel. As soon as the cable TV networks see serious content competition outside of cable, they'll have to start opening their own content beyond the coax as well. Then they'll slip out for a pack of smokes on the cable companies in a hurry so their content can reach the newer streaming audience.

Which reminds me, I need to check out House of Cards on Netflix, just to support the concept. Anyone watched it yet?

I'm on the 6th episode. It is good, not as good as West Wing though.

West Wing shows what can be great about politics. House of Cards shows you what is bad about Politics. West Wing is streaming now as well so I have been watching both.

razorwire77
03-01-2013, 09:33 AM
Just read about how CableVision is suing Viacom over on bundling channels that send customers bills through the roof. Here's the story:


http://www.latimes.com/business/la-fi-lazarus-20130301,0,2193723,full.column


Looking forward to the day Cable Companies become obsolete, and at this current rate with Cable/Satellite bills, it will be around 200 dollars/month or more in less than 10 years. You probably don't even watch 80 percent of the available channels but your paying for them anyway. It's a joke.

Someday will be within 5 years. The buzzards are already circling. Streaming total content television from your phone, tablet, computer and flat panel will be the norm soon. Satellite TV will basically be CD like obsolete by 2020. It will also ensure that the remaining 1 hour of work that actually gets done in an office will be down to about 7 minutes.

Drunk Monkey
03-01-2013, 10:08 AM
I just can't do the no ESPN thing. I keep the basic-est of basic cable pretty much just for that.

The cable/network cartel won't be broken until quality content builds up outside the cartel. As soon as the cable TV networks see serious content competition outside of cable, they'll have to start opening their own content beyond the coax as well. Then they'll slip out for a pack of smokes on the cable companies in a hurry so their content can reach the newer streaming audience.

Which reminds me, I need to check out House of Cards on Netflix, just to support the concept. Anyone watched it yet?

Same here. I have a hard time not having ESPN. I can't imaging collage football without it. My wife would throw a fit about Bravo. Those 2 networks aside I could cut the cord no problem.

For those of you who have cut the cord what do you for sports programing that is only on ESPN? NBA, NCAA ect.

broncosteven
03-01-2013, 10:09 AM
Someday will be within 5 years. The buzzards are already circling. Streaming total content television from your phone, tablet, computer and flat panel will be the norm soon. Satellite TV will basically be CD like obsolete by 2020. It will also ensure that the remaining 1 hour of work that actually gets done in an office will be down to about 7 minutes.

Who said CD's are obsolete! It took me 35 years to build my wall of CD's and records. I still even have a storage tub full of 78's.

Bacchus
03-01-2013, 10:19 AM
Same here. I have a hard time not having ESPN. I can't imaging collage football without it. My wife would throw a fit about Bravo. Those 2 networks aside I could cut the cord no problem.

For those of you who have cut the cord what do you for sports programing that is only on ESPN? NBA, NCAA ect.

You can watch espn on the internet 24/7, same with the NFL network during football season.

razorwire77
03-01-2013, 10:24 AM
Who said CD's are obsolete! It took me 35 years to build my wall of CD's and records. I still even have a storage tub full of 78's.

I hear you. I finally started converting music over in December.

Drunk Monkey
03-01-2013, 10:30 AM
You can watch espn on the internet 24/7, same with the NFL network during football season.

ESPN requires you to sign in with your TV provider info. How do you get around that?



Programs on ESPN require you to sign-in with your TV provider.

Need help? Check FAQs or call 888-549-ESPN.

boltaneer
03-01-2013, 11:00 AM
Google Fiber will make cable companies obsolete unless they change their ways of thinking.

Bacchus
03-01-2013, 11:12 AM
Google Fiber will make cable companies obsolete unless they change their ways of thinking.

How is that?

maven
03-01-2013, 11:27 AM
ESPN requires you to sign in with your TV provider info. How do you get around that?



Programs on ESPN require you to sign-in with your TV provider.

Need help? Check FAQs or call 888-549-ESPN.

Hook a computer up to your TV and stream anything you want on the internet.

maven
03-01-2013, 11:32 AM
Start here.

http://www.reddit.com/r/cordcutters/

nice link!

This is also an option for some of you out there.

http://www.reddit.com/r/cordcutters/comments/19fz82/thanks_to_my_brother_still_attached_to_the_cord_i/

Also, with the above link if someone in your family has comcast, directv, dish there's an app for that.

rugbythug
03-01-2013, 12:21 PM
I bought a computer with a built in TV tuner and HDMI output 4 years ago. No cable bill watch everything I want. Widows media has a built in DVR.

Drunk Monkey
03-01-2013, 12:38 PM
Hook a computer up to your TV and stream anything you want on the internet.

Ya, I get that. For ESPN can you stream it online without having a Cable / Sat / fiber account?

If I go to the website and try to watch the live feed it ask for that info before it lets you watch. ESPN 2, U and some of the others only ask if you are a customer of any of their affiliates. I assume if you got broadband from one of them that would work.

Currently, I have Verizon FIOS so I can enter me account info and watch ESPN 1,2, ect. If I didn't what would I do?

BroncoBeavis
03-01-2013, 01:23 PM
Hook a computer up to your TV and stream anything you want on the internet.

I have an HTPC. Hard to watch sports around the kids with the fantastic array of porn ads you'll probably see while trying to stream from a place like firstrow though. :)

Not worth the risk or hassle at this point, for me at least.

Jetmeck
03-01-2013, 01:58 PM
Quit complaining and stop paying.

There are plenty of alternatives that cost much less.


Everybody doesn't have enough bandwidth (speed) to watch internet tv, movies or whatever and if they did most ISP are starting to add data limits..................sos your gonna pay one or the other....period !

ludo21
03-01-2013, 02:20 PM
yeah i pay for just internet and its 46 bucks...ouch

cell... 150 (cut that sucker down from 180 when we first got married)

Drek
03-01-2013, 02:21 PM
Just wondering what proof it is you have that cable companies are on their way out. This not so distant future you speak of is probably what, 30-50 years from now?
I think most poor people know what over the air broadcasting is. And still not everybody can get it. These are people that don't have TVs that are newer than 2007, and can't afford a converter box. I work for a cable company. So I guess I should start looking for another job before my job disappears.

Declining user base, more competition from non-traditional sources, no way to dictate terms because not enough of them own enough of the content.

Netflix's CEO has said his goal is for Netflix to become HBO before HBO becomes Netflix. He outbid them for House of Cards to that end. So if Netflix does hit a few original programming home runs how long can Time Warner keep HBO behind their walled garden while Netflix gains mind share? Amazon is now pursuing more digital content to attack Netflix as well. Hulu Plus exists specifically to try out different business models for content providers.

Eventually content providers will find the right model to sell to their customers directly and take the middleman that is cable/satellite out of the equation for all but the most rural of customers. That model is likely going to arrive within the next several years and its all downhill for cable from there. Middlemen never survive too long, the middleman cable company is about to face that reality.

BroncoBeavis
03-01-2013, 03:05 PM
Declining user base, more competition from non-traditional sources, no way to dictate terms because not enough of them own enough of the content.

Netflix's CEO has said his goal is for Netflix to become HBO before HBO becomes Netflix. He outbid them for House of Cards to that end. So if Netflix does hit a few original programming home runs how long can Time Warner keep HBO behind their walled garden while Netflix gains mind share? Amazon is now pursuing more digital content to attack Netflix as well. Hulu Plus exists specifically to try out different business models for content providers.

Eventually content providers will find the right model to sell to their customers directly and take the middleman that is cable/satellite out of the equation for all but the most rural of customers. That model is likely going to arrive within the next several years and its all downhill for cable from there. Middlemen never survive too long, the middleman cable company is about to face that reality.

Cable companies will survive. They'll just become ISPs instead of having any role in programming. What they lost in programming revenue they'll try to make up by charging for bandwidth. Good news is it brings them into open bandwidth competition with the telecom and maybe even wireless providers on some level, so they'll no longer have as much pricing control.

I've also wondered sometimes if a major cable player like TW couldn't talk the channel providers into some sort of virtual cable service. Where they can still try their hand at packaging certain things, but give themselves an instant nationwide market. I think it could work well for the first few cable companies that tried it. But the rest of the legacy market would pitch a fit.

Broncos4Life
03-02-2013, 12:02 AM
Declining user base, more competition from non-traditional sources, no way to dictate terms because not enough of them own enough of the content.

Netflix's CEO has said his goal is for Netflix to become HBO before HBO becomes Netflix. He outbid them for House of Cards to that end. So if Netflix does hit a few original programming home runs how long can Time Warner keep HBO behind their walled garden while Netflix gains mind share? Amazon is now pursuing more digital content to attack Netflix as well. Hulu Plus exists specifically to try out different business models for content providers.

Eventually content providers will find the right model to sell to their customers directly and take the middleman that is cable/satellite out of the equation for all but the most rural of customers. That model is likely going to arrive within the next several years and its all downhill for cable from there. Middlemen never survive too long, the middleman cable company is about to face that reality.

The strength of any cable company these days is its high speed internet service. So if your talking about video programming you are on to something, but I think it a bit premature. The a la cart possibility is still many, many years away. If there was an a la cart service, how would new channels survive? If not packaged in a bundle, they would never make it. I'm sure something will give and a revolution will begin sometime, but so called middlemen worth billions don't just disappear. They will adapt.

Drek
03-02-2013, 01:55 AM
The strength of any cable company these days is its high speed internet service. So if your talking about video programming you are on to something, but I think it a bit premature. The a la cart possibility is still many, many years away. If there was an a la cart service, how would new channels survive? If not packaged in a bundle, they would never make it. I'm sure something will give and a revolution will begin sometime, but so called middlemen worth billions don't just disappear. They will adapt.

They'll just become ISPs, yes. The days of cable companies being middlemen on video programming are VERY close to the end already because Netflix, Amazon, iTunes, etc. all offer the same kind of media but with a far better format and better understanding of the end user.

There is a reason why Netflix upped the entire first season of House of Cards at once. Their usage statistics tell them that is what their consumers want. These companies are miles ahead on user metrics, much like Google is on the web browsing front. They use that to leverage their services in the optimal fashion - seeming pro-consumer while actually doing what is best for them.

Also, any channel that can't survive in an a la carte environment is a channel that shouldn't exist. This is the most powerful paradigm shift that will bring about a la carte programming in the near future. When the major content providers realize that a la carte not only frees them from a middle man collecting from their customers but that it also gives them the most healthy free market determination of whether a product is viable.

Instead of a cable company paying $2 per channel to Viacom and then charging what they need to from the consumer the consumer can instead just pay Viacom that $2 for any channel they find interesting. The cream of the crop will distinguish itself and the channels that have survived entirely thanks to bundling and that have actually been wasting money will be singled out and eliminated.

Cable and satellite have their place still in a country that still can't offer universal high speed, and the major companies are obviously well into becoming ISPs as it stands now. The video services will in the next several years (5-10) begin to turn into a boutique industry where only a fraction of their total consumers care for it.

rmsanger
03-02-2013, 05:48 AM
will bump this thread when apple tv is dropped later this year.

Drunk Monkey
03-02-2013, 06:38 AM
Drek, what do you do for sports outside of the free to air channels?

ColoradoDarin
03-02-2013, 10:03 AM
OTA Antenna for local, Amazon Prime for just about every thing else (we got Prime originally with my wife's Kindle, but it is so worth keeping because we live a bit from shopping), and firstrow/stream 2 watch/other stream for live games. I won't be going back even for a la carte.

Rascal
03-02-2013, 10:55 AM
I have an HTPC. Hard to watch sports around the kids with the fantastic array of porn ads you'll probably see while trying to stream from a place like firstrow though. :)

This.

ColoradoDarin
03-02-2013, 11:08 AM
I have an HTPC. Hard to watch sports around the kids with the fantastic array of porn ads you'll probably see while trying to stream from a place like firstrow though. :)

Not worth the risk or hassle at this point, for me at least.

Firstrow has ads?

???

Firefox with adblock.

BroncoBuff
03-02-2013, 12:26 PM
Drek, same questions as DrunkyMonkey .... sports and news, NFL Network, MSNBC, etc. ?? As you know, Roku offers a long list of news channels, Fox, CNN, NBC, CBS and ABC News, MSNBC, etc ... but it's a hodgepodge of patchwork content. Everything's a day or two or a week old, some shows are even audio only.

Our setup sounds identical to yours, Roku XS with Netflix, Hulu Plus and Amazon Instant Video free with Prime (though HD versions still cost us extra). I'm okay with networks delaying first-run TV shows, they usually release them for streaming after midnight the night they air. But news just doesn't work well for me, I need it live.



Anybody interested In Internet TV, note most of the Netflix catalog is still available by mail only. And by "most" I mean when I checked my Top 10 or so favorite films, zero. Not a single one available.

Hulu Plus has virtually no movies, but the sheer volume of it's TV content is staggering. Example: you can watch every SNL ever. Every.single.one starting with the George Carlin premiere. CBS finally signed on with Hulu last month, so now they have all 4 broadcast networks. There's such a massive quantities of programming, Hulu slices and dices them into over 100 different channel groupings to make them easier to find (navigation can be a problem), like the 'Stephen J. Cannel Channel.'

Downsides to Internet TV: In addition to no live programming, hence no worthwhile news or sports, the DVR problem nags me. So easy with cable or satellite, a HUGE plus. Can't really use a DVR with this, you could but the hassles would kill it.

Couple things if you're shopping for a box: 1) Virtually every TV manufactured today has the functions of Roku-type boxes built-in, been that way the past couple years, and 2) Because of an ongoing (and ongoing) technical dispute with Google, Roku boxes still does not carry YouTube's Channel.

Bacchus
03-02-2013, 01:27 PM
Downsides to Internet TV: In addition to no live programming, hence no worthwhile news or sports, the DVR problem nags me. So easy with cable or satellite, a HUGE plus. Can't really use a DVR with this, you could but the hassles would kill it.


I watch all sports live on the internet.

Drunk Monkey
03-02-2013, 01:50 PM
I watch all sports live on the internet.

Where?

BroncoBuff
03-02-2013, 01:56 PM
If there's a decent subscription-based content provider, tell me. But I don't like bouncing around Jutin-TV one step ahead of the sheriff.

NFL Network and others should really be looking into providing subscriber-based online access. Lots of guys would buy it, and it turn out to be a goldmine.

Archer81
03-02-2013, 02:30 PM
Eventually it will all be internet based. I am thinking about dumping directv and keeping netflix, amazon prime and Vudu.


:Broncos:

Agamemnon
03-02-2013, 03:38 PM
I'm part of the growing group of Roku, Hulu, Netflix rebels. The only thing I miss is Bronco games on NFL Network and Espn, but I can always go to a bar or restaurant for those. Cable and satellite TV are the devil.

Broncos4Life
03-02-2013, 03:49 PM
I'm part of the growing group of Roku, Hulu, Netflix rebels. The only thing I miss is Bronco games on NFL Network and Espn, but I can always go to a bar or restaurant for those. Cable and satellite TV are the devil.

Not when they pay for your cable and internet. ;D

INbronco
03-02-2013, 04:08 PM
As another side to this issue, I would love to have cable where I live out in the country; not because of the tv programming but for the cable internet. I would then abandon my land line and use Skype for my telephone, Netflix and Vudu for TV and internet for internet. My daughter pays less than $30 for her cable modem and that would be my total cost for all electronic communication. Hopefully all cable companies will devolve into internet providers only. **** the cable, satelite tv.

Bacchus
03-02-2013, 04:12 PM
Where?

Here is ESPN and the NFL Channel

http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/american-football.html

Here is NBA

http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/basketball.html

Here is hockey
http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/ice-hockey.html

Here is Tennis
http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/tennis.html

You can even watch ABC & CBS along with some Canadian channels

http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/tv-box.html

Bacchus
03-02-2013, 04:53 PM
This one has Euro sports, BBC 1 and 2; Espn, Espn 2 and ESPN America and even poker

http://atdee.net/

Aftermath
03-03-2013, 12:53 AM
Already don't use that garbage. Subscribe to Netflix, NHL gamecenter, and rent movies from iTunes on my Apple TV.

Drek
03-03-2013, 03:50 AM
Drek, same questions as DrunkyMonkey .... sports and news, NFL Network, MSNBC, etc. ?? As you know, Roku offers a long list of news channels, Fox, CNN, NBC, CBS and ABC News, MSNBC, etc ... but it's a hodgepodge of patchwork content. Everything's a day or two or a week old, some shows are even audio only.

Our setup sounds identical to yours, Roku XS with Netflix, Hulu Plus and Amazon Instant Video free with Prime (though HD versions still cost us extra). I'm okay with networks delaying first-run TV shows, they usually release them for streaming after midnight the night they air. But news just doesn't work well for me, I need it live.
I get all my news from PBS, which you can get live via an antenna. My interest in Fox News (GOP PR Network), MSNBC (Attempting to fill the void opposite Fox, but is full of faux-intellectual caricatures with the exception of Maddow, and milfy Mika but then Joe steps all over her anyhow), and CNN (are they even trying anymore? They can't be right? This has to be a joke) has hit rock bottom, so not having that available doesn't bother me in the least.

I find that PBS' lineup is more balanced and give a more honest world view. Other than that I typically use Hulu to watch the Daily Show and Colbert Report for a bit of pseudo-news comedy that keeps me a bit less cynical.

As for sports - MLB.tv and it's NHL and NBA counterparts obviously fill a huge part of the void. I've always had pretty good luck with the local CBS and Fox affiliates putting up worthwhile games on Sundays for the NFL, but if I was really desperate you can get NFL Sunday Ticket type programming on PS3, you just have to pay full freight, or have a friend who wants it for their direcTV and would go half/half with you.



Anybody interested In Internet TV, note most of the Netflix catalog is still available by mail only. And by "most" I mean when I checked my Top 10 or so favorite films, zero. Not a single one available.
I personally have a rather large (>300 titles) Blu-Ray collection because 1. Blu-Ray is likely to be the final physical storage media we ever use before going cloud and 2. Blu-Ray 1080p is basically uncompressed audio and video in optimal quality making it the peak in current A/V content, and it will likely remain there for some time as the connection speeds required on both ends to stream a 50GB file in the span of 2-2.5 hours is still quite some distance off.

However, Netflix' disc based service is something I've held onto because I do see value in their expanded catalog, I don't see why so many people are dumping it myself. Also, the on-demand catalog isn't meant to provide you with a wholistic movie library at this point. I view it more as the chance to branch my tastes out and see what new content I can discover, be that movie or series. Also, if House of Cards is anything to go by in terms of what their original content will be like then you can sign me up indefinitely. Fincher and Spacey hit a home run for them with that, and I can't imagine the return of Arrested Development will disappoint either.

Hulu Plus has virtually no movies, but the sheer volume of it's TV content is staggering. Example: you can watch every SNL ever. Every.single.one starting with the George Carlin premiere. CBS finally signed on with Hulu last month, so now they have all 4 broadcast networks. There's such a massive quantities of programming, Hulu slices and dices them into over 100 different channel groupings to make them easier to find (navigation can be a problem), like the 'Stephen J. Cannel Channel.'
I find the best way to manage Hulu is to set up favorites for shows you will watch weekly, either via the on-screen app or through the website (even easier).

Also, they do have an extensive collection of movies, just not the most mainstream of titles. Right now it's the exclusive home for the Criterion Collection, which is pretty ****ing awesome to have as a streaming library. The depth of their lineup is incredible as well. I'm something of a food geek and as a result have been on a binge of Avec Eric episodes, a two season long travel/cooking show hosted by Eric Ripert, three star Michelin chef of Le Bernardin. He's hands down the most accomplished chef de cuisine to ever do such a show that I know of and there on Hulu are ~40 episodes I would have never known existed without it.

Downsides to Internet TV: In addition to no live programming, hence no worthwhile news or sports, the DVR problem nags me. So easy with cable or satellite, a HUGE plus. Can't really use a DVR with this, you could but the hassles would kill it.
Internet TV is primarily focused towards on-demand viewing so most of it doesn't need DVR, it's effectively DVR via the cloud. For your over the air networks though you could easily get a Windows PC set up with a capture card to be your DVR. I currently have an old desktop turned into a home theater PC via Media Portal myself, works quite well and you can even have on-screen channel guides.

Couple things if you're shopping for a box: 1) Virtually every TV manufactured today has the functions of Roku-type boxes built-in, been that way the past couple years, and 2) Because of an ongoing (and ongoing) technical dispute with Google, Roku boxes still does not carry YouTube's Channel.
Just as a word of warning, most "smart" TVs as they're called feature rather low tier versions of the various apps (Netflix, Hulu, Amazon, etc.) with very infrequent updates. They aren't nearly as functional or user-friendly as the Roku, PS3, or X360 interfaces, which also get constant updates.

Also, this fall we might see the first big crack put in the cable/satellite industry's armor as both the new PS4 and next Xbox systems are being built for on-demand content streaming whereas their predecessors just had it tacked on mid-cycle. The console arms race is spilling over into on-demand content and as a result we'll see very lucrative deals struck to get as much content on the consoles as either company can.

Drunk Monkey
03-03-2013, 06:04 AM
Here is ESPN and the NFL Channel

http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/american-football.html

Here is NBA

http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/basketball.html

Here is hockey
http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/ice-hockey.html

Here is Tennis
http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/tennis.html

You can even watch ABC & CBS along with some Canadian channels

http://www.firstrow1.eu/sport/tv-box.html

That's what I use for Bronco games when they are not shown in my market. For the most part it works but the quality is sup par. I don't really view that as am equal alternative. I would have a hard time inviting my friends over to watch something that I streamed from there.

24champ
03-03-2013, 08:48 AM
I have an HTPC. Hard to watch sports around the kids with the fantastic array of porn ads you'll probably see while trying to stream from a place like firstrow though. :)

Not worth the risk or hassle at this point, for me at least.

You build the HTPC yourself?

Bacchus
03-03-2013, 12:27 PM
That's what I use for Bronco games when they are not shown in my market. For the most part it works but the quality is sup par. I don't really view that as am equal alternative. I would have a hard time inviting my friends over to watch something that I streamed from there.

well, I don't have any friends to invite over so they work fine.

maven
03-03-2013, 01:35 PM
Eventually it will all be internet based. I am thinking about dumping directv and keeping netflix, amazon prime and Vudu.


:Broncos:

Just think, all the money saved you could attend a gay rally in Frisco.

To the topic: I don't watch a ton of tv. I'd rather be out doing stuff than watching endless junk on cable. That's why HTPC, Netflix, antenna, etc is more than plenty for me.

RunSilentRunDeep
03-03-2013, 04:16 PM
Does anyone else find it near impossible to use Netflix on a Friday or Saturday night? "Loading, please wait" and HD content getting reduced to crap quality are the two things stopping me from dropping cable. I supposedly have the fastest internet FIOS has to offer.

Bacchus
03-03-2013, 04:25 PM
Does anyone else find it near impossible to use Netflix on a Friday or Saturday night? "Loading, please wait" and HD content getting reduced to crap quality are the two things stopping me from dropping cable. I supposedly have the fastest internet FIOS has to offer.

I never have much problem with netflix however NBC News can be hit and miss.

ZONA
03-03-2013, 10:30 PM
I hear you. I finally started converting music over in December.

I have a huge music collection, something like 20,000 MP3's. I spent weeks ripping my CD's.

Now I don't even listen to them. I just log into Grooveshark and listen to whatever I want for free. Not just channels with music types, but you can actually build your own custom playlists with all the songs on there. People can share playlists. Awesome website.

Ratboy
03-03-2013, 10:56 PM
Anyone else use NFL GamePass? I started using it 2 seasons ago and I absolutely love it. The quality of the games are amazing and never experience lag/buffering problems. It is quite pricey, but they have a team only package which is a tad bit cheaper than the full season.

The downside to GamePass is it is only available to people outside the United States but you can use a VPN service to get around it.

I've looked into streaming these games, but nothing really worked out the way I wanted it to. If I make it happen, it would only be available to a few select people.

24champ
03-03-2013, 11:52 PM
Anyone else use NFL GamePass? I started using it 2 seasons ago and I absolutely love it. The quality of the games are amazing and never experience lag/buffering problems. It is quite pricey, but they have a team only package which is a tad bit cheaper than the full season.

The downside to GamePass is it is only available to people outside the United States but you can use a VPN service to get around it.

I've looked into streaming these games, but nothing really worked out the way I wanted it to. If I make it happen, it would only be available to a few select people.

NFL Ticket is available through PS3 and I would assume through PS4 in the future. Also can watch NHL games through gamecenter. Plus I can go back and watch old games. So with that, cable/directv is worthless to me.

As Drek mentioned, HULUPlus and Netflix are getting more content for shows.

Drek
03-04-2013, 04:15 AM
Does anyone else find it near impossible to use Netflix on a Friday or Saturday night? "Loading, please wait" and HD content getting reduced to crap quality are the two things stopping me from dropping cable. I supposedly have the fastest internet FIOS has to offer.
FIOS is still built on DSL's hub structure. You're likely seeing peak usage in your neighborhood at those times and as a result the hubs in your area are getting overcrowded.

Make sure your viewer for Netflix is hard wired if you want optimal quality, and don't have any other secondary bandwidth hogs running (torrent, downloads, etc.).


As Drek mentioned, HULUPlus and Netflix are getting more content for shows.

So is Amazon Prime. They signed a deal to be the only online streamer of FX's popular show Justified a little while back and just recently became the first streaming partner for the Scripps family of networks (FoodTV, Travel Channel, HGTV, etc.).

Amazon is starting to push into the subscription based streaming market with a bit more force now. That will only spark a bidding war between them and Netflix. As their memberships go up the major networks will be forced to respond by improving Hulu Plus' lineup. It's a slippery slope they're already set down.

Hulu Plus adding CBS, despite it being only old programming for the most part, is already a sign of this. CBS has been notoriously anti-streaming/internet tech. For them to jump in now shows a changing of philosophies in the industry. With Comcast's recent finalized buyout of NBC from GE it initially seemed like a threat to Hulu's continued existence. Instead Comcast's CEO talked extensively about needing to move towards an expanded internet based service.

It makes sense for them. If they are a dominant ISP (which they already are) it is far cheaper to run a single physical service to consumers (internet service) and move them into cloud based services for everything else.

24champ
04-08-2013, 11:06 PM
LOS ANGELES (AP) Some people have had it with TV. They've had enough of the 100-plus channel universe. They don't like timing their lives around network show schedules. They're tired of $100-plus monthly bills.

A growing number of them have stopped paying for cable and satellite TV service, and don't even use an antenna to get free signals over the air. These people are watching shows and movies on the Internet, sometimes via cellphone connections. Last month, the Nielsen Co. started labeling people in this group "Zero TV" households, because they fall outside the traditional definition of a TV home. There are 5 million of these residences in the U.S., up from 2 million in 2007.

Winning back the Zero TV crowd will be one of the many issues broadcasters discuss at their national meeting, called the NAB Show, taking place this week in Las Vegas.

While show creators and networks make money from this group's viewing habits through deals with online video providers and from advertising on their own websites and apps, broadcasters only get paid when they relay such programming in traditional ways. Unless broadcasters can adapt to modern platforms, their revenue from Zero TV viewers will be zero.

"Getting broadcast programing on all the gizmos and gadgets like tablets, the backseats of cars, and laptops is hugely important," says Dennis Wharton, a spokesman for the National Association of Broadcasters.


More at Link:

http://news.yahoo.com/broadcasters-worry-zero-tv-homes-154357101--finance.html

Jetmeck
04-09-2013, 02:46 AM
LOS ANGELES (AP) Some people have had it with TV. They've had enough of the 100-plus channel universe. They don't like timing their lives around network show schedules. They're tired of $100-plus monthly bills.

A growing number of them have stopped paying for cable and satellite TV service, and don't even use an antenna to get free signals over the air. These people are watching shows and movies on the Internet, sometimes via cellphone connections. Last month, the Nielsen Co. started labeling people in this group "Zero TV" households, because they fall outside the traditional definition of a TV home. There are 5 million of these residences in the U.S., up from 2 million in 2007.

Winning back the Zero TV crowd will be one of the many issues broadcasters discuss at their national meeting, called the NAB Show, taking place this week in Las Vegas.

While show creators and networks make money from this group's viewing habits through deals with online video providers and from advertising on their own websites and apps, broadcasters only get paid when they relay such programming in traditional ways. Unless broadcasters can adapt to modern platforms, their revenue from Zero TV viewers will be zero.

"Getting broadcast programing on all the gizmos and gadgets like tablets, the backseats of cars, and laptops is hugely important," says Dennis Wharton, a spokesman for the National Association of Broadcasters.


More at Link:

http://news.yahoo.com/broadcasters-worry-zero-tv-homes-154357101--finance.html



All this is BS for the masses...........internet bandwidth isn't up to par for this in most of the country and even if it was data caps would kill you. Don't have a data cap, just wait you will..........

broncobum6162
04-09-2013, 02:59 AM
Someday will be within 5 years. The buzzards are already circling. Streaming total content television from your phone, tablet, computer and flat panel will be the norm soon. Satellite TV will basically be CD like obsolete by 2020. It will also ensure that the remaining 1 hour of work that actually gets done in an office will be down to about 7 minutes.

Ok I have a question. I currently get my internet via my tablet which I use as a mobile hotspot. Using Hulu and Netflix is not an option since I have an 8 gig data package. My Direct TV bill just went up another 6 bucks. It's now 85 bucks...To get unlimited data so I can go to Netflix/Hulu is gonna cost me 50 bucks a month....basically the same cost right?

Jetmeck
04-09-2013, 03:08 AM
This sounds like the guy on an AV forum I frequent arguing about 4k television content which will only be available over internet if you have an 18-20mb connection to stream or obviously slower to download and wait.

WTF is gonna wait for tv.

How many have an 18-20mb connection.....percentage wise ?

How many have data caps ?

With internet usage going up how long before everyone has a data cap after every ISP is seeing dolar signs...................?

Bacchus
04-09-2013, 03:11 AM
Ok I have a question. I currently get my internet via my tablet which I use as a mobile hotspot. Using Hulu and Netflix is not an option since I have an 8 gig data package. My Direct TV bill just went up another 6 bucks. It's now 85 bucks...To get unlimited data so I can go to Netflix/Hulu is gonna cost me 50 bucks a month....basically the same cost right?

Sounds like it. Now what are you going to get with that extra unlimited Data? What are you losing with the cable package?

I spend $50 a month on Internet, $17 a month on Netflix, $9 a month on Hulu and ZERO $ on cable. I could not be happier.

broncobum6162
04-09-2013, 03:26 AM
Sounds like it. Now what are you going to get with that extra unlimited Data? What are you losing with the cable package?

I spend $50 a month on Internet, $17 a month on Netflix, $9 a month on Hulu and ZERO $ on cable. I could not be happier.

At this point it sounds like a wash for me...your bill is 76 bucks mine is 85. I wouldn't mind trying it your way but to only save 10 bucks for me right now isn't worth it. If it works for you then go for it....but I'm putting Direct TV on notice to stop w the annual rate hikes. This is the first year since they had it I didn't do the Sunday ticket...I do love the streaming music channels on Direct TV....Hair Nation is the bomb!

Drek
04-09-2013, 03:49 AM
All this is BS for the masses...........internet bandwidth isn't up to par for this in most of the country and even if it was data caps would kill you. Don't have a data cap, just wait you will..........

Data caps aren't going to happen. ISPs have been threatening them for years. About two years ago a bunch of them started to try rolling out enforcement of it and quickly pulled back.

My data is technically "capped" at 250GB per month, my router logs my usage in hourly, daily, weekly, and monthly units. One month I used 998GB of data and my ISP didn't say a peep.

Bacchus
04-09-2013, 05:09 AM
At this point it sounds like a wash for me...your bill is 76 bucks mine is 85. I wouldn't mind trying it your way but to only save 10 bucks for me right now isn't worth it. If it works for you then go for it....but I'm putting Direct TV on notice to stop w the annual rate hikes. This is the first year since they had it I didn't do the Sunday ticket...I do love the streaming music channels on Direct TV....Hair Nation is the bomb!

I find that i get much more use out of my high speed internet on my computer and Ipad than anything cable tv would give me.

You are paying $85 for cable, what are you spending on internet?

Tim
04-09-2013, 07:04 AM
I have 4 months of my Comcast contract left. 150 per month for a ton of movie and sport channels and very fast Internet. I can't wait till that bill gets cut in 1/3rd.. F cable.

Drunk Monkey
04-09-2013, 08:02 AM
****ing Game of Thrones just delayed my departure from FIOS TV. The wife will throw a fit if we don't get True Blood after that so I am stuck until the summer.

Jetmeck
04-09-2013, 03:46 PM
Data caps aren't going to happen. ISPs have been threatening them for years. About two years ago a bunch of them started to try rolling out enforcement of it and quickly pulled back.

My data is technically "capped" at 250GB per month, my router logs my usage in hourly, daily, weekly, and monthly units. One month I used 998GB of data and my ISP didn't say a peep.


Keep thinking that...........they know where the money is and just cause ATT isn't doing it don't mean much.

The majority of ISPs have data caps and you guys know it.

ScottXray
04-09-2013, 06:25 PM
Keep thinking that...........they know where the money is and just cause ATT isn't doing it don't mean much.

The majority of ISPs have data caps and you guys know it.

I agree...Comcast has a data cap of 250 GB but is currently " suspended" , meaning they can start to enforce it whenever they want . And as the population moves to streaming and continues away from cable you can bet the cap will be enforced more. They will move to a variable cap and price structure on the internet as their cable revenue declines. No way they are not going to get their "share " of the pie, and the profit from the internet only services will actually be higher than the cable side. They won't be responsible for picture quality etc, and only need to maintain the internet feed to your modem. No need to supply you with a hardware settop, or maintain it, and no need to pay the content providers to carry the signals.

It actually will be to their benefit to embrace it, but right now a number of feeds like HBO is limited to cable/Satellite so they can hold the consumer hostage. Satellite will maintain a presence as long as high speed internet/cable is not available ( most rural areas) but urban areas definitely are going to see a change in this in the next 5-10 years. Older customers ( non tech savvy) will be the core of cables user base for a while, but their limited disposable incomes and limited interests will eventually also limit cables long term viability.

broncobum6162
04-10-2013, 06:45 AM
I find that i get much more use out of my high speed internet on my computer and Ipad than anything cable tv would give me.

You are paying $85 for cable, what are you spending on internet?

I'm paying 95/ month for Verizon which is 8 gig data, unlimited talk and text and that's w/ a cellphone and Samsung tablet. I do not have a landline or internet package from phone company