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View Full Version : Do Pee Wee players need to have killer instincts?


houghtam
08-01-2012, 08:54 AM
I know everyone hates Reilly, but this was an interesting article.

"My objectives are simple," the coach wrote. "We need to become better, tougher and more aggressive blockers, tacklers and runners. Tackle football isn't for everybody. It takes a certain mindset, an aggressive or killer instinct if you will

Think of your team! The summer camp sessions will be short, but intense. Pre-season conditioning will be intense. In-season practices will be intense. Mental and physical toughness are also requirements. We must get tougher and through hard work, we will.

Players practice full throttle unless they are injured. It's about team! If you don't love being a Bulldog and can't whole heartedly commit, you are in the wrong place. You are either getting better or getting worse. We need to get better and it will take serious commitment. This e-mail is meant to set expectations. No surprises, full steam ahead. Thanks and Go Bulldogs!"

http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/id/8217949/do-pee-wee-players-need-killer-instinct

Rascal
08-01-2012, 08:58 AM
There is no reason to put your kid in Pee Wee football (risk injury and lack of fundamentals) and I will not allow my kid to play in football till junior high at the earliest.

RhymesayersDU
08-01-2012, 09:14 AM
My pee wee sure has one.

TheElusiveKyleOrton
08-01-2012, 09:15 AM
My pee wee sure has one.

http://fierth.com/wp-content/gallery/peewee/pee_wee_herman.jpg

razorwire77
08-01-2012, 09:15 AM
http://www.motifake.com/image/demotivational-poster/1009/the-leg-sweep-it-karate-kid-leg-sweep-demotivational-poster-1285260713.jpg

baja
08-01-2012, 09:25 AM
I know everyone hates Reilly, but this was an interesting article.

Quote:
"My objectives are simple," the coach wrote. "We need to become better, tougher and more aggressive blockers, tacklers and runners. Tackle football isn't for everybody. It takes a certain mindset, an aggressive or killer instinct if you will

Think of your team! The summer camp sessions will be short, but intense. Pre-season conditioning will be intense. In-season practices will be intense. Mental and physical toughness are also requirements. We must get tougher and through hard work, we will.

Players practice full throttle unless they are injured. It's about team! If you don't love being a Bulldog and can't whole heartedly commit, you are in the wrong place. You are either getting better or getting worse. We need to get better and it will take serious commitment. This e-mail is meant to set expectations. No surprises, full steam ahead. Thanks and Go Bulldogs!"



http://espn.go.com/espn/story/_/id/8217949/do-pee-wee-players-need-killer-instinct

This was written on the bulletin board in the gladiators locker room in Rome.

TerrElway
08-01-2012, 09:35 AM
I've coached for 10 years at the little league level - 4 coaching the oldest group (9th graders in a district where the 9th grade goes to jr high and there is no jr high ball) and the other 6 coaching my own kid through all the other groups.

I can tell you that by and large it has been my experience that the majority of pee wee FB coaches are nearly indistinguishable from the folks you see in the Black Hole at the Oakland Coliseum.

Neanderthals and mouth-breathers looking to regain past glory who think they are King Leonidas of Sparta and weaklings should be killed. Their idea of practice is lining up 25 yards apart, geting a full sprint and running into each other. Concussions are a crutch made up by pussy ass liberals to make our boys more like women and if that kid who might not make weight is our best player, we need to make sure he doesn't eat dinner or breakfast before weigh ins and that we take all the pads out of his pants so he does make weight. Who cares if he's 10 - DON'T LET HIM EAT!

It's ridiculous. We have grown men teaching their kids to take kids out at the knee or hit leading with the head to the head to get kids out of games and when confronted on it they say "that's football" and call you a pussy for even saying something about it.

Remember, I've coached for 10 years - been a head coach, a DC and an OC and we have never missed the playoffs so I know you can be successful without making your kids into felons.

Having said all that, football is a sport that takes a certain...mindset, especially as they get older, to really compete. You do have to play the game with aggression because if you don't, you run a big risk of getting hurt. But you can do that without being a complete animal and as these kids hit 13-14 years old and the hormones start raging, you don't really even need to coach it much. For many it is an acceptable release of pent up aggression natural at that age.

But kids that are 7, 8, 9, even up to 11 or 12? Yeah, I think it should be dialed down a few notches. Nothing is more pathetic to me than gangsta looking grown man with his fat gut, shaved head and goatee, barb wire tattoos and Raiders shirt screaming and yelling to little kids about killing someone or kicking their ass etc. etc.

Well, maybe it's worse when the guy looks like Ned Flanders and he's always the first guy to shout "Praise Jesus" at church and he is yelling at little kids telling them to kill someone or kick their ass etc. etc.

vancejohnson82
08-01-2012, 09:35 AM
There is no reason to put your kid in Pee Wee football (risk injury and lack of fundamentals) and I will not allow my kid to play in football till junior high at the earliest.

I'd rather have my kid learn the fundamentals at an early age so when he grows up he's used to hitting/being hit and knows how to do it properly

If an 8 year old boy isn't playing football or another kind of sport, he's damn sure doing something else that he's going to get hurt doing (building bicycle ramps, playing in woods, etc...)

razorwire77
08-01-2012, 09:50 AM
I've coached for 10 years at the little league level - 4 coaching the oldest group (9th graders in a district where the 9th grade goes to jr high and there is no jr high ball) and the other 6 coaching my own kid through all the other groups.

I can tell you that by and large it has been my experience that the majority of pee wee FB coaches are nearly indistinguishable from the folks you see in the Black Hole at the Oakland Coliseum.

Neanderthals and mouth-breathers looking to regain past glory who think they are King Leonidas of Sparta and weaklings should be killed. Their idea of practice is lining up 25 yards apart, geting a full sprint and running into each other. Concussions are a crutch made up by p***Y ass liberals to make our boys more like women and if that kid who might not make weight is our best player, we need to make sure he doesn't eat dinner or breakfast before weigh ins and that we take all the pads out of his pants so he does make weight. Who cares if he's 10 - DON'T LET HIM EAT!

It's ridiculous. We have grown men teaching their kids to take kids out at the knee or hit leading with the head to the head to get kids out of games and when confronted on it they say "that's football" and call you a p***Y for even saying something about it.

Remember, I've coached for 10 years - been a head coach, a DC and an OC and we have never missed the playoffs so I know you can be successful without making your kids into felons.

Having said all that, football is a sport that takes a certain...mindset, especially as they get older, to really compete. You do have to play the game with aggression because if you don't, you run a big risk of getting hurt. But you can do that without being a complete animal and as these kids hit 13-14 years old and the hormones start raging, you don't really even need to coach it much. For many it is an acceptable release of pent up aggression natural at that age.

But kids that are 7, 8, 9, even up to 11 or 12? Yeah, I think it should be dialed down a few notches. Nothing is more pathetic to me than gangsta looking grown man with his fat gut, shaved head and goatee, barb wire tattoos and Raiders shirt screaming and yelling to little kids about killing someone or kicking their ass etc. etc.

Well, maybe it's worse when the guy looks like Ned Flanders and he's always the first guy to shout "Praise Jesus" at church and he is yelling at little kids telling them to kill someone or kick their ass etc. etc.
Good post. Pee-Wee football coach is basically the same animal as wear your softball uniform to impress the chicks at Hooters guy. There are obviously some exceptions to the rule, but even if you find a decent coach with ethics, your son's team still has to play all of the douchers. The last thing I want is for some kid to neck tie tackle or viciously cut block my 7-year-old son, because the coach is trying to channel the high school "glory years" of his pathetic life. My kids are going to stay away from contact football until junior high. At that point, we'll decide if they have the desire to play and go from there.

55CrushEm
08-01-2012, 09:56 AM
Bill Parcells would say "yes".

Back in 1986 when the SI "Crunch Course" video came out......Parcells said, "If they don't bite when they're puppies, then they're just not gonna bite."

baja
08-01-2012, 10:11 AM
I've coached for 10 years at the little league level - 4 coaching the oldest group (9th graders in a district where the 9th grade goes to jr high and there is no jr high ball) and the other 6 coaching my own kid through all the other groups.

I can tell you that by and large it has been my experience that the majority of pee wee FB coaches are nearly indistinguishable from the folks you see in the Black Hole at the Oakland Coliseum.

Neanderthals and mouth-breathers looking to regain past glory who think they are King Leonidas of Sparta and weaklings should be killed. Their idea of practice is lining up 25 yards apart, geting a full sprint and running into each other. Concussions are a crutch made up by p***Y ass liberals to make our boys more like women and if that kid who might not make weight is our best player, we need to make sure he doesn't eat dinner or breakfast before weigh ins and that we take all the pads out of his pants so he does make weight. Who cares if he's 10 - DON'T LET HIM EAT!

It's ridiculous. We have grown men teaching their kids to take kids out at the knee or hit leading with the head to the head to get kids out of games and when confronted on it they say "that's football" and call you a p***Y for even saying something about it.

Remember, I've coached for 10 years - been a head coach, a DC and an OC and we have never missed the playoffs so I know you can be successful without making your kids into felons.

Having said all that, football is a sport that takes a certain...mindset, especially as they get older, to really compete. You do have to play the game with aggression because if you don't, you run a big risk of getting hurt. But you can do that without being a complete animal and as these kids hit 13-14 years old and the hormones start raging, you don't really even need to coach it much. For many it is an acceptable release of pent up aggression natural at that age.

But kids that are 7, 8, 9, even up to 11 or 12? Yeah, I think it should be dialed down a few notches. Nothing is more pathetic to me than gangsta looking grown man with his fat gut, shaved head and goatee, barb wire tattoos and Raiders shirt screaming and yelling to little kids about killing someone or kicking their ass etc. etc.

Well, maybe it's worse when the guy looks like Ned Flanders and he's always the first guy to shout "Praise Jesus" at church and he is yelling at little kids telling them to kill someone or kick their ass etc. etc.

Thanks for the insight and you're from Utah imagine what it's like in Florida, Texas or any inner city.

Rascal
08-01-2012, 10:34 AM
I'd rather have my kid learn the fundamentals at an early age so when he grows up he's used to hitting/being hit and knows how to do it properly

If an 8 year old boy isn't playing football or another kind of sport, he's damn sure doing something else that he's going to get hurt doing (building bicycle ramps, playing in woods, etc...)


He can't be taught at a older age how to hit? That is ludicrous. And I wager that the chances of him learning how to do it correctly at the hands of a parent wanting to relive their high school glory days are slim.

Maybe, but it won't be because some douche bag parent is telling their kid to go hurt mine because theirs is getting their ass kicked. I can't help their bad genes.

vancejohnson82
08-01-2012, 10:43 AM
He can't be taught at a older age how to hit? That is ludicrous. And I wager that the chances of him learning how to do it correctly at the hands of a parent wanting to relive their high school glory days are slim.

Maybe, but it won't be because some douche bag parent is telling their kid to go hurt mine because theirs is getting their ass kicked. I can't help their bad genes.

is it possible to learn how to ski at an older age? sure, but it helps to learn it at a younger age because you haven't developed any other instincts....also, at an older age you might be more cautious or squeamish heading into hits which can cause injury...at a younger age I would just tend to argue that that fearlessness of contact and the "blank slate" of other instincts could be beneficial

again, this isn't to say either argument is the right one....if parents don't want their kids participating at a younger age, so be it

spdirty
08-01-2012, 10:46 AM
I personally wouldn't mind having my 9 year old play for that coach. He moves at a snails pace. In coach pitch baseball, where the coaches were focused on teaching and not competition, a couple months ago he got yelled at for walking from 2nd base to 3rd base.I get tired of yelling at him to "MOVE!" A little drill instructor coach would do my boy some good. I would of course have to be at the practices though to make sure this coach doesn't get too out of line.

houghtam
08-01-2012, 11:01 AM
I personally wouldn't mind having my 9 year old play for that coach. He moves at a snails pace. In coach pitch baseball, where the coaches were focused on teaching and not competition, a couple months ago he got yelled at for walking from 2nd base to 3rd base.I get tired of yelling at him to "MOVE!" A little drill instructor coach would do my boy some good. I would of course have to be at the practices though to make sure this coach doesn't get too out of line.

Far be it from me to ever tell anyone else how to be a parent, but...maybe it's not the coach who needs to get your boy in line.

Beantown Bronco
08-01-2012, 11:04 AM
Far be it from me to ever tell anyone else how to be a parent, but...maybe it's not the coach who needs to get your boy in line.

I hear Jay Cutler is always available for disciplining children.

JakeZ01
08-01-2012, 12:04 PM
With the pussies being pumped out in America today, I think pee wee football should be a requirement. I am not ready to welcome our Chinese masters. Those kids don't get trophies for participation, and that's why they are kicking our ass.

razorwire77
08-01-2012, 12:11 PM
With the pussies being pumped out in America today, I think pee wee football should be a requirement. I am not ready to welcome our Chinese masters. Those kids don't get trophies for participation, and that's why they are kicking our ass.

What a moronic take. Yep, it has nothing to do with trade agreements, cheap labor and a global economy. China is "kicking our ass" because not enough people are allowing a 45-year-old fat "coach" to teach their children to lead with the head in YAFL.

tsiguy96
08-01-2012, 12:14 PM
if you want an extremely well rounded kid, have them grow up doing tumbling/gymnastics at a young age, then playing soccer. develop fundamental movements in those sports that can ONLY be truly developed at a young age. start football around 8th-9th grade.

bronco militia
08-01-2012, 12:16 PM
I hear Jay Cutler is always available for disciplining children.

LOL oh man, where is that thread

Tombstone RJ
08-01-2012, 12:19 PM
I've coached for 10 years at the little league level - 4 coaching the oldest group (9th graders in a district where the 9th grade goes to jr high and there is no jr high ball) and the other 6 coaching my own kid through all the other groups.

I can tell you that by and large it has been my experience that the majority of pee wee FB coaches are nearly indistinguishable from the folks you see in the Black Hole at the Oakland Coliseum.

Neanderthals and mouth-breathers looking to regain past glory who think they are King Leonidas of Sparta and weaklings should be killed. Their idea of practice is lining up 25 yards apart, geting a full sprint and running into each other. Concussions are a crutch made up by p***Y ass liberals to make our boys more like women and if that kid who might not make weight is our best player, we need to make sure he doesn't eat dinner or breakfast before weigh ins and that we take all the pads out of his pants so he does make weight. Who cares if he's 10 - DON'T LET HIM EAT!

It's ridiculous. We have grown men teaching their kids to take kids out at the knee or hit leading with the head to the head to get kids out of games and when confronted on it they say "that's football" and call you a p***Y for even saying something about it.

Remember, I've coached for 10 years - been a head coach, a DC and an OC and we have never missed the playoffs so I know you can be successful without making your kids into felons.

Having said all that, football is a sport that takes a certain...mindset, especially as they get older, to really compete. You do have to play the game with aggression because if you don't, you run a big risk of getting hurt. But you can do that without being a complete animal and as these kids hit 13-14 years old and the hormones start raging, you don't really even need to coach it much. For many it is an acceptable release of pent up aggression natural at that age.

But kids that are 7, 8, 9, even up to 11 or 12? Yeah, I think it should be dialed down a few notches. Nothing is more pathetic to me than gangsta looking grown man with his fat gut, shaved head and goatee, barb wire tattoos and Raiders shirt screaming and yelling to little kids about killing someone or kicking their ass etc. etc.

Well, maybe it's worse when the guy looks like Ned Flanders and he's always the first guy to shout "Praise Jesus" at church and he is yelling at little kids telling them to kill someone or kick their ass etc. etc.

yep, good stuff. When I was playing pee-wee football it was a lot of fun and that was because I had good coaches that made it fun. Fundamentals were taught, tackling was taught and playing aggressively was also taught but all of that comes with good coaching. When you love football, you love to hit and tackle so getting a young boy to do that should be relatively easy. The young boys who don't like that stuff wash out quickly. By the time junior high football rolls around you have the guys you've been playing with for years and the team just happens more naturally. Lot's of fun!

milehighJC
08-01-2012, 04:03 PM
I've coached for 10 years at the little league level - 4 coaching the oldest group (9th graders in a district where the 9th grade goes to jr high and there is no jr high ball) and the other 6 coaching my own kid through all the other groups.

I can tell you that by and large it has been my experience that the majority of pee wee FB coaches are nearly indistinguishable from the folks you see in the Black Hole at the Oakland Coliseum.

Neanderthals and mouth-breathers looking to regain past glory who think they are King Leonidas of Sparta and weaklings should be killed. Their idea of practice is lining up 25 yards apart, geting a full sprint and running into each other. Concussions are a crutch made up by p***Y ass liberals to make our boys more like women and if that kid who might not make weight is our best player, we need to make sure he doesn't eat dinner or breakfast before weigh ins and that we take all the pads out of his pants so he does make weight. Who cares if he's 10 - DON'T LET HIM EAT!

It's ridiculous. We have grown men teaching their kids to take kids out at the knee or hit leading with the head to the head to get kids out of games and when confronted on it they say "that's football" and call you a p***Y for even saying something about it.

Remember, I've coached for 10 years - been a head coach, a DC and an OC and we have never missed the playoffs so I know you can be successful without making your kids into felons.

Having said all that, football is a sport that takes a certain...mindset, especially as they get older, to really compete. You do have to play the game with aggression because if you don't, you run a big risk of getting hurt. But you can do that without being a complete animal and as these kids hit 13-14 years old and the hormones start raging, you don't really even need to coach it much. For many it is an acceptable release of pent up aggression natural at that age.

But kids that are 7, 8, 9, even up to 11 or 12? Yeah, I think it should be dialed down a few notches. Nothing is more pathetic to me than gangsta looking grown man with his fat gut, shaved head and goatee, barb wire tattoos and Raiders shirt screaming and yelling to little kids about killing someone or kicking their ass etc. etc.

Well, maybe it's worse when the guy looks like Ned Flanders and he's always the first guy to shout "Praise Jesus" at church and he is yelling at little kids telling them to kill someone or kick their ass etc. etc.

This hits a hot button for me, and its not just football.

Sports can teach invaluable life lessons about hard work, dedication, and teamwork. But depending on the coach, it can also teach "win at any price", including intentionally injuring an opponent in the name of a win.

Without adding all the ugly details, my daughter was a victim of an illegal slide tackle in a soccer game about two years ago which resulted in a severed PCL. The ortho doc said he had not seen an injury like it from sports - usually only head-on auto accidents (knee into the dash). Over five hours of surgery, over a year of reahab, and thousands of dollars in medical bills later she is playing again, but will never be the same.

I later learned that the coach of the opposing team had been explicitly encouraging that kind of play, and the player who did it had said just before going out on the field that she "was going to take someone out". She did.

There is a HUGE difference between dedicated preparation and tough play and "winning at any cost" including intentionally injuring an opponent. Sadly the rules in our league explicitly prohibited the type of slide tackle (cleats up, after the ball was gone) that caused the injury, but the rules will not overcome years of "bad coaching", especially when the games are officiated by kids barely older than the ones playing.

Jason in LA
08-01-2012, 11:17 PM
There are a ton of great things about youth football, but there are also a ton of bad things about it. I've been involved in it as a parent and a coach for the past 8 years, with my son playing Pop Warner since the age of 8, and I started coaching it 3 years ago. I'd say that there are a lot of bad coaches (also at the high school level), and there are a lot of delusional parents. I learned about the issues with parents after I became a coach.

I'd say that kids who play Pop Warner have an advantage over the kids who don't when they get to high school, but it is not the deciding factor on whether or not a kid is going to be good on that level or not. I'd say that my son's progression has been greatly helped by playing for all of those years, and a lot of the best players on his team played Pop Warner. But players who wait until high school can still make it. And for skill position players, flag football is really better. My son, who is a WR, took two years off of tackle when he was 11 and 12 and played flag, and it helped him greatly.

A lot of parents do not get the purpose of youth football. A kid being good or bad at 8 years old is no indication of how good they will be when they get to the high school level. Parents need to realize that and stop worrying about their kid playing those prime positions. The team I'm coaching now is an 8 year old team, and I've been coaching a lot of these players since their first season at the age of 6. Some parents try to project what position their kid will play later in life and expect their kid to play those positions now. And they act as if we, the coaches, should have their kid in those positions. And they act like our play calling should be like what they watch on TV. Football for an 8 year old is nothing like it is for a 16 year old, or a professional player.

When my son started playing at 8, he was the youngest kid on the team and the smallest, so he got knocked around. He was a "must play" player, so when he got his 8 plays I knew he was coming out of the game. I knew that he'd have the body type of a WR/CB, but his first year, he played DT! And I didn't care. He ran around, made a couple tackles, and he got used to hitting and getting hit. His next two years he played with kids his age, so he got way more playing time, at LB and TE (which is pretty much playing O line). Again, I didn't care. He was playing. It didn't matter that he was playing positions that he'd never play when he got older. He didn't get the ball until he was 13 years old, his final year of Pop Warner, and he got beat up all season because our O line wasn't any good.

It wasn't until high school that he got to play his natural position. Now that he's in high school, he's balling. Last year as 10th grader on the JV team he had 900+ receiving yards and 18 touchdowns.

I think back to when he was 10, and he played on this team that two of his high school teammates played on. One kid was the MLB and RB, and he was a beast. He was cracking other kids. The other kid played WR, but there was nothing special about him, or my son. The one kid was the star of the team and if anybody had to guess, he'd be the one who would dominate in high school and have a chance to go somewhere. Well fast forward 6 years, the kid who played WR is a senior and is getting recruited by a few PAC 12 schools. If my son has a season like he did last year (he's already a starter on varsity), he's going to be heavily recruited heading into his senior year. The kid who was the star of the team way back then, he's a junior like my son, but he's the back up MLB, and the only way he's going to see the field is if the guy in front of him gets hurt. The guy in front of him has the makings of a really good player, but he's no blue chip player at this point.

Point is that these parents need to shut the hell up, leave the coaches alone, and just let their kid play and have fun. One parent last year would pull his kid from practice and have him do sprints because he said the kid wasn't fast enough. The kid was only 7! He also wanted his kid to play QB. We had him at LG. That father was pissed. The kid actually liked playing on the line because he liked to hit people, but that wasn't in the father's plan.

As for coaches, I've come to figure out that the yellers don't know how to coach. They yell because they don't know what to teach the player. They seem to think by yelling that the kid will just magically play better. They don't get that if they don't teach the kid the right way to do it, the kid will never get it right, and will just get yelled at all the time. Coaches who know what they're doing don't have to yell. They're too busy coaching.

barryr
08-02-2012, 05:56 AM
For most sports, team sports at least, if you don't start playing at an early age, you are not likely going to be very good. Sure, there are instances where that isn't the case, but generally speaking, waiting to play a sport when you are a teen against others who have been playing already a handful of years usually means you will be behind the rest and never able to catch up. Like I said, "generally." The key thing is to find coaches who can teach fundamentals at an early age since that is the very foundation they need in order to be able to handle the more advanced things later on.

Beantown Bronco
08-02-2012, 06:31 AM
For most sports, team sports at least, if you don't start playing at an early age, you are not likely going to be very good. Sure, there are instances where that isn't the case, but generally speaking, waiting to play a sport when you are a teen against others who have been playing already a handful of years usually means you will be behind the rest and never able to catch up. Like I said, "generally." The key thing is to find coaches who can teach fundamentals at an early age since that is the very foundation they need in order to be able to handle the more advanced things later on.

For the more non-contact sports like tball, gymnastics and soccer, sure. The earlier the better IMO. But for the full contact violent sports like football which the OP was referring to (and linked article was referring to), there's really nothing they're going to teach you at 6 that you couldn't learn at 10-12, and be "caught up" by the time you get to HS.

I don't think anyone in this thread has said you have to wait to be a teen. The most "extreme" said junior high, which for most would mean 11 or 12. Nothing wrong with that. And, as an alternative, you can always learn the fundamentals through a flag football program at 9 or 10.

Tombstone RJ
08-02-2012, 08:25 AM
There are a ton of great things about youth football, but there are also a ton of bad things about it. I've been involved in it as a parent and a coach for the past 8 years, with my son playing Pop Warner since the age of 8, and I started coaching it 3 years ago. I'd say that there are a lot of bad coaches (also at the high school level), and there are a lot of delusional parents. I learned about the issues with parents after I became a coach.

I'd say that kids who play Pop Warner have an advantage over the kids who don't when they get to high school, but it is not the deciding factor on whether or not a kid is going to be good on that level or not. I'd say that my son's progression has been greatly helped by playing for all of those years, and a lot of the best players on his team played Pop Warner. But players who wait until high school can still make it. And for skill position players, flag football is really better. My son, who is a WR, took two years off of tackle when he was 11 and 12 and played flag, and it helped him greatly.

A lot of parents do not get the purpose of youth football. A kid being good or bad at 8 years old is no indication of how good they will be when they get to the high school level. Parents need to realize that and stop worrying about their kid playing those prime positions. The team I'm coaching now is an 8 year old team, and I've been coaching a lot of these players since their first season at the age of 6. Some parents try to project what position their kid will play later in life and expect their kid to play those positions now. And they act as if we, the coaches, should have their kid in those positions. And they act like our play calling should be like what they watch on TV. Football for an 8 year old is nothing like it is for a 16 year old, or a professional player.

When my son started playing at 8, he was the youngest kid on the team and the smallest, so he got knocked around. He was a "must play" player, so when he got his 8 plays I knew he was coming out of the game. I knew that he'd have the body type of a WR/CB, but his first year, he played DT! And I didn't care. He ran around, made a couple tackles, and he got used to hitting and getting hit. His next two years he played with kids his age, so he got way more playing time, at LB and TE (which is pretty much playing O line). Again, I didn't care. He was playing. It didn't matter that he was playing positions that he'd never play when he got older. He didn't get the ball until he was 13 years old, his final year of Pop Warner, and he got beat up all season because our O line wasn't any good.

It wasn't until high school that he got to play his natural position. Now that he's in high school, he's balling. Last year as 10th grader on the JV team he had 900+ receiving yards and 18 touchdowns.

I think back to when he was 10, and he played on this team that two of his high school teammates played on. One kid was the MLB and RB, and he was a beast. He was cracking other kids. The other kid played WR, but there was nothing special about him, or my son. The one kid was the star of the team and if anybody had to guess, he'd be the one who would dominate in high school and have a chance to go somewhere. Well fast forward 6 years, the kid who played WR is a senior and is getting recruited by a few PAC 12 schools. If my son has a season like he did last year (he's already a starter on varsity), he's going to be heavily recruited heading into his senior year. The kid who was the star of the team way back then, he's a junior like my son, but he's the back up MLB, and the only way he's going to see the field is if the guy in front of him gets hurt. The guy in front of him has the makings of a really good player, but he's no blue chip player at this point.

Point is that these parents need to shut the hell up, leave the coaches alone, and just let their kid play and have fun. One parent last year would pull his kid from practice and have him do sprints because he said the kid wasn't fast enough. The kid was only 7! He also wanted his kid to play QB. We had him at LG. That father was pissed. The kid actually liked playing on the line because he liked to hit people, but that wasn't in the father's plan.

As for coaches, I've come to figure out that the yellers don't know how to coach. They yell because they don't know what to teach the player. They seem to think by yelling that the kid will just magically play better. They don't get that if they don't teach the kid the right way to do it, the kid will never get it right, and will just get yelled at all the time. Coaches who know what they're doing don't have to yell. They're too busy coaching.

great point coach. When you are that young, it really does NOT matter what position you are playing. The important thing for these young kids is to play and learn the basic fundamentals. I played WR when I was in Pop warner, however when I got to be older and bigger I played on the line. But as a kid, who cares??? I loved playing and I'd play where ever the coach put me.

It's about having fun. It's about learning the GAME and that means playing many different positions. In youth football, if you play several different positions and you are coached up well in those positions, later on down the road when you are in jr. high or HS football you know the basics of the other positions. If you are a lineman but you played WR when you were younger, you have a basic idea of the position and what is expected of that player.

overall, the parents who say "my son is a QB!!" when that kid is 8 years old, I'm sorry, that parent is an idiot. Youth football is about learning the game, learning how to be a team player, learning how to tackle, learning how to block, learning how to catch, learning how to throw, learning how to run, learning how to line up, etc, etc, etc. Its not about being Peyton Manning.

Jason in LA
08-02-2012, 09:09 AM
For most sports, team sports at least, if you don't start playing at an early age, you are not likely going to be very good. Sure, there are instances where that isn't the case, but generally speaking, waiting to play a sport when you are a teen against others who have been playing already a handful of years usually means you will be behind the rest and never able to catch up. Like I said, "generally." The key thing is to find coaches who can teach fundamentals at an early age since that is the very foundation they need in order to be able to handle the more advanced things later on.

For the more non-contact sports like tball, gymnastics and soccer, sure. The earlier the better IMO. But for the full contact violent sports like football which the OP was referring to (and linked article was referring to), there's really nothing they're going to teach you at 6 that you couldn't learn at 10-12, and be "caught up" by the time you get to HS.

I don't think anyone in this thread has said you have to wait to be a teen. The most "extreme" said junior high, which for most would mean 11 or 12. Nothing wrong with that. And, as an alternative, you can always learn the fundamentals through a flag football program at 9 or 10.

I do think that there is an advantage to playing youth tackle football, but it is not the deciding factor. A lot of linemen in high school couldn't play when they were younger because they were too big. When they get to high school, they're so big and strong that they can dominate without having played youth football.

I'd say that my son got more out of playing flag football for two seasons than he did playing four seasons of tackle. He got bored playing tackle because if you're not the RB, you're not getting the ball. So on offense he was just a blocker. He liked playing defense because he was a LB, so he was in the mix.

When he went to play flag for two years, the game totally changed for him. He was running routes, catching the ball, scoring touchdowns. He was having a lot of fun and learning the position that he'd eventually play. The year before high school he went back and played a season of tackle, just to get used to the hitting again.

I'd say that the advantage to playing tackle is just getting used to the hitting. The Pop Warner kids aren't scared out there when they get the high school, where the kids who didn't play as a kid have to get used to that in a hurry, as well as learning how to play structured football.

If I had another son and he wanted to be a football player, I wouldn't have a problem with him playing flag all the way up to Jr high, and then maybe get him a couple years of tackle before high school just to get used to the equipment and the hitting. Actually, if it fit into the schedule, I wouldn't mind him playing tackle and flag at the same time.

Jason in LA
08-02-2012, 09:31 AM
great point coach. When you are that young, it really does NOT matter what position you are playing. The important thing for these young kids is to play and learn the basic fundamentals. I played WR when I was in Pop warner, however when I got to be older and bigger I played on the line. But as a kid, who cares??? I loved playing and I'd play where ever the coach put me.

It's about having fun. It's about learning the GAME and that means playing many different positions. In youth football, if you play several different positions and you are coached up well in those positions, later on down the road when you are in jr. high or HS football you know the basics of the other positions. If you are a lineman but you played WR when you were younger, you have a basic idea of the position and what is expected of that player.

overall, the parents who say "my son is a QB!!" when that kid is 8 years old, I'm sorry, that parent is an idiot. Youth football is about learning the game, learning how to be a team player, learning how to tackle, learning how to block, learning how to catch, learning how to throw, learning how to run, learning how to line up, etc, etc, etc. Its not about being Peyton Manning.

It's a trip, the parents who don't get it never want their kid to play on the O line. Like it means that there kid won't be a great player down the line. These parents need to realize that there are no college scouts at these games, and until these kids get a year away from high school, there aren't even any high school coaches watching these games.

My son played in an All Star game when he was 13, and when we got to the first practice the coaches told everybody who wanted to play offense to go on one side, and everybody who wanted to play defense to go on the other side. Out of the 30 or so kids, at least 20 of them went to the offensive side. I looked at him son and pointed to the defensive side and he nodded in agreement. The kid played DT in the game and had a ball. I'd say right now he's a better WR than all the kids who played WR in that game.

With the team I'm coaching, we had one kid who was slow, not very athletic compared to most of the other kids, and he didn't want to hit anybody or get hit. We had a hard time finding a position where he could excel, or want to play. We finally tried him at center and it was perfect. At that age the defense cannot line a player up over the center, so he wasn't really getting hit, and our center before him was so aggressive that he was shooting out of his stance too quick to make his block that he was pulling the ball away from the QB, causing fumbled snaps. So the kid who didn't really want to play, when we tried him at center, he'd just snap the ball and stand there. The fumble problem was fixed! We were really happy, and the kid had no pressure on him. All he had to do was hike the ball and stand there. The kid finally seemed happy. But not his father. His father was upset about his son playing center, and said that he wanted him to play a cool position like QB or RB. I gave him a side eye look, like, are you serious? That kid has no athletic ability (at this age), and he doesn't even want the ball.

One more thing that is funny, parents want to see their kid get the ball and be the star, but they don't understand that at an early age, most of the kids don't want the ball. And when they get it, they aren't going anywhere with it because they're scared. Funny thing, the player with the ball attracts a lot of attention, and it's not good attention. We try to get everybody the ball, and when a parent is really complaining, no problem, we'll give your kid the ball. Then the kid gets blown up and that parent will stop complaining. The age group I'm working with now, I get to be on the field calling the offensive plays. In games where the score gets out of hand we try to give the ball to everybody instead of just our main few runners. I'll look at a kid and say "It's your turn to get the ball." About half the kids look at me with this scared look in their eyes and they're shaking their head saying no. I'm looking at the kid saying "yes, you're getting the ball!" Mostly because that kid's parent has been getting on my nerves about getting their kid the ball. Then the kid gets the ball, doesn't run because he's scared, gets blown up and all the parents see why that kid doesn't get the ball.

The way I see it, nothing really matters until high school. Until then, just let the kids have fun and don't worry about it.

houghtam
08-02-2012, 09:36 AM
The way I see it, nothing really matters until high school. Until then, just let the kids have fun and don't worry about it.

That's the crux of it right there. Sports prior to high school are about learning the game and having fun. If you're not doing both, you're doing it wrong.

vancejohnson82
08-02-2012, 10:48 AM
That's the crux of it right there. Sports prior to high school are about learning the game and having fun. If you're not doing both, you're doing it wrong.

True...and this coach seems like a supreme nerd

But, half of the fun for my years playing youth football was THINKING that it was important...getting the pre-game speeches about how much the game mattered and all was a lot of the fun for me. It's not for all kids, becuase a lot of them didn't like the intensity but I still remember the butterflies and stuff during pregame when I was 7-12 years old

usually it was a lot of the college kids and stuff helping out during the summer and then the "real" coaches taking over during the season....great memories

JakeZ01
08-02-2012, 12:58 PM
What a moronic take. Yep, it has nothing to do with trade agreements, cheap labor and a global economy. China is "kicking our ass" because not enough people are allowing a 45-year-old fat "coach" to teach their children to lead with the head in YAFL.

Our kids today would rather be told how special they are than actually earn anything. You don't think that has a huge impact on culture. In china, you have to do your homework. these kids grow up to be productive, even willing to do jobs "below" them while oour kids are busy on facebook and talking about "destiny".

America used to make things and we were proud of our struggles. NOw we offer nothing because frankly we cannot do anything.

So..yes, if our kids are taught to work hard, overcome hardships and even handle pain, the future will be in better hands.

Can you imagine if red dawn happened today? FOrget the wolverines, no kid would even know how to stop crying at the sight of an enemy because it made them "uncomfortable."

JakeZ01
08-02-2012, 12:59 PM
and yes, I am really this ****ing awesome.

vancejohnson82
08-02-2012, 01:42 PM
Our kids today would rather be told how special they are than actually earn anything. You don't think that has a huge impact on culture. In china, you have to do your homework. these kids grow up to be productive, even willing to do jobs "below" them while oour kids are busy on facebook and talking about "destiny".

America used to make things and we were proud of our struggles. NOw we offer nothing because frankly we cannot do anything.

So..yes, if our kids are taught to work hard, overcome hardships and even handle pain, the future will be in better hands.

Can you imagine if red dawn happened today? FOrget the wolverines, no kid would even know how to stop crying at the sight of an enemy because it made them "uncomfortable."

What???? you know how many hours the Asian youth spend playing video games?? or how many commit suicide after 'shaming' their family with a bad grade or mistake?? are they pussies too?? chances are that u still live at home eating ring dings your mom packs in your lunch every day after she drops u off at your job at costco

JakeZ01
08-02-2012, 01:48 PM
What???? you know how many hours the Asian youth spend playing video games?? or how many commit suicide after 'shaming' their family with a bad grade or mistake?? are they pussies too?? chances are that u still live at home eating ring dings your mom packs in your lunch every day after she drops u off at your job at costco

yes. they are HUGE pussies. if you kill yourself over bad grades, what should I call you? Rambo?

It's Darwinism. Those that aren't tough enough to survive will fail. unless they are coddled by a pussy factory...like here.

vancejohnson82
08-02-2012, 01:53 PM
yes. they are HUGE pussies. if you kill yourself over bad grades, what should I call you? Rambo?

It's Darwinism. Those that aren't tough enough to survive will fail. unless they are coddled by a p***Y factory...like here.

soooo, they 'make more stuff' than us...but take smaller issues to heart due to pressure and spend just as much time playing video games and whatnot....btw these are all generalities ....but which country has TOUGH kids, pray tell

razorwire77
08-02-2012, 01:57 PM
Our kids today would rather be told how special they are than actually earn anything. You don't think that has a huge impact on culture. In china, you have to do your homework. these kids grow up to be productive, even willing to do jobs "below" them while oour kids are busy on facebook and talking about "destiny".

America used to make things and we were proud of our struggles. NOw we offer nothing because frankly we cannot do anything.

So..yes, if our kids are taught to work hard, overcome hardships and even handle pain, the future will be in better hands.

Can you imagine if red dawn happened today? FOrget the wolverines, no kid would even know how to stop crying at the sight of an enemy because it made them "uncomfortable."

That really has nothing to do with it, but thank you for playing. People in America can do plenty, the problem is that because of the nature of how the global economy is structured people in India and China do it for $12 a day.

I seriously doubt that you know dick about the Chinese educational system or how it's structured so please just stop.

Lastly, Red Dawn was a movie. Albeit a highly entertaining cold war propaganda 80's movie, but a freakin movie. The last thing I want for my kid is to view the world as some sort of Turner Diaries wet dream, and pee-wee football as some sort of battle training for a modern day Sparta. They're ****ing kids. Hopefully you don't have any.

Jason in LA
08-03-2012, 07:21 AM
Dang, this was a pretty good youth football thread. Yall serious. lol

CPA
08-03-2012, 09:25 AM
I've coached for 10 years at the little league level - 4 coaching the oldest group (9th graders in a district where the 9th grade goes to jr high and there is no jr high ball) and the other 6 coaching my own kid through all the other groups.

I can tell you that by and large it has been my experience that the majority of pee wee FB coaches are nearly indistinguishable from the folks you see in the Black Hole at the Oakland Coliseum.

Neanderthals and mouth-breathers looking to regain past glory who think they are King Leonidas of Sparta and weaklings should be killed. Their idea of practice is lining up 25 yards apart, geting a full sprint and running into each other. Concussions are a crutch made up by p***Y ass liberals to make our boys more like women and if that kid who might not make weight is our best player, we need to make sure he doesn't eat dinner or breakfast before weigh ins and that we take all the pads out of his pants so he does make weight. Who cares if he's 10 - DON'T LET HIM EAT!

It's ridiculous. We have grown men teaching their kids to take kids out at the knee or hit leading with the head to the head to get kids out of games and when confronted on it they say "that's football" and call you a p***Y for even saying something about it.

Remember, I've coached for 10 years - been a head coach, a DC and an OC and we have never missed the playoffs so I know you can be successful without making your kids into felons.

Having said all that, football is a sport that takes a certain...mindset, especially as they get older, to really compete. You do have to play the game with aggression because if you don't, you run a big risk of getting hurt. But you can do that without being a complete animal and as these kids hit 13-14 years old and the hormones start raging, you don't really even need to coach it much. For many it is an acceptable release of pent up aggression natural at that age.

But kids that are 7, 8, 9, even up to 11 or 12? Yeah, I think it should be dialed down a few notches. Nothing is more pathetic to me than gangsta looking grown man with his fat gut, shaved head and goatee, barb wire tattoos and Raiders shirt screaming and yelling to little kids about killing someone or kicking their ass etc. etc.

Well, maybe it's worse when the guy looks like Ned Flanders and he's always the first guy to shout "Praise Jesus" at church and he is yelling at little kids telling them to kill someone or kick their ass etc. etc.

I have coached going on 15 years. I have also been the President of a league that had over 1700 players from ages 4 through 6th grade (being in Texas should explain it :) ) I agree whole-heartedly with this post, though I will say, the majority of coaches do understand their role and do it right. However, there are coaches, and many parents, who want to relive glory through their kids. I've seen parents push their kids back on the field only days after suffering a concussion, parents who want their kids playing with broken arms and coaches throwing things/grabbing facemasks/belittling players because little johnny missed a tackle. It was enough, I just couldn't take it anymore. I still help out a friend with his team, but that's the extent of my involvement. You can only help so much until you just can't take it anymore. There's too many against too few.

As far as the issue with offense/defense, who gets to run/play QB: I tell the parents and players right off the bat, there's one ball and 22 players which means quite a few kids are not going to run the ball, but that doesn't mean he can't help the team and be part of scoring touchdowns. You can't do that without great blocking. Never had a parent complain.