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View Full Version : Possibly the 2nd best picture from space ever.


broncosteven
02-19-2013, 06:44 PM
http://colchrishadfield.tumblr.com/post/43531084825/the-full-moon-rises-over-the-only-planet-we-have
http://24.media.tumblr.com/f3a32bbbfd189a423dc82599c523c1f6/tumblr_mih9b9dZg41s1mt5yo1_500.jpg


I think the 1st is "Earth Rise" from Apollo 8 but this is up there!

Check out Earth Rise and tell me that we should keep destroying the only place in the universe we can live.

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRICJT-HvSEPK86MmKy-ogsHOU3yn9718xKxGKbBlet5kegSzGU

KipCorrington25
02-19-2013, 07:05 PM
This is better:

http://www.joshmcdanielssucks.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/McDaniels-Fired.jpg

Taco John
02-19-2013, 07:15 PM
This is better:

http://www.joshmcdanielssucks.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/12/McDaniels-Fired.jpg


This right here is a good reason to destroy the planet.

Taco John
02-19-2013, 07:16 PM
That is a great picture. I love how you can see the edge of the atmosphere in it. Very cool.

Chris
02-19-2013, 07:19 PM
http://qph.is.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-58cffbbee4a9881887e0c1b382328c6d

SportinOne
02-19-2013, 07:29 PM
http://qph.is.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-58cffbbee4a9881887e0c1b382328c6d


Jesus, that's deep..

ShutDownPoster
02-19-2013, 07:42 PM
I don't know - this one is kinda in the top 3 at least...

http://fanart.tv/fanart/movies/957/moviebackground/spaceballs-504eabaea6a46.jpg

broncosteven
02-19-2013, 07:48 PM
http://qph.is.quoracdn.net/main-qimg-58cffbbee4a9881887e0c1b382328c6d

This is better with if you take a handful of goofballs, and contemplate it for a couple hours while "The Great Gig from the Sky" from Dark Side of the Moon plays on a loop.

gyldenlove
02-19-2013, 07:51 PM
This is my favourite, taken by Harrison Schmitt on the last Apollo mission, also the most requested picture from NASA archives in history.

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/jscfeatures/images/hires/as17-148-22727.jpg

My 2nd favourite is this one, the Hubble Ultra deep field.

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/56533main_MM_image_feature_142_jwfull.jpg

broncosteven
02-19-2013, 07:52 PM
I don't know - this one is kinda in the top 3 at least...

http://fanart.tv/fanart/movies/957/moviebackground/spaceballs-504eabaea6a46.jpg

I can honestly say I have better hair that Bill Pulman, my hair right now is approaching Michael Douglas Epicness on good hair days if I get it just right and my colic in the back stays down.

broncosteven
02-19-2013, 07:54 PM
This is my favourite, taken by Harrison Schmitt on the last Apollo mission, also the most requested picture from NASA archives in history.

http://www.jsc.nasa.gov/jscfeatures/images/hires/as17-148-22727.jpg

My 2nd favourite is this one, the Hubble Ultra deep field.

http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/56533main_MM_image_feature_142_jwfull.jpg

Well played. I bought the Apollo 17 pic for a friend's office years ago and he still has it.

The Deep field shot is amazing. One look at that and you know we cannot be alone.

ShutDownPoster
02-19-2013, 08:06 PM
Yeah, that Hubble one is insanity at its finest

McDman
02-19-2013, 08:19 PM
http://ut-images.s3.amazonaws.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/02/Gas-Pillars-in-the-Eagle-Nebula.jpg

The Eagle Nebula is my favorite. From the top of the biggest cloud to the bottom is 7 light years long. The tiny finger at the top is bigger than our solar system.

schaaf
02-19-2013, 08:38 PM
^thats some bad diarrhea

Man-Goblin
02-19-2013, 08:49 PM
The other day in Jeopardy, I learned what 'syzygy' means.

Ratboy
02-19-2013, 08:58 PM
Check out Earth Rise and tell me that we should keep destroying the only place in the universe we can live.

As in you don't believe any other place can sustain life or we're stuck here because the lack of technology?

Archer81
02-19-2013, 09:32 PM
Deep Field one is humbling. All of that looks so close together, but they are millions of lightyears apart.


:Broncos:

cutthemdown
02-19-2013, 09:39 PM
Now they think there could be several planets for every star in the sky. Just think what could be out there. Someone should make a show about man exploring the galaxy in a spaceship.

Archer81
02-19-2013, 09:41 PM
I'm waiting for mankind to explore Mars, find a 50,000 year old science facility and then find out Pluto is actually a giant mass effect drive that will propel us out unto the universe.

:Broncos:

ZONA
02-19-2013, 09:50 PM
http://colchrishadfield.tumblr.com/post/43531084825/the-full-moon-rises-over-the-only-planet-we-have
http://24.media.tumblr.com/f3a32bbbfd189a423dc82599c523c1f6/tumblr_mih9b9dZg41s1mt5yo1_500.jpg


I think the 1st is "Earth Rise" from Apollo 8 but this is up there!

Check out Earth Rise and tell me that we should keep destroying the only place in the universe we can live.

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRICJT-HvSEPK86MmKy-ogsHOU3yn9718xKxGKbBlet5kegSzGU

I'm as big a space nerd and junkie as they come but I don't see what's so amazingly great about this picture you're calling the 2nd best ever. There are plenty of pics with the earth and moon together.


I'll have to give this image here a nod over yours. You got the earth, the atmosphere, an eclipse going on and you can see the milkyway center also.


http://www.wallsfeed.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Moon-eclipse-Earth-Moon.jpg

Bacchus
02-19-2013, 10:34 PM
Steven I know you are a big space cas.....errrrr... guy, so check this picture out. I love it. After a long day at work I think I'll lay down and look at Earth.

Kaylore
02-19-2013, 11:28 PM
Sorry Zona, but fakes don't count.

Chris
02-20-2013, 08:49 AM
Sorry Zona, but fakes don't count.

Tell that to my wife!


akakakaka
akakaka
akaka
aka

Requiem
02-20-2013, 08:54 AM
Hey BroncoSteven, listen to the album "The Earth Is Not a Cold Dead Place." and look at some space pictures. :)

Rohirrim
02-20-2013, 09:16 AM
Crank up the volume...

<iframe width="640" height="360" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/cWnmCu3U09w?feature=player_detailpage" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

ZONA
02-20-2013, 09:30 AM
Steven I know you are a big space cas.....errrrr... guy, so check this picture out. I love it. After a long day at work I think I'll lay down and look at Earth.

http://www.orangemane.com/BB/attachment.php?attachmentid=32090&stc=1&d=1361342051



I'd hit that - hahahaha

Baba Booey
02-20-2013, 12:18 PM
I'm waiting for mankind to explore Mars, find a 50,000 year old science facility and then find out Pluto is actually a giant mass effect drive that will propel us out unto the universe.

:Broncos:

This

gyldenlove
02-20-2013, 12:19 PM
So many good nebula pictures, the eagle, horsehead, crab, orion. Many earthrise pictures were taken from the moon, some of them are truly amazing.

Not a lot of things I would die for, but I would take a one way trip into space.

Bacchus
02-20-2013, 12:47 PM
I'd hit that - hahahaha

especially with no gravity

broncosteven
02-20-2013, 01:29 PM
I'm as big a space nerd and junkie as they come but I don't see what's so amazingly great about this picture you're calling the 2nd best ever. There are plenty of pics with the earth and moon together.


I'll have to give this image here a nod over yours. You got the earth, the atmosphere, an eclipse going on and you can see the milkyway center also.


http://www.wallsfeed.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/Moon-eclipse-Earth-Moon.jpg

BTW I said "Possibly" in the thread title, surprised so many over looked that one word.

Plus I am glad that others contributed their favorites and gave valid arguments to support their choices.

broncosteven
02-20-2013, 01:32 PM
BTW Pez has a ton of great shots of the stars that he has shared on facebook over the years if your looking for terrestrial based photography.

http://www.facebook.com/Pezpix?fref=ts

Requiem
02-20-2013, 01:35 PM
Thanks for sharing Steven. GodbLESS! (voice from Happy Gilmore crazy man!!!)0665

ak1971
02-20-2013, 07:48 PM
http://colchrishadfield.tumblr.com/post/43531084825/the-full-moon-rises-over-the-only-planet-we-have
http://24.media.tumblr.com/f3a32bbbfd189a423dc82599c523c1f6/tumblr_mih9b9dZg41s1mt5yo1_500.jpg


I think the 1st is "Earth Rise" from Apollo 8 but this is up there!

Check out Earth Rise and tell me that we should keep destroying the only place in the universe we can live.

https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRICJT-HvSEPK86MmKy-ogsHOU3yn9718xKxGKbBlet5kegSzGU
Just glad you didn't post a picture of Uranus.

broncosteven
02-20-2013, 08:43 PM
Just glad you didn't post a picture of Uranus.

One would think NASA would be rife with midgets in space, the capsules, suits, landers would be smaller and require less fuel...

Hmmm maybe I should send another letter to them, this could change the whole space flight paradigm!

ChrisToker
02-20-2013, 09:50 PM
As in you don't believe any other place can sustain life or we're stuck here because the lack of technology?

Yeah it sucks! Cosmic roadblock. We will most likely kill ourselves. Possibly extinction from non man-made event. Maybe if we are really ****ing lucky we fly off of this rock maybe get as far as a Jupiter moon w/ in next 500yrs.

maher_tyler
02-20-2013, 09:54 PM
http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0907/devilstower_pacholka.jpg

One of my faves.

Archer81
02-20-2013, 09:56 PM
Yeah it sucks! Cosmic roadblock. We will most likely kill ourselves. Possibly extinction from non man-made event. Maybe if we are really ****ing lucky we fly off of this rock maybe get as far as a Jupiter moon w/ in next 500yrs.


So you dont think that man, that went from riding horses and sailing on boats in 1513 to traveling to the moon and sending vehicles to mars by 2013 will make an equivilent jump between now and 2513?

:Broncos:

Man-Goblin
02-20-2013, 10:39 PM
Syzygy. May have been the teen tournament.

ZONA
02-20-2013, 11:35 PM
So you dont think that man, that went from riding horses and sailing on boats in 1513 to traveling to the moon and sending vehicles to mars by 2013 will make an equivilent jump between now and 2513?

:Broncos:

Nope. It's like a fat person who can lose 100 pounds easy but when somebody in shape wants to lose that last 10 pounds it's a MF'er. hahaha


Seriously though, who knows what will happen. The 2 main things we need to master, IMO, are fusion and magnetic fields. Fusion for the energy to propel you through space at light speed and the magnetic fields to protect you from radiation and micro asteroids. You've got to be able to generate pseudo gravity, atmospheric pressure, water generation, food supply. And you've got roughly a few million years to get it done because our Sun will most likely be going into Red Giant phase by then.

I love this crap man, one of my favorite past times. We should have a sticky all offseason long with fun discussions on this topic.

Archer81
02-20-2013, 11:45 PM
Nope. It's like a fat person who can lose 100 pounds easy but when somebody in shape wants to lose that last 10 pounds it's a MF'er. hahaha


Seriously though, who knows what will happen. The 2 main things we need to master, IMO, are fusion and magnetic fields. Fusion for the energy to propel you through space at light speed and the magnetic fields to protect you from radiation and micro asteroids. You've got to be able to generate pseudo gravity, atmospheric pressure, water generation, food supply. And you've got roughly a few million years to get it done because our Sun will most likely be going into Red Giant phase by then.

I love this crap man, one of my favorite past times. We should have a sticky all offseason long with fun discussions on this topic.


From what I understand, the sun's increasing luminosity will destroy the atmosphere, evaporate water and bake the earth's crust to the point continental drift will no longer be possible. A billion or so years after that, the sun eats up the last of its fuel, turns into a red giant, and then ultimately a white dwarf.

:Broncos:

ZONA
02-21-2013, 12:22 AM
From what I understand, the sun's increasing luminosity will destroy the atmosphere, evaporate water and bake the earth's crust to the point continental drift will no longer be possible. A billion or so years after that, the sun eats up the last of its fuel, turns into a red giant, and then ultimately a white dwarf.

:Broncos:

I've always loved looking at these 2 images. Really gives you a sense of the magnitude of size on some of these stars. You see how small earth is compared to our Sun. Then you see how tiny the Sun is compared to some of the monsters out there. You can understand why, when these hyper giants go hypernova billions of light years away from earth, how they could be brighter then entire galaxies just millions of light years away.

http://thesuntoday.s3.amazonaws.com/website/2011/04/EarthVSun-April62011.001.png

http://img10.imageshack.us/img10/165/sizeofworld.jpg

Doggcow
02-21-2013, 02:29 AM
I'm waiting for mankind to explore Mars, find a 50,000 year old science facility and then find out Pluto is actually a giant mass effect drive that will propel us out unto the universe.

:Broncos:

1000x this. I'd jizz in my pants.

Broncomutt
02-21-2013, 08:23 AM
Not a picture, but a memory.

On an early December night in 1990 I was on Parris Island for BWT, 10 days in the woods around this abandoned airfield. This was during Desert Shield, so all military bases were blacked out at night. I was assigned gear guard duty while my platoon did a midnight hump.

As I'm sitting alone in the middle of a runway I look up and see a long line of clouds crossing the sky. I thought, "Great probably gonna rain on me." Then I saw it for what is was. It wasn't a cloud, it was stars packed so tightly together it looked like a cloud. I was seeing the Milky Way for the first, and so far, only time in my life with the naked eye. It's cliche to say it took my breath away, but it really did.

Some day I'd like to find a nice quiet spot away from the light pollution and see it again. Really tough to do on the east coast.

Never will forget that night.

maher_tyler
02-21-2013, 04:43 PM
Not a picture, but a memory.

On an early December night in 1990 I was on Parris Island for BWT, 10 days in the woods around this abandoned airfield. This was during Desert Shield, so all military bases were blacked out at night. I was assigned gear guard duty while my platoon did a midnight hump.

As I'm sitting alone in the middle of a runway I look up and see a long line of clouds crossing the sky. I thought, "Great probably gonna rain on me." Then I saw it for what is was. It wasn't a cloud, it was stars packed so tightly together it looked like a cloud. I was seeing the Milky Way for the first, and so far, only time in my life with the naked eye. It's cliche to say it took my breath away, but it really did.

Some day I'd like to find a nice quiet spot away from the light pollution and see it again. Really tough to do on the east coast.

Never will forget that night.

You can see the Milky Way with the naked eye if its dark enough. I was up in Sedona AZ and my wife and I went to this star gazing thing. The guy had a pretty good telescope. He pointed at a point in the Milky Way area. Through the telescope was stars every where. He said that every "star" was actually between 300-500 more stars. It's was pretty cool.

broncosteven
02-21-2013, 07:29 PM
You can see the Milky Way with the naked eye if its dark enough. I was up in Sedona AZ and my wife and I went to this star gazing thing. The guy had a pretty good telescope. He pointed at a point in the Milky Way area. Through the telescope was stars every where. He said that every "star" was actually between 300-500 more stars. It's was pretty cool.

I have seen it a couple times while at my Grandma's farm up in Michigan after sitting outside and talking in the dark, we just looked up and it was there the 1st time. I had to work at it more the next couple times.

Tombstone RJ
02-21-2013, 08:39 PM
Not a picture, but a memory.

On an early December night in 1990 I was on Parris Island for BWT, 10 days in the woods around this abandoned airfield. This was during Desert Shield, so all military bases were blacked out at night. I was assigned gear guard duty while my platoon did a midnight hump.

As I'm sitting alone in the middle of a runway I look up and see a long line of clouds crossing the sky. I thought, "Great probably gonna rain on me." Then I saw it for what is was. It wasn't a cloud, it was stars packed so tightly together it looked like a cloud. I was seeing the Milky Way for the first, and so far, only time in my life with the naked eye. It's cliche to say it took my breath away, but it really did.

Some day I'd like to find a nice quiet spot away from the light pollution and see it again. Really tough to do on the east coast.

Never will forget that night.

That's a great story Mutt! It reminds me of the time I was down on Lake Powell in Souther Utah. The night sky was so clear that you could easily see the Milky Way. One night I was just laying there staring up at the night sky and I see this tiny, little star just moving in a straight line across the sky. It was a damn satellite! It was just moving in a straight line across the sky.

g6matty
02-21-2013, 08:41 PM
http://www.sciencerecorder.com/news/water-discovered-in-apollo-lunar-rocks-may-upend-theory-of-moons-origin/

water found on moon

broncosteven
02-21-2013, 09:19 PM
http://science.time.com/2013/02/20/telescope-to-hunt-for-missing-96-of-the-universe/

Telescope to Hunt for Missing 96% of the Universe

Read more: http://science.time.com/2013/02/20/telescope-to-hunt-for-missing-96-of-the-universe/#ixzz2LbP6ycfL

g6matty
02-21-2013, 09:20 PM
i like the stuff u post broncosteven

ZONA
02-21-2013, 10:00 PM
A little lengthy but a good video none the less.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/j9w-i5oZqaQ?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

maher_tyler
02-21-2013, 10:19 PM
A little lengthy but a good video none the less.

<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/j9w-i5oZqaQ?rel=0" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

A bit long? How about a summary. I'll admit, I watch that show. I think most of it is a bit far fetched but they have some interesting theory's. If there was any time in history I could go back to, it'd be during the time the Egyptians constructed the pyramids. Perfectly constructed. It'd be cool to know how they did it without the technology we have today.

gyldenlove
02-22-2013, 07:16 AM
Nope. It's like a fat person who can lose 100 pounds easy but when somebody in shape wants to lose that last 10 pounds it's a MF'er. hahaha


Seriously though, who knows what will happen. The 2 main things we need to master, IMO, are fusion and magnetic fields. Fusion for the energy to propel you through space at light speed and the magnetic fields to protect you from radiation and micro asteroids. You've got to be able to generate pseudo gravity, atmospheric pressure, water generation, food supply. And you've got roughly a few million years to get it done because our Sun will most likely be going into Red Giant phase by then.

I love this crap man, one of my favorite past times. We should have a sticky all offseason long with fun discussions on this topic.

This may sound defeatist, but we as a species have nothing to fear from the sun. By the time the sun kills off all life on earth we will either have moved elsewhere or destroyed every opportunity of ever going anywhere ourselves. We have all the resources we need.

Fusion would definitely be a good power source. Magnetic fields are not the only option for radiation protection, electronically charged shielding may be a lot better. Fake gravity can be done by making a rotating vessel, protection against debris, you are probably going to have to go low-tech with a Titanic like solution, compartmentalize and accept that if there is an impact you may take casualties, so make sure you have very high redundancy. Water generation is trickier, you would need to bring a lot of water from the outset and you would need to recycle like crazy, so you would need to purify urine and bathing would be a thing of the past. Food is a bit easier, it is much more compactable than water and diets that are very high nutrients can be devised.

I think the best option of going far (out of solar system) would be to create either flotillas of smaller ships or a few bigger ships so groups of 50.000 to 100.000 can go together, that would leave room for redundancy and provide enough genetic variance to avoid inbreeding problems among descendants.

Quoydogs
02-22-2013, 09:34 AM
<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/hoz5Q2rGQtQ" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>:


Someone had this up on FB a while back pretty cool 3 minute vid.

Eldorado
02-22-2013, 09:41 AM
Nope. It's like a fat person who can lose 100 pounds easy but when somebody in shape wants to lose that last 10 pounds it's a MF'er. hahaha


Seriously though, who knows what will happen. The 2 main things we need to master, IMO, are fusion and magnetic fields. Fusion for the energy to propel you through space at light speed and the magnetic fields to protect you from radiation and micro asteroids. You've got to be able to generate pseudo gravity, atmospheric pressure, water generation, food supply. And you've got roughly a few million years to get it done because our Sun will most likely be going into Red Giant phase by then.

I love this crap man, one of my favorite past times. We should have a sticky all offseason long with fun discussions on this topic.
Not a few million. 1-3 billion. The earth will be uninhabitable somewhere in the gradual warming phase.

http://theabysmal.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/sun_life.png

ZONA
02-22-2013, 09:43 AM
This may sound defeatist, but we as a species have nothing to fear from the sun. By the time the sun kills off all life on earth we will either have moved elsewhere or destroyed every opportunity of ever going anywhere ourselves. We have all the resources we need.

Fusion would definitely be a good power source. Magnetic fields are not the only option for radiation protection, electronically charged shielding may be a lot better. Fake gravity can be done by making a rotating vessel, protection against debris, you are probably going to have to go low-tech with a Titanic like solution, compartmentalize and accept that if there is an impact you may take casualties, so make sure you have very high redundancy. Water generation is trickier, you would need to bring a lot of water from the outset and you would need to recycle like crazy, so you would need to purify urine and bathing would be a thing of the past. Food is a bit easier, it is much more compactable than water and diets that are very high nutrients can be devised.

I think the best option of going far (out of solar system) would be to create either flotillas of smaller ships or a few bigger ships so groups of 50.000 to 100.000 can go together, that would leave room for redundancy and provide enough genetic variance to avoid inbreeding problems among descendants.

The water thing can be helped, by dragging meteors along with us in our convoy of ships. Also, they've shown that water is more abundant in the universe then previously thought. We could stop off nearby planets that had ice and extract the water. We would just have to have some monster sized floating tankers in our convoy :)

I honestly think before we would be taking long space travel, millions of years from now most likely, I think humans will tweak their DNA and you would probably see hybrid humans in the future better suited for long space travel.

Requiem
02-22-2013, 09:47 AM
CNN has an article saying that the dude who went to the ISS in 2001 (some rich guy) is having a 2018 expedition to Mars that they want to complete in ~ 500 days or so.

BroncoSteven, you have been nominated to represent the Mane. You are gonna be an astronaut buddy!

ZONA
02-22-2013, 09:54 AM
Not a few million. 1-3 billion. The earth will be uninhabitable somewhere in the gradual warming phase.

http://theabysmal.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/sun_life.png

It says right there on the illustrationg "approx". Not all G type stars live exactly 14 billion years. Some can be shorter, say 10-12 billion years. There's no real way to say how much longer we have until the Sun starts heating up. It could be a few million, it could be a few billion. Better to estimate the lower side of things to be on the safe side.

broncosteven
02-22-2013, 02:21 PM
CNN has an article saying that the dude who went to the ISS in 2001 (some rich guy) is having a 2018 expedition to Mars that they want to complete in ~ 500 days or so.

BroncoSteven, you have been nominated to represent the Mane. You are gonna be an astronaut buddy!

I would rather be the Flight Director. My body would hold up getting to orbit much less the moon.

Managing a mission like that from the Earth would be awesome, if just as demanding.

broncosteven
02-22-2013, 02:36 PM
This may sound defeatist, but we as a species have nothing to fear from the sun. By the time the sun kills off all life on earth we will either have moved elsewhere or destroyed every opportunity of ever going anywhere ourselves. We have all the resources we need.

Fusion would definitely be a good power source. Magnetic fields are not the only option for radiation protection, electronically charged shielding may be a lot better. Fake gravity can be done by making a rotating vessel, protection against debris, you are probably going to have to go low-tech with a Titanic like solution, compartmentalize and accept that if there is an impact you may take casualties, so make sure you have very high redundancy. Water generation is trickier, you would need to bring a lot of water from the outset and you would need to recycle like crazy, so you would need to purify urine and bathing would be a thing of the past. Food is a bit easier, it is much more compactable than water and diets that are very high nutrients can be devised.

I think the best option of going far (out of solar system) would be to create either flotillas of smaller ships or a few bigger ships so groups of 50.000 to 100.000 can go together, that would leave room for redundancy and provide enough genetic variance to avoid inbreeding problems among descendants.

I think our best option for long term space travel would be capturing a couple nice sized asteroids, get them rotating fast enough for gravity, hollow them out for living space. An ideal one would have lots of ice on/in it already. Use the excavated material to manufacture tools and possibly even metal/mud sheets that form bulkheads. I would capture a couple asteroids and get them rotating around the main "ship". Attach Fission and ION propulsion to the main asteroid and smaller chemical based engines to the "resource" asteroids to keep them orbiting properly etc... Get everything spinning the right way, allow gravity to keep it all together then propel the whole mass using the main ships engines. You could have chemical engines to alter course and get the mass moving, then use a combo of Fission and ION engines to get fast over time. Not sure how big the main asteroid would need to be to keep the other smaller resource asteroids in tow as it gains speed. That would be a lot of math for people smarter than me.

As far as radition shielding the rock and ice from the asteroid would be the major protection and we could store the liquid water (both clean and dirty tanks) around the sleeping and or living quarters, places where the crew would spend the majority of their time. I have read that water is the best or one of the better shields for cosmic radiation, at least that is what they are looking to do for a trip to Mars.

I think for long term manned missions and habitations we need to look at inflatable fabrics that are extremely strong, stuff made of Kelvar that can be lifted into space then expanded to provide working/living space. A hollowed out asteroid that has a blown up Kevlar type shell. Think pop up camper type stuff but more reliable.

Just a quick thought in response to what Glynden said.

maven
02-22-2013, 11:09 PM
A bit long? How about a summary. I'll admit, I watch that show. I think most of it is a bit far fetched but they have some interesting theory's. If there was any time in history I could go back to, it'd be during the time the Egyptians constructed the pyramids. Perfectly constructed. It'd be cool to know how they did it without the technology we have today.

Aliens didn't help create anything. People did.

maven
02-22-2013, 11:16 PM
Just a quick thought in response to what Glynden said.

Need to colonize moons and planets in our solar system. Mine them and build a network going back and forth(hey maybe a vacation one day). Slowly build out and continue to develop more technology for space travel. I think eventually we should send men/women on a one way mission to explore other worlds and beam back data, and possibly starting a colony somewhere else in the universe.

UltimateHoboW/Shotgun
02-23-2013, 07:25 AM
Not a few million. 1-3 billion. The earth will be uninhabitable somewhere in the gradual warming phase.

http://theabysmal.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/sun_life.png

ITS MAN MADE GOLBAL WARMING!

Oh wait this is real science not global warming myth.

Kaylore
02-23-2013, 08:26 AM
Not a few million. 1-3 billion. The earth will be uninhabitable somewhere in the gradual warming phase.

http://theabysmal.files.wordpress.com/2008/10/sun_life.png

Yeah I was going to see it won't happen in a million. They can estimate the life of the sun and the amount of fuel left relatively accurately since it's right there. It will be at least a billion. As for if the Earth will be uninhabited by then, I estimate we will be so advanced as a species, provided we haven't killed ourselves, that we'll be able to do whatever we want with our Earth long before the warming phase.

jerseyboiler120
02-23-2013, 08:44 AM
ITS MAN MADE GOLBAL WARMING!

Oh wait this is real science not global warming myth.


I was gonna post the same thing. The sun clearly has some of those evil Capitalists on it, otherwise it would not go through a warming phase. If the sun was solely populated with the good people, aka the democrats and liberals of course, it would stay at the perfect temperature for all of eternity and everybody would be kind to each other and all sing Cumbaya. Somehow technology and industry would never be needed because all necessities of life and progress would simply manifest themselves, thanks to the democrats.

jerseyboiler120
02-23-2013, 08:55 AM
On all the other planets surrounding all the other stars, the refereees in the playoffs are fair unbiased creatures and The Broncos won every other game in the universe that day. In addition, since those societies are fair and just, ray lewis was in prison in every one of them for what he did in the past. We are on the only planet in the entire Universe where the Broncos were hosed that day.

Tombstone RJ
02-23-2013, 12:50 PM
Need to colonize moons and planets in our solar system. Mine them and build a network going back and forth(hey maybe a vacation one day). Slowly build out and continue to develop more technology for space travel. I think eventually we should send men/women on a one way mission to explore other worlds and beam back data, and possibly starting a colony somewhere else in the universe.

Yep, we have to take baby steps right here in our own solar system with Earth as vacation, resting spot. Long range exploration is only viable with robotics and such. Once data is received from those sources it will be determined if it's worth it to send humans.

broncosteven
02-23-2013, 02:26 PM
Need to colonize moons and planets in our solar system. Mine them and build a network going back and forth(hey maybe a vacation one day). Slowly build out and continue to develop more technology for space travel. I think eventually we should send men/women on a one way mission to explore other worlds and beam back data, and possibly starting a colony somewhere else in the universe.

I agree! So do some of the richest people on the planet.

Planetary Resources and another less funded company DSI are launching ventures to mine Asteroids. Imagine hitting on an Asteroid that is composed of gold and Platinum among other heavier metals?

We don't **** where we eat, why should we mine where we live?

Set up bases on the moon, and the moons of the gas giants and mine the **** out of them!

broncosteven
02-23-2013, 02:28 PM
Yep, we have to take baby steps right here in our own solar system with Earth as vacation, resting spot. Long range exploration is only viable with robotics and such. Once data is received from those sources it will be determined if it's worth it to send humans.

Yep, Just look at the data Voyagers are still sending out 30 years later!

No reason we couldn't solar manned missions though, we need to learn to walk in space in reach of home.

broncosteven
02-23-2013, 02:32 PM
Yeah I was going to see it won't happen in a million. They can estimate the life of the sun and the amount of fuel left relatively accurately since it's right there. It will be at least a billion. As for if the Earth will be uninhabited by then, I estimate we will be so advanced as a species, provided we haven't killed ourselves, that we'll be able to do whatever we want with our Earth long before the warming phase.

The other factor is the wobble of the Earth on the axis. I live where a huge glacier once stood that carved the great lakes. I really think the roation of Earth's axis impacted the ice ages and the recent heat up. Does CO2 play a big part in the warm up? Yes! Is it all man made? Nope, can we control it? Nope.

I think reducing CO2 emmissions is just plain common sense. They have proof that the Earth has gone through cycles of heat and cold throughout the millienia(sp?)

Tombstone RJ
02-23-2013, 04:18 PM
A bit long? How about a summary. I'll admit, I watch that show. I think most of it is a bit far fetched but they have some interesting theory's. If there was any time in history I could go back to, it'd be during the time the Egyptians constructed the pyramids. Perfectly constructed. It'd be cool to know how they did it without the technology we have today.

I'm suprised The History Channel even allows "Ancient Aliens" to be a show. It's so filled with flaws and questionable sources (and I'm being kind) that it's really a joke.

Watch that youtube vid or go to the website http://ancientaliensdebunked.com/

The History Channel should be called The Fictional History Channel based on this Ancient Aliens program/series.

broncosteven
02-23-2013, 05:50 PM
I'm suprised The History Channel even allows "Ancient Aliens" to be a show. It's so filled with flaws and questionable sources (and I'm being kind) that it's really a joke.

Watch that youtube vid or go to the website http://ancientaliensdebunked.com/

The History Channel should be called The Fictional History Channel based on this Ancient Aliens program/series.

This history channel is full of questionable "History" material. Though this season's Ax Men has been very compelling for staged reality TV

ZONA
02-23-2013, 09:40 PM
ITS MAN MADE GOLBAL WARMING!

Oh wait this is real science not global warming myth.

We're having a nice discussion about space and somebody's just got to put their political spin on it somehow someway. Does everything you do throughout your day have to revolve around a political view of something. Can't you just, for a moment, give it a rest. Enjoy the topic, leave the politics out of it. Thank you.


Steven, loved your thinking out of the box on the asteroid ship. I don't think the rotation of it to provide gravity would really work though. Even the largest asteroid would still be too small for it to work correctly. It's not just the earth spin that creates the gravity we are used to, it's the mass of the planet as well. I think with an asteroid, to create gravity equal to what we feel on earth, you would have to make it spin quite fast and relative to the mass of the asteroid, I would think it would feel like awkward gravity. It would be a cool thing for them to test out though. Alot of that theory sounds good, such as the asteroid having water, protection from small particles and radiation.


And last but not least - to our global warming is a hoax gentleman, forget about the fact you don't believe greenhouse gases are heating up the planet. Don't you think it's still a good idea to create less toxic fumes in the air so we have cleaner air to breath. Haven't you seen those images of the lungs of people who have lived their entire lives in a big city vs those who have lived in the rural areas. It's quite a difference. It's like looking at a person who smoked and one who has not. I for one don't wish to breath fossil fuel air as much as I can help it. But there are so many other reasons why we need to look to cleaner more modern fuels and energy's. What, do you think we're all going to travel the galaxy on oil and gasoline, hahahaha.

jerseyboiler120
02-24-2013, 07:21 AM
We're having a nice discussion about space and somebody's just got to put their political spin on it somehow someway. Does everything you do throughout your day have to revolve around a political view of something. Can't you just, for a moment, give it a rest. Enjoy the topic, leave the politics out of it. Thank you.


Steven, loved your thinking out of the box on the asteroid ship. I don't think the rotation of it to provide gravity would really work though. Even the largest asteroid would still be too small for it to work correctly. It's not just the earth spin that creates the gravity we are used to, it's the mass of the planet as well. I think with an asteroid, to create gravity equal to what we feel on earth, you would have to make it spin quite fast and relative to the mass of the asteroid, I would think it would feel like awkward gravity. It would be a cool thing for them to test out though. Alot of that theory sounds good, such as the asteroid having water, protection from small particles and radiation.


And last but not least - to our global warming is a hoax gentleman, forget about the fact you don't believe greenhouse gases are heating up the planet. Don't you think it's still a good idea to create less toxic fumes in the air so we have cleaner air to breath. Haven't you seen those images of the lungs of people who have lived their entire lives in a big city vs those who have lived in the rural areas. It's quite a difference. It's like looking at a person who smoked and one who has not. I for one don't wish to breath fossil fuel air as much as I can help it. But there are so many other reasons why we need to look to cleaner more modern fuels and energy's. What, do you think we're all going to travel the galaxy on oil and gasoline, hahahaha.


Some of the posts that turned the nice pictures discussion into space travel and colonization mentioned how we are messing up our own planet and will need to find somewhere else to go if not careful. IMHO that puts things right in the political zone as it mirrors what we have shoved in our faces by the media 24-7.

DivineLegion
02-24-2013, 12:29 PM
The other factor is the wobble of the Earth on the axis. I live where a huge glacier once stood that carved the great lakes. I really think the roation of Earth's axis impacted the ice ages and the recent heat up. Does CO2 play a big part in the warm up? Yes! Is it all man made? Nope, can we control it? Nope.

I think reducing CO2 emmissions is just plain common sense. They have proof that the Earth has gone through cycles of heat and cold throughout the millienia(sp?)

As a NASA enthusiast, you of all people have greater access to the scientific data behind the theoretical evidence regarding global warming.


http://www.brighton73.freeserve.co.uk/gw/paleo/20000yearsbig.gif
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/icecore/antarctica/vostok/vostok.html


If climate changes naturally over time, why isn't the current warming just another natural cycle?

The industrial activities that our modern civilization depends upon have raised atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane to higher levels than at any point during the last 650,000 years. Scientists agree it is very likely that most of the global average warming since the mid-20th century is due to the human-induced increases in greenhouse gases, rather than to natural causes.

While natural variations have altered the climate significantly in the past, it is very unlikely that the changes in climate observed since the mid-20th century can be explained by natural processes alone.

http://climate.nasa.gov/climatechangeFAQ#Q1

broncosteven
02-24-2013, 12:55 PM
As a NASA enthusiast, you of all people have greater access to the scientific data behind the theoretical evidence regarding global warming.


http://www.brighton73.freeserve.co.uk/gw/paleo/20000yearsbig.gif
http://www.ncdc.noaa.gov/paleo/icecore/antarctica/vostok/vostok.html


If climate changes naturally over time, why isn't the current warming just another natural cycle?

The industrial activities that our modern civilization depends upon have raised atmospheric concentrations of carbon dioxide and methane to higher levels than at any point during the last 650,000 years. Scientists agree it is very likely that most of the global average warming since the mid-20th century is due to the human-induced increases in greenhouse gases, rather than to natural causes.

While natural variations have altered the climate significantly in the past, it is very unlikely that the changes in climate observed since the mid-20th century can be explained by natural processes alone.

http://climate.nasa.gov/climatechangeFAQ#Q1

I agree we need to address the man made CO2 issues. I have seen the data and agree that man is contributing to the issue but again I point to the fact that at one point a long time ago I would be living on top of a Glacier.

CO2 is an issue we need to address but if you look at other data they have gathered from the Ice at the poles they have found periods of warming and cooling, before the industrial revolution. I think the Earth has been on a warming trend since the last little ice age back in the middle ages.

The CO2 spike is us for sure and it is something we need to reduce quickly or find a new place to live but it can be addressed quickly if we invest in scrubbing it from the enviroment and regulate abusers. We have made some strides already.

When I lived in Denver back in the early 70's Denver had some of the worst air pollution, to the point where my dad, who had Asthma, had to stay in doors and or wear a mask. I believe it is much better as each time I have been back over the years they don't mention it in the news, it is something we can address quickly. Other towns like LA have done the same things, and we cleaned up the Cuyohoga(sp?) river in Ohio that once caught fire. With proper regulations we can turn this around. I am worried about things we can't control. We live on a very active planet that vary's it's spin on it's axis. We can't control stuff like that which is why space flight is in our best interest if we want to stay alive in this universe.

Cito Pelon
02-24-2013, 02:19 PM
The best Deep Field was the first. See it here:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hubble_Deep_Field

It shows the stages the Hubble went through, starting from the naked eye view, then to a second stage, then to the Deep Field.

I've been trying to find prints of those original Deep Field views from 1995, let me know if you know where to get some.

Cito Pelon
02-24-2013, 02:33 PM
Hah, found something similar to the original Deep Field:

http://astrosociety.org/astroshop/index.php?p=product&id=51&parent=1

It shows the the stages from naked eye to deep field. I'm ordering 10 of these, should have ordered 10 from the original Deep Field (and those were from the Astronomical Society of the Pacific also).

Cito Pelon
02-24-2013, 04:48 PM
You can see the Milky Way with the naked eye if its dark enough. I was up in Sedona AZ and my wife and I went to this star gazing thing. The guy had a pretty good telescope. He pointed at a point in the Milky Way area. Through the telescope was stars every where. He said that every "star" was actually between 300-500 more stars. It's was pretty cool.

Every "star" you see with the naked eye is actually a galaxy, not 300-500 stars.

This is why I posted the link to astrosociety.org above. The posters they print show the progression from the naked eye to the Deep Field. It's surprising people haven't made the connection between stars and galaxies despite 18 years since the first Hubble Deep Field photos. It's just too awesome for some people to grasp I guess or just lack of exposure.

Here's another link to print Hubble photos:

http://hubblesite.org/gallery/printshop/

Cito Pelon
02-24-2013, 05:30 PM
So many good nebula pictures, the eagle, horsehead, crab, orion. Many earthrise pictures were taken from the moon, some of them are truly amazing.

Not a lot of things I would die for, but I would take a one way trip into space.

Keep in mind some of these Hubble pics are enhanced, so to speak. See here for the explanation:

http://hubblesite.org/gallery/behind_the_pictures/meaning_of_color/hubble.php

Some features of the Universe are not visible to the naked eye because they are only in spectrums that our eyes cannot deal with.

Which makes the Deep Field that much more awesome, because it's not enhanced, it's just what you'd see if you had super vision. I ordered 10 of those posters from astrosociety.org, I made the mistake of only ordering three of the original Deep Fields, much to my regret. I don't like to make the same mistake twice.

maher_tyler
02-24-2013, 06:08 PM
Every "star" you see with the naked eye is actually a galaxy, not 300-500 stars.

This is why I posted the link to astrosociety.org above. The posters they print show the progression from the naked eye to the Deep Field. It's surprising people haven't made the connection between stars and galaxies despite 18 years since the first Hubble Deep Field photos. It's just too awesome for some people to grasp I guess or just lack of exposure.

Here's another link to print Hubble photos:

http://hubblesite.org/gallery/printshop/

I know. However, Sirius, the brightest Star in the sky is a Star and not a galaxy.

Cito Pelon
02-24-2013, 06:35 PM
I know. However, Sirius, the brightest Star in the sky is a Star and not a galaxy.

True. One star among all those billions of lights is a star. All the rest visible to the naked eye are galaxies. It's awesome to me.

Except for the Milky Way, of course. The Milky Way is our own galaxy, hence it's so prominent.

It's so prominent because we are way out on one of the Milky Way's spiral arms, way out there on the spiral arm, that's why the Milky Way moves across the sky from season to season, we rotate around it. Awesome we're just a tiny speck on a spiral arm of one galaxy among billions of galaxies.

EDIT: We don't rotate around the Milky Way, it's the rotation of the Earth that makes it look that way. We're just way out on one of the spiral arms of the Milky Way galaxy.

DivineLegion
02-24-2013, 07:40 PM
I can't wait for the James Webb deep field, that is going to be something. I really wish our government would invest more money into NASA, I understand the reasoning for the budget cuts, but its one of the greatest opportunities for technological development in this country. Space X and Googles first enterprise upon receiving the corporate go ahead was to develop plans for space mining. That's a great opportunity, but its not conducted with the same vision of curiosity. Granted we will learn a lot from the new fiscal backing of Corporate space programs, the theoretical research will not be emphasized. I am also afraid of the privatization of information for capital gain. It's relative to the genome race in the potential danger of patented knowledge. I believe that Musk wouldn't try to pull something like that, mostly because of his philanthropic contributions to Science education, but he is not going to be alone at the head if manned operations for long, and that's when I begin to worry.

broncosteven
02-24-2013, 07:53 PM
I can't wait for the James Webb deep field, that is going to be something. I really wish our government would invest more money into NASA, I understand the reasoning for the budget cuts, but its one of the greatest opportunities for technological development in this country. Space X and Googles first enterprise upon receiving the corporate go ahead was to develop plans for space mining. That's a great opportunity, but its not conducted with the same vision of curiosity. Granted we will learn a lot from the new fiscal backing of Corporate space programs, the theoretical research will not be emphasized. I am also afraid of the privatization of information for capital gain. It's relative to the genome race in the potential danger of patented knowledge. I believe that Musk wouldn't try to pull something like that, mostly because of his philanthropic contributions to Science education, but he is not going to be alone at the head if manned operations for long, and that's when I begin to worry.

Yep, I agree well said

maher_tyler
02-24-2013, 08:02 PM
True. One star among all those billions of lights is a star. All the rest visible to the naked eye are galaxies. It's awesome to me.

Except for the Milky Way, of course. The Milky Way is our own galaxy, hence it's so prominent.

It's so prominent because we are way out on one of the Milky Way's spiral arms, way out there on the spiral arm, that's why the Milky Way moves across the sky from season to season, we rotate around it. Awesome we're just a tiny speck on a spiral arm of one galaxy among billions of galaxies.

EDIT: We don't rotate around the Milky Way, it's the rotation of the Earth that makes it look that way. We're just way out on one of the spiral arms of the Milky Way galaxy.

Dude I know. I don't find anything more fascinating than the universe. Growing up through elementary school we took a lot of field trips to the planetarium. There are also a ton of observatories down here in AZ. The one in Flagstaff is pretty awesome.

Cito Pelon
02-24-2013, 08:36 PM
Dude I know. I don't find anything more fascinating than the universe. Growing up through elementary school we took a lot of field trips to the planetarium. There are also a ton of observatories down here in AZ. The one in Flagstaff is pretty awesome.

No light pollution. One of the reasons I try to keep the colorado population down.

BroncoBuff
02-26-2013, 07:34 AM
Sorry Zona, but fakes don't count.

Definitely, tons of fakes ... I use space shots for my desktop, and the web overflows with phonies, there's a million and one of them.

I like the ones that look fake, but are real. Like this Saturn shot ... looks like a drawing, or maybe an animation or computer generated image. But it's real, got it off NASA's site.


http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash4/252991_1915242692359_6376651_n.jpg




These time-lapse shots are striking, but i suspect the second one is not entirely genuine ....


http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/46107_1455904329187_5559415_n.jpg

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-ash3/29905_1387889188851_73204_n.jpg



This purporting to be a real-life E.T. shot seems fishy .....

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/29905_1387882788691_1077854_n.jpg



This one MUST be phony. The LEM is intact, that is, the command module and support stage are still attached. But that happens only during landing, as the lower stage is left behind when they takeoff. The Apollo missions were clicking off every few months there for awhile, so I suppose one crew could have set up a camera to be operated remotely by a later Apollo, but I doubt it. .... (how'd I do, b-steven?)

http://sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-prn1/29905_1387889108849_2705089_n.jpg

BroncoBuff
02-26-2013, 07:36 AM
These are my favorite desktops ..........


http://img600.imageshack.us/img600/8287/earth6391.jpg


http://img715.imageshack.us/img715/3471/earthfrommoon.jpg


http://img824.imageshack.us/img824/8549/moonearthbehind.jpg









I like this one too, but the second one is part phony. Look close, it's just the first pic with the moon moved to the other side, I NEEDED TO SEE MY DESKTOP ICONS!


http://img254.imageshack.us/img254/8139/moonu.jpg



http://img534.imageshack.us/img534/2604/earthfromspace.jpg

BroncoBuff
02-26-2013, 07:41 AM
http://img707.imageshack.us/img707/9863/n1580720728149140638880.jpg


This is my favorite, though ... I know it's real cause I took it myself.

Rare occurrence, guesses anybody?

Requiem
02-26-2013, 08:17 AM
A lunar eclipse!?

BroncoBuff
02-26-2013, 08:31 AM
Kinda I guess ... no, that's the Moon and Venus, the the two closest objects to Earth. Taken in 2007.

Next quiz: "Keep Looking Up!" as Tomita plays Debussy and you don't know Jack. What am I talking about?

Broncomutt
02-27-2013, 09:45 AM
NOVA recently aired an episode called Earth From Space that was really interesting and has some excellent animation. All about satellites.

Good stuff.



<iframe width="560" height="315" src="http://www.youtube.com/embed/x_QoKYvjhl4" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>

Broncomutt
02-28-2013, 07:05 AM
Coworker just sent me a flyer from a Wisconsin based astronomy club about a comet coming up in about 10 days called Pan Starrs, that will be visible from March 10th-16th (dates based on a Wisconsin perspective).

I looked it up in my Orion Starry Nights software (from a central NC perspective) and this is what it will look like at 6:40 pm in the western sky. Look at it's juxtaposition with the moon, pretty cool.

Wow, look at the apparent magnitude! Thing is going to be almost as bright as Saturn!!

gyldenlove
02-28-2013, 07:11 AM
Keep in mind some of these Hubble pics are enhanced, so to speak. See here for the explanation:

http://hubblesite.org/gallery/behind_the_pictures/meaning_of_color/hubble.php

Some features of the Universe are not visible to the naked eye because they are only in spectrums that our eyes cannot deal with.

Which makes the Deep Field that much more awesome, because it's not enhanced, it's just what you'd see if you had super vision. I ordered 10 of those posters from astrosociety.org, I made the mistake of only ordering three of the original Deep Fields, much to my regret. I don't like to make the same mistake twice.

They are all enhanced and put in false color, there is nothing more boring than looking at raw telescope data. I did a project on correcting errors in observations such as errors in adaptive optics or overexposure using channel decomposition to determine temperature and magnitude.

broncosteven
02-28-2013, 11:08 AM
Kinda I guess ... no, that's the Moon and Venus, the the two closest objects to Earth. Taken in 2007.

Next quiz: "Keep Looking Up!" as Tomita plays Debussy and you don't know Jack. What am I talking about?

Was it taken by one of the Mars missions?

Claire De Lune?

maven
02-28-2013, 12:49 PM
http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/11/02/curiosity-self-portrait-hi-res_620x465.jpg

no rover pics? I like!

maven
02-28-2013, 12:52 PM
http://darkerview.com/darkview/uploads/Astronomy/PhoenixParachute.jpg

Mars Global Surveyor snapping a pic of the Phoenix Lander.

broncosteven
02-28-2013, 12:56 PM
http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/11/02/curiosity-self-portrait-hi-res_620x465.jpg

no rover pics? I like!

From Space...

Still cool though!

ZONA
02-28-2013, 08:21 PM
I'd talk stars and galaxies any day of the week with this hottie (Amy Mainzer - PhD in Astronomy)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6HnUpqqP5ls/UKfQpw4ufkI/AAAAAAAAUUE/pNWOp2UM1-M/s1600/86735_amy_mainzer_002_122_379lo1.jpg

Tombstone RJ
02-28-2013, 08:46 PM
http://i.i.com.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/11/02/curiosity-self-portrait-hi-res_620x465.jpg

no rover pics? I like!

Really, if you think about it, this is sad. In 1969 we landed men on the moon. In 1975 (I think) we sent an unmanned rover to Mars (what was that again, the Viking missions?).

It's 2013 and this is all we got? Really?

We should be absolutely ashamed of ourselves.

Tombstone RJ
02-28-2013, 08:48 PM
I'd talk stars and galaxies any day of the week with this hottie (Amy Mainzer - PhD in Astronomy)

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6HnUpqqP5ls/UKfQpw4ufkI/AAAAAAAAUUE/pNWOp2UM1-M/s1600/86735_amy_mainzer_002_122_379lo1.jpg

Hey Annie, what's all this molecule stuff?

Heyneck
02-28-2013, 11:21 PM
http://i.imgur.com/ga7JvOV.jpg

cutthemdown
02-28-2013, 11:34 PM
They are looking for a couple to go to Mars. Any of you married folks down? If i was in shape, young, and had a wife i loved I would be all over it! Wow I am 0-3 on being elgible for going to Mars. :(

maven
03-01-2013, 02:00 AM
Really, if you think about it, this is sad. In 1969 we landed men on the moon. In 1975 (I think) we sent an unmanned rover to Mars (what was that again, the Viking missions?).

It's 2013 and this is all we got? Really?

We should be absolutely ashamed of ourselves.

Well, you could say if we didn't pour all that money into the ISS and Space Shuttles, we could have accomplished something else instead.

broncosteven
04-02-2013, 01:25 PM
This is way better than the trailer for the new staR treK movie:

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html?media_id=134209771#.UVryIUZOfuc.faceboo k

ZONA
04-02-2013, 02:09 PM
Did anybody get to see Nova this week? They had a ton of videos from that russian meteorite. Looks like it was mostly rock and not metal.

ZONA
04-02-2013, 02:13 PM
http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6HnUpqqP5ls/UKfQpw4ufkI/AAAAAAAAUUE/pNWOp2UM1-M/s1600/86735_amy_mainzer_002_122_379lo1.jpg

Hey Annie, what's all this molecule stuff?

I'd like to discuss the affects gravity has on an erection with her.