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View Full Version : OT: Do you actually buy software?


That One Guy
01-26-2013, 07:33 AM
So I just got my laptop back from getting repaired and I'm having to install a bunch of software to do some work. I'm grabbing photoshop, MS Office, and daemon tools to install them at the current moment. If I paid for everything, that'd be well over $1000 for pretty much just two programs. I'm just curious if anyone actually pays for these things on their home PCs? My philosophy is that these things are really catered to the professional market and they understand the prices are unreasonable and the home users will just pirate them.

In a way, you might even argue that using them at home makes people more proficient in them and makes it more of a necessity for professional environments to buy them.

Anyways, just curious, do you guys pay for this software? Is there a cutoff where you draw the line? Or if you can't afford it, do you just not have it?

rugbythug
01-26-2013, 07:40 AM
So I just got my laptop back from getting repaired and I'm having to install a bunch of software to do some work. I'm grabbing photoshop, MS Office, and daemon tools to install them at the current moment. If I paid for everything, that'd be well over $1000 for pretty much just two programs. I'm just curious if anyone actually pays for these things on their home PCs? My philosophy is that these things are really catered to the professional market and they understand the prices are unreasonable and the home users will just pirate them.

In a way, you might even argue that using them at home makes people more proficient in them and makes it more of a necessity for professional environments to buy them.

Anyways, just curious, do you guys pay for this software? Is there a cutoff where you draw the line? Or if you can't afford it, do you just not have it?

I buy software. Although I have not had to buy some as I have 2 licenses that came with the work copy.

DenverBound
01-26-2013, 07:51 AM
If you pay for software, your doing it wrong.

The only software that I'll pay for is from smaller startup companies that I really want to support. Microsoft, Adobe, or any other big name Co can kiss me, and tell me that you love me..

LOL... I said they could bIow me... Random edit FTW..

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 07:59 AM
If you pay for software, your doing it wrong.

The only software that I'll pay for is from smaller startup companies that I really want to support. Microsoft, Adobe, or any other big name Co can kiss me, and tell me that you love me..

LOL... I said they could bIow me... Random edit FTW..

LOL

I, for a minute considered actually paying for Daemon tools as I believe it's fairly cheap and very handy but then the irony of paying for a piece of software which is almost exclusively used for pirating software was just too much. Or it was just my way of defending it in my head. Either way, yeah, I just can't imagine hundreds of dollars in software is targeted at the home market.

I actually got a MS Office light with this computer. The word and excel are ad-based and it has no powerpoint or access. I thought that was really strange.

Drek
01-26-2013, 08:03 AM
So I just got my laptop back from getting repaired and I'm having to install a bunch of software to do some work. I'm grabbing photoshop, MS Office, and daemon tools to install them at the current moment. If I paid for everything, that'd be well over $1000 for pretty much just two programs. I'm just curious if anyone actually pays for these things on their home PCs? My philosophy is that these things are really catered to the professional market and they understand the prices are unreasonable and the home users will just pirate them.

In a way, you might even argue that using them at home makes people more proficient in them and makes it more of a necessity for professional environments to buy them.

Anyways, just curious, do you guys pay for this software? Is there a cutoff where you draw the line? Or if you can't afford it, do you just not have it?
That's some crazy rationalization for copyright infringement.

1. all of those companies have versions that are directly targeted at home users. Adobe has Photoshop Elements, Microsoft has Office Home & Student, Daemon Tools has multiple varieties including Lite, and range from all of ~$20-$50.

2. all of these products have comparable freeware alternatives. Photoshop can be replaced via Gimp and Paint.Net. MS Office can be replaced with LibreOffice. Daemon Tools' disc burning features are more than replaced with ImgBurn and the image mounting feature is matched by ISODisk.

So because you're too lazy to investigate the free alternatives you instead rationalize your illicit downloading and use of copyrighted software because you fantasize a world where you aren't the target audience.

slick7
01-26-2013, 08:09 AM
Use linux. It's all free.

I've used Ubuntu for years. http://www.ubuntu.com/

I've also got a laptop with Linux mint. http://www.linuxmint.com/

Check them out.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 08:11 AM
That's some crazy rationalization for copyright infringement.

1. all of those companies have versions that are directly targeted at home users. Adobe has Photoshop Elements, Microsoft has Office Home & Student, Daemon Tools has multiple varieties including Lite, and range from all of ~$20-$50.

2. all of these products have comparable freeware alternatives. Photoshop can be replaced via Gimp and Paint.Net. MS Office can be replaced with LibreOffice. Daemon Tools' disc burning features are more than replaced with ImgBurn and the image mounting feature is matched by ISODisk.

So because you're too lazy to investigate the free alternatives you instead rationalize your illicit downloading and use of copyrighted software because you fantasize a world where you aren't the target audience.

So I take it you are a payer. Awesome.

I actually have a copy of MS Office somewhere that I bought back in the day. It was 07 and only cost $20 through the Army deal. I went to buy a student copy a few years ago and it was up to $95 or something.

As for the photoshop, that one I am aware that there's other alternatives but, again, it's a mix of wanting to be proficient on the one everyone uses and already knowing how to use this one. Which do you think Adobe would prefer (serious question), me pirating theirs at home or just using a competitors for free? Either way, they're not getting money. Which would they prefer?

And Daemon tools... like I said, they exist for piraters. They can hardly take a high road here. I guess my question above also applies to them, though. Would they prefer I pirate them or use a competitor for free? I know you aren't in their heads but take a guess.

And I was just posting this out of curiosity while I'm installing. For the sake of making you feel good, I'm willing to say I'm just using everything on the trial period.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 08:14 AM
Use linux. It's all free.

I've used Ubuntu for years. http://www.ubuntu.com/

I've also got a laptop with Linux mint. http://www.linuxmint.com/

Check them out.

I've been intrigued by them as I hear they've really come up from what they were 10+ years ago. It's just such an investment in time, effort, and the risk of compatibility issues which stop me. One day when a crashed computer won't be the worst thing to happen, ever, I might sit down with them. I've been very intrigued.

Drek
01-26-2013, 08:25 AM
So I take it you are a payer. Awesome.
So specifically listing the free alternatives makes you think I actually pay for the industry standard offerings?

I actually have a copy of MS Office somewhere that I bought back in the day. It was 07 and only cost $20 through the Army deal. I went to buy a student copy a few years ago and it was up to $95 or something.
And? MS still offers sales for home use to the military, school faculty and students, and even many large license holding private companies. Also, for how frequently most people use Office do you really think $95 is all that much? You probably pay more for that per month for cable/satellite, and the NFL/DirecTV feels they're entitled to over three times that just to watch football games over the span of 17 weeks. I'd say it's a pretty "high value" offering relative to time spent working with it.

As for the photoshop, that one I am aware that there's other alternatives but, again, it's a mix of wanting to be proficient on the one everyone uses and already knowing how to use this one. Which do you think Adobe would prefer (serious question), me pirating theirs at home or just using a competitors for free? Either way, they're not getting money. Which would they prefer?
Seeings how you pirating it helps build the culture that steals them of sales, yes they would. Also, that (people using the free alternative) on a large scale would prompt them to offer more features and better pricing for Elements, as the market for the product would be more quantifiable.

And Daemon tools... like I said, they exist for piraters. They can hardly take a high road here. I guess my question above also applies to them, though. Would they prefer I pirate them or use a competitor for free? I know you aren't in their heads but take a guess.
First of all, there are other uses for Daemon tools. Second, do you think it's completely moral to steal anything you want from someone's home once they're convicted of a crime? Last I checked handing out punitive damages for participating in criminal activity was the jurisdiction of the government, not individuals.

And I was just posting this out of curiosity while I'm installing. For the sake of making you feel good, I'm willing to say I'm just using everything on the trial period.
I don't give a **** what you do man, doesn't bother me one way or the other. I'm just pointing out that you're an intellectually dishonest thief who is using a message board to simultaneously validate and brag about your crime. A crime that any 7 year old can perpetrate, as well as spot the immorality of.

nyuk nyuk
01-26-2013, 08:33 AM
MSOffice isn't worth paying for. You can get free versions that can open/make MSOffice documents such as Open Office.

I paid $15 for a Droid version of MSOffice for my tablet. I forget the name off the top of my head. It makes/edits .docs and whatnot. I think it's Office Suite Pro.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 08:33 AM
I wasn't bragging, just curious. I just don't wanna cause any stress in anyone's life but I'm apparently stressing you out.

Bacchus
01-26-2013, 08:39 AM
So I just got my laptop back from getting repaired and I'm having to install a bunch of software to do some work. I'm grabbing photoshop, MS Office, and daemon tools to install them at the current moment. If I paid for everything, that'd be well over $1000 for pretty much just two programs. I'm just curious if anyone actually pays for these things on their home PCs? My philosophy is that these things are really catered to the professional market and they understand the prices are unreasonable and the home users will just pirate them.

In a way, you might even argue that using them at home makes people more proficient in them and makes it more of a necessity for professional environments to buy them.

Anyways, just curious, do you guys pay for this software? Is there a cutoff where you draw the line? Or if you can't afford it, do you just not have it?

Almost everything I install is free. Microsoft word etc. being the exception. And actually, I did not buy the microsoft i got a friends 2010 version.

Bacchus
01-26-2013, 08:41 AM
Here is the free anti-virus I use. It is very good.

http://free.avg.com/us-en/homepage

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 08:51 AM
Here is the free anti-virus I use. It is very good.

http://free.avg.com/us-en/homepage

I usually run without an anti-virus at all. The only times I've had a use for one were after I was infected and they are almost completely useless then. It seems like the best use of an anti-virus is to make you feel secure.

CSU Husker
01-26-2013, 09:04 AM
I usually run without an anti-virus at all. The only times I've had a use for one were after I was infected and they are almost completely useless then. It seems like the best use of an anti-virus is to make you feel secure.

Did you ever think that maybe you got infected because you didn't have an AV running? A quality AV (not norton, mcafee, etc) will save your ass a ton of headaches.

Bacchus
01-26-2013, 09:05 AM
I usually run without an anti-virus at all. The only times I've had a use for one were after I was infected and they are almost completely useless then. It seems like the best use of an anti-virus is to make you feel secure.

That is risky, google and FB are loaded with viruses.

Play2win
01-26-2013, 09:16 AM
Take 2 classes online from your local community college that will help you in your career. Then get educational pricing for said software products.

As for Photoshop and/or Adobe, check out their monthly Creative Cloud Webservice.

Dr. Broncenstein
01-26-2013, 09:40 AM
It's an aptitude test. Guess what it means if you have to pay.

Requiem
01-26-2013, 09:54 AM
I'm not a cheap bastard criminal. Yes.

Drek
01-26-2013, 10:09 AM
It's an aptitude test. Guess what it means if you have to pay.

That you have a high aptitude towards a meaningful ethical standard for yourself?

Better yet, what does it say if you're the halfwit you thinks it's easier to pirate than to get any of the very good free alternatives?

Fedaykin
01-26-2013, 10:12 AM
99% of all software a home user might actually need has an open source alternative to the commercial rip off.

OpenOffice, The Gimp, etc.

Unless you are
a.) Trying to get a job that requires a particular piece of software (i.e. Photoshop)

or

b.) like wasting money

then just use open source.

rugbythug
01-26-2013, 10:12 AM
Its an Inverse Relationship those that Do pay for software Don't pay for sex.

cutthemdown
01-26-2013, 10:14 AM
So then you have justified stealing?

cutthemdown
01-26-2013, 10:15 AM
I can't afford photoshop so i use the free program GIMP. Not as good but i get by with it. i can't lie though i am no better because I have downloaded a lot of free music.

We basically justified a way of stealing because its so easy and not looked on like regular theiving from a store or something. Its a great experiment on human behavoir.

chadta
01-26-2013, 10:24 AM
Its an Inverse Relationship those that Do pay for software Don't pay for sex.

dont kid yourself, anybody that has sex, pays for it, some pay in cash directly, others pay in dinners, shoes, jewelry. Sometimes i think cash directly might be easier.

ColoradoDarin
01-26-2013, 10:28 AM
I usually pay for software that I use, but like Drek said, there are so many free alternatives out there it's not really necessary to pirate anyways. Another way to legally obtain them is too look for a year or 2 older versions where the latest updates aren't needed. A couple of years ago I bought a one year past Quicken version for something like $8. I still use Office 2000 from when I was given a free copy back then thanks to the dot com bust (our company had an entire closet full of discs, with not enough employees to use them and still laying off people), it's not like you really need to update Office every year.

rugbythug
01-26-2013, 10:29 AM
dont kid yourself, anybody that has sex, pays for it, some pay in cash directly, others pay in dinners, shoes, jewelry. Sometimes i think cash directly might be easier.

I married my Sex Partner and have amortized the payments over 30 Years. As a bonus I get meals, and Cleaning for free.

gyldenlove
01-26-2013, 10:45 AM
I don't think I have a single unlicensed program on my computer, which is a big change from 5 years ago when it was pretty much all downloaded and installed without paying.

UberBroncoMan
01-26-2013, 10:57 AM
dont kid yourself, anybody that has sex, pays for it, some pay in cash directly, others pay in dinners, shoes, jewelry. Sometimes i think cash directly might be easier.

Hahaha, so ****ing true!

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 10:59 AM
Did you ever think that maybe you got infected because you didn't have an AV running? A quality AV (not norton, mcafee, etc) will save your ass a ton of headaches.

Maybe that's the issue. I've tried a few different brands but never much more than Norton's or McAfee. I always figure they should be capable of clearing a virus as well as preventing so when they can't clear, I assume they're as incapable at preventing. Especially in my younger days and as a kid, the computers we had were barely functional so running an AV preventatively seemed like a waste.

So it's a hard question to deal with: Did I not get infected because I have an AV or did I just not come across a virus?

Dr. Broncenstein
01-26-2013, 11:07 AM
99% of all software a home user might actually need has an open source alternative to the commercial rip off.

OpenOffice, The Gimp, etc.

Unless you are
a.) Trying to get a job that requires a particular piece of software (i.e. Photoshop)

or

b.) like wasting money

then just use open source.

This.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 11:11 AM
I can't afford photoshop so i use the free program GIMP. Not as good but i get by with it. i can't lie though i am no better because I have downloaded a lot of free music.

We basically justified a way of stealing because its so easy and not looked on like regular theiving from a store or something. Its a great experiment on human behavoir.

If I steal your car, you no longer have a car. If I steal a car from a dealership, they no longer have a car. I replaced Office Starter (ad-based) with Office 2010 today. What was different in the world? How would the world be different if I hadn't made a thread asking other people about it?

If I couldn't have had office for free, I'd have kept using starter for free. Totally different stealing intellectual property from physical theft.

rugbythug
01-26-2013, 11:23 AM
If I steal your car, you no longer have a car. If I steal a car from a dealership, they no longer have a car. I replaced Office Starter (ad-based) with Office 2010 today. What was different in the world? How would the world be different if I hadn't made a thread asking other people about it?

If I couldn't have had office for free, I'd have kept using starter for free. Totally different stealing intellectual property from physical theft.

Does this help you sleep at night? It is totally just a justification of your actions. If I run downtown and steal a Vagina but only for a night that is fine. Cause she still has a vagina.

chadta
01-26-2013, 11:35 AM
Does this help you sleep at night? It is totally just a justification of your actions. If I run downtown and steal a Vagina but only for a night that is fine. Cause she still has a vagina.

not the same, if he took the girl, and made a copy of her vagina and used it, without actually using hers it would be the same.

Drek
01-26-2013, 11:41 AM
Maybe that's the issue. I've tried a few different brands but never much more than Norton's or McAfee. I always figure they should be capable of clearing a virus as well as preventing so when they can't clear, I assume they're as incapable at preventing. Especially in my younger days and as a kid, the computers we had were barely functional so running an AV preventatively seemed like a waste.

So it's a hard question to deal with: Did I not get infected because I have an AV or did I just not come across a virus?
Funny enough, most knowledgeable users consider Norton and McAfee to be two of the worst AV options on the market. They're bloated, have heavy handed update systems, and honestly aren't even updated as quickly as the free alternative. Also, since they're the OEM standard they're also the ones most targeted to beat.

I'm personally partial to AVG. Keep it from installing the secure search ad ons and it's a very unobtrusive, highly effective anti-virus with a sub-5 MB footprint. I've used Avira quite a bit as well though and it is a quality program in it's own right.

AVG plus Malware Bytes (disable run at start-up) and CCleaner basically goes above and beyond the functionality of Norton Systemworks with at worst 10% of the memory footprint, 5% of the CPU clock cycles, and zero money out of pocket.

If I steal your car, you no longer have a car. If I steal a car from a dealership, they no longer have a car. I replaced Office Starter (ad-based) with Office 2010 today. What was different in the world? How would the world be different if I hadn't made a thread asking other people about it?

If I couldn't have had office for free, I'd have kept using starter for free. Totally different stealing intellectual property from physical theft.

I would agree, and the penalties shouldn't be the same as larceny in it's original form, but it is still stealing, by even your own description.

What's worse, it's a pointless crime more akin to vandalism since there are high quality options available for free that your support could, in the long run, spur serious competition and innovation within the industry.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 11:52 AM
Does this help you sleep at night? It is totally just a justification of your actions. If I run downtown and steal a Vagina but only for a night that is fine. Cause she still has a vagina.

Let's put it this way: If a crime can be committed in the safety of your own home and you're the ONLY person that knows it happened, it wasn't a crime.

If you rape someone, obviously that's different. I feel stupid even responding to your post.

chadta
01-26-2013, 11:55 AM
For the record I justify my stealing by saying that I would be using the free versions, or just doing without if I didnt steal, so the company I am stealing from didnt actually lose a sale, so they are really out nothing.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 11:57 AM
What's worse, it's a pointless crime more akin to vandalism since there are high quality options available for free that your support could, in the long run, spur serious competition and innovation within the industry.

That's a very good point. Assuming people don't get greedy because they have a large following and either start charging or ruin the product for profit (I'm looking at you, PFT), the alternatives are being deprived.

The question, though, is are these startups ever capable of being as good as the established?

rugbythug
01-26-2013, 12:23 PM
Let's put it this way: If a crime can be committed in the safety of your own home and you're the ONLY person that knows it happened, it wasn't a crime.

If you rape someone, obviously that's different. I feel stupid even responding to your post.

So by your own admission if the developer catches you it is a crime.

Drek
01-26-2013, 12:44 PM
That's a very good point. Assuming people don't get greedy because they have a large following and either start charging or ruin the product for profit (I'm looking at you, PFT), the alternatives are being deprived.

The question, though, is are these startups ever capable of being as good as the established?
Well, since the freeware alternatives to antivirus are already superior I'd say yes, they are quite capable of being better than the established standard.

And if the free options did get too big for their britches you can be sure another freeware alternative will rise up to knock them down as well.

The only thing that keeps overpriced software the standard is people refusing to try the alternatives. Look at Windows as an OS. It's been jank for years, everyone complained, but everyone used it. Now that compelling options are appearing on other formats (iOS and Android, most notably) we're suddenly seeing MS scramble to keep Windows alive with declining sales numbers.

Instead of just tolerating a single product's hegemony people were willing to try the alternatives. End result - market turnover leading to innovation and competition. That's good for us end consumers.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 01:16 PM
So by your own admission if the developer catches you it is a crime.

WTF is the developer doing in my house?

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 01:22 PM
Well, since the freeware alternatives to antivirus are already superior I'd say yes, they are quite capable of being better than the established standard.

And if the free options did get too big for their britches you can be sure another freeware alternative will rise up to knock them down as well.

The only thing that keeps overpriced software the standard is people refusing to try the alternatives. Look at Windows as an OS. It's been jank for years, everyone complained, but everyone used it. Now that compelling options are appearing on other formats (iOS and Android, most notably) we're suddenly seeing MS scramble to keep Windows alive with declining sales numbers.

Instead of just tolerating a single product's hegemony people were willing to try the alternatives. End result - market turnover leading to innovation and competition. That's good for us end consumers.

Well the AVs are a different ballgame. I'm asking about the big things, though. For a long time, all the open source OSs were just nerds wanting to go against the grain. For all intents and purposes, they were not serious competitors with anyone.

Are the other programs going to ever be better than the expensive programs? Are these substitution programs going to overtake Office, Photoshop, etc, in quality?

Not trying to justify downloading anything at this point, just curious if these big dogs stay big dogs because they are the big dogs or if they're just still popular due to marketing and name recognition.

rugbythug
01-26-2013, 03:48 PM
WTF is the developer doing in my house?

Digging in the sofa for the money you stole from him.

Wes Mantooth
01-26-2013, 04:38 PM
So I just got my laptop back from getting repaired and I'm having to install a bunch of software to do some work. I'm grabbing photoshop, MS Office, and daemon tools to install them at the current moment. If I paid for everything, that'd be well over $1000 for pretty much just two programs. I'm just curious if anyone actually pays for these things on their home PCs? My philosophy is that these things are really catered to the professional market and they understand the prices are unreasonable and the home users will just pirate them.

In a way, you might even argue that using them at home makes people more proficient in them and makes it more of a necessity for professional environments to buy them.

Anyways, just curious, do you guys pay for this software? Is there a cutoff where you draw the line? Or if you can't afford it, do you just not have it?

So if you work for a company with an MS ea, you mos likely have home use rights.

sisterhellfyre
01-26-2013, 05:31 PM
AVG plus Malware Bytes (disable run at start-up) and CCleaner basically goes above and beyond the functionality of Norton Systemworks with at worst 10% of the memory footprint, 5% of the CPU clock cycles, and zero money out of pocket.

That's the combination I use too.

I also occasionally use for Trend Micro's Housecall online virus scanner, for PCs brought to me for cleanup.

Drek
01-26-2013, 07:22 PM
Well the AVs are a different ballgame. I'm asking about the big things, though. For a long time, all the open source OSs were just nerds wanting to go against the grain. For all intents and purposes, they were not serious competitors with anyone.

Are the other programs going to ever be better than the expensive programs? Are these substitution programs going to overtake Office, Photoshop, etc, in quality?

Not trying to justify downloading anything at this point, just curious if these big dogs stay big dogs because they are the big dogs or if they're just still popular due to marketing and name recognition.

Well, depends on what you're looking for.

I'd argue that the whole "parents having their kids set up and manage their computer for them, when all they want is email and internet" deal is best done via Linux, Ubuntu to be exact. Don't give them admin access and they'll have a rock solid environment with very few risks of hacks,viruses, bugs, etc.. It also comes pre-loaded with office software, CD authoring software, web browser, etc..

That's on the OS front.

As for Office software - does it 1. piss you off that MS took Access out of office or 2. preferred the pre-ribbon user interface? Then LibreOffice is for you as it includes their knock off of Access and uses a Windows 2003-esque layout as opposed to the Office '07 format that has been pusehd but definitely not became mainstream. Hidden benefit, if you do a lot of international business you've likely ran into some European companies that prefer Corell. LibreOffice has no problems opening and saving to their file type.

And for AV editing - Photoshop is a bloated nas hell. For 90% of what the average home user will ever use Gimp of Paint.NET would cover them cheaper and allow mroe effective multi-tasking.

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 08:02 PM
Well, depends on what you're looking for.

I'd argue that the whole "parents having their kids set up and manage their computer for them, when all they want is email and internet" deal is best done via Linux, Ubuntu to be exact. Don't give them admin access and they'll have a rock solid environment with very few risks of hacks,viruses, bugs, etc.. It also comes pre-loaded with office software, CD authoring software, web browser, etc..

That's on the OS front.

As for Office software - does it 1. piss you off that MS took Access out of office or 2. preferred the pre-ribbon user interface? Then LibreOffice is for you as it includes their knock off of Access and uses a Windows 2003-esque layout as opposed to the Office '07 format that has been pusehd but definitely not became mainstream. Hidden benefit, if you do a lot of international business you've likely ran into some European companies that prefer Corell. LibreOffice has no problems opening and saving to their file type.

And for AV editing - Photoshop is a bloated nas hell. For 90% of what the average home user will ever use Gimp of Paint.NET would cover them cheaper and allow mroe effective multi-tasking.

Interesting. I'm wiping the wife's laptop right now (not innuendo) and I'll have to check those out - particularly the photoshop alternative. Thanks

lonestar
01-26-2013, 08:57 PM
dont kid yourself, anybody that has sex, pays for it, some pay in cash directly, others pay in dinners, shoes, jewelry. Sometimes i think cash directly might be easier.

Certainly less long term issues.

That said with my second marriage (first one was way young to make smart decision) is going on thirty some odd years with the same woman, has been well worth the money invested.

Bronco Boy
01-26-2013, 09:17 PM
Cars are way too expensive. They basically are asking people to steal them. Plus, as long as you bring it back every morning before the dealership realizes it's gone, its not a crime right guys?

MacGruder
01-26-2013, 09:27 PM
Cars are way too expensive. They basically are asking people to steal them. Plus, as long as you bring it back every morning before the dealership realizes it's gone, its not a crime right guys?

To make your analogy correct you would be able to clone that car instantly for no cost then steal it. How would that effect your scenario?

That One Guy
01-26-2013, 09:55 PM
Cars are way too expensive. They basically are asking people to steal them. Plus, as long as you bring it back every morning before the dealership realizes it's gone, its not a crime right guys?

The fact that you guys have to keep trying to come up with scenarios that are in no way comparable to make your point completely makes my point.

maher_tyler
01-26-2013, 11:15 PM
So I just got my laptop back from getting repaired and I'm having to install a bunch of software to do some work. I'm grabbing photoshop, MS Office, and daemon tools to install them at the current moment. If I paid for everything, that'd be well over $1000 for pretty much just two programs. I'm just curious if anyone actually pays for these things on their home PCs? My philosophy is that these things are really catered to the professional market and they understand the prices are unreasonable and the home users will just pirate them.

In a way, you might even argue that using them at home makes people more proficient in them and makes it more of a necessity for professional environments to buy them.

Anyways, just curious, do you guys pay for this software? Is there a cutoff where you draw the line? Or if you can't afford it, do you just not have it?

Being in the Air Force...they have a program set up to where we can get the entire MS Office for like $20. I had it on my Sony Vaio before my wife spilled a glass of water on it.

That One Guy
01-27-2013, 06:11 AM
Being in the Air Force...they have a program set up to where we can get the entire MS Office for like $20. I had it on my Sony Vaio before my wife spilled a glass of water on it.

Yeah, I did the same thing a while back but I recall there being a note about you were only supposed to use it while you're employed by the army, the unit identifier that was used, or something like that.

But, ultimately, that is where the intellectual property laws get vague. I paid for a copy of Office once. Am I allowed to legally have Office on my computer even if I misplaced my disks? Office 2010 is the first I came across so I got it but if I knew the 07 I downloaded would be absolutely legal, I'd have had no issues getting that. The rules are just way too cluttered.

FrankieTwoThumbs
01-27-2013, 04:28 PM
The fact that you guys have to keep trying to come up with scenarios that are in no way comparable to make your point completely makes my point.

You are using the labor of others while defrauding them of any reward, and justifying it because it is available in a convenient way due to them unwisely counting on your honor. Polish that turd anyway you wish, its still a turd.

Tombstone RJ
01-27-2013, 04:50 PM
So I just got my laptop back from getting repaired and I'm having to install a bunch of software to do some work. I'm grabbing photoshop, MS Office, and daemon tools to install them at the current moment. If I paid for everything, that'd be well over $1000 for pretty much just two programs. I'm just curious if anyone actually pays for these things on their home PCs? My philosophy is that these things are really catered to the professional market and they understand the prices are unreasonable and the home users will just pirate them.

In a way, you might even argue that using them at home makes people more proficient in them and makes it more of a necessity for professional environments to buy them.

Anyways, just curious, do you guys pay for this software? Is there a cutoff where you draw the line? Or if you can't afford it, do you just not have it?

when it comes to buying a 'puter, if the software isn't all part of the package, I won't even consider buying the friggen thing.

Popps
01-28-2013, 10:52 PM
This tired debate is pretty much a sign of the times.

It's one thing to steal... and that's what it is.

It's another to be so morally bankrupt that you truly believe you have the right to steal... and not just that, but so much so that you announce it to the world on a public forum. (Along with an always logical explanation of in your case.. why stealing is okay.)

What happened to the days when people just stole things, knew it was wrong and shut up about it?

ZONA
01-28-2013, 11:34 PM
99% of all software a home user might actually need has an open source alternative to the commercial rip off.

OpenOffice, The Gimp, etc.

Unless you are
a.) Trying to get a job that requires a particular piece of software (i.e. Photoshop)

or

b.) like wasting money

then just use open source.

OpenOffice is awesome. Why would anybody ever want to pay for Microsoft when this is out there.